PE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> Meanwhile back at the 'stead

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #810 on: March 16, 2017, 06:36:44 PM »
I have baby Mangalitsas. 

One full litter of 11 born today, and one of the younger girls had a litter of two and a stillborn runt, perhaps on Monday night.

She lost one of the healthy ones somehow. I'm only guessing this is the case, because there was no afterbirth I could find (probably eaten) and because the one she has left is bonded to her for sure, and not the sow who gave birth today. I tried to put it with the new mother thinking it was hers, but no go. I'm not sure she'll be able to raise it, but she was willing to fight me to keep it so I let her.

All the ones born today look fine, and the Mom too.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #811 on: March 16, 2017, 07:19:09 PM »
I have baby Mangalitsas. 

One full litter of 11 born today, and one of the younger girls had a litter of two and a stillborn runt, perhaps on Monday night.

She lost one of the healthy ones somehow. I'm only guessing this is the case, because there was no afterbirth I could find (probably eaten) and because the one she has left is bonded to her for sure, and not the sow who gave birth today. I tried to put it with the new mother thinking it was hers, but no go. I'm not sure she'll be able to raise it, but she was willing to fight me to keep it so I let her.

All the ones born today look fine, and the Mom too.

Cigars all around on the House for the Diners!  :icon_sunny:


At least now you know Mr. Pig's not a limp dick!

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #812 on: March 16, 2017, 07:32:39 PM »
Good to know for sure. But now I'll need a new boar in a year for these new females (if I have to keep any, which I probably will). Pigs live in the fast lane.

Fortunately, I have found a really cool large ranch nearby that has cattle AND pigs and they raise Mangalitsas among a few other breeds . Probably the only real commercial type breeding ranch with Mangalitsas within a thousand miles...and it's maybe 10 miles from the stead. I have not talked to them yet, but they do some kind of intensive grazing thing like Joel Salatin.

So I should be able to get a boar from them, no problem, and he won't be related to my stock. I never ran across them because they use the Hungarian spelling in their ads (Mangalica), so I never saw them when I searched on  CL.

First I need to see if I can keep them alive. I started building the nursery tonight. Water in a chicken feeder inside a small cage with a hole only the babies can get in. They are nursing but I want them to have plenty of clean water.

I need to see how many are males and decide how many to castrate. That needs to be done ASAP, if I'm going to....
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline JRM

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #813 on: March 16, 2017, 07:45:27 PM »
I have baby Mangalitsas. 

One full litter of 11 born today, and one of the younger girls had a litter of two and a stillborn runt, perhaps on Monday night.

She lost one of the healthy ones somehow. I'm only guessing this is the case, because there was no afterbirth I could find (probably eaten) and because the one she has left is bonded to her for sure, and not the sow who gave birth today. I tried to put it with the new mother thinking it was hers, but no go. I'm not sure she'll be able to raise it, but she was willing to fight me to keep it so I let her.

All the ones born today look fine, and the Mom too.

Cigars all around on the House for the Diners!  :icon_sunny:


At least now you know Mr. Pig's not a limp dick!

RE

I'll have the chocolates, instead.

chocolate cigars
chocolate cigars
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Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #814 on: March 16, 2017, 07:48:02 PM »
Good to know for sure. But now I'll need a new boar in a year for these new females (if I have to keep any, which I probably will). Pigs live in the fast lane.

Fortunately, I have found a really cool large ranch nearby that has cattle AND pigs and they raise Mangalitsas among a few other breeds . Probably the only real commercial type breeding ranch with Mangalitsas within a thousand miles...and it's maybe 10 miles from the stead. I have not talked to them yet, but they do some kind of intensive grazing thing like Joel Salatin.

So I should be able to get a boar from them, no problem, and he won't be related to my stock. I never ran across them because they use the Hungarian spelling in their ads (Mangalica), so I never saw them when I searched on  CL.

First I need to see if I can keep them alive. I started building the nursery tonight. Water in a chicken feeder inside a small cage with a hole only the babies can get in. They are nursing but I want them to have plenty of clean water.

I need to see how many are males and decide how many to castrate. That needs to be done ASAP, if I'm going to....

GET PICS & VIDS!

Also write a Blog!

Out of curiousity, what would you do if you could not get a new Boar to keep the genetic diversity up?

Your feed bill looks like it will be getting expensive.  When do you think you can start selling bacon to cover some costs? ???

RE
« Last Edit: March 16, 2017, 07:51:14 PM by RE »
Save As Many As You Can

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #815 on: March 17, 2017, 05:07:28 AM »
Actually, the feed bill has gotten a little better lately, down under $250/month. It'll be a little higher now, but the babies won't eat much right away, and I'm going to have to get the pasture fence finished so I can make the  paddock bigger for more grazing. I hope I don't have to hang on to many of the offspring. Perhaps one or two females.

I'll need to be more present for a while. I might be having more babies any day. I have to assume the other two females will domino any time now.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #816 on: March 17, 2017, 05:21:55 AM »
Actually, the feed bill has gotten a little better lately, down under $250/month. It'll be a little higher now, but the babies won't eat much right away, and I'm going to have to get the pasture fence finished so I can make the  paddock bigger for more grazing. I hope I don't have to hang on to many of the offspring. Perhaps one or two females.

I'll need to be more present for a while. I might be having more babies any day. I have to assume the other two females will domino any time now.

What will you do with the offspring?  Sell them to another Doomsteader?  How much do you think you can get for them?

You also didn't answer the question of what you would do to maintain genetic diversity and avoid inbreeding if you could not get  a new Boar?  How would anyone with an isolated Doomstead do this?

RE
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Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #817 on: March 17, 2017, 05:29:02 AM »
Maintaining genetic diversity would be a big problem, except that post collapse I wouldn't necessarily be trying to raise pure bred stock, so I could cross breed with any pigs out there, and there are millions in the state. With my tiny operation, I'd always need to bring in new boars. It's part of pig farming, generally speaking.

If I couldn't bring in new DNA, I'd just have to settle for sub-par genetics and what goes with that. It wouldn't be the end, just wouldn't be ideal.

The reason I chose the breed I did is because they're a little rare,and I thought they would be possible to sell for a decent price. I'll soon find out.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline knarf

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #818 on: March 17, 2017, 05:29:25 AM »
As you know we raised Heritage hogs for a number of years. It becomes a fast learning curve to learn to deal with all the complexities. Every farm and situation is different, but getting used to the containment, the pasturing, the feedings, the litters, etc...can become quite time consuming. Are you going to butcher your pigs? We started doing it once we took one of our beloved hogs to a butchering shop nearby. They used an electrical prod to get her from the cage in the truck to the shoot and then kept poking her afterwards. That is when we decided to butcher them ourselves.
  We had a butchering tree, where I would use the tractor and ropes to raise the hog up high enough near the tree so we could work. I am really glad we had the experience of raising hogs. They are amazing animals.
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Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #819 on: March 17, 2017, 05:36:02 AM »
The problem with butchering here is temperature. You'd have to do it between Thanksgiving and Christmas and catch a cold spell, or the fat would render before you could get the animals dressed out.

I'd like to raise one or two barrows for meat this next year. Maybe just one, for the practice. No need to overload myself with work at this point.

I hope I can sell most of the babies. I need to get a count of males and females and round up somebody to help me castrate most of the males. I haven't done that surgery, but I watched the video. :)
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #820 on: March 17, 2017, 05:40:15 AM »

The reason I chose the breed I did is because they're a little rare,and I thought they would be possible to sell for a decent price. I'll soon find out.

I would think that you need to fatten them up some to get a good price?  Or do some ranchers buy the babies at a good price to make the breeding profitable?

Just in terms of total economics, if you raised them yourself and then slaughtered them, say you get the pig to 500 lbs.  After the slaughter and all the bones and waste like the brains are fed to the chickens, say you have 300 lbs of good commercial bacon and pork chips diced up from the pig.  Now if you could get $2/lb,, the dead pig is worth $600.  But how much was spent on feed to get the pig to this weight?

Unless you can pretty much feed the pigs for free off what you grow, this doesn't seem like a very profitable bizness to me.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #821 on: March 17, 2017, 05:44:48 AM »
I hope I can sell most of the babies. I need to get a count of males and females and round up somebody to help me castrate most of the males. I haven't done that surgery, but I watched the video. :)

I REALLY want a video of "Amateur Castration 101" learned from YouTube tutorials! lol.

Economics wise, if you don't DIY and hire a vet for the job, I wanna know what the Vet charges for the castrations!

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Save As Many As You Can

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #822 on: March 17, 2017, 05:56:22 AM »
The only way to make any money at all is if people want to buy the pigs to get started with a new breed. You sell the offspring as soon as they're weaned, ideally. If I could get two herds going with different genetics, I could then sell breeding pairs, which would be good.

You can sell barrows (castratos) to people who might want a Mangalitsa for their meat. They're known as the "Kobe beef of pork."

You can't compete on price with commercially farmed pork. No way. Unless you can grow your own feed or get it from the waste stream, which is very possible now, but would take more time and energy on my part to keep going. I'm being very lazy by feeding all pre-fab chow.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #823 on: March 17, 2017, 06:05:43 AM »
The only way to make any money at all is if people want to buy the pigs to get started with a new breed. You sell the offspring as soon as they're weaned, ideally. If I could get two herds going with different genetics, I could then sell breeding pairs, which would be good.

You can sell barrows (castratos) to people who might want a Mangalitsa for their meat. They're known as the "Kobe beef of pork."

You can't compete on price with commercially farmed pork. No way. Unless you can grow your own feed or get it from the waste stream, which is very possible now, but would take more time and energy on my part to keep going. I'm being very lazy by feeding all pre-fab chow.

Buying the prefab chow, how much do you estimate it costs to get a piggie to 500 lbs?

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #824 on: March 17, 2017, 06:25:46 AM »
I got into pigs because I think they're a good choice for a post-collapse doomstead. Fast growing food, fecund females with lots of offspring. Three litters a year if you push it, which I'm not at the moment. 8-12 offspring typically.It doesn't take long to gear up from a skeleton operation to a larger enterprise. That might be important.

If I had several people living with me there would be enough of a waste stream to support a couple of slaughter animals on an ongoing basis. Also, if I didn't have to worry about my HOA, I could run a  whole herd on pasture.

Pigs live in the woods under ideal circumstances and I have tons of pecans...just have to keep the squirrels culled, which I did by accident if you'll recall. I could probably support one breeding pair with no feed bill now, if I rotated the animals more frequently.

I don't try to figure out a break-even number with BAU costs and outlays. It really wouldn't be all that applicable. Everything would be totally different after BAU folds up its tent. I'm interested in building skills and keeping a tiny herd going for the moment.

Buying the prefab chow, how much do you estimate it costs to get a piggie to 500 lbs?


Right now I'm feeding 5 pigs for roughly 250/month. You only want to fatten the ones you slaughter. The rest can stay skinny. At some point you'd want to keep the food pigs sequestered in their own pen or pasture, so you wouldn't be wasting food, which I definitely am now. I can even see the benefit of keeping the bigger sows in their own enclosure, so that they don't eat more than their fair share. That is happening now too.



What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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