AuthorTopic: Meanwhile back at the 'stead  (Read 202819 times)

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #930 on: March 12, 2018, 07:33:18 PM »
I am thinking about getting a pick-up camper to fit on the back of my truck. I'd probably leave it set up on a rack (off the truck) out at the stead, with the idea that my next truck would be bought with camper hauling in mind. Maybe a dually one-ton. My current truck (or one just like it) would do, with heavy springs added, I think.

I have run across a nice old Avion, that I think would be a good one to customize and turn into a bug-out vehicle.



https://images.craigslist.org/00b0b_b8iitf1u3ik_600x450.jpg

I like these because they don't require a yearly registration tax, and they have no tires or running gear of their own to maintain. Since having some kind of truck is a given for me, I think it makes some sense.

I don't need one per se, but it would be nice to have a vehicle set up to travel, with some off-grid and off-road capabilities.
I had a vision of the camper I built for my 1991 ford ranger. I still get nostalgic. If It was just me I'd have one. Kids grown and gone I will have again.

Why not now? ??? You can take the kids camping in it.  Bonus, you have a Bugout Machine to house the family in if you get an evac order due to wildfires.

RE
« Last Edit: March 12, 2018, 07:35:15 PM by RE »
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Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #931 on: March 15, 2018, 05:57:37 AM »
My five minute job of changing the well pressure switch after work yesterday went all pear-shaped. The quarter inch galvanized nipple that feeds the switch snapped off when I tried to unscrew the switch. I was in a hurry and didn't hold a proper back-up, but it's really good it broke because it was nearly completely occluded with rust. Might have been the problem all along, rather than the switch itself.

The switch purchase was typical. Only 5 bucks online, but I paid $25 at Lowe's to get one immediately.

It's a long way back to town to the store, so I left the water off overnight and popped back into a Home Depot on my way back home and bought the bits to build up a new nipple for the switch and pressure gauge. I bought a 30/50 switch, and then noticed that the old one was a 20/40, so I expect when this is fixed, the pressure tank will go next.

So another long day, but it's not so bad since it's light until about 8 pm now. It's an emergency to get the water back on today. I wish Texas would stay on Daylight Saving time year-round. It would suit me.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #932 on: March 15, 2018, 06:01:41 AM »
My five minute job of changing the well pressure switch after work yesterday went all pear-shaped. The quarter inch galvanized nipple that feeds the switch snapped off when I tried to unscrew the switch. I was in a hurry and didn't hold a proper back-up, but it's really good it broke because it was nearly completely occluded with rust. Might have been the problem all along, rather than the switch itself.

The switch purchase was typical. Only 5 bucks online, but I paid $25 at Lowe's to get one immediately.

It's a long way back to town to the store, so I left the water off overnight and popped back into a Home Depot on my way back home and bought the bits to build up a new nipple for the switch and pressure gauge. I bought a 30/50 switch, and then noticed that the old one was a 20/40, so I expect when this is fixed, the pressure tank will go next.

So another long day, but it's not so bad since it's light until about 8 pm now. It's an emergency to get the water back on today. I wish Texas would stay on Daylight Saving time year-round. It would suit me.

What will you do when there's no more Lowes or Home Depot to buy parts at when stuff breaks?

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #933 on: March 15, 2018, 06:43:29 AM »
I've been considering that. It's a thorny problem for sure. My grandfather drew his water from a well on his back porch, with a hemp rope and a galvanized bucket. I can't do that with my deep well.

In the old (ghost) town near the stead, I have noticed a huge well curb behind the (one) historic bank building. I've been thinking about peering into it to see how deep it is and whether it has water. I have that old pioneer well that looks like a drilled well, that was probably put in in the early 1900's. I've intended to check it to see how deep it is. It still has the draw-works and sucker rod in it, and no doubt the windmill foot valve is in there too. Originally it was run by a small windmill, and then a one lung IC engine. (still there, but no compression). That well is in the creek bottom. There was a reason for that. Post apocalypse, that'd be the go-to source,other than catchment or creek. The windmill is no longer an option, because it's grown up in woods now.

I'd say catchment and gravity are the best solution, with that high bluff to get pressure. It's about 75-80 feet, and perfect for a tank site up top. I just need a roof up there to catch rain.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2018, 06:54:46 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online Surly1

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #934 on: March 15, 2018, 06:44:12 AM »
My five minute job of changing the well pressure switch after work yesterday went all pear-shaped. The quarter inch galvanized nipple that feeds the switch snapped off when I tried to unscrew the switch. I was in a hurry and didn't hold a proper back-up, but it's really good it broke because it was nearly completely occluded with rust. Might have been the problem all along, rather than the switch itself.

The switch purchase was typical. Only 5 bucks online, but I paid $25 at Lowe's to get one immediately.

It's a long way back to town to the store, so I left the water off overnight and popped back into a Home Depot on my way back home and bought the bits to build up a new nipple for the switch and pressure gauge. I bought a 30/50 switch, and then noticed that the old one was a 20/40, so I expect when this is fixed, the pressure tank will go next.

So another long day, but it's not so bad since it's light until about 8 pm now. It's an emergency to get the water back on today. I wish Texas would stay on Daylight Saving time year-round. It would suit me.

What will you do when there's no more Lowes or Home Depot to buy parts at when stuff breaks?

RE

He'll continue to keep operating for a hell of a lot longer than you and me, Mr. KNow-it-All.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #935 on: March 15, 2018, 07:18:36 AM »
He'll continue to keep operating for a hell of a lot longer than you and me, Mr. Know-it-All.

Mr. KIA's operating lifespan is a good deal less than Eddie's, but not because of water availability, Mr. Sarcastic.  Water is the least of our problems around here.  We have a year-round flowing stream fed by glacier water, it doesn't even have to rain for it to be flowing.  It's not even 1/4 mile from my front door.

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #936 on: March 15, 2018, 09:22:59 AM »
When the glacier melts, the whole thing will probably break loose, come down the mountain and wipe the entire town off the face of the earth.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/CO8vBVUaKvk&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/CO8vBVUaKvk&fs=1</a>
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #937 on: March 15, 2018, 09:31:38 AM »
When the glacier melts, the whole thing will probably break loose, come down the mountain and wipe the entire town off the face of the earth.

No, the glacier itself is too far away from here.  Glacier Falls might have a problem, but I doubt even there you would have a break away event that would wipe out the town.  Glaciers melt off pretty slow generally speaking.

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #938 on: March 15, 2018, 09:37:38 AM »
Thirteen thousand years ago glaciers all over the earth melted at the same time and wiped out most of human civilization, according to some accounts. Don't think it can't happen. LOL.

Or maybe an earthquake will open up a crack and the whole Matsu Valley will fall into it.

The Pacific Rim is a dangerous place to live.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #939 on: March 15, 2018, 09:50:10 AM »
Thirteen thousand years ago glaciers all over the earth melted at the same time and wiped out most of human civilization, according to some accounts. Don't think it can't happen. LOL.

Or maybe an earthquake will open up a crack and the whole Matsu Valley will fall into it.

The Pacific Rim is a dangerous place to live.

Earthquakes and Volcanic eruptions definitely are an issue.  :o  I report on the ones I get regularly.  ;D  About two decent shakers a year these days in the 6-7 category.  These do not affect us as much as places like Mexico or Italy where they have many old structures not built to withstand these things.  A 6 quake makes things rattle in my digs.  A 7 quake can break some windows.  Otherwise though, its just a little nerve wracking when it happens.  A 9 quake would probably kill  me if I cant get out the door fast enough before the digs come crashing down on top of me.

Last big motherfucker was in Anchorage in '64. 9.1 on the Richter Scale.  That's 50 years ago and really it only wiped out about half of Anchorage at the time and didn't do too much damage up in the valley here, which wasn't too populated at the time granted.

Mt. Redoubt going Ballistic might be a problem, but again there it's not THAT close and depends which way the wind is blowing at the time of eruption also.

These are risks of course, but statistically speaking, lower risks than your water aquifer dropping constantly. :P

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #940 on: March 16, 2018, 06:40:20 AM »
I managed to complete the pressure switch installation after work without any more real difficulty. The only tricky part was adjusting the switch, which is a mechanical spring loaded thingie with contact points. After a bit of trial and error I got it working. I need to go back tomorrow at the latest to make sure it's all working right.

I'm close now to being able to sell some pigs finally, as soon as the old wallow dries up and I can do a little dirt work around the pen entrance with the tractor.

I'm making a goal of getting them sold and/or slaughtered by around the first of May. I have a trip to BVI coming up in less than two weeks that will interfere with getting it done sooner.

It's been a useful experiment, but way too much work and driving. With all the trips to the farm this week, and the time change, I'm bushed. I've been neglecting other duties, too, and have a backlog of minor missions elsewhere.

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #941 on: March 22, 2018, 06:23:24 AM »
Breakout!

I was planning on feeding the pigs on Tuesday, but teacher daughter needed to borrow my car for a day while hers got a brake job, so I put it off until yesterday. When I got out to unlock the gate I was greeted with the sight of my entire herd of Mangalitsas milling around just inside the fence along the road, which fortunately had confined them. The fence isn't finished, so they would have eventually probably found their way to the end of the completed part and just walked around it and wandered off into the creek bottom....but I got lucky.

And they were hungry, and so followed my truck like a pack of dogs and I got them back into the e-fence, which they managed to knock over. I had to help a couple of the piglets who got caught in the mesh...but I got them penned easily.

This has been my nightmare scenario for a while, I am in violation of the HOA to have more than a few pigs, so if they'd gone for the neighbors garbage cans it might have been tricky.

I put the fence back up and speeded up the pulse. The batteries are brand new. We'll see if it holds. I will try to make improvements this weekend. As soon as I get back from my trip to BVI, I will have to initiate the Final Solution.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2018, 06:26:20 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #942 on: March 22, 2018, 06:38:18 AM »
As soon as I get back from my trip to BVI, I will have to initiate the Final Solution.

Break out the Zyclon-B!

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Offline cernunnos5

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #943 on: March 22, 2018, 07:25:20 AM »
Breakout!

I was planning on feeding the pigs on Tuesday, but teacher daughter needed to borrow my car for a day while hers got a brake job, so I put it off until yesterday. When I got out to unlock the gate I was greeted with the sight of my entire herd of Mangalitsas milling around just inside the fence along the road, which fortunately had confined them. The fence isn't finished, so they would have eventually probably found their way to the end of the completed part and just walked around it and wandered off into the creek bottom....but I got lucky.

And they were hungry, and so followed my truck like a pack of dogs and I got them back into the e-fence, which they managed to knock over. I had to help a couple of the piglets who got caught in the mesh...but I got them penned easily.

This has been my nightmare scenario for a while, I am in violation of the HOA to have more than a few pigs, so if they'd gone for the neighbors garbage cans it might have been tricky.

I put the fence back up and speeded up the pulse. The batteries are brand new. We'll see if it holds. I will try to make improvements this weekend. As soon as I get back from my trip to BVI, I will have to initiate the Final Solution.


I hear your pain, dude. Pigs seamed like such a win, win. Real life experience kicked that right out of me. There is just something about pigs that take one look at what you just built, and deciding it would be entertaining to break it. Im not sure there is any fence that they cant break. Its a nightmare. No more pigs for me. Im planning on goats next.
You can read the full, embarrassing story here.  The dizzying highs, the devastating lows, the creamy middles.  https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.wordpress.com/2017/12/02/c5-and-the-post-apocalyptic-permaculture-pig-redux/

Speaking of which, My latest article was my shout out to Re and the Doomstead Diner for his Snap Card series. Unfortunately, it has only brought about 90 readers to the Diner. I dont know what it is, but I just cant get my readers to go read the links...even when I tell them, "Go read this link or the rest wont make sense or be much fun". Well, I tried.

Yup. The piggy final solution will return peace and boringness back to your stead...and full freezers. Ours are still packed and a heavy drain on our solar system that cant keep up and must be supplemented from the grid. Best laid plans of pigs and men often go awry.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Meanwhile back at the 'stead
« Reply #944 on: March 22, 2018, 07:44:12 AM »
Spoken like a wise man. Thanks. I will have to read about your pig adventures. Good luck with goats. I'm going chickens next, but probably not out at the stead. Too many predators and not enough of me there with the dogs to prevent chick-o-cide.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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