AuthorTopic: Meanwhile back at the 'stead  (Read 186631 times)

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #900 on: January 10, 2018, 01:37:17 PM »
I'm thinking. How about War and Remembrance?

Is Hermann Wouk still alive? Think he'll sue if I steal his title?

Can you get Collapse in the title?  How about "Civil War to Collapse: A Family History"?

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #901 on: January 10, 2018, 01:44:29 PM »
 How My Family Was Affected ByThe US Civil War: War and Collapse in American History.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Surly1

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #902 on: January 10, 2018, 02:10:07 PM »
I started the second chapter on this story and I dropped my computer and it went away. Here's round two.

Title!  I need a Title!

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Generations and Glory?
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #903 on: January 10, 2018, 02:10:36 PM »
How My Family Was Affected ByThe US Civil War: War and Collapse in American History.

Sounds good.  :icon_sunny:

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Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #904 on: January 10, 2018, 02:47:56 PM »
How My Family Was Affected ByThe US Civil War: War and Collapse in American History.

Sounds good.  :icon_sunny:

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Got any pics for me to include?

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #905 on: January 10, 2018, 03:18:08 PM »
Can you strip the photo and copy it and show it with no link. I don't want to reveal the real name and location of the plantation, to protect my cousins' privacy.



This is a photo of the original plantation house in Kershaw.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #906 on: January 10, 2018, 03:22:38 PM »
Here's the house my cousins live in now, the 1870s house. One of my cousins committed suicide in an upstairs bedroom early in the 20th century. A young single male cousin, who was still grieving the recent loss of his mother, who was a pillar of the family, from what I understand.

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #907 on: January 10, 2018, 03:25:37 PM »
Can you strip the photo and copy it and show it with no link. I don't want to reveal the real name and location of the plantation, to protect my cousins' privacy.



This is a photo of the original plantation house in Kershaw.

No problem.

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Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #908 on: January 10, 2018, 07:46:25 PM »
Here's a pic of the one who survived the war. He lived until 1906.



Copy of his obit.

I'll add that as a coda to the last part of the series.

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Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #909 on: January 12, 2018, 12:08:59 AM »
(not quite finished, and I'd like to do an edit on chapter two.)

No problem.  Send me the edited chapter in a PM.  Are you going to do a Chapter 4?

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #910 on: January 17, 2018, 06:02:38 AM »
I bought lettuce and chard starts, and onions, more than a week ago, and but for laziness they would have been planted in the garden and probably dead by now...but I dragged my feet. They survived the first couple of cold nights last week, and for this last little bitter weather pattern, my daughter brought them inside.

This cold front is the sort of thing that prevents this locale from being semi-tropical, which it is most of the time...but every winter (almost) we get one or two sub-feezing events. This morning on my commute the car thermometer registered as low as 16 degrees F, up here on the edge of the prairie near my office. At home it only got down to 22F, which is low enough to worry about broken pipes and car radiators.

I can't remember the last time it dropped below 20F. It's been several years, at least. The sun is out this morning and it should quickly get back up into the 40's at least. It's predicted to be back up to 70F on Saturday.

Texas weather, business as usual.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 06:04:32 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #911 on: March 08, 2018, 05:48:27 PM »
I was done with my OR cases by 11:30, and I rushed home to pick up the dogs and head to the Stead to move the water tank for the pigs. Two days ago I noticed the pigs had tipped it partially over and that it didn't seem to be refilling at all.  They had wallowed out a big mudhole around it, and for the past few months it looked like a small island in a lake of extremely nasty algae filled water.

The entrance to the pen was flooded in the process, and so moving the tank has been high on my to-do list, but I kept putting it off due to cold weather and wet, muddy conditions. But with no fresh water coming in, it became an emergency, and today was my first opportunity to deal with it,

The first thing that happened was that my truck wouldn't start. Dead battery. Not sure why. I abandoned it and loaded the dogs in the Volt and just took off. I'll deal with the truck tomorrow.

I damn near wore myself out just turning the 30 gallon water tank over. It was full of nasty black mud (it slowly gets silted in over a couple of months of muddy faces drinking out of it) I stood in water nearly deep enough to flood my wellies and scooped out a couple hundred pounds of mud, and then turned it over and slowly rolled and pulled until the muck let go and I got it up on dry land. The pigs, being curious creatures, and today being warm, waded out into the swamp to check out what I was doing and generally get in the way, which didn't make my job easier.

The dogs watching from outside the e-fence, barked at the pigs wildly until I screamed at them to stop. They know they aren't supposed to bark at the swine, but it's almost more than they can stand to abstain, and they usually have to be called down a few times. The pigs aren't the least bit afraid of them, either.

The plumbing, a jury rigged water hose with various bits to connect up  the tank, was kaput and what was left of it was buried in deep mud that made it hard to even retrieve.

I got the tank moved to a better location and then went to wash off. No water at the tap. The pump had kicked off again. I pulled back the tarp and old carpets I had used to insulate the wellhead during the freezing weather (hopefully over) and flipped the breakers and hit the pump  capacitor reset buttons.  I got nuthin'.

I was starting to panic at that point. No fresh water, and the swamp drying up. I was desperate. I did all the usual reset steps again with the same negative results. Finally, I picked up a foot long loose piece of of PVC pipe and whacked the pressure switch a couple of licks. I didn't expect that to do anything, but it made me feel better to hit something.

Lo and behold, the pump turned on. It's 300 plus feet underground and so it's not real obvious when it starts , but I could hear some air being forced into the pressure chamber at the wellhead, and within a minute or so I could see pressure coming up on the gauge. Score!

So...I'm back home, showered, waiting for the 800mg of ibuprofen to kick in, drinking a glass of wine. I'm dog-ass tired and my back is killing me.

And....guess what? I have another new litter of  eight piglets, probably born last night,
« Last Edit: March 08, 2018, 06:08:47 PM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #912 on: March 08, 2018, 05:58:26 PM »
I was done with my OR cases by 11:30, and I rushed home to pick up the dogs and head to the Stead to move the water tank for the pigs. Two days ago I noticed the pigs had tipped it partially over and that it didn't seem to be refilling at all.  They had wallowed out a big mudhole around it, and for the past few months it looked like a small island in a lake of extremely nasty algae filled water.

The entrance to the pen was flooded in the process, and so moving the tank has been high on my to-do list, but I kept putting it off due to cold weather and wet, muddy conditions. But with no fresh water coming in, it became an emergency, and today was my first opportunity to deal with it,

The first thing that happened was that my truck wouldn't start. Dead battery. Not sure why. I abandoned it and loaded the dogs in the Volt and just took off. I'll deal with the truck tomorrow.

I damn near wore myself out just turning the 30 gallon water tank over. It was full of nasty black mud (it slowly gets silted in over a couple of months of muddy faces drinking out of it) I stood in water nearly deep enough to flood my wellies and scooped out a couple hundred pounds of mud, and then turned it over and slowly rolled and pulled until the muck let go and I got it up on dry land. The pigs, being curious creatures, and today being warm, waded out into the swamp to check out what I was doing and generally get in the way, which didn't make my job easier.

The dogs watching from outside the e-fence, barked at the pigs wildly until I screamed at them to stop. They know they aren't supposed to bark at the swine, but it's almost more than they can stand to abstain, and they usually have to be called down a few times. The pigs aren't the least bit afraid of them, either.

The plumbing, a jury rigged water hose with various bits to connect up  the tank, was kaput and what was left of it was buried in deep mud that made it hard to even retrieve.

I got the tank moved to a better location and then went to wash off. No water at the tap. The pump had kicked off again. I pulled back the tarp and old carpets I had used to insulate the wellhead during the freezing weather (hopefully over) and flipped the breakers and hit the pump  capacitor reset buttons.  I got nuthin'.

I was starting to panic at that point. No fresh water, and the swamp drying up. I was desperate. I did all the usual reset steps again with the same negative results. Finally, I picked up a foot long loose piece of of PVC pipe and whacked the pressure switch a couple of licks. I didn't expect that to do anything, but it made me feel better to hit something.

Low and behold, the pump turned on. It's 300 plus feet underground and so it's not real obvious when it starts , but I could hear some air being forced into the pressure chamber at the wellhead, and within a minute or so I could see pressure coming up on the gauge. Score!

So...I'm back home, showered, waiting for the 800mg of ibuprofen to kick in, drinking a glass of wine. I'm dog-ass tired and my back is killing me.

And....guess what? I have another new litter of  eight piglets, probably born last night,

Gee, I wish I wuz you.  ::)  I am so jealous.

Did you ever dispatch that lame sow to the Great Beyond?

RE
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Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #913 on: March 08, 2018, 06:01:55 PM »
She is getting well, so I've been letting her. It turned out she was just lame in one of her back legs. I think the male hurt her trying to mate wth her. She's limping still but I think she'll recover. She lost some weight, so I'll wait until she puts it back on and then slaughter her, most likely.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline David B.

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #914 on: March 08, 2018, 06:07:16 PM »
I was done with my OR cases by 11:30, and I rushed home to pick up the dogs and head to the Stead to move the water tank for the pigs. Two days ago I noticed the pigs had tipped it partially over and that it didn't seem to be refilling at all.  They had wallowed out a big mudhole around it, and for the past few months it looked like a small island in a lake of extremely nasty algae filled water.

The entrance to the pen was flooded in the process, and so moving the tank has been high on my to-do list, but I kept putting it off due to cold weather and wet, muddy conditions. But with no fresh water coming in, it became an emergency, and today was my first opportunity to deal with it,

The first thing that happened was that my truck wouldn't start. Dead battery. Not sure why. I abandoned it and loaded the dogs in the Volt and just took off. I'll deal with the truck tomorrow.

I damn near wore myself out just turning the 30 gallon water tank over. It was full of nasty black mud (it slowly gets silted in over a couple of months of muddy faces drinking out of it) I stood in water nearly deep enough to flood my wellies and scooped out a couple hundred pounds of mud, and then turned it over and slowly rolled and pulled until the muck let go and I got it up on dry land. The pigs, being curious creatures, and today being warm, waded out into the swamp to check out what I was doing and generally get in the way, which didn't make my job easier.

The dogs watching from outside the e-fence, barked at the pigs wildly until I screamed at them to stop. They know they aren't supposed to bark at the swine, but it's almost more than they can stand to abstain, and they usually have to be called down a few times. The pigs aren't the least bit afraid of them, either.

The plumbing, a jury rigged water hose with various bits to connect up  the tank, was kaput and what was left of it was buried in deep mud that made it hard to even retrieve.

I got the tank moved to a better location and then went to wash off. No water at the tap. The pump had kicked off again. I pulled back the tarp and old carpets I had used to insulate the wellhead during the freezing weather (hopefully over) and flipped the breakers and hit the pump  capacitor reset buttons.  I got nuthin'.

I was starting to panic at that point. No fresh water, and the swamp drying up. I was desperate. I did all the usual reset steps again with the same negative results. Finally, I picked up a foot long loose piece of of PVC pipe and whacked the pressure switch a couple of licks. I didn't expect that to do anything, but it made me feel better to hit something.

Low and behold, the pump turned on. It's 300 plus feet underground and so it's not real obvious when it starts , but I could hear some air being forced into the pressure chamber at the wellhead, and within a minute or so I could see pressure coming up on the gauge. Score!

So...I'm back home, showered, waiting for the 800mg of ibuprofen to kick in, drinking a glass of wine. I'm dog-ass tired and my back is killing me.

And....guess what? I have another new litter of  eight piglets, probably born last night,

Gee, I wish I wuz you.  ::)  I am so jealous.

Did you ever dispatch that lame sow to the Great Beyond?

RE
is there a rundown on the toothstead somewhere? Congrats on the piglets
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

 

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