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Offline agelbert

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Re: Edward Snowden: American Patriot
« Reply #30 on: June 24, 2013, 12:36:48 PM »
I continue to believe ES is a LIMITED HANG OUT to take the American public's mind off of protesting the shedding of American blood in a war in Syria (see my earlier post on him in this thread for details. :evil4:).

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Offline luciddreams

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Re: Edward Snowden: American Patriot
« Reply #31 on: June 24, 2013, 12:41:37 PM »
So which is it?  You think ES is for real because all the Pols are out to discredit him; or you think he is a fake because he is getting so much airplay in the MSM?

I'm not sure about this myself, but I don't THINK he's a fake. I HOPE he's a sign of the Millenial generation giving the status quo and TPTB the finger. Because their generation SHOULD respond that way, and I WANT them to respond that way.

Well that's pretty much how I responded when I told the Navy to go fuck itself.  I wasn't going to partake in an unjust war.  I wasn't going to kill innocent people over an enemy that my government literally created and trained.  I just smelled false flag from the bowels of that carrier...I sensed it. 

Anyways, IMO, whether Snowden is real or not, what you can believe is that MSM is spinning it to suit the Corporatocracy's agenda.  No matter what they'll attempt to use Snowden to suit their ends from here on out. 

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Re: Edward Snowden: American Patriot
« Reply #32 on: June 24, 2013, 02:04:16 PM »
I continue to believe ES is a LIMITED HANG OUT to take the American public's mind off of protesting the shedding of American blood in a war in Syria (see my earlier post on him in this thread for details. :evil4:).

I read that post with interest, by the way. It has stayed with me for days.

Am pretty convinced that Syria is the point of the entire exercise, so I agree with the point you made a couple days ago.

Also get the "limited hang-out" concept. Still not sure whether ES represents that limited hang-out, or is being played by the CIA, or is what/who he says he is.

Have already observed here, and will say it again, that he has attracted a very impressive list of enemies in his short stay in the sunlight. And if you're keeping score at home, you can develop a self-identified list of traitors against the American Constitution...
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: Edward Snowden: American Patriot
« Reply #33 on: June 24, 2013, 03:25:43 PM »
The main thing is, Whistleblowers are irrelevant now, no matter what it is they reveal.  ES could have had documentation that Obama was taking money from Mexican Drug Cartels and people would just shrug.  Nobody except the whistleblower ever gets prosecuted for anything.  We don't have a "Justice Dept", we have an INJUSTICE Dept.

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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: Edward Snowden: American Patriot
« Reply #34 on: June 24, 2013, 03:36:50 PM »
The main thing is, Whistleblowers are irrelevant now, no matter what it is they reveal.  ES could have had documentation that Obama was taking money from Mexican Drug Cartels and people would just shrug.  Nobody except the whistleblower ever gets prosecuted for anything.  We don't have a "Justice Dept", we have an INJUSTICE Dept.

RE

Sad and very sick, but true.  The Whistle Blower is scurrying around the world looking for Sanctuary from persecution and prosecution. The LICE that he outed are the ones in pursuit screaming "Off With The Traitors Head."

IT'S A FRIGGIN MADHOUSE!!!

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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: Edward Snowden: Snowden Gives Countries a chance to Thumb Nose at US
« Reply #35 on: June 24, 2013, 04:04:59 PM »
 
 Edward Snowden gives countries a chance to thumb nose at US


The US has long emphasized the importance it gives to the human rights of the citizens of the nations it is dealing with. Now, countries aiding Edward Snowden as he tries to evade US justice can turn the tables on the US.

The carefully planned journey of Edward Snowden from Hong Kong to Russia – then to Cuba possibly, before ending up in Ecuador to seek political asylum? – underscores just how many countries, big and small, are happy to have an occasion to stick it in the eye of the United States.

The US and the Obama administration in particular are quick to emphasize the importance they give to the human rights of the citizens of the countries they are dealing with. Needless to say, however, those countries don’t always take well to American lesson-giving.

With the case of Mr. Snowden – a former National Security Agency contractor who leaked details of top-secret American and British surveillance programs and who is now sought by the US on espionage charges – those countries have a chance to turn the tables on the US.

In a conference call with reporters Monday, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange said, “I simply do not see the irony” – that countries whose human rights records are deeply questioned by international rights groups, as well as by the US, seem to be the ones most willing to aid Snowden in his flight from US justice.

China is accused of broadly limiting personal freedoms and targeting dissidents, Russia received an international black eye last year for the high-profile prosecution of members of the Pussy Riot feminist punk-rock group, and Ecuador is under fire from rights groups for a succession of laws limiting personal freedoms – including one this month that prohibits news organizations from publishing classified or confidential government documents.

As Secretary of State John Kerry quipped as he was questioned Monday about the countries on Snowden’s seeming itinerary, "I wonder if Snowden chose Russia or China for assistance because they are such bastions of Internet freedom.”

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But those countries’ human rights records are “another matter,” according to Mr. Assange, the noted leaker of sensitive US diplomatic cables who has himself been living at the Ecuadorean Embassy in London for more than a year to avoid extradition to Sweden.

Assange did say that “no one is suggesting that Ecuador is engaging in the kinds of abuses the US” is committing on a large scale internationally – which he said range from the Obama administration’s program to “hack and spy on everyone across the entire world” to President Obama’s “assassination program in other countries.”

The US is “trying to bully Russia and other states” into turning over a legitimate asylum seeker, Assange said, adding, “No self-respecting country would submit to ... the bullying by the US in this matter.”

Assange said Snowden is en route to Ecuador, where he expects to apply for asylum, but he declined to offer any details of Snowden’s route, other than what was already known Monday morning – that Snowden on Sunday had flown from Hong Kong to Moscow, where he was said to have remained in the airport’s transit areas.

Snowden had been expected to take a Moscow-to-Havana flight Monday, but he was not on the plane when it departed, according to numerous reports.

Snowden is still expected to make his way from Moscow to Quito, Ecuador, via Cuba and Venezuela, according to other sources – two other countries with antagonistic relations with the US that in the past have jumped at the chance to make problems for Washington.

Perhaps more surprising was Russia and China’s willingness, as some US officials saw it, to cooperate with Snowden’s efforts to evade US justice.

Speaking on CBS’s “Face the Nation” Sunday, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D) California, chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said that mainland China “clearly had a role” in the Hong Kong authorities’ decision to allow Snowden to leave. “I don’t think this was just Hong Kong without Chinese acquiescence,” she said.

US officials insisted Monday that the US had done everything required under international law for foreign authorities to honor the US request for Snowden’s arrest.

White House spokesman Jay Carney on Monday rejected the claims of Hong Kong authorities that the US extradition request for Snowden was incomplete. Instead, he said, authorities of the semiautonomous Chinese territory made “a deliberate choice ... to release a fugitive despite a valid arrest warrant.”

Many international legal experts note that political and diplomatic considerations almost always weigh in deliberations on extradition requests and foreign arrest requests.

And how countries treat such requests also has political and diplomatic ramifications, as Secretary Kerry noted in his remarks Monday.

Speaking at a press conference in New Delhi with India’s foreign minister, Kerry said “there would be, without any question, some effect and impact on the relationship [with China or Russia] and consequences” if either or both countries are found to have aided Snowden in evading US authorities.

The US remained in dialogue with Russian officials about Snowden on Monday, Kerry said.

Mr. Carney was more blunt, saying the decision to allow Snowden to depart Hong Kong “unquestionably has a negative impact on the US-China relationship.” He said, “The Chinese have emphasized the importance of building mutual trust,” adding, “We think that they have dealt that effort a serious setback.”

Concerning Russia, Carney noted the “intensified cooperation with Russia after the Boston Marathon bombings and our history of working with Russia on law enforcement matters, including returning numerous high-level criminals back to Russia at the request of the Russian government.” Given that recent cooperation, he said, “We do expect the Russian government to look at all the options available to [it] to expel Mr. Snowden back to the United States.”

In comments made after Carney spoke with journalists, Mr. Obama said Monday that the US is "following all the appropriate legal channels" to bring Snowden back to the US from Russia. US officials, he said, are working with a list of other unspecified countries to press for international application of "the rule of law" in the Snowden case.

Snowden took an Aeroflot flight from Hong Kong to Moscow – something international experts say is quite unlikely to have occurred without the knowledge of Russian authorities.

Russian officials including President Vladimir Putin had been evasive when questioned recently about what Russia would do if Snowden sought transit through or even refuge in Russia.

But Russian officials – including Mr. Putin, who has come under growing criticism for perceived authoritarian tendencies from various US and international sources – may have sensed a certain satisfaction in an occasion to tweak the US for what organizations like WikiLeaks consider the persecution of a heroic whistle-blower.

And then there is China.

Chinese leaders were not thrilled last year when then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton took the side of Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng during a visit to Beijing. The US believes "that all governments have to answer our citizens' aspirations for dignity and the rule of law and that no nation can or should deny those rights," Ms. Clinton told her Chinese counterparts.

Mr. Chen was later allowed to leave China for study in the US.

Now might it be that China, and the other countries apparently ready to step up and assist Snowden, are seizing the opportunity for a satisfying tit for tat?

http://rss.csmonitor.com/~r/feeds/csm/~3/85camt3ghWg/Edward-Snowden-gives-countries-a-chance-to-thumb-nose-at-US  :icon_study:




Offline luciddreams

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Re: Edward Snowden: American Patriot
« Reply #36 on: June 24, 2013, 08:57:51 PM »
I'll tell you another thing that's got my goat about this ES mess. 

His name.

Edward Snowden sounds a lot like Tyler Durden. 

Kinda creepy actually...IMO. 

Edward Snowden
Edward Snowden

 :laugh:

Whatever...the whole thing smells like shit to me.  Big Brother has been a reality for some time now.  9/11 anybody?  I knew it then, at the mouth of the straight of Hormuz, on the USS Carl Vinson, on 9/11...I felt my soul change course that day, and I was trapped at sea, on a metal vessel of war.  The most vicious machined spear man has made. 

America is just starting to realize this shit.  And Tyler Durden...I mean Edward Snowden...is just a new tactic.  John's right...IMO...they are testing their boundaries...like a tired 2 year old. 

Offline agelbert

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Lucid said
« Reply #37 on: June 24, 2013, 09:08:33 PM »
Quote
I'll tell you another thing that's got my goat about this ES mess. 

His name.


ME TOO! But my discomfort is somewhat different than yours. I would just HATE to think that somebody PLANNED to have someone with "SNOW" in their surname do a LIMITED HANG OUT just so the spooks could have a private joke about the great SNOW JOB they did on us.

   
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Offline WHD

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Re: Lucid said
« Reply #38 on: June 25, 2013, 09:49:13 AM »
Quote
I'll tell you another thing that's got my goat about this ES mess. 

His name.


ME TOO! But my discomfort is somewhat different than yours. I would just HATE to think that somebody PLANNED to have someone with "SNOW" in their surname do a LIMITED HANG OUT just so the spooks could have a private joke about the great SNOW JOB they did on us.

   

Why would TPTB need to pull a snow job, to reveal that something like 70% of Americans are perfectly fine with a fascist, totalitarian surveillance state, so long as they are enabled to continue shopping (consuming)?

Perhaps this is this young man's destiny, that he was born with that name because one day he would come to feel snowed-in by the fascist state that had so nurtured and rewarded him and his gifts? Someone actually stands up as an American, in the spirit of what an American was supposed to be, only to find that he has little to no support from Americans, who are the new fascist totalitarians, apparently.

I think the initial uproar, the roar of indignation, either for or against, in the immediate aftermath of what he revealed, and the subsequent 100% uniting of the major media, reporting only what the government says about the "traitor", is most instructive. I think he surprised them, they shook, and then circled the wagons; emboldened now that they realize, they have a blank check to do WHATEVER they want in the name of maintaining security. At this point it is clear, whatever abuses that arise from this surveillance infrastructure, no matter what, Americans on the whole will shrug their shoulders and continue to shop. Which if you are a fascist, might as well now let it be known what you are doing, in regular installments, put on display periodically, your hideous institutional injustices, to further demoralize the few who actually care about the earth and its people, to further cement the cynicism of the majority consumer. Machiavell could not be more proud.

   



 

Offline agelbert

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WHD said
« Reply #39 on: June 25, 2013, 10:20:48 AM »
I hope you are right.

But here's a couple of aspects of media behavior that don't conform to your logical thought train:

1) The fact that the media has moved in lock step in regard to ES implies an organized response. Organized responses are not logical when a large fascist organism like the media is surprised. When they are surprised, they BURY a story, they DON'T parade it.

2) The information he is leaking, regardless of the propensity for the average dumbed down American to shrug his/her shoulders, is not new. Consequently, the media "outrage" at ES's "treason" seems rather contrived.

And as far as American awareness of fascist behavior being put on display, from Common Dreams to AlterNet to the Doomstead Diner to Truthout  to Counterpunch and hundreds of others for about 10 years, not counting our site, the Empire's neocon fascist boot has been on full display for anyone with internet access to view in all its cruel, calloused and Machiavellian puss filled "splendor".

Keep your eye on Syria. The empire needs that war to justify further scare tactics to get us to spend MORE money we don't have for war and the fascist American M&S lock down state. If the goons don't get their war, all their spending "justifications" are TOAST and social programs and spending for renewables and infrastructure cannot be thwarted with the "starve the beast" NEOCON MO by bought and paid for politicians on both sides of the isle.

Just sayin'. 8)




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Online Surly1

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Re: WHD said
« Reply #40 on: June 25, 2013, 02:36:42 PM »
I hope you are right.

But here's a couple of aspects of media behavior that don't conform to your logical thought train:

1) The fact that the media has moved in lock step in regard to ES implies an organized response. Organized responses are not logical when a large fascist organism like the media is surprised. When they are surprised, they BURY a story, they DON'T parade it.

2) The information he is leaking, regardless of the propensity for the average dumbed down American to shrug his/her shoulders, is not new. Consequently, the media "outrage" at ES's "treason" seems rather contrived.

And as far as American awareness of fascist behavior being put on display, from Common Dreams to AlterNet to the Doomstead Diner to Truthout  to Counterpunch and hundreds of others for about 10 years, not counting our site, the Empire's neocon fascist boot has been on full display for anyone with internet access to view in all its cruel, calloused and Machiavellian puss filled "splendor".

Keep your eye on Syria. The empire needs that war to justify further scare tactics to get us to spend MORE money we don't have for war and the fascist American M&S lock down state. If the goons don't get their war, all their spending "justifications" are TOAST and social programs and spending for renewables and infrastructure cannot be thwarted with the "starve the beast" NEOCON MO by bought and paid for politicians on both sides of the isle.

Just sayin'. 8)

Tend to agree that it is about Syria, and specifically for military contractors getting their richly deserved payday in American blood and treasure. Thus are we arming Al Qaeda in Syria.

In re Snowden, another view from Jon Rappoport:

Ed Snowden, NSA, and fairy tales a child could see through
 
By Jon Rappoport
June 25, 2013
www.nomorefakenews.com
 
Sometimes cognitive dissonance, which used to be called contradiction, rings a gong so loud it knocks you off your chair.
 
But if you're an android in this marvelous world of synthetic reality, you get up, put a smile back on your face, and trudge on...
 
Let's see. NSA is the most awesome spying agency ever devised in this world. If you cross the street in Podunk, Anywhere, USA, to buy an ice cream soda, on a Tuesday afternoon in July, they know.
 
They know if you sit at the counter and drink that soda or take it and move to the only table in the store. They know if you lick the foam from the top of the glass with your tongue or pick the foam with your straw and then lick it.
 
They know if you keep the receipt for the soda or leave it on the counter.
 
They know whether you're wearing shoes or sneakers. They know the brand of your underwear. They know your shaving cream, and precisely which container it came out of.
 
But this agency, with all its vast power and its dollars...
 
Can't track one of its own, a man who came to work every day, a man who made up a story about needing treatment in Hong Kong for epilepsy and then skipped the country.
 
Just can't find him.
 
Can't find him in Hong Kong, where he does a sit-down video interview with Glenn Greenwald of The Guardian. Can't find that "safe house" or that "hotel" where he's staying.
 
No. Can't find him or spy on his communications while he's in Hong Kong. Can't figure out he's booked a flight to Russia. Can't intercept him at the airport before he leaves for Russia . Too difficult.
 
And this man, this employee, is walking around with four laptops that contain the keys to all the secret spying knowledge in the known cosmos.
 
Can't locate those laptops. Can't hack into them to see what's there. Can't access the laptops or the data. The most brilliant technical minds of this or any other generation can find a computer in Outer Mongolia in the middle of a blizzard, but these walking-around computers in Hong Kong are somehow beyond reach.
 
And before this man, Snowden, this employee, skipped Hawaii, he was able to access the layout of the entire US intelligence network. Yes. He was able to use a thumb drive.
 
He walked into work with a thumb drive, plugged in, and stole...everything. He stole enough to "take down the entire US intelligence network in a single afternoon."
 
Not only that, but anyone who worked at this super-agency as an analyst, as a systems-analyst supervisor, could have done the same thing. Could have stolen the keys to the kingdom.
 
This is why NSA geniuses with IQs over 180 have decided, now, in the midst of the Snowden affair, that they need to draft "tighter rules and procedures" for their employees. Right.
 
Now, a few pieces of internal of security they hadn't realized they needed before will be put in place.
 
This is, let me remind you, the most secretive spying agency in the world. The richest spying agency. The smartest spying agency.
 
But somehow, over the years, they'd overlooked this corner of their own security. They'd left a door open, so that any one of their own analysts could steal everything.
 
Could take it all. Could just snatch it away and copy it and store it on a few laptops.
 
But now, yes now, having been made aware of this vulnerability, the agency will make corrections.
 
Sure.
 
And reporters for elite US media don't find any of this hard to swallow.
 
A smart sixth-grader could see through this tower of fabricated baloney in a minute, but veteran grizzled reporters are clueless.
 
Last night, on Charley Rose, in an episode that left me breathless, a gaggle of pundits/newspeople warned that Ed Snowden, walking around with those four laptops, could be an easy target for Chinese spies or Russian spies who could get access to the data on those computers. The spies could just hack in.
 
But the NSA can't. No. The NSA can't find out what Snowden has. They can only speculate.
 
It's charades within charades.
 
This whole Snowden affair is an op. It's the kind of op that works because people are prepared to believe anything.
 
The tightest and strongest and richest and smartest spying agency in the world can't find its own employee. It's in the business of tracking, and it can't find him.
 
It's in the business of security, and it can't protect its own data from its employees.
 
If you believe that, I have timeshares to sell in the black hole in the center of the Milky Way.
 
In previous articles, I've made a case for Snowden being a CIA operative who still works for his former employer. He was handed a bunch of NSA data by the CIA. He didn't steal anything. The CIA wants to punch a hole in the NSA. It's called an internal turf war. It's been going on as long as those agencies have existed side by side.
 
For example....the money.
 
Wired Magazine, June 2013 issue. James Bamford, author of three books on the NSA, states:
 
"In April, as part of its 2014 budget request, the Pentagon [which rules the NSA] asked Congress for $4.7 billion for increased 'cyberspace operations,' nearly $1 billion more than the 2013 allocation. At the same time, budgets for the CIA and other intelligence agencies were cut by almost the same amount, $4.4 billion. A portion of the money going to...[NSA] will be used to create 13 cyberattack teams."
 
That means spying money. Far more for NSA, far less for CIA.
 
Turf war.
 
But in this article, let's stay focused on the fairy tales, which are the cover stories floated to the press, the public, the politicians.
 
We have reporters at the Washington Post and at The Guardian. We have Julian Assange, the head of Wikileaks. They're all talking to Snowden. The NSA can spy on them. Right? Can listen to their calls and read their emails and hack into their notes. Just like people have been hacking into the work and home computers of Sharyl Attkisson, star CBS investigative reporter.
 
But the NSA can't do all this spying and then use it to find Snowden. Just can't manage it.
 
So...everybody in the world with a computer has passwords. The NSA can cut through them like a sword through hot butter. But Assange and the Post and Guardian and Snowden must have super-special passwords.
 
They got these passwords by sending a stamped self-addressed envelope, along with 25 cents, and a top from a cereal box, to The Lone Ranger. These passwords are charged with atomic clouds that obscure men's minds so they cannot see or spy. They're immortal and invulnerable.
 
The NSA can spy on anyone else in the world, but they can't get their foot in the door, when it comes to the Post, The Guardian, and Assange.
 
And if Snowden winds up in Ecuador, that too will become an insurmountable mystery.
 
"Nope, we don't know where he is. He's vanished. Ecuador has a Romulan shield surrounding it. The cloaking technology is too advanced."
 
Perhaps you recall that, in the early days of this scandal, Snowden claimed he could spy on anyone in the US, including a federal judge or even the president, if he had their email addresses.
 
Uh-huh. But the combined talents of the NSA, now, can't spy on Snowden. I guess they just can't find his email address.
 
Snowden isn't the only savvy computer kid in the country. There must be a million people, at minimum, who can cook up email addresses that evade the reach of the NSA. Yes?
 
What we have here are contradictions piled on contradictions piled on lies.
 
And in the midst of this, a whole lot of people are saying, "Don't look too closely. Snowden is a hero and he exposed the NSA and that's a wonderful thing."
 
And a whole lot of other people are saying, "Snowden is a traitor and he should be tried for treason or killed overseas. That's all you need to know."
 
The truth? Well, the truth, as they say, is the first casualty in war. But in the spying business, the truth was never there to begin with. That's one of the requirements of the industry.
 
"Son, if you think you've lied before, you haven't got a clue. We're going to tell you to do things that'll make your head spin. That's the game we're in. We're going to make you tell lies in your sleep."
 
And these are the people the public believes.
 
It's a beautiful thing. It really is. The fairy tales are made of sugar and the public, the press, and the people eat them. And then they ask for more.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Online RE

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Spy vs. Spy
« Reply #41 on: June 25, 2013, 03:30:38 PM »
Quote
So...everybody in the world with a computer has passwords. The NSA can cut through them like a sword through hot butter. But Assange and the Post and Guardian and Snowden must have super-special passwords.

They likely would be using 256 bit Encryption, and no the NSA can't crack it.  Basically, it would take all the supercomputers in the world until the Sun goes Red Giant to break 256 bit encryption.

Also, I don't think it is that the NSA can't find ES, its that kidnapping would step on the Sovereignty toes of Hong Kong Illuminati, and certainly Putin would not be OK with NSA Goons snatching ES out from under him in Moscow.  That would be a major slap in the face to the former head of the KGB.

However, it is unlikely that ES is doing this on his own, he couldn't have had the contacts in Hong Kong to make it over there without some help.

It is Spy vs. Spy, and one faction of the Illuminati is butting up against another faction.  Cracks in the wall forming.


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Offline agelbert

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Re: Edward Snowden: American Patriot
« Reply #42 on: June 25, 2013, 09:10:57 PM »
Quote
It's in the business of security, and it can't protect its own data from its employees.
 
If you believe that, I have timeshares to sell in the black hole in the center of the Milky Way.
 

timeshares to sell in the black hole in the center of the Milky Way! That's a KEEPER!
Surly, FOR MAKING MY DAY!  :emthup: :icon_mrgreen:
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Offline Eddie

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Woz Speaks Out on Snowden
« Reply #43 on: June 26, 2013, 01:01:35 PM »
Some clear CFS from the other Steve.


Steve Wozniak: Snowden ‘Is a Hero Because This Came From His Heart’
by Lloyd Grove Jun 26, 2013 4:45 AM EDT
The Apple cofounder tells Lloyd Grove why he supports the NSA leaker, how the agency hasn’t ‘done one thing valuable for us’—and why the Internet wasn’t supposed to be this way.

   Computer whiz Steve Wozniak is more than a little distressed that the technology he helped develop nearly four decades ago is being used on a massive scale to invade people’s privacy.

He’s especially troubled by the secret intrusions into the private emails of American citizens by the National Security Agency—secret, that is, until the recent detailed revelations of the NSA’s Prism program of electronic surveillance by a 29-year-old NSA contractor-turned-fugitive named Edward Snowden.

“I think he’s a hero,” said the 62-year-old Wozniak, who co-founded Apple Computer with Steve Jobs and invented the Apple I and Apple II personal computers that launched a technological revolution. “He’s a hero to my beliefs about how the Constitution should work. I don’t think the NSA has done one thing valuable for us, in this whole ‘Prism’ regard, that couldn’t have been done by following the Constitution and doing it the old way.”

Sitting down with me on Tuesday at the Ford Motor Co. campus in Dearborn, Mich., during the “Go Further With Ford” 2013 Trend Conference, Wozniak added: “I don’t think terrorism is war. I think terrorism is a crime. And by using the word ‘war’ we’ve managed to use all these weird ways to say the Constitution doesn’t apply in the case of a war. And I think Edward Snowden is a hero because this came from his heart. And I really believe he was giving up his whole life because he just felt so deeply about honesty, about spying on Americans, and he wanted to tell us.”

Snowden, a former CIA employee who faces felony charges of espionage and theft of government property after admitting he leaked classified material to Glenn Greenwald of Britain’s The Guardian, was reportedly trying to evade extradition and waiting in the transit area of Moscow’s Sheremetyevo Airport for political asylum from Ecuador or some other sympathetic country. Russian President Vladimir Putin, a former KGB official, acknowledged Snowden’s presence in Moscow on Tuesday but vowed not to extradite him to the United States.

While Wozniak conceded that the NSA has a legitimate mission “to be looking out for our security, there were restrictions [on clandestine surveillance] that were very good,” he told me. “The way I was brought up, the Fourth Amendment of the Constitution means you have to have two people testify that this person is likely doing something very wrong just to get a warrant and a court order from a normal court.”

Referring to the secret proceedings of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which reportedly granted comprehensive warrants for the NSA’s Prism activities, “Why do you set up a little private court? That’s like saying, ‘I need a warrant and I’m going to give one to myself.’ What it leads to is judge, jury, and executioner. It’s the same thing as lynch mobs.”

When Wozniak and Jobs started Apple Computer in 1976, the Internet was in its infancy, unknown to the general public and not a factor in everyday life. But today the World Wide Web presents a serious threat to personal privacy, Wozniak said.

“Every time you set up an account, just because you want to purchase something, you have to click ‘OK’ and ‘I agree to this,’ ” Wozniak said. “Who has the time to read all the legalese terms and who has the ability to understand them? All I know, from a life of having been involved in a lot of contracts, is when the other side breaks the contract and you have no say, it’s all written totally in their favor and you’ve given away everything.”


When Wozniak built the first Apple computers, “they were totally local, and they were totally different from all these shared network machines,” he said. “Now we’re all on the Internet. The funny thing is, you had to mail a letter in an envelope and you had legal guarantees, except in the case of court orders and warrants, that it couldn’t be opened on the way there. It was sealed. And now we don’t have any guarantee about email anymore.

“When the Internet first came, I thought it was just the beacon of freedom. People could communicate with anyone, anywhere, and nobody could stop it…Now it turns out that every single thing we send as email counts as publicly viewable and it’s totally open and exposed, and can be taken for whatever reason. That wasn’t supposed to be. That wasn’t where we thought the Internet was going to go. We thought it was going to elevate the really average people over huge, big, controlling governments and protect us from tyrants.”

Instead, “it allows the tyrants to get tighter control over more and more of our lives,” Wozniak lamented.

He suggested the two top technology companies, Microsoft and Apple, missed an opportunity by not incorporating PGP (for “pretty good privacy) Encryption software into their products. “If two companies, Microsoft and Apple, and built in PGP Encryption,” Wozniak said, “every email would have been encrypted and uncrackable.”
« Last Edit: June 26, 2013, 01:49:34 PM by Eddie »
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Is Snowden in Iceland Already?
« Reply #44 on: June 29, 2013, 10:40:58 AM »
Tracking Edward Snowden: Chartered Russian Jet lands in Reykjavík, Iceland

By 21st Century Wire
Global Research, June 27, 2013
21st Century Wire
Theme: Intelligence

REYKJAVIK, Iceland – Yesterday evening June 26th, at approximately 3:00am Iceland time, an in-bound Russian Sukhoi Super Jet 100-95 chartered flight landed at Keflavik International Airport, after being held in a holding pattern for approximately 45 minutes while circling the airport.

Maybe it was just a “wind test”? We contacted local Iceland media who are claiming that aviation authorities are saying it was some sort of a test.

Or was this a privately chartered jet carrying a controversial and unannounced cargo, and waiting for clearance to land?

Interesting, so let’s take a look…



1-Snowden-in-Iceland
PHOTO: Our man in Iceland took this photo just after 3am last night when this Russian chartered flight landed Keflavik International.

21st Century Wire’s Man in Iceland tracked this flight on FlightRadar24.com last night, and followed-up by documenting the plane itself (above) after landing just after 3:00am Reykjavík local time early this morning. He explained:

“There’s an old military base with hangers there next to Keflavik International Airport, and the Russian plane was hiding there between two hangers. The tail number 97005 matches the flight I tracked coming in”.

“With all the other in-coming flights on FlightRadar24 you could click on the flight and it would reveal the origin of the flight – all except this one. It appeared to be removed, so some of this flight’s data was not being transmitted as with the others – maybe this is because it was a test flight? That’s still a possibility at this point”.

“I went to the arrivals terminal after this flight landed and did not see anyone coming through.”

Based on the information we have so far, this does not appear to be regularly schedule commercial flight, and the flight’s point of origin was concealed on tracking system Flight Radar24.

Is Snowden in Iceland already?

Speculation is still rife in the global media as to where Snowden is heading. The possibility that he will be camping out within the confines of the international transit compartment of the Moscow’s Sheremetyevo International Airport for weeks, or months, without either being processed as an asylum seeker in Russia, or moved on to a friendly foreign destination - seems highly unlikely.

Add to this the fact that mainstream media crews with blank checkbooks have swarmed Moscow’s Airport this week and still have NO confirmation of a visual ID in Moscow either. Yesterday, the Telegraph confirmed this:

“The Daily Telegraph and other media scoured Sheremetyevo’s three southern terminals on Wednesday but airport staff, receptionists at a capsule hotel, policemen, Russian consular officials and passengers all claimed they had not seen the American.”

So no press have actually seen Ed Snowden in Moscow. It seems that this high-profile whistleblower’s public status is still being managed by Icelandic based organisation Wikileaks. It appears that Wikileaks is acting as a media liason of sort, giving press updates on Snowden alleged status in Moscow:

“It seemed likely the whistleblower was in a closed area of the airport and WikiLeaks, the organisation that has been supporting Mr Snowden, said he was safe and well.”

Could Wikileaks be running the PR smoke and mirrors cover for their cyber-hero Snowden, a potentially asset and golden goose for the organisation? Could all of the press flares be misdirection by Wikileaks in order to conceal his flight to Iceland?

Wikileaks have already let slip in public late last week on June 20th that chartered private jets were paid for and ready on standby to transport Snowden to Iceland. Then, only two days ago, Wikileaks appears to have thrown a screen over their private chartered jets claim as their spokesman Olafur Sigurvinsson did a U-turn by announcing that the jets ‘have been canceled:

“The three planes that were on standby in Hong Kong have been cancelled. There is nothing happening there. They were cancelled this morning,” Olafur Sigurvinsson, former chief operating officer at WikiLeaks partner firm DataCell, told AFP.”

There was also the loud media announcement that Snowden requested asylum status from the Ecuador government led by President Rafael Correa – which could very well be a distraction, this supported by the fact that Ecuador’s foreign minister announced yesterday it could take months to decide on Snowden’s asylum case, leaving him in limbo effectively, stuck in a Russian transit wing with an annulled and invalid US Passport.

21st Century Wire already indicated two days ago that Snowden’s Plan A has always been Iceland, so it’s possible that this mystery jet which has landed in Reykjavík early this morning, might have well have been ferrying the NSA whistleblower extraordinaire to his new Wiki-bunker in Iceland.



Snowden-Iceland-tail-number
Above is a zoomed-in photo of the Sukhoi Super Jet, tail number 97005, on the tarmac this morning in Iceland, which matches the Flight Radar data in the screen shot below.

Below is the flight record of this Russian aircraft which arrived last night:
Moscow to Reykjavík_chartered flight

Still no reports from our man on the ground in Iceland about any visual ID on Ed Snowden himself, but we will keep looking.

But then again, still no visual ID of him in Moscow either. The world will wait and see where he turns up next.
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