AuthorTopic: Meanwhile back at the 'stead  (Read 257382 times)

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #765 on: January 01, 2017, 09:07:03 AM »
I spent the last two afternoons getting all the braces properly tensioned with wire, and now I'm ready to hang the first strand on my fence.

This video shows a fairly close facsimile to my technique, as performed by some good ole boy rancher somewhere. I don't use the N brace, but I use two crossed tensioners on the H brace, so that the completed brace looks like an X superimposed over the H. The corners have two H braces built together, sharing one post on the corner.

I use the same posts this guy uses. You can see why a tractor comes in handy. I don't use that special smooth wire to build my braces. Only horse people know that stuff even exists. I use regular barbed wire for my wraps.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/P0e0-kapFB4&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/P0e0-kapFB4&fs=1</a>

My fence is taller, about six feet. I'm hoping that with an additional elevated electric wire on top, it will keep out deer. Also good for keeping trespassers out. Most people won't mess with a fence that might shock them. Obviously, it isn't that hard to breach, but it keeps out what I think of as casual trespassers. Good fences make good neighbors.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #766 on: January 01, 2017, 09:17:26 AM »

My fence is taller, about six feet. I'm hoping that with an additional elevated electric wire on top, it will keep out deer. Also good for keeping trespassers out. Most people won't mess with a fence that might shock them. Obviously, it isn't that hard to breach, but it keeps out what I think of as casual trespassers. Good fences make good neighbors.

Why can't you jut snip the electrified wire with some wire cutters with a rubberized handle? ???  :icon_scratch:
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Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #767 on: January 01, 2017, 09:48:28 AM »
Why can't you jut snip the electrified wire with some wire cutters with a rubberized handle? ???  :icon_scratch:

You can, but that's a crime in and of itself, and a felony if it's associated with subsequent property crime. An electric fence is a deterrent to casual trespassing, as I said. It won't keep out invading armies.

Hunters are one group I worry about, and hunters might cross a fence if it's easy, but won't if its not. They won't cut a fence and risk prosecution just to get a shot at a deer.


What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #768 on: January 01, 2017, 10:03:58 AM »
As you know I have a road easement through my place, and until this year, none of the road frontage was fenced. In that scenario you have all kinds of trespassers, mostly in or on vehicles, who just go wherever they can, figuring they won't get caught because the owners aren't around.

And since almost all places are fenced here, owning property with no fence makes your place a known party spot for beer drinkers in pick-up trucks on Friday nights, etc. A lovers lane, etc.

Simply having a regular cow/goat fence keeps out the trucks and four wheelers. That accounts for maybe 95% of trespassers right there. A tall fence with wire spaced too close to go through means the usual route of egress would be to climb over...but an electric top wire makes a nice surprise for anybody who tries it. That gets the protection up to 99%.

You aren't going to keep out professional thieves who think you have something valuable to steal and can execute a plan for taking your shit. You just have to make it hard enough so that they prey on an easier target.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #769 on: January 02, 2017, 04:11:00 PM »
I estimated the cost on completing the fence. During this last week, on vacation, I basically used up all the materials I had on hand already, with a few exceptions. To complete the fence from here, looks like $1350 conservatively, and that's not counting the electric wire, which I'll add later. Not that expensive to add, and I won't worry about it until the rest is done.

I have a few more strands of barbed wire to run on the 500 or so feet along the frontage that I almost completed last spring before it got too hot to work, and essentially all the wire, barbed wire and woven wire (hog wire) still has to be run on the new part , which is about another 1200 feet. The entire enclosure will be about 4 acres or so.

Lot of money just to fence 4 acres...but at least I'll have a secure perimeter for the pigs. Then I can get on to the other frontage that still isn't fenced, and the parts between me and my new neighbor, which isn't fenced. He seems like a decent guy. We can probably split the cost on that part, when the time comes.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #770 on: January 02, 2017, 04:33:01 PM »
I'm wondering what your feed costs are going to be if the Piggies procreate up to 15 or so?  ???  :icon_scratch:

Doomsteading is an expensive hobby.

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #771 on: January 02, 2017, 04:38:41 PM »
I'm hoping to source some spent grain from a local craft brewery. I talked to the butcher about it when I took my butchering class, but I haven't followed up like I should have. I have cut the feed bill some since I started feeding hay in addition to the plant based protein products.

I hope to sell most of the offspring, and not get too many mouths to feed. Definitely one or two though, raised for food, next year.

The fences are infrastructure that makes the property more valuable. So there is some potential return someday if I sell out and move on. It's just sticker shock. Everything costs a lot these days.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #772 on: January 02, 2017, 04:49:35 PM »
Everything costs a lot these days.

Maybe, but I am pretty sure I live on less than you spend on your Pigs in a month, and that includes my rent AND Beer bill.  lol.

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #773 on: January 02, 2017, 05:04:27 PM »
There's FIVE of them, and they weigh 200-300 pounds now. Pigs gotta eat.

I have gotten some control on the feed costs, running about $300/month currently, since I gave up on organic feed, and added the hay to their diet. They appear healthy.

I haven't seen any evidence of the girls having their estrous cycle though. I need to get a pig pregnancy test.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #774 on: January 05, 2017, 06:41:59 PM »
If I get off work just a few minutes early, and traffic isn't too bad, I can stop at the pig food store and still make it out to the stead before dark. Barely. Thank goodness the days are getting longer now, although it'll be a while before it's enough to make much difference.

Temps are going to drop back down into the low 20's for the next three nights. High in the mid 30's tomorrow with lots of wind chill. That's fucking cold for this part of Texas in the Twenty-Teens. I left a lot of faucets dripping. The big water tank has been slightly overflowing (probably because the tank needs to be cleaned out), so if the water system fails theres still a big mud hole, which the pigs prefer to drink out of anyway.

Once again, no precip predicted, so the whole world won't come to a stop...but it isn't good for the business. Any excuse not to come to your dental appointment. But better than ice days, which cause all commerce here other than the grocery stores to grind to a halt.

I threw down a lot of new hay, which sent the pigs into paroxysms of happiness. I'm glad I built the Pig Palace. I hope they use it.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #775 on: January 05, 2017, 06:55:23 PM »
They'll make it through to the Other Side of the TX Winter.  Pigs are tough.

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #776 on: January 23, 2017, 10:25:25 AM »



I set up a Coleman Weathermaster 10 camping tent early last summer under the shade of some big pecan trees near the cabin, thinking it might make a nice spot to sleep while I was doing some major repairs on the cabin. Well, I still haven't gotten around to the repairs, but the tent is starting to bite the dust.

Admittedly, the high winds this weekend were a contributing factor, as some stakes were pulled up and guy lines loosened as a result. But the rain fly is ripped on one corner, and the plastic floor of the tent, which connects to the ripstop nylon shell about six inches above ground level, has separated from the nylon, and there is a gaping hole on the same corner.

Life of a Coleman Weathermaster tent set up in central Texas.....about 7 months or so. Might have lasted longer with constant attention to the stakes and guys, but I expect that's probably average for a cheap tent. The sun and wind being the primary elemental forces here. No rain leakage noted.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #777 on: January 23, 2017, 03:28:20 PM »



I set up a Coleman Weathermaster 10 camping tent early last summer under the shade of some big pecan trees near the cabin, thinking it might make a nice spot to sleep while I was doing some major repairs on the cabin. Well, I still haven't gotten around to the repairs, but the tent is starting to bite the dust.

Admittedly, the high winds this weekend were a contributing factor, as some stakes were pulled up and guy lines loosened as a result. But the rain fly is ripped on one corner, and the plastic floor of the tent, which connects to the ripstop nylon shell about six inches above ground level, has separated from the nylon, and there is a gaping hole on the same corner.

Life of a Coleman Weathermaster tent set up in central Texas.....about 7 months or so. Might have lasted longer with constant attention to the stakes and guys, but I expect that's probably average for a cheap tent. The sun and wind being the primary elemental forces here. No rain leakage noted.

Why don't you try a prefab Garden Shed instead?  They're pretty reasonable.  You can get a 6'X9' one as cheap as $500.


Or if you wanna spend a couple of grand, you can get nice log cabin models that would make a nice Tiny Home.


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Offline Palloy2

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #778 on: January 23, 2017, 05:34:11 PM »
I reckon the army knows a thing or two about tents.  None of that useless flimsy nylon crap - give me heavy duty canvas over a heavy duty frame every time.  The only trouble is the weight and the cost.

"The State is a body of armed men."

Offline Farmer McGregor

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #779 on: February 22, 2017, 06:38:20 PM »
I don't use the N brace, but I use two crossed tensioners on the H brace, so that the completed brace looks like an X superimposed over the H. The corners have two H braces built together, sharing one post on the corner.

My fence is taller, about six feet. I'm hoping that with an additional elevated electric wire on top, it will keep out deer. Also good for keeping trespassers out. Most people won't mess with a fence that might shock them. Obviously, it isn't that hard to breach, but it keeps out what I think of as casual trespassers. Good fences make good neighbors.
Hey Eddie, I'm coming kinda late to this party (ran across this while snooping the back rooms of the diner) but I'm curious: how's that hot top wire working out for deer deterrent?  And what kind of deer do you have around there?  The mulies out here in CO jump a six foot fence like it's not there.  And putting a hot lead up high wouldn't effect them unless their hooves touched it in passing, but by then it doesn't matter. As for humans climbing it?  I'd think they'd just squeeze between the strands taking care to avoid the barbs.

I use single or double strands of electric to partition pasture to manage grazing.  Cattle totally respect it, though little ones will sometimes roll under it.  But the damn deer run around at night and they just run right through it.  Breaks wire and insulators etc., leaving the cattle to romp freely.  I don't think the deer are in contact with it long enough to feel the pulse, and even if they do, they're on the move so I would think that the wire itself would hurt them as they snap it.  Seriously heavy wire at that!  The consensus seems to be that electric is pretty much useless on deer.  We hafta have a full eight feet in height to contain them, and the DOW officer tells me they can clear that if the have a clean straight shot and are in a panic.

Quote
Why can't you just snip the electrified wire with some wire cutters with a rubberized handle?
In D. Orlov's book he tells how in Russia, after the collapse and privatization, all the new landowners took to putting up fences to keep out trespassers, but since the people, who were accustomed to taking the shortest possible route since they walk most everywhere they go, took to carrying wire cutters.

Incidentally, I also use the wooden H with tensioned X wire config.
--Greg
For years we have let ourselves believe that as long as we have money we will have food. This is a mistake. The government will bring forth no food by providing hundreds of billions of dollars to the agribusiness industry.  --Wendell Berry after the 2008 crash

 

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