AuthorTopic: The Future  (Read 16932 times)

Offline RE

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Tall People got NO REASON to Live
« Reply #30 on: January 05, 2014, 04:53:58 AM »
More on the Tall vs. Small issue, Plaguing me since the days Randy Newman wrote "Short People got no reason to Live" LOL.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/uFmv22ghzQw?feature=player_detailpage" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/uFmv22ghzQw?feature=player_detailpage</a>

Let us talk our fellow Apes.

Here is the LARGEST of the Apes.




Notice how these Big Guys of the Apes are stuck on the ground, plodding around beating their chests and so forth.

Now here are the SMALLEST of the Apes, the Gibbons, just Hanging Out and cruising the territory.


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/acy--k7Qww0?feature=player_detailpage" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/acy--k7Qww0?feature=player_detailpage</a>

In a World of Big Gorillas, I prefer to swing above them as a Small Gibbon.  We use up less resources, we are more efficient, we are more agile with a greater Strength/Weight Ratio.

Tall People got No Reason to Live.
  Randy Newman got it backwards.  :icon_mrgreen:

RE

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Offline luciddreams

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Re: The Future
« Reply #31 on: January 05, 2014, 07:05:45 AM »

 But it isn't just size. I cut on people for a living, while they're awake. If you can do that, and you're any good at it, it confers badass-ness eventually. In the same way working the meat wagon does.

Well hopefully JRM isn't a female...cause if she is we probably just ran her off talking about how much of a badass we all are  ::)   8)   :laugh:

Welcome to the Diner...it happens...and I'm the worst for thread drift.  So I apologize, but you'll find that we'll address anything you want to talk about.  It can't all be analysis however.  This is a virtual community that hangs out in the Diner pictured above.  We talk about things you might imagine people hangin' in that Diner would talk about at the end of the world and while the smoke is still clearing.  Now that I've got that out of the way.

Eddie, what you said about cutting on awake people made me think of the time I started an I.O. on a seizure patient.  We walked into the room and she was actively seizing, flopping around on the floor like a fish.  It's a bitch to get a line started on a seizure patient whom is actively seizing as you might imagine.  We do it, and often, but sometimes when your patient has shitty veins anyways, you have to just wait and keep them from bashing their brains out on the floor.  Anyways, I tried sticking her several times to no avail, my partner tried, and after a while you're just turning them into a pin cushion, but you have to get that line so that you can push some ativan and get the seizure to stop (at least stop the body from showing signs of seizure activity). 

Well we never could get a line so I had to do an I.O. which stands for intraosseous.  Now this thing is a drill, with a 2 inch needle somewhere in the neighborhood of 14 gauge (can't remember now) that you drill into the patients bone.  There are several places you can do this, but it has to be long bone and have bone marrow cause that's where the cannula goes...into the bone marrow.  In this case it was just below the tibial tuberosity  ;D

She was postictal (unconscious after seizure activity stops) when I placed that EZ IO gun on the top of her tibia and pulled the trigger.  The needle popped through the bone just fine, she didn't so much as move.  I attached the flush to it and aspirated her bone marrow and she shot off of the cot like she'd seen Satan himself and started screaming a scream like I'd never heard and haven't heard since.  She could have woke the dead.  This was my first IO.  That shit fucked my nerves up for the rest of the shift.  I just couldn't shake it for some reason.  It was the first one I'd ever done on an adult(we usually do it on pediatrics due to their small veins, and even then I'd only done a couple).  I felt guilty like I'd done it wrong.  Probably because it freaked everybody out...my partner and supervisor (she was there for some reason). 

So yeah, after that my badass emt went up a notch.  But nowhere near the several levels of badass I received after standing 30 yards from a car on the interstate with a tractor trailer on top of it.  The car burst into flames and then two of the wheels popped from the heat, and it was probably the loudest damn thing I'd ever heard.  We loaded the patients up real quick like after that and got the fuck out of there. 

Also, I find it interesting that you are related to the Holiday's Eddie.  Billy the Kids real name was Henry McCarty.  That's right...I'm related to Billy the Kid 8)  I guess that explains why I can't hack the Matrix ::)

Offline Eddie

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Re: The Future
« Reply #32 on: January 05, 2014, 12:50:44 PM »
I've been trained on IO.  For dental office medical emergencies, especially in children, I'm sure you can see the advantages. I don't have the kit, they're expensive. I should put one on on the prep list. I've never actually placed an IO line, though. I bow to you badass-ness..

The only two medical emergencies I've eve had in my office were both seizures. One of them was on the monitor at the time and her pulse got close to 300BPM. I just knew she was going to arrest. I just kept her airway open and breathed a little for her, and she made it okay. I had to check my shorts, however.

I have no idea if I'm actually related to the real Doc Holliday, but he spelled his name with two L's like my cousins.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2014, 01:05:21 PM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline luciddreams

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Re: The Future
« Reply #33 on: January 05, 2014, 01:07:52 PM »
I've been trained on IO.  For dental emergencies, especially in children, I'm sure you can see the advantages. I don't have the kit, they're expensive. I should put one on on the prep list. I've never actually placed an IO line, though. I bow to you badass-ness..

What...that IO story...shiiiiiit, I've got medical emergency stories for days  O0

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The only two medical emergencies I've eve had in my office were both seizures. One of them was on the monitor at the time and her pulse got close to 300BPM. I just knew she was going to arrest. I just kept her airway open and breathed a little for her, and she made it okay. I had to check my shorts, however.

Yeah 300 bpm is pushin' it a bit.  That patient would get adenosine on the truck.  I've started many lines where adenosine got pushed through.  It's wild because it temporarily stops the heart in hopes that the SV Node will take back over.  They have to be on the monitor of course.  "Okay Miss Smith, now you're gonna feel a little funny, a little light headed and woozy, but it won't last."  Then the paramedic pushes the adenosine and we watch as the patient flat lines for a few seconds as we pray that the heart starts back up.  Craziness. 

I wasn't a paramedic.  I was an EMT-Intermediate.  So I always had a paramedic partner whom was ultimately responsible for things.  I would have gotten a .25 cents per hour raise to go from an intermediate to a paramedic.  The amount of additional responsibilities, heart monitor, narcotics, pediatrics...for .25 cents an hour.  Fuck that...which is why I ultimately quit.  However, lately I've been thinking about going to paramedic school and maybe workin' one day a week.  Just to have that to fall back on.  It's 3 semesters, and I already know everything accept pharmacology.  I'd have to study that, and all the different heart rhythms, but it would be easypeasy for me. 

I just don't want the forced flu shot every year...nor the piss test.  I like the ganga...but it's not necessary.  I don't know...it's tough being a father in this world. 
 
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I have no idea if I'm actually related to the real Doc Holliday, but he spelled his name with two L's like my cousins.

I've always been told by my dad's side of the family that we were related to Billy the Kid.  I just use it on my badass resume :laugh:

Offline JRM

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Re: The Future
« Reply #34 on: January 06, 2014, 10:16:39 AM »
You can set up your own self fulfilling prophesies with your own actions and your own life. If I voted neocon instead of green as my method of getting govt to act, that would be true. I would be cynical and look after number 1 that way and pollute as much as everyone else waiting for govt to act.

My gawd, if all of the amazing, brilliant, informed, educated people I've met who say "This Juggernaut will destroy everything and there's nothing we can frigging do about it" [paraphrase] were instead to think there's half a chance  we can turn it around, wow, what a force for change they would be!  Honestly, I think we have the 5-10% in the somewhat awake (not in the "Matrix") category -- even here in the overdeveloped world! Problem is, most of them seem to think our Goose Is Already Cooked. So they're not holding a vision of transformation nor working to enact or embody it.
 

Voting green and signing the odd petition are my token gestures at waiting for someone else to do it. Meanwhile our leaders argue endlessly over a 5% reduction in emissions by 2020 target is too hard on the economy. Even that insignificant bar is too high.

Electoral and policy-oriented (read, majoritarian "democratic") politics is SO last century.  The emerging 21st century "politics" is radically democratic, radically egalitarian, radically distributional of empowerment. I'd even say it's anarchistic, but most folks don't really know what that word means, and think it has to do with destruction and bomb throwing.... Read David Graeber's "The Democracy Project" and get back to me on this after. It's a good start toward clearing out the muck and nonsense that people mistake for politics or political discourse.  .... So, yes, of course you are right. Politics as usual is a dead end. But...

But how do you sell disolving into soup for the govts and economies and 100 men replacing every large tractor and harvester as the human labour replacement potential, which seems like the same thing?

In a word, micro-eutopianism. 

Quote
The word utopia was coined in Greek by Sir Thomas More for his 1516 book Utopia, describing a fictional island society in the Atlantic Ocean. The word comes from the Greek: οὐ ("not") and τόπος ("place") and means "no place". The English homophone eutopia, derived from the Greek εὖ ("good" or "well") and τόπος ("place"), means "good place". This, because of the identical pronunciation of "utopia" and "eutopia", gives rise to a double meaning.

from Wikipedia

Micro = small. Eu = good. Topia = place

The solution to dystopia is eutopia (not the perfect or ideal Utopia -- that's how most people use and understand the word "utopia" -- dismissively, as a word of derision.)

The macro world we dwell within has become dystopian. It's been more or less dystopian for the entire history of "civilization".  So we have a global dystopia. Right? It's a foul, bad place. And one of the surest ways to ensure that it stays that way is to presume that our only real chance to do anything about this Giant Dystopia is via big, great, and giant (and centralized) movements, politics, yada yada. Big actions. Big changes. --read "politics as usual".

Microeutopians don't ask for the governments approval or permission before getting stuff done -- often by doing very small things. Which add up. Especially when there are many small things done in a coordinated, intelligent way by many, many free people who are contributing only that part which is the part they WANT to contribute. Freely, voluntarily. Because they love life.

Microeutopians don't try to build political majorities in order to create social change -- because that's not how nature works. Changes in culture echo changes in natural systems -- which move or change in bits and pieces, little by little, even if those changes are rapid! Changes build upon changes -- as in a snowball effect. Or a forest fire. Microeutopians are interested in making many small or tiny changes, which they can do individually or in small groups, which add up to the creation of conditions in which yet other changes can be made. That is, they create the conditions of possibility for changes up ahead -- not entirely unlike the way a chess player tries to set up conditions of possibility in future chess board moves.

When the path forward is blocked, microeutopians either go under or around ... or otherwise create a path forward. They don't throw in the towel and walk away. They innovate. They use their imagination. They create opportunities.

And they learn from one another.

[I'm writing a book on the subject.]
« Last Edit: January 06, 2014, 10:22:28 AM by JRM »
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline Eddie

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Re: The Future
« Reply #35 on: January 06, 2014, 10:44:50 AM »
I like that premise.  I'd like to think that my own efforts are along those lines. My experience so far tells me that most of us micro-utopians have our own unique vision of what will happen, and/or what needs to happen, over the near future. Getting us to pull TOGETHER is a problem, like herding cats.

But yes, I see lots of individuals making real efforts to change their own world, and I find that very encouraging.

But a part of me understands, too, that the hour is quite late, and that big wheels are in motion. Much of what will transpire is not really within our control at the moment. i do what I can and try not to worry about such things, but it's always there in the back of my mind.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline JRM

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Re: The Future
« Reply #36 on: January 06, 2014, 11:30:32 AM »
[....] My experience so far tells me that most of us micro-utopians have our own unique vision of what will happen, and/or what needs to happen, over the near future. Getting us to pull TOGETHER is a problem, like herding cats.

Yes. We're incredibly diverse. And that's hardly a bad thing. Diversity enriches us, empowers us, strengthens us.

In my own version of microeutopian thinking and practice (theory and practice) we would not attempt to herd cats, because  cats are not herd animals. Likewise we'd not waste valuable resources (time, energy, effort) pushing ropes or pulling rivers.

Permaculture, ecological design, bioregionalism, the ecovillage movement, etc., are examples of microeutopian theory and practice. I'm referring to my favorite kind of micro-eutopian spirits here, which are the explicitly "green" variety.

In permaculture, design is oriented toward efficiency in terms of energy and time, etc.  (Zones & Sectors)

Efficiency is an interesting word for folks like us, 'cause we tend to know just what James H. Kunstler meant when he said (in my favorite quote of anyone, ever) "Efficiency is the shortest path to hell.")  He was referring to the kind of "efficiency" which results in strip malls and WalMart, etc. It's the same sort of "efficiency" which also results in industrial agriculture.  Its measures are the wrong measures, and they are too few.

Trying to herd cats is an outrageously inefficient use of time and energy.  So we learn from that! We learn from nature -- our first teacher. Nature says "people are diverse" and we say "Hallelujah".  What we want is the smoothest and happiest pathways to possible and delightful ends. So those of us who agree, after discussing something, on what the steps are we'd like to take, we work together with THEM. We don't cajole much and we don't corral at all.

It's the dominant culture which is unintelligent, not so much people, per se. So people often brighten up when the sparkle of real human intelligence is about. It's contagious. It feels good to be in the presence of heart linked to mind and these two linked rightly with the world. We come alive! Nobody needs pushing or pulling to see what needs doing and what's really necessary and good. Inspiration? Sure. But not pushing and pulling.

(Some of what I've just said, above, is inspired by having read David W. Orr's essay "Some Thoughts On Intelligence," from "Earth In MInd" yesterday. In this essay, Orr distinguishes cleverness from intelligence, and defines intelligence largely in terms of its relation to virtues and values which contrast with shallow and narrow utilitarianism -- and disregard for the long term. This is just the sort of thinking which permacultuists, and microeutopians generally, should appreciate.)

the hour is quite late

Yes. We're now well into the emergency time frame for awakening and transformation.  We used up almost all of the wiggle room we'd like to have. But I think we can work magic -- if only we'll use our magical intelligence (which includes the heart).
« Last Edit: January 06, 2014, 11:35:28 AM by JRM »
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline JRM

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Re: The Future
« Reply #37 on: January 06, 2014, 11:50:17 AM »
Where is Diner Abbreviations ?
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline JRM

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Re: The Future
« Reply #38 on: January 06, 2014, 12:15:00 PM »
I like that premise.  I'd like to think that my own efforts are along those lines. My experience so far tells me that most of us micro-utopians have our own unique vision of what will happen, and/or what needs to happen, over the near future. Getting us to pull TOGETHER is a problem, like herding cats.

My main purpose in writing a book on micro-eutopian thought and practice is to generate vision-sharing, theoretical discussion, sharing of know-how and know-why and know-that.

I think I'm likely to be the first social theorist to point out that there are hundreds, if not thousands, of theory-practice systems (permaculture, bioregionalism, ecovillages, guerrilla gardening...) which amount to hundreds -- or thousands -- of examples of the same thing: microeutopianism.  (This is the first time I've ever explained this theoretical insight in public!)

I'm very excited by the apparent implications of this which I have just said, above. It means we get -- now -- to begin talking amongst ourselves about what we're doing, why.... To share know-how, know-why, know that.... That is -- we are creating a discipline!  Is it a science? Not exactly, but it includes science! It has its science aspect or facet. That's mostly know-how and now-that knowledge, the science. But there is also the know-why -- which, as folks like David W. Orr and E. F. Schumacher have pointed out, tends to be ignored by "science," per se -- which, like technology, tends to imagine itself as "value-neutral".

Micro-eutopian theory/practice is explicitly value-active, not value-neutral. It makes use of science, but it has a WHY: "the good". That's philosophy. The love of wisdom.

And part of the love of wisdom is the wisdom of love. You won't find many scientists saying that. Nor technologists.

Once we begin really talking amongst ourselves, we micro-eutopians, we will discover the great virtue of our wonderful and delightful diversity! I can hardly wait!
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline Eddie

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Re: The Future
« Reply #39 on: January 06, 2014, 12:59:46 PM »
Where is Diner Abbreviations ?

This is embarrassing. I don't remember where we put them. Somebody help me out here.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Petty Tyrant

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Re: The Future
« Reply #40 on: January 06, 2014, 01:01:41 PM »
JRM
Write it on recycled paper please, during the day so not to burn fossil fuels, and dont do signings involving flying all over, ok accept tickets to an interview on the Today Show or Oprah. Im herding a microutopian here ;). I applaud any effort to get more awareness out to awaken more people of the possibilities and making those realities.
ELEVATE YOUR GAME

Offline JRM

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Re: The Future
« Reply #41 on: January 06, 2014, 01:28:56 PM »
JRM
Write it on recycled paper please, during the day so not to burn fossil fuels,


I'm almost certainly going to make it available for free online, just like Charles Eisenstein has done with some of his books -- e.g., Sacred Economics - http://sacred-economics.com/ .  So those louzy eco-bastards who use computers  :o  ::) -- hopefully plugged into the sun -- will have a free one on me. Those who insist on having a signed first edition  :laugh: will have the option of an old-fashioned actual book, with paper and pages. I promise to make a sensitive decision on the eco-footprint regards the paper and binding.  Which is better, hemp or kenaf?  Maybe kenaf, so folks aren't tempted to smoke my book!

and dont do signings involving flying all over, ok

I doubt I'll ever fly again, and haven't in decades (with an s).  If the publisher insists I promote the book by "doing signings" (and readings) I'll offer to read in a few cities and towns along a rail route. 


My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline jdwheeler42

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Re: The Future
« Reply #42 on: January 06, 2014, 01:29:28 PM »
Where is Diner Abbreviations ?
http://www.doomsteaddiner.net/forum/index.php?topic=2143.msg38430#msg38430
Making pigs fly is easy... that is, of course, after you have built the catapult....

Offline JRM

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Re: The Future
« Reply #43 on: January 06, 2014, 01:39:05 PM »
Wow, I just discovered that Eisenstein's most recent book is also available for free online! Talk about walking your talk ! -- this guy is a living and breathing example of the Gift Economy which is the subject of much of his writing.

http://charleseisenstein.net/project/the-more-beautiful-world-our-hearts-know-is-possible/
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline Eddie

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Re: The Future
« Reply #44 on: January 06, 2014, 02:05:12 PM »
What a great title though...Smoke This Book.

Like Steal This Book. You probably aren't old enough to remember that one.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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