AuthorTopic: 40 Days & 40 Nights: The Precipitation Thread  (Read 4837 times)

Offline RE

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40 Days & 40 Nights: The Precipitation Thread
« on: April 22, 2012, 11:40:12 AM »
A thread for heavy rain and snow events other than cyclonic storms.

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Offline RE

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Nor'Easter Incoming
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2012, 11:45:13 AM »
Looks like Surly will be a little soggy.

RE

Quote
The East Coast is bracing for a powerful storm that is expected to dump a large amount of rain and snow to states in the Northeast. NBC's Janice Huff reports.

By msnbc.com and news services

Heavy rains and snow will soon pound the eastern United States, possibly leading to downed trees, power outages and flight delays as a low pressure system from the Gulf of Mexico moves through the region.

Intense precipitation from the Nor'easter storm was due to start on Sunday morning, with two to four inches of downpour expected along the Mid-Atlantic Coast, which will make for soggy conditions in New York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C.

For snow, "the areas of concern are western New York, western Pennsylvania, extreme eastern Ohio, parts of northern West Virginia and extreme western Maryland," weather.com reported. Buffalo and Pittsburgh could see six inches or so.
 
-----------

"It's going to a very, very intense Nor'easter," said Michael Eckert, senior branch forecaster with the National Weather Service based in Camp Springs, Md.

"Snowfall rates may exceed 1" per hour Sunday night into early Monday, accompanied by thunder and lightning," weather.com added.
 
Winds of 30 to 50 miles per hour are expected on the coast.
 

"The weather will be going downhill during the day on Sunday," Eckert said.
 

On Sunday night, the inland side of the weather system will see an influx of cold air, as falling rain morphs into heavy snow that will blanket western parts of New York state and Pennsylvania, as well as West Virginia, he said.
 

Higher elevations could see up to 12 inches of snow, the Weather Service said.

That could lead to downed branches and even trees. As a result, forecasters expect broken power lines and widespread outages in some areas.

This weather pattern would produce a blizzard if it had come in January, but because the spring air is warmer the storm is not expected to be as severe, Eckert said.

Nevertheless, airports in New York, Boston and Philadelphia could see flight delays on Monday due to the storm, said Eckert, who works for the Weather Service's Hydrometeorological Prediction Center.

On Saturday, Minnesota had a few small tornadoes that struck in the western half of the state, the National Weather Service said. They caused no injuries but damaged barns near the town of Milan and to a flower shop in Lucan, said Weather Service meteorologist Bryon Paulson.

"We had everything, rain, nickel-sized hail, small tornadoes and snow," he said.

The town of Chisholm in northeast Minnesota received nearly 6 inches of snow, after getting a foot a week ago. That followed a mild winter with little snow, he said.

In Florida, a flood watch was canceled but the state braced for powerful thunderstorms overnight packing wind gusts of up to 60 miles per hour and the potential for tornadoes, Weather Service meteorologist Barry Baxter said.

Some showers and thunderstorms will occur in Florida later on Sunday, but they will not be as intense as what the state experienced on Saturday, Eckert said.
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Offline Surly1

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Re: Nor'Easter Incoming
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2012, 01:14:42 PM »
Looks like Surly will be a little soggy.
Quote


Got that right. Soaking wet down here. Drying out comfortably now with the aid of a cigar and manhattan.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2012, 01:18:54 PM by Surly1 »
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

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40 Days & 40 Nights: The Rain in Russia Falls Mainly on Ruskies
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2012, 10:03:55 PM »
Looks like they need Noahtski in Russia. More Pics and Vid in the BBC article.

RE

Russia flash floods: 144 killed in Krasnodar region
Flood water has trapped vehicles and left residents stranded



In pictures: Southern Russia floods
Flash floods: The deadly force of nature

Flash floods caused by torrential rain have swept the southern Russian Krasnodar region, killing 144 people, officials say.

The floods, the worst there in living memory, struck at night, reportedly without warning.

TV pictures showed people scrambling onto their rooftops to escape.

President Vladimir Putin has flown over the region by helicopter and has had emergency talks with officials in the worst-hit town of Krymsk.

Most of those who died were in and around Krymsk, a town of 57,000 people. But nine deaths were reported in the Black Sea resort of Gelendzhik with a further two in the port town of Novorossiysk.

Russian TV showed thousands of houses in the region almost completely submerged and police said many of the victims were elderly people who had been asleep at the time.

"Our house was flooded to the ceiling," Krymsk pensioner Lidiya Polinina told the Agence France-Presse news agency.

"We broke the window to climb out. I put my five-year-old grandson on the roof of our submerged car, and then we somehow climbed up into the attic."

Dozens of people are reportedly missing, and there are fears that the death toll will rise further.

Emergency teams have been sent from Moscow by plane and helicopter.

Crude oil shipments from Novorossiysk have been suspended.

 Some 28 cm of water fell in some areas
Regional governor Alexander Tkachev tweeted after flying over the affected area that there was "something unimaginable" going on in Krymsk.

He said, quoted by the Russian Itar-Tass news agency, that "no-one can remember such floods in our history. There was nothing of the kind for the last 70 years".

'Tsunami'
 
Some users of social media networks in Russia said Krymsk looked like it was hit "by a tsunami". Others accused the authorities of not telling the whole truth about the disaster.

 
The head of the liberal opposition Yabloko party, Sergei Mitrokhin, said on his Twitter feed that local activists had blamed the ferocity of the flood on the opening of sluice gates at a reservoir.

But Krasnodar's regional administration dismissed the allegation as "absolute nonsense", Ria news agency said.

The Krasnodar-Novorossiysk motorway was cut, and the transport system in the region is said to have collapsed.

In a statement, the Krasnodar authorities said altogether 13,000 people had been affected by the floods.

They have declared Monday a day of mourning.

'Something unimaginable'
 
Up to 1,000 rescuers are involved in searching for victims and evacuating survivors.

More than 7,000 Russian children were attending summer camps in the area and one of the camps was evacuated, Russian media reported.

"The floods were very strong. Even traffic lights were ripped out," regional police spokesman Igor Zhelyabin told AFP news agency, adding that evacuations were under way.

 Scenes of devastation greeted rescuers in Krymsk
Anna Kovalevskaya, who says she has relatives in Krymsk, told the BBC her family was caught unawares by the floods.

"The water started flooding in at 02:00 [22:00 GMT Friday]," she said.

"People were running out into the streets in their underwear and wrapping their children in blankets. People were only able to save their passports.

"There is no electricity and the shops are shut. Many people have lost everything and are in a state of panic."

The rains dumped as much as 28cm (11 inches) of water on parts of the Krasnodar region overnight, forcing many residents to take refuge in trees or on house roofs.

Oil pipeline operator Transneft said it had halted crude shipments out of Novorossiysk, but that its infrastructure in the port had been unaffected by the weather.

"Of course, we limited shipments, the port is located in the lower part of town, the whole landslide has moved towards it. As we speak, the rain has started again," spokesman Vladimir Sidorov told Reuters news agency.

Are you in the region? Do you have friends or family there? Have you been affected by the flash floods? If you are happy to speak to the BBC please leave your comment using the form below.
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Offline RE

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Re: 40 Days & 40 Nights: The Rain in Russia Falls Mainly on Ruskies
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2012, 12:46:39 AM »
More on the Ruskie Flooding from the Times of India.  Didn't God PROMISE he wouldn't do the Flooding thing again here?

RE

Over 100 killed in floods, landslides in Russia
Reuters | Jul 8, 2012, 12.44PM

Read more:Vladimir Putin|Transneft|Torrential rain|metric|Landslides|floods|Black Sea

Floods and landslides killed at least 103 people in southern Russia after two months' average rainfall fell in a few hours, forcing some to climb on to roofs and into trees to save themselves, police said on Saturday.

MOSCOW: Floods and landslides killed at least 103 people in southern Russia after two months' average rainfall fell in a few hours, forcing some to climb on to roofs and into trees to save themselves, police said on Saturday.
 
Many victims were elderly people who were asleep in the town of Krymsk when the storm broke in the agricultural region of Krasnodar overnight.
 
They drowned as the torrential rain turned hilly streets into driving torrents and water rose above head-height in what one official called the worst flooding for 70 years.
 
Five people were electrocuted when an electric transformer fell into the water in the coastal resort of Gelendzhik and some victims were swept out to sea.
 
The flooding damaged thousands of homes, blocked railways and roads, and halted oil and grain shipments from the Black Sea port of Novorossiisk.
 
"There are lots of overturned cars, even huge trucks. Brick walls have been washed away," said Vladimir Anosov, a resident of the village of Novoukrainsky near Krymsk, a town surrounded by mountains about 300 km (190 miles) northwest of Sochi where Russia will host the 2014 Winter Olympics.
 
"People are on the street, they are at a loss what to do. Helicopters are flying overhead, they are evacuating people from the flooded areas. The floods are really, really huge," he said by telephone.
 
Russian news agencies said President Vladimir Putin was expected to visit the region to inspect the damage and meet residents, some of whom criticized the rescue operations.
 
It was not immediately clear what the impact might be on the grain harvest, an important part of the regional and national economy.
 
"We found several streets with corpses covered in canvas. People there are in shock. They keep on mumbling that they had not been warned ... There are lots of Emergencies Ministry staff, but they are struggling to cope with the disaster," a reporter on Krasnodar's 9 TV channel said.
 
Novorossiisk, Russia's largest Black Sea port, halted crude oil shipments, a spokesman for oil pipeline operator Transneft said. The port also suspended grain exports.
 
Police put the death toll in the Krymsk area alone at 92 and said two had been killed in Novorossiisk and nine in Gelendzhik.
 
HOLIDAY DESTINATION
 
"Police are beefing up their presence to prevent mass looting," police spokesman Igor Zhelyabin said.
 
"The floods hit at night when people were asleep. You can't do anything about that. Many people in Gelendzhik were hit by electric shocks and some of them were washed away into the sea."
 
The Krasnodar region, with its coastline and high, wooded mountains, is a popular holiday destination for Russians, particularly Gelendzhik. The holiday season has just began, but it was not clear whether any tourists had been killed.
 
The State Hydrometeorology Agency said more rain was possible on Saturday and Sunday and Alexander Tkachov, the governor of the Krasnodar region, urged people not to panic.
 
"No one can remember such floods in our history. There was nothing of the kind for the last 70 years. More than 5,000 households were hit," Itar-Tass news agency quoted him as saying.
 
Transneft spokesman Igor Dyomin said regional transport was in a state of collapse, and all trains heading to and from Novorossiisk were suspended.
 
"The water has risen half a meter above the rails," Russian Railways said on its website.
 
The Novorossiisk port, which handles grains and metals as well as crude oil, said the outlet had cut shipping volumes.
 
"We are not loading grain due to the rainy weather," port spokesman Mikhail Sidorov said.
 
"Of course, we have limited shipments. The port is located in the lower part of town, the whole landslide has moved towards it. As we speak, the rain has started again."
 
Last month Transneft forecast crude exports from Novorossiisk would fall to 3.38 million metric tonnes (3.72 million tons) in July from 3.61 million metric tonnes in June.
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Offline Ashvin

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Re: 40 Days & 40 Nights: The Precipitation Thread
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2012, 09:05:39 AM »
No, RE, God didn't promise that natural weather events would stop happening... this is what he promised:

Quote from: Genesis 8
20Then Noah built an altar to the Lord and, taking some of all the clean animals and clean birds, he sacrificed burnt offerings on it. 21The Lord smelled the pleasing aroma and said in his heart: “Never again will I curse the ground because of man, even thougha every inclination of his heart is evil from childhood. And never again will I destroy all living creatures, as I have done.

22“As long as the earth endures,
seedtime and harvest,
cold and heat,
summer and winter,
day and night
will never cease.”

God did tell us that these types of things would start happening near the end times, though. Whether those are approaching or not is up for debate...

Quote from: Matthew24
3As Jesus was sitting on the Mount of Olives, the disciples came to him privately. “Tell us,” they said, “when will this happen, and what will be the sign of your coming and of the end of the age?”

4Jesus answered: “Watch out that no one deceives you. 5For many will come in my name, claiming, ‘I am the Christ, and will deceive many. 6You will hear of wars and rumors of wars, but see to it that you are not alarmed. Such things must happen, but the end is still to come. 7Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom. There will be famines and earthquakes in various places. 8All these are the beginning of birth pains.

Offline RE

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Nips Need Noah-san NOW!
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2012, 11:50:36 AM »
Our Japanese friends just can't catch a break these days.  They seem to be God's Whipping Boy on Earth.  As a group, these folks are getting Crucified worse than Jesus Christ. As if their Overshoot and Nuke problems are not enough,  God has decided to bring on the Floods now also.

RE

More rain forecast for flood stricken Japan

Updated July 15, 2012 21:43:42



Soldiers of the Ground Self Defence Force and other workers repair a collapsed bank of the Koura River in Kurume, Fukuoka Prefecture.

Related Story: Thousands ordered from homes amid Japan deluge
Map: Japan

Troops have begun flying in supplies to thousands of people cut off by landslides and torrential rain in south west Japan.

More heavy rain and floods are forecast for Kyushu Island, where the death toll from torrential downpours has climbed to 24.

3,500 people have been cut off since Saturday as landslides and fallen trees blocked roads and water supplies in the region, which has been hit by unprecedented rainfall since Wednesday.

Soldiers have been loading food, water and medical supplies into military helicopters to send them to northern Kyushu island.

Local Authorities have also arranged rescue helicopters to take patients and elderly villagers to hospital.

"We will continue sending emergency ration to people there as it is still unknown when we can secure access to the area," said Kayo Shinohara, a spokeswoman for Yame City government.

Rescue operations continued in other affected areas of Kyushu, where at least eight people were still missing after a total of 24 people were confirmed dead in landslides or floods, officials said.

Public broadcaster NHK showed rescuers using heavy machinery to remove uprooted trees, boulders and debris, while residents scooped mud out of their houses with shovels.

Some 3,600 people remained ordered or advised to leave their homes as at least 2,800 houses were flooded, NHK said, after local authorities lifted similar advice to some 400,000 others by Sunday morning.

No relief

The weather eased somewhat Sunday bringing temporary relief, but the Japan Meteorological Agency warned of more heavy rain, landslides and floods on the main southern island of Kyushu.

"A peak of heavy rain in northern Kyushu has passed, but there is fear that driving rain with thunder may hit northern Kyushu as warm and humid air is flowing to the rain front," the agency said.

"Please be vigilant of damage from landslides and floods as part of the ground has already softened and water is still overflowing from rivers because of record rainfalls," it said.

Rainfall of up to 81.7 centimetres has been recorded in hardest-hit Aso, situated at the foot of a volcano, where at least 18 people were killed and four others were still missing.

Television footage showed torrents of muddy, debris-strewn water and flooded houses following what officials described as "unprecedented" downpours from a seasonal rain front.

Heavy rainfall was also monitored in Kyoto, some 500 kilometres east of the affected areas in Kyushu, on Sunday, flooding more than 20 houses, news reports said.

About 20 people were temporarily trapped in the city as stream broke a river bank following rainfall of nine centimetres per hour, but they were later rescued safely, the reports added.
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Offline g

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Re: 40 Days & 40 Nights: The Precipitation Thread
« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2012, 06:06:50 PM »
Quote RE "Our Japanese friends just can't catch a break these days.  They seem to be God's Whipping Boy on Earth.  As a group, these folks are getting Crucified worse than Jesus Christ. As if their Overshoot and Nuke problems are not enough,  God has decided to bring on the Floods now also.
  How does their currency stay so relatively strong?  It baffles the shit out of me.   :dontknow:

Offline RE

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Re: 40 Days & 40 Nights: The Precipitation Thread
« Reply #8 on: July 15, 2012, 06:25:59 PM »
  How does their currency stay so relatively strong?  It baffles the shit out of me.   :dontknow:

Because the whole game is RIGGED. Read that LIE-BOR.

RE
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40 Days & 40 Nights: The Spilla in Manila
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2012, 03:57:36 AM »

OK, now in addition to Noahtsky for Russia we are looking for Nogoyah from the Phillipines for some Ark Building here!

Meanwhile, they sure could use some of that Rainfall in the Cornbelt these days, and I'm sure CYPM wouldn't mind a little falling on the TX-OK border either.

The New Normal. I am SURE George Will can expalin this as "Normal Weather Patterns".

*Note from the Last Great Frontier:  Wet Summer overall.

RE


Torrential rains submerge half of Philippine capital, trigger landslide that kills 8 people

By Associated Press, Published: August 6 | Updated: Tuesday, August 7, 2:30 AM

MANILA, Philippines — Relentless rains submerged half of the sprawling Philippine capital, triggered a landslide that killed eight people and sent emergency crews scrambling Tuesday to rescue and evacuate tens of thousands of residents.

The deluge, the worst since 2009 when hundreds died in rampaging flash floods, was set off by the seasonal monsoon that overflowed major dams and rivers in Manila and surrounding provinces.

The capital and other parts of the country already were saturated from last week’s Typhoon Saola, which battered Manila and the north for several days before blowing away Friday. That storm was responsible for at least 53 deaths.

 “It’s like a water world,” said Benito Ramos, head of the government’s disaster response agency. He said the rains flooded 50 percent of metropolitan Manila on Monday evening, and about 30 percent remained under waist- or neck-deep waters Tuesday.

He urged residents in areas prone to landslides and floods to stay in evacuation centers. Because the soil is saturated, even a little rain could be dangerous, he added.

 “Now that it’s getting dark, I would like to repeat, if the rains are heavy you should be at the evacuation centers,” he said, warning that rescue operations are more difficult at night and could put responders at risk.

Manila’s weather bureau said a separate tropical storm off eastern China had intensified monsoon rains in the Philippines, which were forecast to last until Thursday.

In Manila’s suburban Quezon City, a landslide hit a row of shanties along a road, burying eight people, according to witnesses.

Army troops and police dug frantically to save those buried, including four children, as surviving relatives and neighbors wept. All the victims were later dug up, including a man whose body was found near an entombed shanty’s door.

National police chief Nicanor Bartolome went to the scene and ordered all other slum dwellers to be evacuated from the area.

TV footage showed rescuers dangling on ropes to bring children and other residents to safety from flooded houses across the city. Many residents trapped in their homes as floodwaters rose called radio and TV stations desperately asking for help.

 “We need to be rescued,” Josephine Cruz told DZMM radio as water rose around her house in Quezon City, saying she was trapped in her two-story house with 11 other people, including her 83-year-old mother. “We can’t get out because the floodwaters are now higher than people.”

Vehicles and even heavy trucks struggled to navigate water-clogged roads, where hundreds of thousands of commuters were stranded. Many cars were stuck in the muddy waters.

The government suspended work and classes Tuesday and Wednesday. Some shopping malls opened with limited grocery supplies that were quickly picked up by shoppers waiting in long lines.

The La Mesa dam, which supplies water to the capital of 12 million people, spilled excess water early Tuesday into the rivers flowing into Quezon City, as well as the neighborhoods of Malabon, Valenzuela and Caloocan, where several villages were submerged.

Along the swollen Marikina River, nearly 20,000 residents have been moved away from the riverbanks but many others asked to be rescued from the floods. Mayor Del de Guzman pleaded for patience and said overwhelmed rescue teams would try to reach everyone.

President Benigno Aquino III called an emergency meeting of Cabinet officials and disaster-response agencies. He ordered officials to make sure all residents were accounted for in flooded villages and discussed how flooded hospitals could be helped in case they were hit by power outages.

The Philippine Stock Exchange in the financial district of Makati, which also was flooded, was closed. Also closed was the U.S. Embassy along Manila Bay in the historic old city, which was flooded last week when a storm surge pushed the water over the seawall.

In 2009, massive flooding spawned by a typhoon devastated Manila and surrounding areas, killing hundreds. The state weather bureau said that the current flooding was not as severe and that the weather may start to improve later this week.

Saola was the seventh of 20 typhoons and storms expected to batter the Philippines this year.
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Offline RE

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Re: 40 Days & 40 Nights: The Spilla in Manila
« Reply #10 on: August 07, 2012, 01:37:11 PM »
More on the Spilla in Manila

RE

Thousands Flee Manila Flooding; Desperate Residents Trapped on Roofs


 
By FLOYD WHALEY
 
Published: August 7, 2012 8 Comments

MANILA — At least a third of this overpopulated capital and its suburbs were submerged on Tuesday as torrential rains battered the city and floodwaters poured in from almost all sides. A silted lake in the south sent water coursing into an overflowing river that slices through Manila; water poured from the open floodgates of a dam to the north, and high tide brought flooding from the bay to the west.

The combination kept rescue workers in rubber boats struggling to pluck panicked people from rushing waters that sometimes swirled around their necks and turned major roads into virtual rivers.

More than 50 people have already died in more than a week of intense storms, monsoon rains and flooding, and at least 250,000 have been evacuated in just the past several days, officials said.

Photographs of some of the hardest-hit areas showed people clutching ropes and whatever else they could to keep from being swept away in fast currents; one man clung to the top of a metal pole that once supported a basketball hoop. Another photo showed dozens of people under a sea of umbrellas waiting in waist-deep water for trapped relatives to be rescued from their homes.

“It’s like Waterworld,” said Benito Ramos, who heads the government’s disaster relief agency, referring to the Hollywood movie with Kevin Costner depicting a submerged earth.

Television networks and radio stations reported receiving frantic calls from people unable to flee their homes, according to The Associated Press. One of them, Josephine Cruz, told DZMM radio that she was trapped in her two-story house with 11 other people, including her 83-year-old mother.

“We need to be rescued,” she said, according to the news service. “We can’t get out because the floodwaters are now higher than people.”

A state of emergency was declared in nine provincial areas near Manila, setting government relief efforts in motion. And for much of the day Tuesday, the only major highway linking Manila to the north of the country was flooded and closed to traffic.

The flooding is the worst to hit the area since two storms in 2009 killed more than 900 people.

On Monday, the government said up to half of the city and its environs were under water. On Tuesday, officials said some of the storm waters had receded, but heavy rains continued, leaving open the possibility that floods would again claim more of the city.

Schools and business and government offices were ordered closed, although Manila’s main business districts were largely spared, in part because they have well-maintained drainage systems, unlike slum areas.

Richard Gordon, chairman of the Red Cross of the Philippines, described a perilous situation for rescuers, many of whom were using rafts and makeshift boats to traverse flooded slums.

“We have areas where our people can’t get in because there are live wires in the water,” Mr. Gordon said. “They face the risk of electrocution.”

He added, “We just have to grin and bear it and do our best to rescue people.”

In Quezon City, just northeast of Manila, nine people, including three children, were killed Tuesday when a landslide caused by heavy rain buried a slum.

As rescuers frantically tried to dig people out, Jessie Bailon stared at a muddy mound where his shanty had stood. “My wife, children and grandchild are down there,” he said, according to The Associated Press.

Manila is particularly vulnerable to flooding. The metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 10 million, sits in a low-lying area between a large lake and the ocean. The lake, Laguna de Bay, at the south of the city, drains to the ocean via the Pasig River, which runs through the center of town. The lake and the river are heavily silted and prone to overflowing their banks.

Waters behind the major dam north of the city, which supplies much of Manila’s water, also crested in recent days, compelling officials to open floodgates. In addition, the bay beside Manila has swelled during high tide in recent days.

The flooding provoked fears of a repeat of the typhoons Ketsana and Parma, which struck within a week in 2009. Those storms caused flooding that affected more than nine million people and killed 929, according to the government disaster relief agency.

Mr. Gordon, the Red Cross official, said he did not expect the situation to become as bad as that.

“I feel a little positive that the sun will come out tomorrow,” he said. “We are trying to be positive, but a lot of people are suffering tonight.”
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Offline RE

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40 Days & 40 Nights: Shanghai Seeks Sum Fun Noah
« Reply #11 on: August 07, 2012, 10:40:35 PM »
Moving from the Spilla in Manila to the Mailand now. Shanghai no less!  Gotta love those Evacuation/Relocation numbers! HTF do the Chinese move that many people?

RE

Shanghai Issues Highest Storm Alert as Haikui Grounds Planes

By Bloomberg News - Aug 7, 2012 9:45 PM PT
.
Shanghai raised its highest-level alert for Typhoon Haikui as the approaching storm lashed the region with rain and wind, forcing China’s three largest airlines to cancel all flights to and from the city.

Shanghai evacuated 252,000 people ahead of the storm while about 1.5 million people were relocated in Zhejiang province, which neighbors the city to the south, the official Xinhua News Agency reported. Shanghai’s weather center raised the typhoon alert to red at 11:30 a.m. local time and warned of strong winds at speeds that will be sustained or strengthen in the next six hours. No deaths or injuries were yet to be reported.

Chinese rescuers help evacuate residents from their homes of Typhoon Haikui in Zhoushan, east China's Zhejiang province on August 7, 2012. Source: AFP/Getty Images
.
The typhoon, which made land in Zhejiang today at 3:20 a.m., had winds as fast as 137 kilometers (85 miles) per hour as of 7 a.m., the China Meteorological Administration said. Haikui, the third typhoon to hit China in a week, has poured 350 millimeters (13.8 inches) to 434 millimeters of rain in Xiangshan, Ninghai and Taizhou of Zhejiang province since this morning. Average rainfall in the eastern portion of Zhejiang has been more than 100 millimeters, it said.

China Eastern Airlines Corp., China Southern Airlines Co. and Air China Ltd. (601111) were among carriers that scrapped flights to Shanghai’s two airports, Shanghai International Airport Co. said on its official microblog hosted on Sina Corp.’s Weibo service. China Eastern, Air China and Hong Kong-based Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. (293) also canceled flights to and from the cities of Hangzhou and Ningbo today in Zhejiang, according to their websites.

Haikui was forecast to dump “lasting heavy rains” in the provinces of Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Anhui and the municipality of Shanghai for the next three days, the weather agency said.

In addition to the evacuations, Shanghai also ordered a halt to all outdoor group activities and construction work yesterday and told ships not to leave harbor.
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Offline WHD

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Re: 40 Days & 40 Nights: The Precipitation Thread
« Reply #12 on: August 08, 2012, 07:08:51 AM »
Quote
HTF do the Chinese move that many people?

I think the more accurate question might be, did they move people, or is that # as reliable as all the other #'s that flow from the regime? But then, they are the people of Confucius, a very orderly sort. Still, 1.5 million in a few days? It's one thing to move them, but where do you put them? Maybe one of their numerous ghost cities, where perhaps they will be left.

Offline RE

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40 Days & 40 Nights: The Spilla in Manila II
« Reply #13 on: August 14, 2012, 09:30:09 PM »



By Associated Press | August 14, 2012 | (MANILA, Philippines) — A second tropical storm in as many weeks battered the northern Philippines after making landfall Wednesday, killing at least two people, as forecasters warned that the still-reeling capital could see more flooding.

Meanwhile, President Benigno Aquino III scrambled to avert another crisis when hundreds of state weather agency employees protested over their pay and warned that forecasting services could deteriorate.

Tropical Storm Kai-Tak slammed ashore in northeastern Isabela province with maximum winds of 100 kilometers (60 miles) per hour and higher gusts. It is expected to traverse northern farming provinces and exit along Luzon Island’s western seaboard possibly as a powerful typhoon heading toward southern China in the direction of Hong Kong.

The head of the disaster-relief agency, Benito Ramos, reported two deaths, including a man who drowned while swimming in Ilocos Norte province. He said some roads were flooded knee-deep, and government forecasters warned of intense rains that may drench the sprawling capital, Manila, which is still reeling from last week’s monsoon deluge.

On Tuesday, an alarmed Aquino rushed to assure the protesting weather agency employees that steps were being taken to resume payment of the cash benefits that had been suspended in March.

“I just reminded that since the weather is bad and we have a weather disturbance, we should not add to the worries of those who were hit by the floods,” Aquino told reporters after a hasty meeting with the restive employees.

Forecasters and other employees of the Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration wore black arm bands and hoisted streamers urging the government to resume hazard pay and other allowances.

While the workers did not plan any work stoppage, protest leader Ramon Agustin said some hard-up employees had failed to report for work due to lack of money.

“The only reason why we remain strong in performing our tasks is our pure love for the country, but this will eventually weaken,” Agustin said in a news conference at the weather agency, which buzzed with activity as forecasters tracked the second storm.

The archipelago located in the tropical far western Pacific serves like a welcome mat for about 20 tropical storms and typhoons that develop in the open ocean and blow toward Asia every year. Heavy rain from those storms and the annual monsoon often cause flooding and landslides and leave a trail of death and destruction.

Relentless rains for nearly two weeks culminated in last week’s two-day deluge that submerged Manila and outlying farming provinces, killing nearly 100 people and displacing more than 400,000.

Budget Secretary Florencio Abad said payment of the hazard pay and other cash benefits had been suspended to correct past irregularities, but added the workers would get back the benefits soon.

Agustin said the employees have lost an average of 10,000 pesos ($238) monthly since the benefits were suspended by officials in March.

MORE: Clear Skies Reveal Messy Scope of Philippine Flood


Read more: http://world.time.com/2012/08/14/new-storm-hits-north-philippines-at-least-2-dead/#ixzz23aHblzde
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40 Days & 40 Nights: Alaska Needs Noah
« Reply #14 on: September 20, 2012, 09:26:49 PM »
My turn for Wild Weather!  Constant rain for the last couple of weeks is now causing flooding all over the Mat Valley.  The Cabin is fine though, on High Ground.  Good video in the article.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/MhuKfNAg0JI" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/MhuKfNAg0JI</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Wt6xZWF6uDg" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Wt6xZWF6uDg</a>

RE
Flooding prompts school and road closures ( VIDEO)
Laurel Andrews | Sep 20, 2012
 


 Related
Flooding, high winds prompt state of emergency in Seward Days of rain and high winds caused widespread flooding across Southcentral Alaska overnight Wednesday and Thursday, with voluntary evacuations in flood-prone areas from the Matanuska Valley to the Kenai Peninsula.

Matanuska Valley
Wasilla

Flash flooding was a problem Wednesday night into Thursday, with Lucille Street in Wasilla underwater around midnight, according to Carol Vardeman, a spokesperson for the Matanuska-Susitna Borough. Vardeman said that  water was already waist-deep by the time rescue crews arrived at flooded homes; by the time the crew got boats unloaded, water had risen to chest-deep levels. By the time boats were dispatched, the water was "over their heads," Vardeman said. She didn't know what caused the flash flooding but noted that the homes were in a "marshy area."

With the ground heavily saturated from all the rain, perhaps it was just “one drop too many,” she said. A total of 13 people were rescued from five homes, which were still flooded Thursday.

The Alaska Pacific River Forecast Center, which monitors rivers across the state, wasn't certain what caused flash flooding in Wasilla. Some have speculated that the Little Su River was the source, but forecaster Arlene Lundsford called that unlikely because the river is 2 miles from where the flash flood occurred.

The Red Cross has set up the Menard Sports Center as a shelter; 20 cots are available, along with showers and food.

Willow/Talkeetna

In Willow, an evacuation notice was issued by state and local officials for folks living between Shirley Town Road and the Parks Highway, and along Willow Creek to Willow Fishhook Road. The Willow Community Center has 25 cots available for those needing shelter.

 Photos: Flooding in Southcentral AlaskaSep 20, 2012Mike Morgansen bikes through a flooded tunnel in the Chester Creek greenbelt on September 20, 2012.Loren Holmes photo
 Photos: Flooding in Southcentral AlaskaSep 20, 2012A pedestrian on a flooded boardwalk on Campbell Creek. September 20, 2012Loren Holmes photo
 Photos: Flooding in Southcentral AlaskaSep 20, 2012Flooded Campbell Creek. September 20, 2012Loren Holmes photo
 Photos: Flooding in Southcentral AlaskaSep 20, 2012Flooded Campbell Creek. September 20, 2012Loren Holmes photo
 Photos: Flooding in Southcentral Alaska
Sep 20, 2012
Workers clearing debris below Seward's flooded Lowell canyon waterfall. September 20, 2012
Mike Meeks / City of Seward Photos: Flooding in Southcentral AlaskaSep 20, 2012Flooded lot on Seward's Salmon Creek road. September 20, 2012Mike Meeks / City of Seward
 Photos: Flooding in Southcentral AlaskaSep 20, 2012Debris blocking a downtown Seward street. September 20, 2012Mike Meeks / City of Seward
 Photos: Flooding in Southcentral AlaskaSep 20, 2012The flooded Resurrection River in Seward. September 20, 2012Mike Meeks / City of Seward
 Photos: Flooding in Southcentral AlaskaSep 20, 2012Seward's Old Mill subdivision flooding. September 20, 2012City of Seward via Seward Journal
 Photos: Flooding in Southcentral AlaskaSep 20, 2012Seward's Lowell canyon tunnel during the flood. September 20, 2012City of Seward via Seward Journal
 Photos: Flooding in Southcentral AlaskaSep 20, 2012A flash flood hit a neighborhood in a cul-de-sac outside Wasilla. A flash flood had rescuers paddling 10 residents to safety at 1 a.m. Thursday morning, September 20, 2012.Jon Burns / Manauska-Susitna Borough
 Photos: Flooding in Southcentral AlaskaSep 20, 2012Engineer Jennifer Luce with her haul of rescues, two furry ones.Jon Burns / Manauska-Susitna Borough
 Photos: Flooding in Southcentral AlaskaSep 20, 2012A member of the Mat-Su Borough Water Rescue Team.Jon Burns / Manauska-Susitna Borough
 Photos: Flooding in Southcentral AlaskaSep 20, 2012The flooded Seward Highway at MP 3.5. September 20, 2012Carl High / Alaska DOT&PF
 Photos: Flooding in Southcentral AlaskaSep 20, 2012Flooding on Seward's Nash Road at MP 0.25. September 19, 2012Carl High / Alaska DOT&PF
 Photos: Flooding in Southcentral AlaskaSep 20, 2012Flooded Exit Glacier Road in Seward. September 19, 2012Carl High / Alaska DOT&PFPreviousPauseNext.The Talkeetna River had risen to 12 feet as of 11 a.m. Thursday, with flooding in parts of town, according to the KTNA Talkeetna Facebook page. The river crested spilled out onto Mercedes Road, closing it and several other roads. Residents of 30 homes in the River Subdivision had been asked to evacuate by the fire department. KTNA also reported that the Yoder Road Bridge had reportedly been damaged by Montana Creek flooding as rising waters eroded a dyke. Water levels at Main Street in Talkeetna appear to be up 5 or 6 feet above normal, KTNA News Director Lorien Nettleton said, adding that most flooding was "minor" but had made for an "interesting, long night."

Water levels on the Talkeetna River are expected to continue rising, according to the National Weather Service. A flood warning remains in effect in the Susitna Valley, in effect through 6 p.m. Thursday. Talkeetna’s Sunshine Center has 30 cots available for those needing shelter.

Seward
Flooding left parts of the coastal town of Seward under water Thursday but no injuries had been reported, according to officials there. Subdivisions were closed off due to high waters and flooding creeks, Mayor David Seaward said, and many residents reported property damage.

The Seward Highway, which leads into town from Anchorage, Alaska's largest city, remained open, but "trouble spots" prompted officials to recommend against traveling if at all possible Thursday. A rundown of flooding-related closures in Seward, according to city spokesperson Johanna Kinney:

•Old Mill Road, just north of Seward, was closed;
•Exit Glacier Road was cut off;
•Lowell Point Road, which traces the sea's edge, was closed, too. Residents living out Lowell Point Road were said to be "hunkering down" until flooding subsides.
•Dieckgraeff Road was closed
•Nash Road was closed
Crews have also been working "around the clock" to remove debris that was washing down the Lowell Creek waterfall onto a bridge, Kinney said.

The city had converted Seward High School into a shelter, where at least 13 people stayed overnight, according to Mayor Seaward. Emergency crews were preparing for a high tide at 4:40 p.m., Thursday, which was expected to crest higher than Wednesday. Anyone needing evacuation assistance was instructed to call (907) 224-4041.

School was canceled for Seward on Friday. Shelter operations were suspended due to little to no use by residents.

.
Kenai
A flood warning was in effect on the Kenai River from Kenai Lake to the mouth of the river, through 7 p.m. Sunday, according to the National Weather Service. At Cooper Landing, the Kenai River water level stage was at 12.8 feet as of 10 a.m. Thursday; flood stage is 13 feet. The river was forecast to continue rising over the next 48 to 72 hours and expected to crest near 15.5 feet Sunday. Downstream, the Kenai River is expected to rise steadily and crest over the weekend, with minor flooding early next week.

Additional flood watches were issued for the Anchor and Ninilchik rivers, along with Stariski and Deep creeks, according to the Peninsula Clarion.

Rain is expected to continue through Monday, according to the National Weather Service. Flood watches and advisories were widespread across Southcentral Alaska, from the Mat-Su to Anchorage and the Kenai. Read more, here.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2012, 09:43:50 PM by RE »
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