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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery James Howard Kunstler
« Reply #30 on: May 23, 2013, 04:19:54 AM »
Have been studying the work of JHK lately and was surprised to find out he is an accomplished artist. Thought I would place a few of his works here where he has become a welcome presence on the Diner. Thought RE and Monsta might find some of these especially interesting because of their obvious ties to the age of cheap oil.

 
Mobile and Mac
Mobile and Mac
                         
gallery3 ramps at exit 28
gallery3 ramps at exit 28
 
Gallery5 chestertown 08
Gallery5 chestertown 08
                       
gallery3 ramps at exit 28
gallery3 ramps at exit 28

gallery6 Fort Edward Factories
gallery6 Fort Edward Factories
             
Gallery7 Rainy Spring Day
Gallery7 Rainy Spring Day

gallery6 Woodlawn snow
gallery6 Woodlawn snow
               
painting kmart
painting kmart

Gallery5 Starks Knob
Gallery5 Starks Knob
Gallery5 Muscle Car
Gallery5 Muscle Car

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery: Paul Signac
« Reply #31 on: June 02, 2013, 04:23:30 AM »
Always admired this master of Pointillism.
                                           
                                                           
Cape Canaille, Cassis
Cape Canaille, Cassis

                                                         
Evening Calm
Evening Calm

                                                         
Lighthouse St Tropez
Lighthouse St Tropez
         
                                                         
The Masts
The Masts

clicking once and then again on the box will open large size Hi res images

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery: Christ as the Man of Sorrows Albrecht Durer
« Reply #32 on: June 09, 2013, 07:20:17 AM »
A most unique presentation from a master artist.

                                                 
Christ Man of Sorrows Durer
Christ Man of Sorrows Durer


Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery Self Portrait at 26 Albrecht Durer
« Reply #33 on: June 09, 2013, 07:33:08 AM »
Another masterpiece by Durer.

                                                           
Durer Self Portrait at 26 1498
Durer Self Portrait at 26 1498

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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery Henri Rousseau
« Reply #34 on: June 15, 2013, 08:18:18 AM »
One of the most ridiculed artists.

Rousseau claimed he had "no teacher other than nature",[3] although he admitted he had received "some advice" from two established Academic painters, Félix Auguste Clément and Jean-Léon Gérôme.[10] Essentially he was self-taught and is considered to be a naïve or primitive painter.
 
                                                       
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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery: Paul Gauguin
« Reply #35 on: July 14, 2013, 07:37:43 AM »
What an Artist!!!
                                                                 
Women on the Beach
Women on the Beach

                                                                 
Self Portrait with Yellow Christ
Self Portrait with Yellow Christ

                                                                 
Two Tahitian Women
Two Tahitian Women

                                                                 
The Great Buddha
The Great Buddha

                                                                 
Horse on the Road
Horse on the Road

Clicking on these images and then clicking the square box will enhance them to large Hi Def

Offline Golden Oxen

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Rembrandt van Rijn: A Dutch master remembered in a Google Doodle

                                                                           
0714 Rembrandt full 380
0714 Rembrandt full 380



Monday would have been the 407th birthday of acclaimed Dutch artist, Rembrandt van Rijn, and Google is honoring this occasion not with a doodle per se, but with a self-portrait.

That Rembrandt, who took his first name as his artist’s signature at 27-years-old, should be honored with a self-portrait is fitting: the artist painted some 50 self-portraits, in addition to about 30 etchings and seven drawings of himself. Those works express not just introspection, but also the thoughtful attention that Rembrandt levied on his painted subjects - to the lowest and highest points of character, to our capacity for change, to motives and desires, and to how that humanity could resonate from oil lacquered on a page.

Rembrandt, who was born in Leiden, Netherlands in 1606 and left school to study painting at 14 years old, is perhaps best known for the paintings that depict not himself, but his particular understanding of the world. Rembrandt’s subjects are broad – biblical tales, inherited legends, contemporary dramas arrested mid-action, landscapes swathed in light – but what they share is a common interest in the unfolding of narrative, the telling of a story in just one frame. That was accomplished in painting stories arrested not just in mid-motion, but in painting portraits and landscapes that appear to refer to a broader narrative, that in their resonate emotion seem to imply a beginning and an end.

Rembrandt’s work makes scenes borrowed from remote ancient or fictional worlds bristle with palpable emotion. The people in his paintings are tactile, painted almost as illustrations, but with a roughness and thickness that makes them seem to stand from the paper. Their faces and limbs are expressive, caught in the narrative action and emotive in ways that translate from fictional tale to modern viewer. The landscape answers their pain or sorrow or rage and responds to it in sweeping shades of rich color.

Rembrandt achieved fame quickly. At just 22 years old, he had amalgamated enough prestige to take on his own students, and throughout his years he acquired fans – and sums – often not earned to painters until after their death. He, as well as many of his pupils, are now included in lists of the greatest painters of the Dutch School, which spans some 200 years from about 1400 to 1600.

Still, Rembrandt’s private life was not a happy one. His first wife died at just thirty years old, and only one of his four children lived to adulthood. Though he was fortunate to have been popular and well-paid for his works, most of his fortune was squandered to his expensive tastes. He declared bankruptcy about 13 years before he died, at the end of a tragic and deeply human tale that resonates like those he painted.

Perhaps, then, Élie Faure, the French art critic and historian, was writing about both his work and Rembrandt himself when he wrote: “His humanity is truly formidable, it is fatal like lament, love; change continues, indifferent and dramatic, between all that is born and all that dies. He follows our steps to death in the traces of blood which mark them. He does not pity us, he does not comfort us, because he is with us, because he is us.”
 
http://rss.csmonitor.com/~r/feeds/csm/~3/NgQjKr7qsAM/Rembrandt-van-Rijn-A-Dutch-master-remembered  :icon_study:

                                                                     
Rembrandt self Portrait
Rembrandt self Portrait

                                                                   
Rembrandt self Portrait
Rembrandt self Portrait

                                                                   
Head of Christ
Head of Christ

Top image appears in article.  Bottom three personal picks

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery: Ginsberg - Father Death Blues
« Reply #37 on: July 20, 2013, 07:19:07 AM »

                                                                   <a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Ew6ef3nE-E4&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Ew6ef3nE-E4&fs=1</a>

Offline Eddie

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery
« Reply #38 on: August 05, 2013, 10:12:04 AM »
My son called me yesterday, and we braved the traffic to San Antonio to visit ArtPace and see their Trevor Paglen exhibit. The exhibit turned out to be a single piece...this one, or a close facsimile.




It's not a ceiling fan, it's a satellite. A very elegant little satellite that starts out all folded up, but when deployed, has long arms that extend, unrolling a six inch wide strip of reflective mylar down each of its six arms. It's purpose? Purely esthetic, designed to shine light back at earth and be visible for a couple of months before its orbit decays.

Sound fun to build? On the table is a full set of scale drawings, describing the piece in intricate detail.

The idea is to get some corporate donor to piggyback the extremely lightweight "pinwheel" on the back of some other payload, and you have art in outer space.

Very cool, but I was hoping for some of his photos of black ops sites. No such luck.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery: Long-lost Van Gogh Painting Found in Attic
« Reply #39 on: September 12, 2013, 06:41:02 PM »
Poor Vincent, wonder if he knows?

                                                             <a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/WdIPOXMfJMo&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/WdIPOXMfJMo&fs=1</a>

                                                     
Click for Hi Res

The French painting had been stored in an attic for a century because it was considered a fake.

The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam said Monday that it has identified a long-lost Vincent Van Gogh painting that spent years in a Norwegian attic because it was thought to be "fake."

Axel Rueger, the museum director, described the discovery of the new work by Van Gogh as "a once in a lifetime experience" as the painting was unveiled at a press conference.

Offline RE

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery: Long-lost Van Gogh Painting Found in Attic
« Reply #40 on: September 13, 2013, 12:52:58 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/dipFMJckZOM?feature=player_detailpage" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/dipFMJckZOM?feature=player_detailpage</a>

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline Surly1

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery
« Reply #41 on: September 18, 2013, 11:36:39 AM »
GO,
I rarely comment on this thread but just want you to know I always look and always enjoy these.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery
« Reply #42 on: September 18, 2013, 12:12:44 PM »
GO,
I rarely comment on this thread but just want you to know I always look and always enjoy these.

Thanks Surly, I had very high hopes for the thread when I started it. Had hoped we could express ourselves and who we were, and what we liked, much like the Juke Box thread.

Also thought it might be a way for our silent members to get their feet wet posting and telling us what they liked and posting on it.

Some took it wrong as an art appreciation class, or expression of wealth. I still have high hopes for it becoming a popular thread in the future, much as our Juke Box, and Diner Comics.

Thanks for calling attention to it and thanks to the many members who have participated.

                                                         
Winter in NY
Winter in NY
    click and then click box for huge hi res image

Offline JoeP

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery - Mariano Villalba
« Reply #43 on: September 26, 2013, 02:59:01 PM »


The Midnight Clown Show
just my straight shooting honest opinion

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery Robert Bevan
« Reply #44 on: September 29, 2013, 05:57:18 AM »
Just adore the works of this artist.

                                                           
Sale at Tattersails
Sale at Tattersails

                                                           
Road in Sunlight
Road in Sunlight

                                                           
Showing at Tattersalls
Showing at Tattersalls

                                                           
From the Artist's Window
From the Artist's Window

click images and then click box with arrow for huge high res

Birth name   Robert Polhill Bevan
Born    5 August 1865
Hove, England
Died    8 July 1925
London, England
Nationality    British
Field    Painting
Training    Arthur Ernest Pearce,[1] Westminster School of Art, Académie Julian
Movement    Camden Town Group, London
Despite memorial shows in 1926 and an Arts Council exhibition in 1956, his unique contribution to British art was not widely recognized until 1965, the centenary of his birth.[19] In that year the artist's son published his memoir and organised a series of exhibitions.

Bevan’s modesty and reticence and his “almost complete inability to put himself forward”[20] ensured that most of his works were unsold and a considerable number were left to his wife on his death. Stanislawa Bevan left her estate equally between her son R.A. Bevan and daughter Mrs Charles Baty.[21] In 1961 they presented the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford with The Bevan Gift in honour of their parents’ work. As well as a number of paintings, drawings and lithographs this included the 27 surviving Bevan sketchbooks. Further works were added subsequently.

He was one of nine out of the 17-strong Camden Town Group to be shown in a major retrospective of the group at Tate Britain in London in 2008.[22]



Works by Bevan can be found in many public collections in the United Kingdom. He is also represented in public collections in Australia; France; New Zealand; South Africa and the USA.
         


 

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