AuthorTopic: What's the new guy up to?  (Read 6637 times)

Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: What's the new guy up to?
« Reply #75 on: January 02, 2021, 09:19:55 AM »
In my experience that threaded rod is probably mild steel maybe surface tempered. The rebar will probably have more carbon in it. It's nice and thick with a fairly small blade it should not bend too bad as long as you dont pry too much.

Yeah that's the thing, with just the slamming motion it should be alright. Heavy prying would snap it off though I think. Just thinking of that, it would be fun to practice welding a long pry bar sort of thing just to see how strong I can make it. It would be a good test of the strength of my welds.
you are talking about a crow bar. Not what most people think of when they say that. Most of the time people mean prybar. A crow bar is one of these:   https://www.rona.ca/en/garant-crowbar-steel-54-in-blue-cb54pc-01235343?viewStore=55070&cq_src=google_ads&cq_cmp=9897044398&cq_con=101247314340&cq_term=&cq_med=&cq_plac=&cq_net=u&cq_pos=&cq_plt=gp&&cm_mmc=shopping_google-_-9897044398-_-101247314340-_-pla-565379815352&gclid=Cj0KCQiA0MD_BRCTARIsADXoopbxLL17C08RBOObrDmiQzjI-w-caahai45z4CjnJkGKBvdKZmJ-y6QaAs9aEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds
Mine is 20 years old and still going strong. It's great for wedging out rock when you dig. High carbon steel that is surface tempered.
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Offline Cam

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Re: What's the new guy up to?
« Reply #76 on: January 02, 2021, 10:02:33 AM »
you are talking about a crow bar. Not what most people think of when they say that. Most of the time people mean prybar. A crow bar is one of these:   https://www.rona.ca/en/garant-crowbar-steel-54-in-blue-cb54pc-01235343?viewStore=55070&cq_src=google_ads&cq_cmp=9897044398&cq_con=101247314340&cq_term=&cq_med=&cq_plac=&cq_net=u&cq_pos=&cq_plt=gp&&cm_mmc=shopping_google-_-9897044398-_-101247314340-_-pla-565379815352&gclid=Cj0KCQiA0MD_BRCTARIsADXoopbxLL17C08RBOObrDmiQzjI-w-caahai45z4CjnJkGKBvdKZmJ-y6QaAs9aEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds
Mine is 20 years old and still going strong. It's great for wedging out rock when you dig. High carbon steel that is surface tempered.

Interesting. In the few times we have used pry bars we've used the words pry bar and crow bar pretty much interchangeably. So an experimental crow bar is what I will try to make.
As this world disintegrates, do what you can to help build what comes next.

Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: What's the new guy up to?
« Reply #77 on: January 02, 2021, 01:33:35 PM »
you are talking about a crow bar. Not what most people think of when they say that. Most of the time people mean prybar. A crow bar is one of these:   https://www.rona.ca/en/garant-crowbar-steel-54-in-blue-cb54pc-01235343?viewStore=55070&cq_src=google_ads&cq_cmp=9897044398&cq_con=101247314340&cq_term=&cq_med=&cq_plac=&cq_net=u&cq_pos=&cq_plt=gp&&cm_mmc=shopping_google-_-9897044398-_-101247314340-_-pla-565379815352&gclid=Cj0KCQiA0MD_BRCTARIsADXoopbxLL17C08RBOObrDmiQzjI-w-caahai45z4CjnJkGKBvdKZmJ-y6QaAs9aEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds
Mine is 20 years old and still going strong. It's great for wedging out rock when you dig. High carbon steel that is surface tempered.

Interesting. In the few times we have used pry bars we've used the words pry bar and crow bar pretty much interchangeably. So an experimental crow bar is what I will try to make.
have fun. Happy New Year Cam...
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline Cam

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Re: What's the new guy up to?
« Reply #78 on: January 02, 2021, 06:46:14 PM »
you are talking about a crow bar. Not what most people think of when they say that. Most of the time people mean prybar. A crow bar is one of these:   https://www.rona.ca/en/garant-crowbar-steel-54-in-blue-cb54pc-01235343?viewStore=55070&cq_src=google_ads&cq_cmp=9897044398&cq_con=101247314340&cq_term=&cq_med=&cq_plac=&cq_net=u&cq_pos=&cq_plt=gp&&cm_mmc=shopping_google-_-9897044398-_-101247314340-_-pla-565379815352&gclid=Cj0KCQiA0MD_BRCTARIsADXoopbxLL17C08RBOObrDmiQzjI-w-caahai45z4CjnJkGKBvdKZmJ-y6QaAs9aEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds
Mine is 20 years old and still going strong. It's great for wedging out rock when you dig. High carbon steel that is surface tempered.

Interesting. In the few times we have used pry bars we've used the words pry bar and crow bar pretty much interchangeably. So an experimental crow bar is what I will try to make.
have fun. Happy New Year Cam...

I will, I always do. To you to!
As this world disintegrates, do what you can to help build what comes next.

Offline Cam

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Re: What's the new guy up to? - The Golden Hoe
« Reply #79 on: January 16, 2021, 04:29:49 PM »
So I cleaned up our hoe today. Basically just took the rust off with the grinder and wire wheel, then sharpened and oiled it. The mystery to me is the weld on the back. It's a brass or gold-ish color, which is different from the grey I'm used to. A quick google mentioned stainless steel welds being gold sometimes but I don't think this hoe is made of stainless. One pic is dirty and the other is clean.

Any ideas?
« Last Edit: January 16, 2021, 04:32:59 PM by Cam »
As this world disintegrates, do what you can to help build what comes next.

Offline Phil Rumpole

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Re: What's the new guy up to?
« Reply #80 on: January 16, 2021, 05:32:11 PM »
That's called brazing, using flame with brass rod. It's more for filling in where you can't have leaking, because it's only as strong as the soft brass. They might have used it there if the tool is iron not steel. 

Plumbers still use brazing to join their copper pipes, but that hoe was done by someone who knew oxygen/acetylene welding.

For brazing you just heat the metal until it changes colour and then the brass melts onto it and bonds. On that hoe, they also dabbed the rod in to build it up.

Oxy welding with steel wire is a thinner rod than the brass one and you have to melt a little pool of metal to liquid and then quickly dab in the wire just before it becomes a hole and move along. Yes thats not easy, takes time to learn, first watching someone else, with dark goggles on.

It's a forgotten art now, completely obsolete, but I used to do it all the time. I'm not sure mig welding was even invented, though we also had stick, or arc as it was called for heavier guague (yes you CAN do car body panelwork using stick, with 1/16 rod at about 40 amp). 

They probably haven't taught oxy welding in tech school for decades, but when I went it was really hard to pass because we had to get the penetration and presentation perfect. There was a Mr Stuart who was almost impossible to get any module passed by, and welding just forget it. If you missed any modules in any of the 2 week blocks 4x a year and needed to catch up, you went to Thursday night class. Going to Thursday night class was just about pointless because it was run by Mr Stuart. Eventually a bunch of guys gave him a beating in the carpark, even though he was a bodybuilder. Laughing about that never gets old lol.

« Last Edit: January 16, 2021, 05:39:14 PM by Phil Rumpole »
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Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: What's the new guy up to? - The Golden Hoe
« Reply #81 on: January 16, 2021, 06:28:51 PM »
So I cleaned up our hoe today. Basically just took the rust off with the grinder and wire wheel, then sharpened and oiled it. The mystery to me is the weld on the back. It's a brass or gold-ish color, which is different from the grey I'm used to. A quick google mentioned stainless steel welds being gold sometimes but I don't think this hoe is made of stainless. One pic is dirty and the other is clean.

Any ideas?
Phil is right it's brazed. It used to be pretty common before wire feed and tig caught on. It's great for joining thin stuff or dissimilar metals together. Exotic bike frames were usually brazed, stuff like that. I had an oxygen acetylene rig until a while ago. I sold it as I only used it for cutting. I had to do a welding course for trade school. Carpenters used to do a lot of tilt up panels with metal plates at the bottom that needed welding so we learned to weld.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2021, 06:35:05 PM by Nearingsfault »
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: What's the new guy up to?
« Reply #82 on: January 16, 2021, 06:45:48 PM »
Yep, I had a TAFE teacher much the same 30 years ago when I did basic welding. Old school boiler makers....Oxy welding still widely used though when you dont have power or need to join dissimillar metals. Also good for sheet metal work. I cut rust out of my ute and welded in a piece with oxy-actylene using a steel coat hanger as filler rod... I did not have a mig.

Brazing: Join dissimilar metals with filler rod. Often brone a or other copper alloys. Good for Cast iron as it wont crack like acr/ mig welds often do. Expensive because it uses expensive filler rods.
Braze Wedling: Joining steel with steel filler rod. (Should have done this on your hoe as the metals are not disimmilar). Mostly done with arc/ submerged arc/ mig/ tig now.
Soldering: Joining simmilar to brazing with solder filler rod. Used on plumping/ copper pipes. Low melt alloy solders means you can use a blow torch not oxy-acetylene.

All still used a lot. Before advent of electric acr/ submerged arc/ mig/ tig Brazing and braze welding was used a lot more. Some good videos around of guys oxy torches and filler rods braze welding plates and pipelines we would now do with mig. See link below around 9 minute mark where they are welding up pipelines with horse drawn oxy-acetylene set.

JOW
Oxy welding:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcNv67a2v2o


Offline John of Wallan

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Re: What's the new guy up to?
« Reply #83 on: January 16, 2021, 06:48:12 PM »
That should read arc welding  not acr...

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: What's the new guy up to?
« Reply #84 on: January 16, 2021, 06:54:11 PM »
Before you ask:
Submerged arc:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LD8vntp39uA

Lays a big weld down in one pass.

JOW

Offline Cam

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Re: What's the new guy up to?
« Reply #85 on: January 16, 2021, 07:54:11 PM »
That's called brazing, using flame with brass rod. It's more for filling in where you can't have leaking, because it's only as strong as the soft brass. They might have used it there if the tool is iron not steel. 

Plumbers still use brazing to join their copper pipes, but that hoe was done by someone who knew oxygen/acetylene welding.

For brazing you just heat the metal until it changes colour and then the brass melts onto it and bonds. On that hoe, they also dabbed the rod in to build it up.

Oxy welding with steel wire is a thinner rod than the brass one and you have to melt a little pool of metal to liquid and then quickly dab in the wire just before it becomes a hole and move along. Yes thats not easy, takes time to learn, first watching someone else, with dark goggles on.

It's a forgotten art now, completely obsolete, but I used to do it all the time. I'm not sure mig welding was even invented, though we also had stick, or arc as it was called for heavier guague (yes you CAN do car body panelwork using stick, with 1/16 rod at about 40 amp). 

They probably haven't taught oxy welding in tech school for decades, but when I went it was really hard to pass because we had to get the penetration and presentation perfect. There was a Mr Stuart who was almost impossible to get any module passed by, and welding just forget it. If you missed any modules in any of the 2 week blocks 4x a year and needed to catch up, you went to Thursday night class. Going to Thursday night class was just about pointless because it was run by Mr Stuart. Eventually a bunch of guys gave him a beating in the carpark, even though he was a bodybuilder. Laughing about that never gets old lol.

I'm not sure why I didn't think of brazing. Part of me must have thought it wouldn't have been strong enough. I just watched a video demonstrating the technique and the whole movement seems similar to tig with the heat source and filler and whatnot. Lol poor Mr. Stuart. Don't be a hardass I guess.


Phil is right it's brazed. It used to be pretty common before wire feed and tig caught on. It's great for joining thin stuff or dissimilar metals together. Exotic bike frames were usually brazed, stuff like that. I had an oxygen acetylene rig until a while ago. I sold it as I only used it for cutting. I had to do a welding course for trade school. Carpenters used to do a lot of tilt up panels with metal plates at the bottom that needed welding so we learned to weld.

I think I might take a welding course at some point just to learn the different techniques. Not soon as I have other stuff lined up, but it's something I'd definitely like to do. It's a useful skill to have and it's very fun, especially taking videos of it and watching an arc with no helmet on.

Yep, I had a TAFE teacher much the same 30 years ago when I did basic welding. Old school boiler makers....Oxy welding still widely used though when you dont have power or need to join dissimillar metals. Also good for sheet metal work. I cut rust out of my ute and welded in a piece with oxy-actylene using a steel coat hanger as filler rod... I did not have a mig.

Brazing: Join dissimilar metals with filler rod. Often brone a or other copper alloys. Good for Cast iron as it wont crack like acr/ mig welds often do. Expensive because it uses expensive filler rods.
Braze Wedling: Joining steel with steel filler rod. (Should have done this on your hoe as the metals are not disimmilar). Mostly done with arc/ submerged arc/ mig/ tig now.
Soldering: Joining simmilar to brazing with solder filler rod. Used on plumping/ copper pipes. Low melt alloy solders means you can use a blow torch not oxy-acetylene.

All still used a lot. Before advent of electric acr/ submerged arc/ mig/ tig Brazing and braze welding was used a lot more. Some good videos around of guys oxy torches and filler rods braze welding plates and pipelines we would now do with mig. See link below around 9 minute mark where they are welding up pipelines with horse drawn oxy-acetylene set.

Oxy welding:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcNv67a2v2o

Before you ask:
Submerged arc:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LD8vntp39uA

Lays a big weld down in one pass.

JOW



Huh now I'm curious why the hoe was brazed instead of braze welded. Also all these videos of brazing and oxy welding are reminding of me when I used to stare down into the top of our automatic breadmaker and be completely mesmerized by the dough being kneaded, sometimes for hours. These videos give me the same feeling of watching that bread dough. 

As for the submerged arc, I assumed it was underwater welding. Nope, but that is real cool. I've never seen flux loose before, I'm used to seeing it wrapped around a rod or a wire. That was another satisfying video to watch.

Thanks for all the answers folks I got to watch some neat videos and now I know I can braze with a coat hanger if I need to.
As this world disintegrates, do what you can to help build what comes next.

Offline Cam

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Re: What's the new guy up to? - Kindling Cracker Beginnings
« Reply #86 on: February 20, 2021, 01:47:32 PM »
So I am making a kindling cracker. So far I have just the top square. The frame is all rebar. Haven't measured but I'm guessing it's 3/4" stuff. Just want to show off my welding. First cleaned up the ends after cutting with a flap disc. Then stuck them together with 1/8" 6011. Very easy rod to start and offers good penetration but the bead doesn't look pretty, at least not when I do it. I capped it off with a 3/32" 7018 rod. In my experience it's a little pickier...harder to start but when you do get it going it makes a beautiful bead. The longest part of this project by far is going to be grinding out the blade. When I searched around the scrapyard weeks or months ago all I could find was a rectangular chunk of mild steel. Oh well I will persevere!

If any of you have ideas to find hardened steel that could be a splitting blade or made into one let me know. Also I put up a pic of my drawing of the cracker. The only thing I won't be doing is putting the blade across like that, the bar I have isn't long enough. It will be attached to bars in between the others, either bolted or welded on I haven't decided yet. Bolted is potentially not as strong, but welded makes it challenging to sharpen the blade inside the cage. Hmmm....
As this world disintegrates, do what you can to help build what comes next.

Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: What's the new guy up to?
« Reply #87 on: February 20, 2021, 05:37:19 PM »
Leaf springs off of a truck might be a good choice cam. They are decent steel usually. Do you have a picture of what it's supposed to look like?
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline Phil Rumpole

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Re: What's the new guy up to?
« Reply #88 on: February 20, 2021, 06:12:12 PM »
I'm not familiar with these, but a spade that has a broken handle seems like it could fit the bill. Quite hard and sharp, but u probably want a thicker wedge shape. Welds look neat
Women are like hurricanes: Wet and wild when they come, take your house when they leave

Offline Cam

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Re: What's the new guy up to?
« Reply #89 on: February 20, 2021, 07:01:48 PM »
Leaf springs off of a truck might be a good choice cam. They are decent steel usually. Do you have a picture of what it's supposed to look like?

Just gave those a quick google and that just might work. Just gotta see if the scrapyard is still open or not and I can have a look around there. And yes the original model is made of cast iron and is much rounder than mine will be. I put a pic below. I'm also gonna be adding metal feet with holes so it can be bolted to a big round of wood so it's much more stable.

I'm not familiar with these, but a spade that has a broken handle seems like it could fit the bill. Quite hard and sharp, but u probably want a thicker wedge shape. Welds look neat

I wasn't either until I found it on permies. To me it seems like a far easier and safer way to split wood into smaller kindling pieces. Just had a fire tonight and holding the log in your hand while tapping the axe or hatchet on in it is asking for a cut, especially with my luck. I love the idea of resting the log on the blade and tapping it with a hammer or another piece of wood. And yeah the challenging part is finding something that is hard enough to hold an edge but has a shape that can at least be ground down to a blade.

Now that I think of it, the blade may not need to be as hard as an axe or maul head. My reasoning here is that the blade itself is not being swung, so it is much less likely to be hitting rocks or dirt. Maybe the mild steel will still work. This is the first iteration so if it isn't perfect I will survive. Also I put a pic of what I have currently to make the splitting blade. Took one end off already and am going to take the other one soon.
As this world disintegrates, do what you can to help build what comes next.

 

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