AuthorTopic: Near Term Human Extinction  (Read 13649 times)

Offline RE

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Re: Near Term Human Extinction
« Reply #30 on: June 06, 2013, 09:50:55 PM »
Assuming the climate in that case is stable enough to grow anything. It's already June 6 here in Minnesota, and I feel like I haven't hardly seen the sun in two months. I don't think it hit 60F today. The ten day forecast looks optimistic, but that seems as much a factor of meteorologists taking so much shit all spring; overly optimistic, like the last two ten day forecasts I consulted have proved to be. Does not bode well for the growth of summer veggies. Estimates that 50% of the regional corn crop is not yet in the ground.

Your location clearly is not doing as well as mine with Climate Change.  Weather here has been about perfect,  a day or two of rain followed by several days of  :icon_sunny:

The Colony Days Parade goes on Saturday, so maybe I will take the time afterward to drive around Palmer Farms and see what the local Farmers got in the ground here.  As usual of course I will shoot Pics at the Alaska State Fair at the end of Summer when John Evans & Friends compete their Big Veggies.  Here's John with 4 of his 7 World Records.


John Evans, a mechanical designer who lives 40 miles north of Anchorage in Palmer, Alaska, holds seven world records for giant vegetables. One of them is this Green Cabbage, who weighted over 76 lb, making it a world record in 1998.




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Offline jdwheeler42

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Re: Near Term Human Extinction
« Reply #31 on: June 07, 2013, 01:22:20 AM »
Quote
In a world 4 degrees warmer, the Average Temperature in Winter in the Matanuska Susitna River Valley where I live would be around 10 F and in Summer around 70 F.  We would lose some of the lower elevation coastline, Anchorage for instance would be underwater.  However, most of the state would remain above water, and the growing season would be extended by about a month.

Assuming the climate in that case is stable enough to grow anything. It's already June 6 here in Minnesota, and I feel like I haven't hardly seen the sun in two months. I don't think it hit 60F today. The ten day forecast looks optimistic, but that seems as much a factor of meteorologists taking so much shit all spring; overly optimistic, like the last two ten day forecasts I consulted have proved to be. Does not bode well for the growth of summer veggies. Estimates that 50% of the regional corn crop is not yet in the ground.
I feel your pain.  It really helps to have a long memory.  Around here this year has been more of a reversion to the mean.  Tradition in this area has been not to plant your garden until Memorial Day because you couldn't be assured there wouldn't be a frost before then.  Last year our last frost was around April 15th, this year it was right before Memorial Day.

The key is, unlike what you said William, it is always a great year for something.  You just can't necessarily know what that is beforehand.  I have some barley coming up quite nicely -- only, I didn't plant any barley last fall; I did plant some in the spring, but more importantly, I used barley straw to cover my beds, so these are all "volunteers".  When the unpredictable climate becomes a problem is when you rely on a single crop like corn, which is native to Mexico after all, for the bulk of your agriculture.  If you have 80 different crops and 20 of them are complete failures, that's probably okay because there are probably 20 that produce more than you know what to do with. 
Making pigs fly is easy... that is, of course, after you have built the catapult....

Online Eddie

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Re: Near Term Human Extinction
« Reply #32 on: June 07, 2013, 06:20:02 AM »
Central Texas had the coolest May that I can recall in several years, with a near-freezing episode while I was gone to AZ on the 2nd through the 5th that nipped my garden. Not that that means anything about long term trends...but it was so nice. We've even had some decent rain, not enough to break the drought, but enough to keep my creek full for the moment.

Yesterday it got up to 95 which is not particularly hot by recent standards, and that 's the warmest day we've had.

I also have a hard time worrying about NTE. As some wise man or woman once said, it doesn't pay to worry about the things you cannot change...and I see no way to reverse  the trend in global warming, given the politics of the situation and the ignorance and denial that run rampant. I can only hope that what appears inevitable is really not...and there are enough examples of that in my memory banks to have a little hope. That's all I can say.

My personal philosophy is such that, to me, it ultimately does not matter whether NTE does or does not happen in 50 years or 150 years. It isn't how we die that defines us as much as how we live. Death is a certainty for every individual man and higher animal. We gave up on immortality when we quit reproducing by mitosis. I try to live consciously, but I also try to live now...because the now is all that we ever really have.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2013, 06:22:18 AM by Eddie »
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Offline luciddreams

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Re: Near Term Human Extinction
« Reply #33 on: June 07, 2013, 06:57:40 AM »
My personal philosophy is such that, to me, it ultimately does not matter whether NTE does or does not happen in 50 years or 150 years. It isn't how we die that defines us as much as how we live. Death is a certainty for every individual man and higher animal. We gave up on immortality when we quit reproducing by mitosis. I try to live consciously, but I also try to live now...because the now is all that we ever really have.

I see it exactly the same way Eddie.  Which is good, means I'm ahead of the curve since you're 20 years my senior ;D

Seriously, "now is all that we ever really have," is about as true as truth gets.  I know the present moment got all Sheilaistic thanks to Opera with Eckart Tolle's The Power of Now, but that doesn't detract from it's truth.  I read that book in 2002, just after getting out of the Navy, and it resonated with me and gave me many epiphanies.  I've learned the difference between living in the present moment wisely, or recklessly, is the wise man knows that the future probably will happen, and that the past has shit to teach us; whearas the fool pays no attention to the past or future.  You have to live in the present but pay attention to the past and plan for the future.  Just living in the present by itself is destined for tragedy.  At least IMO. 

I only bring it up because I think it's an important part of living presently that gets neglected by those who discover the power of now.  It was very powerful for me to experience reality presently for the first time.  Talk about setting a load of bricks down that I was voluntarily, yet unconsciously, carrying around with me everywhere I went. 

I'm also leaning towards the idea that this NTE phenomenon is more destructive and pointless than it is anything else.  Same as this feminism bullshit.  They both came out of the AOL conference and I'm not sure either of them are doing any good whatsoever.  In fact, I smell a stink associated with both of them.  Almost like those tactics TPTB use to destroy a movement from within before it gets any real traction.  Coopting a movement and whatnot.  Or maybe it's just the product of egos gone savage. 

 

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