AuthorTopic: Meanwhile back at the 'stead  (Read 257740 times)

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #825 on: March 17, 2017, 06:34:31 AM »
So, to answer your question, as best I can, I'd say it is currently costing 50 bucks a month for feed, and it'd take maybe 9 months to get the pigs to slaughter size, which probably isn't 500 pounds. Maybe 300-350. Or less if you're hungry.

The way I'm doing it now it costs maybe $500 to raise a pig...but like I said, that's not representative of any kind of sustainable operation, which, as of now, I know I don't have (and don't have to, fortunately.)
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline JRM

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #826 on: March 17, 2017, 07:26:57 AM »
You can't compete on price with commercially farmed pork. No way. Unless you can grow your own feed or get it from the waste stream, which is very possible now, but would take more time and energy on my part to keep going. I'm being very lazy by feeding all pre-fab chow.

I used to work in restaurants, long ago. My first restaurant job was, naturally, dishwasher.  It was there that I got a first hand look at how much food gets wasted at restaurants.  Surprisingly, at least half!  Lots of people buy a big plate and nibble at it and call it a day. I find this odd, personally, because I ALWAYS eat every possible nibble (unless it's really bad, which is really rare).

I know it takes work to set such a thing up, but I have wondered... can this be fed to pigs?  At least from some restaurants?
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline JRM

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #827 on: March 17, 2017, 07:31:55 AM »
What are you not supposed to give to pigs for food?  Aside from obvious things like broken glass?
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #828 on: March 17, 2017, 07:35:23 AM »
Yes, it could all be fed to pigs. Pigs are omnivores, like humans, not ruminants, so they can eat almost anything. Real pig farmers try to line that kind of thing up.

It's mostly a logistical problem. Can you take ALL the waste or just part of it?  Because obviously the restaurant needs it to all go away, and each and every workday. It doesn't help them for you to show up haphazardly. There has to be a mutually beneficial arrangement.

I watched some utoob vids of a guy who was feeding his pigs waste food from a prison. He had a huge operation, though, so he was carting the slop by the truckload.

I'd like to find a brew pub and get spent grain. That's popular with pig and cattle raisers. Once again,  it requires a commitment. I had a lead and I dropped the ball on it.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline JRM

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #829 on: March 17, 2017, 07:49:11 AM »
I'd like to find a brew pub and get spent grain.

Is the nutrient value of "spent grain" good?  Is there alcohol in it?

....

I bet there are places where restaurant waste is being collected by folks as a business, for the reasons you said, Eddie.  It take coordination and time to do it, but the source is waste -- so "free" apart from time.  The business service would be delivering it to the farmer, I suppose.  Both farmer and intermediary get benefits if it's done right.  Austin must have a mountain of supply for this!
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline knarf

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #830 on: March 17, 2017, 07:53:15 AM »
I hope I can sell most of the babies. I need to get a count of males and females and round up somebody to help me castrate most of the males. I haven't done that surgery, but I watched the video. :)

I REALLY want a video of "Amateur Castration 101" learned from YouTube tutorials! lol.

Economics wise, if you don't DIY and hire a vet for the job, I wanna know what the Vet charges for the castrations!

RE

We castrated our pigs 4 days to two weeks after their birth. 

1. Wash hands good.
2. Someone hold the pig by the hind legs, while sitting in a chair, belly out, with the testicles easy to reach.
3. Use new razor blade, scalpel, or something very sharp.
4. Cut then skin of a testicle about 2/3 right in the middle, so that the outsides have 1/6 of skin on either side.
5. Squeeze the testicle out.
6. Scrap the tube ( I don't know what is called ) slowly and many times ( instead of just cutting it ) until it is free. You try to kind of close the opening.
7. Do the other one.
8. Spray with Blue-Cote.   https://www.horse.com/item/blue-kote-wound-spray/SLT170412/

We had no problems. 

« Last Edit: March 17, 2017, 08:01:15 AM by knarf »
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #831 on: March 17, 2017, 07:56:42 AM »
Spent grains can contain 20-25% protein, but it isn't a complete food. It's missing some essential amino acids like lysine and it doesn't have enough mineral content. There isn't any alcohol in it. It does have carbs. It works out best as maybe 25% of the total intake, with some other feed making up for the missing stuff.

I haven't fed it, but I know a guy with a few longhorns, and the cattle love it and come running when they smell it in his truck.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #832 on: March 17, 2017, 07:57:27 AM »
I hope I can sell most of the babies. I need to get a count of males and females and round up somebody to help me castrate most of the males. I haven't done that surgery, but I watched the video. :)

I REALLY want a video of "Amateur Castration 101" learned from YouTube tutorials! lol.

Economics wise, if you don't DIY and hire a vet for the job, I wanna know what the Vet charges for the castrations!

RE

We castrated our pigs 4 days to two weeks after their birth. 

1. Wash hands good.
2. Someone hold the pig by the hind legs, while sitting in a chair, belly out, with the testicles easy to reach.
3. Use new razor blade, scalpel, or something very sharp.
4. Cut then skin of a testicle about 2/3 right in the middle, so that the outsides have 1/6 of skin on either side.
5. Squeeze the testicle out.
6. Scrap the tube ( I don't know what is called ) slowly and many times ( instead of just cutting it ) until it is free. You try to kind of close the opening.
7. Spray with Blue-Cote.   https://www.horse.com/item/blue-kote-wound-spray/SLT170412/

We had no problems.

Thanks. I wish you were here.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline JRM

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #833 on: March 17, 2017, 07:59:24 AM »
Apparently, the EU has a ban on feeding food waste to pigs. 

http://thepigidea.org/
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #834 on: March 17, 2017, 08:01:36 AM »
Apparently, the EU has a ban on feeding food waste to pigs. 

http://thepigidea.org/

A triumph of corporate and government collusion to destroy small farmers. There's a lot of that. Read Joel Salatin. It isn't just Europe.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline JRM

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #835 on: March 17, 2017, 08:09:51 AM »
Apparently, the EU has a ban on feeding food waste to pigs. 

http://thepigidea.org/

A triumph of corporate and government collusion to destroy small farmers. There's a lot of that. Read Joel Salatin. It isn't just Europe.

I will. 

Good grief... as if Big Business (and corporations) don't already have massive advantages over the small ones!  To have ALL of that and to aggressively seek to push the small folks out of business...!

I bought a nice, new guitar from a small local guitar shop which was struggling to stay in business due to the big corporate chain stores -- which, he said, can make special purchase deals with the manufacturers ... and which have massive access to credit, etc. 

The same "forces" which tend to erode away small and local businesses are at play in the relation between Big Business and government.  Big Business has the resources to manipulate government which small business does not.  Government "servants" get more goodies from Big Business from small....

But small businesses are what we should be giving preference to in our policies!  Small is beautiful.
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #836 on: March 17, 2017, 08:13:24 AM »
The book that made me want to raise pigs:

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8296911-the-sheer-ecstasy-of-being-a-lunatic-farmer
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Surly1

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #837 on: March 17, 2017, 12:14:24 PM »
Yes, it could all be fed to pigs. Pigs are omnivores, like humans, not ruminants, so they can eat almost anything. Real pig farmers try to line that kind of thing up.

Anyone who ever watched the magnificent series Deadwood on HBO got a real education on pigs being omnivores.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/QJPgngJr5jA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/QJPgngJr5jA</a>
"...reprehensible lying communist..."

Offline JRM

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #838 on: March 17, 2017, 03:38:47 PM »
The book that made me want to raise pigs:

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8296911-the-sheer-ecstasy-of-being-a-lunatic-farmer

Quote
"In today's conventional food-production paradigm, any farm that is open-sourced, compost-fertilized, pasture-based, portably-infrastructured, solar-driven, multi-speciated, heavily peopled, and soil-building must be operated by a lunatic. Modern, normal, reasonable farmers erect "No Trespassing" signs, deplete soil, worship annuals, apply petroleum-based chemicals, produce only one commodity, erect Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations, and discourage young people from farming."

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8296911-the-sheer-ecstasy-of-being-a-lunatic-farmer


Which called to mind this:

Quote
"Society highly values its normal man. It educates children to lose themselves and to become absurd, and thus to be normal. Normal men have killed perhaps 100,000,000 of their fellow normal men in the last fifty years."

Laing was a man of intellectual courage and great heart.  I love him for it.

Some other things he said in the same book:  https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Ronald_David_Laing



When I see a "normal man" I don't reach for my revolver, but I may well walk the other way.





« Last Edit: March 17, 2017, 03:42:53 PM by JRM »
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline JRM

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Laing
« Reply #839 on: March 17, 2017, 03:55:58 PM »
R. D. Laing was undisputedly a genius, but he was apparently also a tormented genius ... and a simply terrible father.

When you learn about his own family (parents, childhood), well, it's no wonder he was a bit of a hot mess himself!
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

 

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