AuthorTopic: 🦠 🏫 Education in the Era of COVID-19  (Read 3146 times)

Offline RE

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🦠 🏫 Education in the Era of COVID-19
« on: July 15, 2020, 01:56:26 AM »
Back to Skule with NO MASKS and NO SOCIAL DISTANCING?!?!?!?!?!  Are these people INSANE? ??? ??? ???

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« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2020, 05:06:56 AM »
Despite physically distancing and wearing masks, 3 Arizona teachers who shared a classroom to online teach caught the coronavirus and one died



An Arizona teacher died from the coronavirus in late June.
Kimberley Chavez Lopez Byrd was sharing a classroom with two other teachers for two hours a day to online teach, and despite following safety protocols all three caught the virus.
The two other teachers Jena Martinez and Angela Skillings are arguing that their circumstances show why schools should not reopen in the fall.


One of three Arizona teachers who were sharing a classroom to conduct online classes caught the novel coronavirus and died. Now her two colleagues are saying it's too early to reopen schools, CNN reported.

Jena Martinez, Angela Skillings, and Kimberley Chavez Lopez Byrd were sharing a classroom in Arizona for two hours a day so they could online teach — and all had COVID-19 despite wearing masks, using gloves and hand sanitizer, and physically distancing. Byrd, 61, passed away from COVID-19 complications at the end of June.

"We followed everything we were supposed to do," Martinez told CNN's Don Lemon. "While we were there, we did distance ourselves."

According to WWBT, Byrd died on June 26 after being hospitalized for coronavirus.

Martinez and Skillings said despite following those guidelines, they still caught the virus. They believe that it still isn't safe for schools to reopen on August 17 in Arizona.

"My main thing is if we can't stay safe, how are our students going to stay safe?" Skillings told WWBT.

WWBT reported that Martinez and Skillings are still struggling with fatigue and coughing from the virus.

"I'm still taking breathing treatments to relieve the tightness in my chest. There is still weakness in my body and fatigue," Martinez told CNN.

Skillings told CNN she's concerned that since schools have been closed since March, there's no way to tell what transmission between students would look like.

"There's no documentation that children aren't going to transmit it back and forth in the classroom or that it isn't going to affect them harshly," Skillings told CNN. "Our schools are not ready. We are not prepared to open up. We're supposed to open up on the 17th of August, and there's no way that even the teachers are ready for that to happen."

President Donald Trump has pushed for schools to reopen. Business Insider's Eliza Relman reported last week that Trump threatened to "cut off funding" for school districts that don't reopen. He's claimed that efforts to keep schools closed and online in the fall were "political" and not based on limiting the spread of the coronavirus.

In a press conference on Tuesday, Trump was asked about Byrd's death and avoided the question to further push for reopening schools, Business Insider reported.

A reporter asked the President: "What do you tell parents, who look at this, who look at Arizona where a teacher recently died teaching summer school, parents who are worried about the safety of their children in public schools?"

Trump responded: "Schools should be opened. Those kids want to go to school. You're losing a lot of lives by keeping things closed. We saved millions of lives while we did the initial closure."

While different districts have taken different approaches to classes in the fall, from hybrid online and in-person classes, online-only, or entirely in person, health experts worry about the spread of the virus in schools.

California's two largest school districts, the Los Angeles and San Diego unified school systems, announced on Monday that they'll be starting off the fall semester with online-only classes until it's safe to resume in-person classes.
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I am not making commentary on this story because i have an Article & Video I will publish Sunday.

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New Report Says Schools Should Try To Reopen In Person For Elementary Students

July 15, 202011:01 AM ET
Anya Kamanetz


The National Academy of Sciences report includes an updated review of the evidence from around the world and a set of recommendations on mitigation strategies for the coronavirus in school settings.

This fall, public school districts should prioritize full-time, in-person classes for grades K-5 and for students with special needs. That's the top-line recommendation of a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

The report includes an updated review of the evidence from around the world and a set of recommendations on mitigation strategies for the coronavirus in school settings. It adds to a hefty reading list of back-to-school guidance that now includes comprehensive recommendations from the CDC, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Federation of Teachers and every U.S. state except Kansas. There's a growing consensus on a few best practices across most of these reports, such as the importance of masking and social distancing.

What stands out from this particular report is its emphasis on collaboration with public health authorities and focus on not just recommendations for action now, but decision-making strategies for schools under conditions that will continue to change.

Dr. Dimitri Christakis, a pediatrician and member of the committee that created the report, told NPR that it comes at a time of crisis and repeated failures.
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"We failed children ethically and in three important ways. First and foremost, that we have done such a terrible job containing this pandemic. Secondly, that we closed schools ... abruptly without any good plan about how to transition to distance learning and without adequate infrastructure for so many kids. And third, that the moment we closed schools, we didn't immediately start planning about how to reopen them."

Now, he says, with school months or weeks away, schools are "struggling to put together some kind of a coherent plan for how to bring kids back, if at all." In fact, with cases rising in most states, a growing number of districts from Los Angeles to Richmond, Va., are choosing to start the year virtually.
Los Angeles And San Diego Schools Announce Online-Only Fall
Coronavirus Live Updates
Los Angeles And San Diego Schools Announce Online-Only Fall

The new report makes nine recommendations. First, schools should consider that staying closed poses a serious risk to children, especially the most vulnerable children. When possible, districts should "prioritize" full-time, in-person classes for the youngest children in elementary school, and for special needs children. Christakis says that this is because these two groups generally struggle the most with online learning and need the most supervision.

When it comes to mitigating the risks of the coronavirus once schools are open, the report says, adult staff should wear surgical masks, and everyone should have access to hand-washing sinks, soap and water or hand sanitizer. People should practice physical distancing and limiting large gatherings. Cleaning and ventilation are important but not sufficient, the report says. Furthermore, Christakis notes, "deep cleaning, as is currently recommended, is expensive and may or may not really make a big difference." The report also includes a recommendation that states and the federal government provide funds to schools to safely reopen.

The report also goes into detail about processes for decision-making going forward and says districts should form coalitions to make decisions on opening, school operations and staying open. They should prioritize equity, understanding that communities of color are more affected by this virus, and that poor students and students of color are more likely to attend school in outdated and dilapidated buildings with overcrowded classrooms.

Coalitions, the report says, should work closely with local public health authorities in order to do contact tracing if someone at the school contracts the virus. This partnership should allow schools to keep tabs on the rate of infections in the broader community, which will determine whether they can stay open.

The true role of children and teenagers in spreading the coronavirus is not known. Christakis points out that "the explosions that we're seeing now all across this country are happening while schools are closed. We can't blame schools for what's happening in Florida or Arizona or Texas." Christakis says the next few months offer a crucial opportunity to finally do the research needed to help the public understand the risks that many districts are in the middle of taking right now.
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https://www.forbes.com/sites/tommybeer/2020/07/15/one-of-americas-largest-school-districts-will-not-reopen-for-in-person-instruction-until-february-at-the-earliest/#488971a31c7d

One Of America's Largest School Districts Will Not Reopen For In-Person Instruction Until February, At The Earliest
Tommy Beer

Tunisian highschool students wearing face masks sit at a classroom a school in Tunisia's capital on ...
  • AFP via Getty Images[/i]
Amid a spike in coronavirus cases and a heated national debate surrounding the efficacy of remote learning, several large U.S. school districts have already announced that they will not reopen for any in-person instruction at the start of the upcoming academic year, with the latest being Prince George's County in Maryland.


KEY FACTS

Prince George's County Public Schools announced Wednesday afternoon that the 2020-2021 school year will begin on Monday, August 31, with distance learning for all grades.

Per the district's statement, distance learning will continue through the first and second quarters, "with a goal to return to school buildings in February to begin the third quarter."

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, Prince George's County is home to approximately 131,000 students, making it one of the 20 largest districts in the United States.

On Monday, Los Angeles Unified School District (the second largest in the U.S) and San Diego Unified School District both announced they would also be online-only at the start of the academic year, while California’s Orange County Board of Education voted Monday to allow schools to reopen next month with in-person instruction.

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In New York City, home to the country's largest school district, Mayor Bill de Blasio has stated he expects there will be at least some in-person instruction in September, but Gov. Andrew Cuomo said a final decision would not be made until early August.

Florida surpassed 300,000 cases of Covid-19 on Wednesday and its rolling seven-day average for deaths is now 92 per day, yet, just last week, the state's Education Commissioner declared that upon reopening in August, "all school boards must open brick and mortar schools at least five days per week for all students."
Key Background:

Last Wednesday, President Trump denounced the Centers for Disease Control's guidelines and threatened to withhold federal funding from schools that do not resume in-person classes in the coming months. Plenty of pundits have argued that Trump's reelection odds will be impacted significantly by the state of the U.S. economy in the fall, and a vast majority of financial experts agree that for the economy to recover fully, schools need to reopen, which will allow parents to work full-time. However, many teachers and parents remain hesitant. Prince George's County released data from a survey they took last month, which found that just 12% of parents and 8% of educators said they preferred returning to school full-time for in-person instruction. Both groups favored either a hybrid of distance and in-person learning or a continuation of the distance learning model. According to Prince George's administrators, "conditions will be reassessed in December and families will be offered the option to continue distance learning or begin a hybrid learning model of two days of in-person/three days of distance learning for 3rd and 4th quarters."
Big Number:

31: Although more than 136,000 Americans have died from the coronavirus, children under the age of 15 account for only 31 of those deaths, according to the latest CDC data.
Tangent:

While many European countries have safely opened up schools without experiencing a subsequent uptick in coronavirus infections, the situation in Israel is troubling. Israel reopened their school systems on May 17 and, according to data compiled by the Daily Beast, "of 1,400 Israelis diagnosed with Covid-19 last month, 657 (47%) were infected in schools. Now 2,026 students, teachers, and staff have it, and 28,147 are quarantined."

Further Reading:

Trump Criticizes CDC And Threatens To Cut Funding For Schools That Refuse To Reopen (Forbes)

Israeli Data Show School Openings Were a Disaster That Wiped Out Lockdown Gains (Daily Beast)
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Education in the Age of COVID-19
« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2020, 02:59:12 AM »


gc2reddit-logoOff the keyboard, camera & microphone of RE



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Published on the Doomstead Diner on July 19, 2020






Disuss this article at the Education Table inside the Diner



 






 



The Grand Reopening has turned into an Epic Failure, although not according to the Imbecile in Chief who gets on the Tube and spits out on bald faced lie after lie.  Basically he believes if he says it, that makes it true.  Fortunately I think this approach is losing its effectiveness even with his "base"  Coronavirus isn't a political problem, it's a health problem and you can't sweep100,000 Dead People under the rug.  They need to be buried, by the truckload.  Bring out the Caterpillar Back Hoe for digging the mass graves.



The biggest of the many COVID issues to lately become the hot potato pollitical football is the Education issue and the reopening of the Public Skules in the fall.  The normal reopening date is around a month away, and Trumpovetsky wants a full reopening, everywhere because in his warped mind, Amerika has won the battle against Coronavirus.  This is of course preposterous as cases spike up in many states even without reopened schools.  It's inevitable if kids go back to school they'll pass around the virus,bring it home and pass it on to other family members.  What is even more insane is some school districts are advocating reopening without even requiring masks or social distancing!  You just can't get more reckless than that.



So what possible solutions are there to this Morton's Fork?  Well, there is no real solution that doesn't have huge blowback, which is why it's a Morton's Fork. However, there are a few things we might do to ameliorate the problem in the near term:



 



Recommendations for an Education Plan from RE, M.S.Ed



1- Get rid of Donalditry Trumpovetsky.  He's the most dangerous man on the planet  right now.



2- Establish a nationwide, comprehensive Distance Learning program.  Distance Learning has many problems, because parents often don't monitor it or enforce it too well.  This is particularly important in the elementary grades.  But at the moment, it's about the best we can do.  Without the active participation of parents in the Elementary school grades, Virtual Classroom learning is virtually useless.



3- Reconfigure classrooms currently configured for 30 kids in the room to 6 kids in a room, and have them rotate and come in once a week for a review session with a live in person teacher.  Require Masks, hand sanitizers and gloves.  Open Air Classrooms are another possibility, particularly in the warmer climates of the Southern States, where the biggest spike ups are currently occuring.  The school vacation time can also be changed, and make the long vacation from December-February, instead of May-August so outdoor classes are more plausible through most of the year.



———————————————–



Another problem has cropped up in higher education, where many small colleges are now going bankrupt. Blowback from that is many of the local biznesses that depend on the college kids for their income, also going bankrupt.  College kids doing Online classes will not save the local cafes from bankruptcy.  In all likelihood, these towns wil suffer economic death over the next year or two.  Property values will fall, and the Rentiers will go bankrupt too.  It is a Cascade Failure of the system.



The education system as pursued since the 19th Century and the beginning of the Industrial system has alway been a terriffic failure, getting ever worse over time.  It's job was to warehouse kids until they were old enough to become workers in the industrial machine.  It is a system in need of eradication anyhow, and if this helps hurry that along, all to the good.  But how will kids get an Education, how will they get Socialized you ask?  Prior to the late 1800s, there were no real Public Skules, and kids got educated just fine and socialized just fine.  It's not the only possible model for education.



Moving forward into the future of Collapse, many things being taught now simply will not be necessary and many things currently not  taught will be.  Education needs a top to bottom revision and reexamination of its goals.  Coronavirus gives us the opportunity to do that.



————————-



Finally, in today's video I discuss nutrition and a few of my recipes to help you in the Battle against COVID-19.  None of my advice should be considered Medical advice, nor has it been in any way tested for its efficacy and effectiveness.  It is however based on sound Nutritional principles, and generations of Jewish Grandmothers will swear by it.



Jewish Penicillin




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https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/florida-s-largest-teachers-union-files-suit-against-state-over-n1234382

Florida's largest teachers' union files suit against state over school reopenings
The state is grappling with a significant surge in coronavirus cases, reporting upwards of 10,000 new cases on Monday alone.
News: School Reopening Protests

A young girl and her mother protest plans to reopen schools in Jacksonville, Fla. on July 14 2020.Bob Self / Florida Times-Union via Imagn

July 20, 2020, 11:46 AM AKDT / Updated July 20, 2020, 12:49 PM AKDT
By Daniel Arkin

The largest teachers' union in Florida filed a lawsuit Monday against Gov. Ron DeSantis over his administration's push to fully reopen all public schools next month — even as coronavirus cases in the state are spiking.

The Florida Education Association (FEA) accused DeSantis and other state officials of violating a state constitutional mandate to keep public schools "safe and secure." The union asked a state court in Miami to halt the governor's reopening edict, according to a copy of the suit obtained by NBC News.

The lawsuit, filed in circuit court, names several defendants: DeSantis, Florida Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran, the Florida Department of Education and the Florida State Board of Education. The legal filing is sure to escalate a nationwide political debate over school reopenings amid the pandemic.

“Gov. DeSantis needs a reality check, and we are attempting to provide one,” FEA President Fedrick Ingram said in a statement announcing the lawsuit. “The governor needs to accept the reality of the situation here in Florida, where the virus is surging out of control."

Florida is grappling with a significant surge in coronavirus cases, reporting upwards of 10,000 new cases on Monday alone. DeSantis was heckled by protesters during a news conference in Orlando on Monday afternoon, with some demonstrators shouting, "Shame on you!"
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DeSantis, a first-term Republican, did not immediately respond to a request for comment through his press office.

Corcoran issued an emergency order earlier this month in which he said schools were "not just the site of academic learning" but also key places for "nutrition, socialization, counseling and extracurricular activities." He said reopening schools was crucial in terms of "Florida hitting its full economic stride."

The order, which applies to the fall academic semester, requires schools to open at least five days a week for all students, subject to guidance from public health officials. It came after DeSantis recommended all Florida schools reopen at full capacity. He argued that if they remained closed, parents would not be able to return to work.
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They plan to reopen the Public Skules here on schedule in 3 weeks.  This is fucking nuts considering our infection rate is currently on an exponential rise in cases.

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https://www.ktva.com/story/42396468/matsu-teachers-express-safety-concerns-as-schools-start-year-inperson

Mat-Su teachers express safety concerns as schools start year in-person
Tuesday, July 21st 2020, 9:34 PM AKDT
Updated: Wednesday, July 22nd 2020, 8:33 AM AKDT
By: Megan Mazurek


Teachers and parents gathered at an informational meeting Tuesday night at Wasilla Middle School to discuss the start of the school year, wearing masks and social distancing.

"My concerns are basic safety for kids staff and families," said Tim Walters, a biology teacher in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough School District. "Simple things, like there won't be hand sanitizer in every classroom. It's not possible for every kid to wash their hands in between classes; most classrooms don't have sinks."

Walters has been a part of a working group the district put together to help prepare for the upcoming school year that included a handful of teachers within the district.

He's felt his concerns weren't addressed and said many teachers don't feel safe going back to work.

"At the big schools, the secondary schools, you're going to have a thousand kids mixing in the hallways between every class," Walters said. "The district hasn't considered looking at other scheduling options to minimize some of that risk, and here we are three weeks before school starts and it's looking like the perfect storm."

He's concerned if one student comes to school sick, he can encounter up to 200 other students in a day and many of them won't be wearing masks.

District staff is working with high school and middle school teachers to figure out the best way for students to transition in the hallways between classes.

Walters would like to see the district look at different scheduling options and using some of the COVID-19 federal funding to hire additional teachers in an effort to reduce class sizes.

"The Mat-Su has the highest class sizes, largest classes in the state," he added.

Despite his concerns, Walters will be in the classroom on the first day of school.

"I'll be showing up in a mask, a face mask, gloves," he said. "Right now, the only thing I have control over is keeping myself safe and help keep kids safe and honor those kids that want to wear masks."

The MSBSD 2020-2021 School Mitigation Plan outlines what would happen if a school was at medium- or high-risk for coronavirus infections and which actions schools would take.

The first day of school in the Mat-Su is Aug. 19.
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https://www.foxnews.com/us/georgia-schools-reopening-coronavirus

Georgia school reopenings: Elementary student tests positive for coronavirus, student crowds raise questions
School districts resuming in-person classes in the state are facing challenges
By Stephen Sorace | Fox News

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Epidemiologist warns COVID outbreak at Georgia summer camp carries implications for reopening schools

A Georgia elementary school has shut down a classroom after a second-grade student tested positive for the coronavirus just two days into the new academic year, while photos of students packed close together have raised questions over safety policies for in-person learning.
placeholder

Cherokee and Paulding County, two of the first school districts in the country to reopen, resumed full five-day-a-week instruction on Monday. However, these early days of navigating educational instruction amid the COVID-19 pandemic are providing schools with new challenges.

ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS POSTPONE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL, MANDATE CORONAVIRUS MASKS FOR STUDENTS

Cherokee County School District officials announced Tuesday that a teacher at Sixes Elementary School near Canton and 20 other students were sent home to quarantine and learn online for 14 days after a student tested positive for the virus.

Officials said the teacher has shown no signs of COVID-19 symptoms, FOX5 Atlanta reported.

Meanwhile, Cherokee and Paulding schools have faced questions over their mask-optional policies.

In Cherokee County, dozens of seniors gathered at two of the district's six high schools to take the traditional first day of school senior photos, with students squeezing together in black outfits. No one in pictures at Sequoyah High School in Hickory Flat or Etowah High School in Woodstock wore a mask.

Cherokee County school district spokesperson Barbara Jacoby said the pictures weren't a sanctioned activity and officials only became aware when the photos were posted on social media.
placeholder

In Paulding County, student pictures taken Monday and Tuesday show crowded hallways at North Paulding High School in Dallas. Many students were not seen wearing masks.
In this photo posted on Twitter, students crowd a hallway on Tuesday at North Paulding High School in Dallas, Ga. The 30,000-student suburban Paulding County school district in suburban Atlanta resumed classes Monday with 70% of students returning for in-person classes five days a week. (Twitter via AP)

In this photo posted on Twitter, students crowd a hallway on Tuesday at North Paulding High School in Dallas, Ga. The 30,000-student suburban Paulding County school district in suburban Atlanta resumed classes Monday with 70% of students returning for in-person classes five days a week. (Twitter via AP)

Paulding County Superintendent Brian Otott wrote in an email Tuesday that the pictures were accurate, according to The Associated Press, adding that the district is following state guidelines.

He said class changes are “a challenge" and that "it is an area where we are continuing to work on in this new environment to find practicable ways to further limit students from congregating.”

He added that “there is no question that the photo does not look good," but defended the district's decision not to require masks, writing that “wearing a mask is a personal choice and there is no practical way to enforce a mandate to wear them.”

CHASTITY MILLIGAN: SCHOOLS NEED TO REOPEN FOR IN-PERSON CLASSES -- VIRTUAL EDUCATION A POOR SUBSTITUTE

Both districts are giving parents the option of five-day-a-week classes or online learning. In Cherokee, 22 percent chose to learn remotely, while 30 percent of students chose it in Paulding, The Associated Press reported.

Other school districts in the state are having students begin the year with remote learning.
placeholder

The 180,000-student Gwinnett district said it would start instruction all-virtual on Aug. 12. It later announced that kindergartners, first graders, sixth graders, high school freshmen, and certain special education students would be back to school as early as Aug. 26, with other grades following in phases.
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🦠 🏫 NYC Announces School Reopening Plan
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2020, 12:15:13 PM »
It will be interesting to see how this model works out for NY Shity.

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This is ridiculous.  You can make a mask out of any piece of cloth.  Not an N95, but it will keep your sneezes and coughs from spreading all over the desk.

RE

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/education/2020/08/14/back-to-school-shopping-lists-fall-semester-masks-ppe/5435002002/

Masks are on superintendents' back-to-school shopping lists. Some leaders wonder if there will be enough.
Wenei Philimon
USA TODAY


Shari Obrenski, a high school history teacher in Cleveland, usually spends about $500 each year on paper, pencils, markers and tissues for her classroom.

This year, her back-to-school list includes hand sanitizer, wipes and disinfectant spray — none of which Obrenski can find in stores. She hopes the Cleveland Metropolitan School District can get them.

"Reopening safely across the country is going to cost billions of dollars," said Obrenski, who's also the president of the Cleveland Teachers Union.

Cleveland schools will be online for the first quarter of the school year after a surge of COVID-19 cases in the area.

As rising infections put the first day of school in limbo across the country, school districts are trying to make sure they'll have enough cleaning supplies, masks and other protective equipment to bring students and staff back safely.

“There’s an expectation for school districts to kind of figure this all out on their own,” said Elleka Yost, government affairs and communications manager for the Association of School Business Officials International. “It’s unfortunate because we’re not just dealing with an economic issue, but also with a global pandemic.”

But many state governments are lending a hand, in some cases distributing equipment obtained from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Wednesday afternoon, President Donald Trump announced the federal government will provide up to 125 million reusable masks to school districts across the country.

The masks, a mix of adult and youth sizes, can be used for students, teachers and staff, said Carol Danko, a spokeswoman for the Department of Health and Human Services. Some will come from current supplies and some will be manufactured.

While that's helpful, Yost said, "it simply does not begin to address all the challenges district leaders and educators are wrestling with as they plan to safely reopen schools." She said Congress should pass another relief bill with $200 billion for schools to pay for everything from online learning technology to modified food-service operations.

Back to school and COVID-19:Everything to know as students head back to class

'Hoping it goes well':Students among first to return offer lessons for reopening schools

The cost of masks and other protective equipment has factored into some school districts' decisions to start the year remotely.

The Los Angeles Unified and San Diego Unified school districts will start the yearonline and have called on lawmakers to pay for personal protective equipment, or PPE.

"We frankly do not want to spend a single dime on PPE when that money should be going toward the education of our students," said Superintendents Austin Beutner and Cindy Marten.

Seventeen of the country's 20 largest school districts — affecting more than 4 million students — plan to reopen only with online classes, according to Education Week.

Other districts say they want to offer in-person classes, but they’ve moved back their start dates. Some districts in the Midwest and South forged ahead with in-person reopenings over the past two weeks; a handful have closed after outbreaks or have asked hundreds of students to quarantine.
Story Collins and her mother protest at Duval County school board meeting on July 14, against in-person plans for the upcoming school year with COVID-19 infections surging
Masks, protective equipment will cost school districts millions

A typical school district with about 3,700 students will need about $1.8 million to reopen this fall, according to associations representing superintendents and business officials. That would pay for cleaning supplies and equipment, extra staff, and masks for staff and students who don't bring them from home.

Some schools have ordered these supplies. But there's a shortage of protective equipment and cleaning supplies nationwide, said David Lewis, executive director of the Association of School Business Officials International. Some school districts are still waiting for their plexiglass, masks and cleaning supplies to arrive, Lewis said.

“We’ve ordered things, especially cleaning supplies and PPE, and were told that it was going to be delivered, but those dates have been bumped many times,” said Kelley Kitchen, executive director of finance for Goshen Community Schools and a member of the Association of School Business Officials' legislative advisory committee.

No advice:Health directors told to keep quiet as Florida leaders pressed to reopen classrooms

Mask shortage:Despite warnings, the US wasn’t prepared with masks for coronavirus. Now it’s too late

In some cases, state leaders have promised to provide personal protective equipment, hand sanitizer and extra cleaning supplies.

Texas' school districts will receive 53 million disposable and 18 million reusable masks for students and staff, along with gloves, thermometers, hand sanitizer and face shields. In Tennessee, school districts will receive 27 million disposable masks and 298,000 reusable masks.

Based on last year's enrollment, it appears both states would have an ample supply of masks.

That doesn't appear to be the case in California. The California Department of Education has distributed 1.9 million cloth masks, 1.3 million face shields and 2.7 million bottles of hand sanitizer. The state has about 6.2 million public school students in kindergarten through 12th grade.

In Wisconsin, Gov. Tony Evers provided 2 million masks and more than 4,200 thermometers to school districts, said Chris Bucher, communication specialist for the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said the state would provide at least five reusable masks for every student and staffer, and a two-month supply of thermometers and equipment.

Some school districts expect to provide masks for every student. The school business officials association based its reopening estimate on providing masks for 30% of them. That's based on the assumption that schools would need to provide masks for students whose families can't buy them or those who forget them, Yost said.
Alexandra Daniels, a 6th-grade teacher at Eastern Middle School in Montgomery County used her own money to purchase school supplies for the 2019-2020 year.
States call on FEMA for masks

Some of that equipment is coming from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which said it has distributed masks to states on behalf of the Department of Health and Human Services. The supplies can be distributed as states see fit.

Brian Ferguson, deputy director for crisis communication for the California Governor's Office of Emergency Services, anticipates FEMA will cover 75% of the supplies distributed to schools there.

FEMA supplied 2 million masks and 4,200 thermometers at no cost to the state of Wisconsin, said Britt Cudaback, the governor's deputy communications director.

In Indiana, school districts have obtained protective equipment through the CARES Act, local and state general funds, and donations from the community, Kitchen said.
'The need is so much bigger than just masks'

As school districts wait for supplies, some teachers worry the burden will fall on them. That's especially concerning in poorly funded districts and those with a large share of students from poor families.

Heather Sanchez is a music teacher at a public school in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where 68% of students are eligible for free or reduced lunch. State officials plan to provide personal protective equipment and hand sanitizer for students and staff, Sanchez said. But that's not all these students need.

"There are issues with our kids having shoes," she said. "Our kids don't have food and school supplies. The need is so much bigger than just masks."

On top of that, parents and educators are concerned about students' safety. 

Elementary school principal Victoria Creamer in Durham, North Carolina, said she fears what lies ahead. Last school year, when the state was under a stay-at-home order, an 8-year-old student in her school contracted the virus and died.

Creamer worries that without the proper preparation and supplies, there may be an outbreak.

Some wonder how schools with small classrooms will ensure social distancing and how schools will deal with parents who don’t want their kids to wear masks, Sanchez said.

"The fear is there," Creamer said, "and no one seems to be addressing it."

Contributing: Elinor Aspegren, Dinah Voyles Pulver, Erin Richards, Donovan Slack
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This is ridiculous.  You can make a mask out of any piece of cloth.  Not an N95, but it will keep your sneezes and coughs from spreading all over the desk.

RE

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/education/2020/08/14/back-to-school-shopping-lists-fall-semester-masks-ppe/5435002002/

Masks are on superintendents' back-to-school shopping lists. Some leaders wonder if there will be enough.
Wenei Philimon
USA TODAY


Shari Obrenski, a high school history teacher in Cleveland, usually spends about $500 each year on paper, pencils, markers and tissues for her classroom.

This year, her back-to-school list includes hand sanitizer, wipes and disinfectant spray — none of which Obrenski can find in stores. She hopes the Cleveland Metropolitan School District can get them.

"Reopening safely across the country is going to cost billions of dollars," said Obrenski, who's also the president of the Cleveland Teachers Union.

Cleveland schools will be online for the first quarter of the school year after a surge of COVID-19 cases in the area.

As rising infections put the first day of school in limbo across the country, school districts are trying to make sure they'll have enough cleaning supplies, masks and other protective equipment to bring students and staff back safely.

“There’s an expectation for school districts to kind of figure this all out on their own,” said Elleka Yost, government affairs and communications manager for the Association of School Business Officials International. “It’s unfortunate because we’re not just dealing with an economic issue, but also with a global pandemic.”

But many state governments are lending a hand, in some cases distributing equipment obtained from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Wednesday afternoon, President Donald Trump announced the federal government will provide up to 125 million reusable masks to school districts across the country.

The masks, a mix of adult and youth sizes, can be used for students, teachers and staff, said Carol Danko, a spokeswoman for the Department of Health and Human Services. Some will come from current supplies and some will be manufactured.

While that's helpful, Yost said, "it simply does not begin to address all the challenges district leaders and educators are wrestling with as they plan to safely reopen schools." She said Congress should pass another relief bill with $200 billion for schools to pay for everything from online learning technology to modified food-service operations.

Back to school and COVID-19:Everything to know as students head back to class

'Hoping it goes well':Students among first to return offer lessons for reopening schools

The cost of masks and other protective equipment has factored into some school districts' decisions to start the year remotely.

The Los Angeles Unified and San Diego Unified school districts will start the yearonline and have called on lawmakers to pay for personal protective equipment, or PPE.

"We frankly do not want to spend a single dime on PPE when that money should be going toward the education of our students," said Superintendents Austin Beutner and Cindy Marten.

Seventeen of the country's 20 largest school districts — affecting more than 4 million students — plan to reopen only with online classes, according to Education Week.

Other districts say they want to offer in-person classes, but they’ve moved back their start dates. Some districts in the Midwest and South forged ahead with in-person reopenings over the past two weeks; a handful have closed after outbreaks or have asked hundreds of students to quarantine.
Story Collins and her mother protest at Duval County school board meeting on July 14, against in-person plans for the upcoming school year with COVID-19 infections surging
Masks, protective equipment will cost school districts millions

A typical school district with about 3,700 students will need about $1.8 million to reopen this fall, according to associations representing superintendents and business officials. That would pay for cleaning supplies and equipment, extra staff, and masks for staff and students who don't bring them from home.

Some schools have ordered these supplies. But there's a shortage of protective equipment and cleaning supplies nationwide, said David Lewis, executive director of the Association of School Business Officials International. Some school districts are still waiting for their plexiglass, masks and cleaning supplies to arrive, Lewis said.

“We’ve ordered things, especially cleaning supplies and PPE, and were told that it was going to be delivered, but those dates have been bumped many times,” said Kelley Kitchen, executive director of finance for Goshen Community Schools and a member of the Association of School Business Officials' legislative advisory committee.

No advice:Health directors told to keep quiet as Florida leaders pressed to reopen classrooms

Mask shortage:Despite warnings, the US wasn’t prepared with masks for coronavirus. Now it’s too late

In some cases, state leaders have promised to provide personal protective equipment, hand sanitizer and extra cleaning supplies.

Texas' school districts will receive 53 million disposable and 18 million reusable masks for students and staff, along with gloves, thermometers, hand sanitizer and face shields. In Tennessee, school districts will receive 27 million disposable masks and 298,000 reusable masks.

Based on last year's enrollment, it appears both states would have an ample supply of masks.

That doesn't appear to be the case in California. The California Department of Education has distributed 1.9 million cloth masks, 1.3 million face shields and 2.7 million bottles of hand sanitizer. The state has about 6.2 million public school students in kindergarten through 12th grade.

In Wisconsin, Gov. Tony Evers provided 2 million masks and more than 4,200 thermometers to school districts, said Chris Bucher, communication specialist for the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said the state would provide at least five reusable masks for every student and staffer, and a two-month supply of thermometers and equipment.

Some school districts expect to provide masks for every student. The school business officials association based its reopening estimate on providing masks for 30% of them. That's based on the assumption that schools would need to provide masks for students whose families can't buy them or those who forget them, Yost said.
Alexandra Daniels, a 6th-grade teacher at Eastern Middle School in Montgomery County used her own money to purchase school supplies for the 2019-2020 year.
States call on FEMA for masks

Some of that equipment is coming from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which said it has distributed masks to states on behalf of the Department of Health and Human Services. The supplies can be distributed as states see fit.

Brian Ferguson, deputy director for crisis communication for the California Governor's Office of Emergency Services, anticipates FEMA will cover 75% of the supplies distributed to schools there.

FEMA supplied 2 million masks and 4,200 thermometers at no cost to the state of Wisconsin, said Britt Cudaback, the governor's deputy communications director.

In Indiana, school districts have obtained protective equipment through the CARES Act, local and state general funds, and donations from the community, Kitchen said.
'The need is so much bigger than just masks'

As school districts wait for supplies, some teachers worry the burden will fall on them. That's especially concerning in poorly funded districts and those with a large share of students from poor families.

Heather Sanchez is a music teacher at a public school in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where 68% of students are eligible for free or reduced lunch. State officials plan to provide personal protective equipment and hand sanitizer for students and staff, Sanchez said. But that's not all these students need.

"There are issues with our kids having shoes," she said. "Our kids don't have food and school supplies. The need is so much bigger than just masks."

On top of that, parents and educators are concerned about students' safety. 

Elementary school principal Victoria Creamer in Durham, North Carolina, said she fears what lies ahead. Last school year, when the state was under a stay-at-home order, an 8-year-old student in her school contracted the virus and died.

Creamer worries that without the proper preparation and supplies, there may be an outbreak.

Some wonder how schools with small classrooms will ensure social distancing and how schools will deal with parents who don’t want their kids to wear masks, Sanchez said.

"The fear is there," Creamer said, "and no one seems to be addressing it."

Contributing: Elinor Aspegren, Dinah Voyles Pulver, Erin Richards, Donovan Slack
Our girls are going back to school in two weeks. We just took on the whole Ppe for our kids ourselves. They each have 3 reusable masks and a hand sanitizer dispenser. We've been drilling in social distancing and following arrows all summer. The Ontario government has made 200 per kid available to the parents for ppe and special supplies... teachers and school boards are Ill prepared I find, most parents I've talked to though have been working out how they will manage all summer. Our rates are way down though... As per a teacher friend roughly 25 percent have requested at home learning in elementary ...  Sure will be fun.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2020, 10:22:48 AM by Nearingsfault »
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

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🦠 🏫 Three more Valley schools close temporarily due to COVID-19
« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2020, 04:12:39 AM »
Somehow, I expect these "temporary" closures to be a regular feature of life for the forseeable future.

RE

[size 14pt] Three more Valley schools close temporarily due to COVID-19[/size]

    By Tim Rockey Frontiersman.com Aug 31, 2020

Colony Middle School
Frontiersman file photo


PALMER — Three more Mat-Su Borough School District schools will be closed during this school week due to COVID-19.

Machetanz Elementary was the first to be closed due to a positive tests among students. The school was closed Aug. 28, but reopened on Monday to in-person instruction for students. On Monday night, MSBSD officials updated mitigation plans, closing Colony High School and Colony Middle School for the rest of the week. Pioneer Peak Elementary is also closed until Wednesday.

Colony High and Colony Middle school students will return to the school buildings on Tuesday, Sept. 8. This is a developing story. Continue to see frontiersman.com for more.
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« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2020, 04:41:28 AM »


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Published on The Doomstead Diner on March 9, 2020



 



Discuss this article at the Education Table inside the Diner



 



Because dead people can't teach students to spell. If the point is to teach students to spell, dead people can't do it. The same goes for teaching anything at all. Dead people can't teach. What is hard to figure out about this?



The summer could have been spent figuring out how to pair educated and unemployed Americans with students furloughed by COVID-19. Doing this would eliminate problems caused by remote learning and keep lives moving ahead. Like lives matter.



The knee-jerk solution, remote learning, by itself has serious problems. The biggest problem is the mere suggestion of remote learning causes a person to think the problem is solved. Techno-narcissism creeps in and stops thought. Today we have remote learning and tomorrow we will have Mars. It takes a strong mind not to go fantastical. Particularly if you are an educated person who has used the internet to acquire a skill or two or three. You think everyone can do it and you don't see that you are unique, special and hooked up. You are also likely to think that there is no problem technology can't solve.



Remote learning is part of a solution for doing education in a pandemic but it is not a one size fits all solution. Distance learning panders to a connected elite in the same way mail-in voting does but more so. Part of a solution under the circumstances but far from ideal. A minimum computer literacy, which many students do not have, is required for remote learning to work. Those most in need are the least capable.



Schools as a COVID-19 Petri dish is a true fact even to those who deny that COVID-19 even exists. A rational person can be perhaps slightly forgiven for the current situation since the idea that the COVID-19 pandemic would not have been contained by September seemed crazy in May. Sadly we live in crazy times, and we are now in crisis. Paring educated and unemployed Americans with students furloughed by COVID-19 leads to small classes which by their size, contain COVID-19 infection.



Thinking about what to do about schools in September was put on hold. According to President Trump America will panic if they find out that we are in a COVID-19 pandemic. Trump's solution thus has been to pretend COVID-19 does not exist and that it will just go away someday. Obeying the impulse to follow the herd, America continued to assume it had a leader all summer long. Easily seduced America trusted in the miracle of remote learning. In both cases trust has been misplaced. Everything goes away and soon enough we are all dirt. Knowing this and knowing that it is the POTHUS job to protect the nation, I find the Trump reassurance disgusting.



Small class sizes so outbreaks can be contained. An obvious answer and one which in a time of no leadership is ignored. A national program using the forcibly retired and unemployed. Homeschooling at the local instead of the family level of implementation. This is and continues to be, a valid solution. Perhaps the only solution. A solution which could be deployed now as early as January.



Elite leadership made the mistake of pretending that the COVID-19 problem does not exist. Getting classes up and running in the fall because of the choice made in the spring is nonsense now. Countries which took appropriate action can recover somewhat. It may be safe to have coffee in a Rome Café now because Italy locked down. Not so in America which made no progress in eliminating their COVID-19 problem with any national lockdown. In America money has been far more important than lives and this continues to be true. COVID-19 remains someone else's problem in America. It is an exceptional point of view which on the scales of cosmic justice does not balance.



I realize an effort to create a New Deal style program of citizen teachers has no chance of being adopted by the major US political parties. It would empower people far beyond any mainstream Democrat or Republican level of comfort. I write this knowing that America will continue to choose ignorance because this is a 'write' thing to do.



 

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