AuthorTopic: DD Favorite Art Gallery  (Read 31316 times)

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery - Destroyed Place - Klee
« Reply #150 on: November 11, 2017, 07:24:56 AM »
Destroyed Place - Paul Klee

 Date: 1920
Style: Expressionism
Period: Early Works
Genre: cityscape
Media: oil, paper

                                               

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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery - Come On - Strider
« Reply #151 on: November 11, 2017, 07:30:16 AM »
Come On - Marjorie Strider

 Marjorie Strider
Style: Pop Art
Genre: portrait

                                         
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Offline Surly1

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery - The Soundtrack (To My Life) 2004 - Cheuh
« Reply #152 on: November 11, 2017, 08:20:23 AM »
The Soundtrack (To My Life) 2004 - Luke Chueh
           
 Born: 07 March 1973; Philadelphia, United States *
Nationality: American
Art Movement: Lowbrow Art
Field: painting, design, illustration   


                                                   

Wow. Just wow.
Nice to see you posting here again.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery - The Soundtrack (To My Life) 2004 - Cheuh
« Reply #153 on: November 11, 2017, 08:31:34 AM »
The Soundtrack (To My Life) 2004 - Luke Chueh
           
 Born: 07 March 1973; Philadelphia, United States *
Nationality: American
Art Movement: Lowbrow Art
Field: painting, design, illustration   


                                                   

Wow. Just wow.
Nice to see you posting here again.

Thanks Surly, Most appreciated.   
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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery 'Winter Sunset'
« Reply #154 on: November 17, 2017, 04:19:06 AM »


                                   

                                                  'Winter Sunset'  -  Krista Eaton
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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery - Thanksgiving Day
« Reply #155 on: November 23, 2017, 04:16:27 AM »

                 
                              Home To Thanksgiving 1867 - Currier&Ives



                     
                             Catching the Thanksgiving Turkey 1943 - Grandma Moses


                     
                                            Thanksgiving 1935 - Doris Lee



                         
                           



                   


                   
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Offline Surly1

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery
« Reply #156 on: November 23, 2017, 04:56:33 AM »
Thanks for posting these, GO.

Interesting how these images, and I'm thinking of the Currier and Ives print, inform our idea of what "the holidays" should mean. Over the river and trough the woods, etc...

Great finds.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery - New Paintings 2016 -17 - James Howard Kunstler
« Reply #157 on: December 03, 2017, 05:10:17 AM »
Am quite an admirer of Mr Kunstler's gift for exquisite writing, his art as well, though not nearly as much as the former.

What a remarkable gifted person. His art has a way of relaxing me, while his prose does the opposite.


                             
                                             Sacred Heart Lake


                             

                                             Bedlam Corners, West Hebron, New York


                             

                                             Lawn Party


                             

                                              Cozy Hollow Road


                             

                                             Louse Hill Road, Greenwich, New York, in October


                             

                                            Washington Square, Greenwich, Spring


                               

                                        Tripps Antiques, Shusan, New York


                               

                                                Reggie's Veggies


                               

                                                 Eddy Plough Factory, Greenwich, New York


                               

                                               View from O'Donnell Hill Road, Winter
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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery - Seated statue of Amenemhat II - Egyptian Art
« Reply #158 on: January 27, 2018, 05:17:37 PM »


                                     

               

Seated statue of Amenemhat II

Period:
    Middle Kingdom

Dynasty:
    Dynasty 12

Reign:
    Amenemhat II

Date:
    ca. 1919–1885 B.C.

Geography:
    From Egypt

Medium:
    Granodiorite

Dimensions:
    H. 320 cm (10 ft. 6 in.); W. 110.5 cm (43 1/2 in.); D. 209 cm (82 5/16 in.)
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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery
« Reply #159 on: February 10, 2018, 02:55:08 PM »
testing
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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery - Nelson Shanks - American -Realism - 1935 2015
« Reply #160 on: February 17, 2018, 04:34:43 AM »
John Nelson Shanks (December 23, 1937 – August 28, 2015) was an American artist and painter.[1] His best known work is probably his portrait of Diana, Princess of Wales, completed in 1996. The painting was first shown at Hirschl & Adler Gallery in New York City, April 24 to June 28, 1996.[1]

Shanks had been on the faculty of the Memphis Academy of Arts, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Art Students League of New York, the National Academy of Design and Studio Incamminati and was a resident of Andalusia, Pennsylvania. He was an honorary member of the American Society of Classical Realism Guild of Artists.[2]

                           


                             


                             


                             


                             


                             


                             


                             
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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery - The Puritan - Augustus Saint-Gaudens
« Reply #161 on: February 17, 2018, 05:00:23 AM »
Diners, If you are interested I have posted at the bottom of this posting a full sized detailed image of this magnificent work.

                                   

In 1881 Saint-Gaudens was commissioned by Chester W. Chapin, a railroad tycoon and congressman, to sculpt a large-scale bronze likeness of an ancestor, Deacon Samuel Chapin (1595–1675), one of the three founding fathers of Springfield, Massachusetts. The sculptor wrote in his "Reminiscences" that: "The statue . . . was to represent Deacon Samuel Chapin, but I developed it into an embodiment . . . of the 'Puritan.'" On Thanksgiving Day 1887, "The Puritan" was unveiled on Stearns Square in Springfield, at one end of a site designed by Stanford White. The monument was relocated to Merrick Park in 1899. In "The Puritan," Saint-Gaudens successfully translated an abstract idea into three-dimensional form. The figure is not an individual portrait, but a representation of Puritan dogma. Eyes focused downward, he strides with a knotty walking stick across the pine-strewn New England wilderness, symbolized by a few scattered branches on the base. About 1894, Saint-Gaudens resolved to make reductions after the full-size "Puritan," because of the statue's popularity and for the income he would derive. Located reductions, which number more than forty, reveal minor alterations to the figure, which at once add energy and soften the facial expression. By mid-1898 bronze reductions were being cast in Paris. Examples vary in the angles of the hat and the walking stick and particularly in the coloration, which ranges from gold to brown to the green of the Metropolitan's cast.



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Offline Surly1

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery - The Puritan - Augustus Saint-Gaudens
« Reply #162 on: February 17, 2018, 06:34:28 AM »
Diners, If you are interested I have posted at the bottom of this posting a full sized detailed image of this magnificent work.

                                   

In 1881 Saint-Gaudens was commissioned by Chester W. Chapin, a railroad tycoon and congressman, to sculpt a large-scale bronze likeness of an ancestor, Deacon Samuel Chapin (1595–1675), one of the three founding fathers of Springfield, Massachusetts. The sculptor wrote in his "Reminiscences" that: "The statue . . . was to represent Deacon Samuel Chapin, but I developed it into an embodiment . . . of the 'Puritan.'" On Thanksgiving Day 1887, "The Puritan" was unveiled on Stearns Square in Springfield, at one end of a site designed by Stanford White. The monument was relocated to Merrick Park in 1899. In "The Puritan," Saint-Gaudens successfully translated an abstract idea into three-dimensional form. The figure is not an individual portrait, but a representation of Puritan dogma. Eyes focused downward, he strides with a knotty walking stick across the pine-strewn New England wilderness, symbolized by a few scattered branches on the base. About 1894, Saint-Gaudens resolved to make reductions after the full-size "Puritan," because of the statue's popularity and for the income he would derive. Located reductions, which number more than forty, reveal minor alterations to the figure, which at once add energy and soften the facial expression. By mid-1898 bronze reductions were being cast in Paris. Examples vary in the angles of the hat and the walking stick and particularly in the coloration, which ranges from gold to brown to the green of the Metropolitan's cast.


Truly remarkable. Had no idea.

We tend to forget the long shadow and influence the early Puritans cast on the American psyche, and only remember the belt-bucks hats. In their struggle with the Anglican Church for being "too Catholic," they laid the foundation for the religious, intellectual, and social order of New England.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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Re: DD Favorite Art Gallery
« Reply #163 on: February 17, 2018, 07:46:23 AM »
Have gone back to look at this, and was wondering what SPECIFIC imprint the Putitans left on the national psyche. Because if you ever had to encounter Cotton Mather in school, you know they did.

In casting about, I found this: http://www.history.com/topics/puritanism
Pretty elementary, but a worthwhile summation:

Quote
Puritanism as a basic attitude was remarkably durable and can hardly be overestimated as a formative element of early American life. Among its intellectual contributions was a psychological empiricism that has rarely, if ever, been exceeded in categorical subtlety. It furnished Americans with a sense of history as a progressive drama under the direction of God, in which they played a role akin to, if not prophetically aligned with, that of the Old Testament Jews as a new chosen people. Perhaps most important, as Max Weber profoundly understood, was the strength of Puritanism as a way of coping with the contradictory requirements of Christian ethics in a world on the verge of modernity. It supplied an ethics that somehow balanced the injunction to charity and the premium on self-discipline; it counseled moderation within a psychology that virtually ensured exertion toward worldly prosperity as the best sign of divine favor...

Though “the New England Way” evolved into a relatively minor system of organizing religious experience within the broader American scene, its central themes recur in the related religious communities of Quakers, Baptists, Presbyterians, Methodists, and a whole range of evangelical Protestants. More recently, the word “Puritan” has once again become a pejorative epithet, meaning prudish, constricted, cold–as in H. L. Mencken’s famous remark that a Puritan is one who suspects “somewhere someone is having a good time.” Puritanism, however, had a more significant persistence in American life than as the religion of black-frocked caricatures. It survived, perhaps most conspicuously, in the transmuted secular form of self-reliance and political localism that became, by the Age of Enlightenment, virtually the definition of Americanism. And in its bequest of intellectual and moral rigor to the New England mind, it established what was arguably the central strand of American cultural life until the twentieth century.


It may not be too much to say that the entire myth of "American Exceptionalism" has its origins in America Puritan experience. Certainly the Mayflower Compact laid a foundation stone for the Constitution. It informed the vision of a "shining city on a hill."

This is what good art does: it challenges and makes its think.

Thanks again, GO.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

 

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