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Privatization of Water
« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2014, 03:51:39 PM »
Privatization of Water as an Owned Commodity Rather Than a Universal Human Right

By Joachim Hagopian
Global Research, April 20, 2014

There is no greater natural resource on this earth than water. As the sustenance of all life, water keeps every living and breathing organism, every plant, every animal and every human being on this planet alive. In the same way that without air to breathe, without water we humans cannot sustain life for more than a few days.

Due to global warming, widespread drought and increasingly polluted water systems, the projected availability of clean freshwater in years to come to meet the rising demands of a growing global population is among the most daunting human challenges of this century. By 2015 a 17% increase in global water demand is projected just for increasing agriculturally produced food. By the same year 2025, the growing global population will increase water consumption needs by a whopping 40%. While oil played the keenly critical role during the twentieth century, water is being deemed the most valued precious natural resource of the twenty-first century.

As such, several years ago the United Nations declared access to clean drinking water a universal human right. Conversely, willfully denying it is considered a serious human rights violation that denies life itself. And any calculated decision denying people their universal right to life is nothing short of a murderous, shameful crime against humanity.

Despite the human air pollution that has long been dirtying our lungs, while also causing global warming, climate change and increasing catastrophic natural disasters, not to mention the growing global health hazard for us humans, the very thought of making clean air a precious commodity that can opportunistically be packaged and sold by the same corporations that have been ruining our air, that very notion would instantly be criticized, scorned and ridiculed.

Yet that is exactly what has been happening for the last thirty years now all over this planet with the earth’s preciously dwindling freshwater drinking supply. The World Bank has been financing global privatization of the earth’s water supply making clean water that is so necessary for survival an unaffordable private commodity for the poorest people on earth to even access. They are literally dying of thirst and disease because of greedy psychopathic corporate profiteers once again placing theft and greed over human welfare and life itself.

But then that is the globalist agenda – thinning the human herd down from near seven billion currently to as low as just half a billion. That means 13 out of 14 of us alive today according to their diabolical oligarch plan simply must die within the next few years. And what better way to rapidly kill off the human population than taking full ownership and control over the earth’s limited diminishing water supply.

More people on this planet are dying presently from waterborne disease from dirty water than are dying from all wars and violence worldwide combined. Every hour 240 babies die from unsafe water. 1.5 million children under five years of age die every year from cholera and typhoid fever due to unsanitary water conditions. These incredibly sad, alarming facts illustrate just how significant and critical a clean freshwater supply is to staying alive on this planet. Taking control over the earth’s clean water supply is achieved by turning water into a privately owned commodity that only the largest corporations and banks control. Simply making water unaffordable and thereby inaccessible to the poorest people on the planet is one extremely effective, albeit most sinister way to reduce the so called overpopulation problem.

Three primary ways that the human population decreases significantly every year is death caused by starvation and malnutrition (including lack of drinkable water) at between seven to eight millionpeople, diseases that kill between two to three million (with mounting threats of infectious diseases becoming pandemics) and upwards of near a half million dying each year from war.

Behind closed doors oligarchic globalists periodically meet and discuss what is best for humanity and the planet according to them and their megalomaniacal self-interests. For many years now this all important topic of water privatization and control as a convenient and most effective means of addressing the overpopulation problem has been regularly tabled for discussion… along with related topics like geo-engineering, GMO’s, vaccines, overuse of antibiotics, planned wars over oil and water, devising global policies designed to increase political destabilization, poverty and undermine economies, nuclear radiation and a host of other means for culling the human population.

Time Magazine reported how the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has been financing research at the University of North Carolina among 78 others to develop ultrasound infertility contraception techniques to sterilize male sperm. At a 2010 TED conference Bill Gates spoke openly of depopulating the total of 6.8 billion people living on earth by up to “10 to 15%” using both of his heavily funded vaccine and contraception programs that will render much of the global population infertile. Meanwhile, billionaire Ted Turner went even further, offering his public opinion to decrease the world population by 70% down to “two billion.” It too is on tape.

Calls to begin sterilizing the human population began surfacing back in the mid-1970’s with Henry Kissinger as former Secretary of State and high ranking Bilderberg member in his declassified National Security Council document (1974) entitled “The Implications of World-wide PopulationGrowth on the Security and External Interests of the United States.” This document emphasized highest priority given to implementing birth control programs targeting thirteen Third World nations mostly in South America. Extraordinary resources were allocated through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) pushing the carrot stick of additional financial aid to countries willing to enact sterilization and depopulation programs.

More overt evidence of the callous contempt that globalist oligarchs have toward us 99%-ers is captured in a statement written by Prince Phillip, Queen Elizabeth II’s husband in the forward of his book, “I must confess that I am tempted to ask for reincarnation as a particularly deadly virus” to reduce the human population. It seems readily discernable that an explicit globalist agenda for a New World Order openly propagated with repeated references by President Goerge Bush senior includes depopulation through various means, water control through privatization just one of many in the power elite’s arsenal.

Humans have been dying from lack of clean water for a long time now and will only continue dying at an even greater frequency if the plan to privatize water continues to unfold unchecked and without opposition. Fortunately forces have been mobilizing to combat water privatization. Just last week on the heels of the World Bank annual convening in Washington DC for several days ofconferencing, an international coalition of anti-privatization water rights groups from India and America sent a formal message calling on the World Bank to end its destructive practice of privatizing water around the world under the guise of developmental progress. The Bank’s DC meetings had been touting lies and disinformation in an attempt to paint a glowing report showcasing the so called efficacy and successes that turning water rights over to the private sector have accomplished in recent years. The World Bank’s International Finance Corporation (IFC) as the planet’s largest funding source for water privatization provides loans and financing to Third World nations for private water management companies to take charge of municipal, regional and national water rights.

The director of a global advocacy group called Corporate Accountability International, Shayda Naficy, pointed out that 75% of expenses for running a water utility company should go to infrastructure. In nation after nation private companies have placed the priority of making a profit over the need to invest in necessary infrastructure to connect and adequately service water customers. In efforts to maximize cost efficiency as well as profits, water prices invariably go up and fast become out of reach for poorest customers. Cutting off the water supply to thousands of low income families unable to pay for their rising costs has become the all too frequent inevitable result. The World Bank’s 34 percent failure rate for all private water and sewerage contracts between 2000 and 2010 far surpasses its single digit failure rates in the telecommunications, energy and transportation industries.

Critics maintain that the public sector is far more accountable to its public constituents than private sector businesses that only answer to its board of directors to show sufficient profits. Corruption becomes commonplace. Additionally, a conflict of interest exists when the IFC acts as both a money lender and consultant to foreign municipalities in assigning no bid contracts to favored private water utility companies.

To best illustrate typical scenarios where water privatization is either not working or already proved a failure deserve close examination. The good news is that in recent years people in various parts of the world have been mobilizing successful efforts and campaigns to stop water privatization in their own backyards. Presently in a number of regions in India, citizens are banding together to confront and fight the myriad of problems with water privatization in their country.

Recently in Nagpur, central India’s largest city where the country’s first municipal partnership with a private utility company is being played out, major tensions have erupted. Three years ago the city signed a 25-year contract with Veolia Water to supply the city of 2.7 million residents with 24 hour-7-days a week water service. Instead unforeseen delays driving up prices manyfold along with unfair water distribution and frequent service breakdowns have led to widespread angry protests in the streets and charges of corruption. City officials point to a series of serious contract violations. Again cutting corners by refusing to invest in the needed infrastructure appears to be the primary cause for this failed project. The Corporate Accountability International’s 2012 report called “Shutting the Spigot on Private Water: The Case for the World Bank to Divest” cites a number of similar cases where privatization has proven ineffective.

Bold and empowered citizens in Bolivia in the year 2000 made headlines around the globe when they were victorious in kicking out privatized water there in the form of the Bechtel, the fifth largest private corporation on the planet. Impassioned protestors in Bolivia’s third-largest city managed to oppose Bechtel’s increasing prices and demanded that the company abandon its hold on their city’s municipal water supply, eventually driving the powerful scandalous giant out of the country. Though big business efforts to buy and control water rights in many Latin American nations have each had their turn in nations like Equator and Brazil, only Chile water services are privatized. Ultimately local residents virtually everywhere privatization has attempted to take hold has been met with such strong resistance from consumers who realize their private utility company has failed miserably in delivering quality service at affordable prices.

The story is always the same. That is why advocacy groups like Corporate Accountability International is proactively working toward educating governments and citizens worldwide to ensure water remains under the public domain. The exhaustive and expensive legal process of ending long term contracts and successfully removing privatized foreign corporations once established in a city, state or country is formidable. It is obviously in the best interests of people around the world to ensure privatization of their water supply never gets a local foothold in the first place.

Nestlé corporation’s marketing campaign targeted wealthy Pakistanis in Lahore, and its brand of bottled water ‘Pure Life’ became a status symbol for the rich. To bottle its product, Nestlé busily dried up local underground springs that subsequently caused the village poor unable to buy the bottled water stolen from their springs to end up consuming contaminated water. Nestlé went on to extracting water from two deep wells in Bhati Dilwan village, forcing them to turn to bottled water. A similar story emerged from Nigeria where a single bottled water exceeds the average daily income of a Nigerian citizen. Nestlé is notorious for draining local water supplies used to bottle its water brands, then charge unaffordable prices to the local population whose clean water supply was stolen from them.

Corporate Watch released a report exposing some of the unethical and illegal practices that Nestlé has long been committing around the globe, completely disregarding public health concerns while destroying natural environments to ensure huge annual profits of $35 billion just from water bottle sales alone. In Brazil’s Serra da Mantiqueira region where the groundwater is rich in mineral content containing medicinal properties, over-pumping has depleted its valuable water resources and caused permanent damage to the natural environment. and long-term damage.

Nestlé has also allegedly been involved in human trafficking of child slave labor. A BBC investigative report claimed that “hundreds of thousands of children in Mali, Burkina Faso and Togo were being purchased from their destitute parents and shipped to the Ivory Coast to be sold as slaves to cocoa farms.” Yet Nestlé likely bought the cocoa from the Ivory Coast and Ghana knowing it was produced using child slaves.

Finally, Nestlé owns or leases fifty spring sites throughout America. Nestlé controls a third of the domestic market for bottled water in the US. The company is notorious for unlawful extraction of spring water while engaging in price-gouging and reeking havoc in numerous communities. An example of the trouble Nestlé typically causes is Colorado where 80% of the citizens of Aurora were opposed to Nestlé’s presence, fully aware of the company’s terrible reputation for damaging communities and natural environments. Yet the city council voted in favor 7 to 4 to let the devastation begin and over the next decade Nestlé extracted 650 million gallons of precious Arkansas River valley water that went into its Arrowhead Springs brand of bottled water. For years the embattled townspeople of Aurora fought to rid the company predator from destroying their precious aquifers. Additionally, the plastic non-biodegradable bottles are major pollutants that stay toxically intact for a full millennium.

The cumulative grave effects of privatizing water as a global commodity are appalling. The underprivileged residents of Jakarta, Manila and Nairobi pay 5 to 10 times more for water than those living in high-income areas of those same cities. People living in the Third World slums even pay more for water than upscale New Yorkers and Londoners. This kind of unfairness and inequity is obscene. Women in places in Africa where privatized water is beyond their limit walk miles to obtain dirty water from rivers and then too often die along with their children from contamination and disease. Asian farmers are losing their livelihoods if they are unable to receive state funded irrigation. The human suffering caused globally by wealthy private corporations from North America and Europe exploiting people from Third World nations for pure profit is nothing less than pure psychopathic evil.

Taking on global privatization of water for the well being and greater good of the people is but an example of the monumental work that needs to be done. Only if informed, caring and committed human beings collectively come together worldwide to take a global stand against this gravest of life and death issues facing humanity can this oligarch agenda be stopped dead in its tracks. As global human rights activists it is up to us to end the global corporate malevolence and malfeasance from further damaging and afflicting our planet like never before. With the recent formal finding that Americans no longer live in a democracy but an oligarchy, as if we did not already painfully know, it becomes even more “formally” imperative now that we as ordinary citizens of the world take the vested interest in preserving life on our only planet before it becomes too late. It is high time we take back our planet once and for all from the oligarchic corporatocracy bent on insidiously making our earthly home increasingly uninhabitable for all life forms.

Mass extinction of plant and animal species that have thrived on this planet for millions of years is silently, invisibly taking place every single day right before our eyes. At ever-perilous stake now is our own human species as well as all living species inhabiting this earth, suffering at the hands of national governments that have corruptly co-opted with the banking cabal-owned transnational corporations and for too many decades been systematically destroying the richly diverse natural ecosystems of all earthly life forms on an unprecedented scale.

Since governmental co-opting with global fortune 500 corporations has been polluting and poisoning the earth’s skies, its waters, food sources and seeds for so long, global theft and destruction has us humans and all life forms teetering now on the brink of complete self-annihilation and extinction, human-induced for the first time on a massive never before seen scale. It is time to hold the oligarchy in the form of corporations responsible for all the damage they have reeked on this earth. No more grotesque “Abama-nations” of bank and Wall Street bailouts at taxpayer expense. Since the 99% in debt to the hilt have been squeezed dry, while the 1% have made this planet nearly unlivable as the only ones filthily richly profiting from their plundering this earth, the transnationals are the sole entities with the financial capital and means to clean up the very mess they created. It is only fair then that after an entire century of mucking the planet up at our expense, that they now need to finally be held accountable for repairing the destruction they directly caused and obscenely profited from.

Joachim Hagopian is a West Point graduate and former Army officer. His written manuscript based on his military experience examines leadership and national security issues and can be consulted at http://www.redredsea.net/westpointhagopian/. After the military, Joachim earned a masters degree in psychology and became a licensed therapist working in the mental health field for more than a quarter century. He now focuses on writing. 
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Re: Official California Dustbowl Thread
« Reply #16 on: May 23, 2014, 08:36:09 PM »
Jimbo picked this one up from the Weather Channel.  Get your Grow Domes Up!

RE

U.S. FOOD SUPPLY IN DANGER

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Posted on 23rd May 2014 by Administrator in Economy |Politics |Social Issues

, , ,

This is not a story from some gloom and doom website. It’s from The Weather Channel. Get ready for much higher prices. I hear cat food doesn’t taste that bad.

California Drought Threatens Food Supply of All Americans; Collapsing Aquifer Sinking the Land

Stephen NeslagePublished: May 22, 2014, 3:23 PM EDTweather.com

Overlay

Cracked: San Joaquin Valley sinking due to drought

Walk into any grocery store in America and there’s a good chance the fresh produce you see there was grown in California. Up to half of the nation’s fruit, nuts and vegetables are grown in the Central Valley, one of the planet’s most fertile growing regions, between Los Angeles and Sacramento.

Now, for the first time this century, the entire state is in severe to exceptional drought.

“It’s really depressing for us to leave ground out. We’re still paying taxes and payments on everything that’s non-production,” said Gene Errotabere, whose family has farmed the valley since the late 1920s. “I mean, it’s this whole valley. It’s just a breadbasket of our whole country here, and to see this much ground being fallowed is not something I like to see.”

(MORE: Texas Town Forced to Drink Toilet Water Because of the Drought?)

Errotabere says his farm is in uncharted territory and on the verge of catastrophe. Thirty percent of his fields have been fallowed this year, and if these conditions continue, more growing operations could be shut down.

“If we have one more year like we had these past two years, it’s going to be devastating out here. … We’ll probably have 60 to 65 percent of our production out next year.”

The consequences are staggering near towns like Mendota. Dried-up fields blow dust into the sky. River beds and canals, once full of water, are now full of dead weeds and rattlesnakes. Fruit orchards along Interstate 5 look like burned piles of firewood. Workers who used to make a living picking fruit and working machinery now stand in government supported food lines to feed their families. No water means no jobs.

This is the worst I’ve ever seen it. There’s no water for anything.
Jeff Holt, restoration biologist

Mendota Mayor Robert Silva doesn’t mince words when discussing the disaster.

“Roughly about 40 percent unemployment … it’s higher than normal right now because of the water situation and farmers not planting. It’s indication that it’s going to be close to maybe 55 percent by the time situation is over.

“It’s ugly to see people standing in line because they’re out of a job.”

USGS Photo

A pole is marked with the land levels in Mendota, California, showing the drastic sinking of the land for nearly a century.

The San Joaquin River runs through the heart of this arid growing region and in a normal year would flow with fresh snow melt from the Sierra. But there’s little snow in the mountains, and little water in the river.

“Imagine washing the dirt off your driveway. That’s what the water is like in the San Joaquin River,” said Jeff Holt, a restoration biologist with River Partners in California, who got emotional when he looked at what’s left of the river. “This is the worst I’ve ever seen it. There’s no water for anything.”

To combat drought conditions, farmers and cities use water wells to tap underground aquifers. But those aquifers are overused and the rapidly declining water levels are causing the once water rich cavities to collapse in a process known as subsidence.

A recent report from USGS hydrologist Michelle Sneed paints a grim picture: A valley the size of Rhode Island is sinking.

(WATCH: California Now in the Deepest Stages of Drought)

“About 11 inches a year … is among the fastest rates ever measured in the San Joaquin Valley,” she said. “It’s a very large subsidence bowl. We were also surprised the high rate of subsidence.”

It’s irreversible damage. One area near Mendota is nearly 30 feet lower than it was in 1926, increasing the risk for infrastructure damage and even severe flooding in the future.

“This subsidence is permanent,” said Sneed. “If water levels come back up, the subsidence will not be recovered. The land will stay subsided.”

Severe Drought in California

Severe Drought in California

The San Joaquin River is almost completely dried out near Kerman, California. (Stephen Neslage for weather.com)

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Dwindling Water Resources
« Reply #17 on: June 23, 2014, 02:04:21 AM »

Off the keyboard of Michael Snyder


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Published on Economic Collapse on June 18, 2014


Drought-No-Swimming-Sign-Photo-by-Peripitus


Discuss this article at the Environment Table inside the Diner


25 Shocking Facts About The Earth’s Dwindling Water Resources


War, famine, mass extinctions and devastating plagues – all of these are coming unless some kind of miraculous solution is found to the world’s rapidly growing water crisis.  By the year 2030, the global demand for water will exceed the global supply of water by an astounding 40 percent according to one very disturbing U.S. government report.  As you read this article, lakes, rivers, streams and aquifers are steadily drying up all over the planet.  The lack of global water could potentially be enough to bring about a worldwide economic collapse all by itself if nothing is done because no society can function without water.  Just try to live a single day without using any water some time.  You will quickly realize how difficult it is.  Fresh water is the single most important natural resource on the planet, and we are very rapidly running out of it.  The following are 25 shocking facts about the Earth’s dwindling water resources that everyone should know…


#1 Right now, 1.6 billion people live in areas of the world that are facing “absolute water scarcity“.


#2 Global water use has quadrupled over the past 100 years and continues to rise rapidly.


#3 One recent study found that a third of all global corn crops are facing “water stress“.


#4 A child dies from a water-related disease every 15 seconds.


#5 By 2025, two-thirds of the population of Earth will “be living under water stressed conditions“.


#6 Due to a lack of water, Chinese food imports now require more land than the entire state of California.


#7 At this point, the amount of water that China imports is already greater than the amount of oil that the United States imports.


#8 Approximately 80 percent of the major rivers in China have become so polluted that they no longer support any aquatic life at all.


#9 The Great Lakes hold about 21 percent of the total supply of fresh water in the entire world, but Barack Obama is allowing water from those lakes “to be drained, bottled and shipped to China” at a frightening pace.


#10 It is being projected that India will essentially “run out of water” by the year 2050.


#11 It has been estimated that 75 percent of all surface water in India has been heavily contaminated by human or agricultural waste.


#12 In the Middle East, the flow of water in the Jordan River is down to only 2 percent of its historic rate.


#13 Due to a lack of water, Saudi Arabia has essentially given up on trying to grow wheat and will be 100 percent dependent on wheat imports by the year 2016.


#14 Of the 60 million people added to the major cities of the world every year, the vast majority of them live in deeply impoverished areas that have no sanitation facilities whatsoever.


#15 Nearly the entire southwestern United States is experiencing drought conditions as you read this article.  It has been this way for most of the past several years.


#16 Thanks in part to the seemingly endless drought, the price index for meat, poultry, fish, and eggs in the U.S. just hit a new all-time high.


#17 As underground aquifers are relentlessly drained in California, some areas of the San Joaquin Valley are sinking by 11 inches a year.


#18 It is being projected that Lake Mead has a 50 percent chance of running dry by the year 2025.


#19 Most Americans don’t realize this, but the once mighty Colorado River has become so depleted that it no longer runs all the way to the ocean.


#20 According to the U.S. Geological Survey, “a volume equivalent to two-thirds of the water in Lake Erie” has been permanently drained from the Ogallala Aquifer since 1940, and it is currently being drained at a rate of approximately 800 gallons per minute.


#21 Once upon a time, the Ogallala Aquifer had an average depth of approximately 240 feet, but today the average depth is just 80 feet. In some areas of Texas, the water is already completely gone.


#22 Approximately 40 percent of all rivers and approximately 46 percent of all lakes in the United States have become so polluted that they are are no longer fit for human use.


#23 Because of the high cost and the inefficient use of energy, desalination is not considered to be a widely feasible solution to our water problems at this time…


The largest desalination plant in the Western Hemisphere is currently under construction in Carlsbad in San Diego County at great expense. The price tag: $1 billion.


Right now, San Diego is almost totally dependent on imported water from Sierra snowmelt and the Colorado River. When the desalination plant comes online in 2016, it will produce 50 million gallons per day, enough to offset just 7 percent of the county’s water usage. That’s a huge bill for not very much additional water.


#24 We have filled the North Pacific Ocean with 100 million tons of plastic, and this is starting to have a very serious affect on the marine food chain.  Ultimately, this could mean a lot less food available from the Pacific Ocean for humans.


#25 One very shocking U.S. government report concluded that the global demand for water will exceed the global supply of water by 40 percent by the year 2030.


Sadly, most Americans are not going to take this report seriously because they can still turn on their taps and get as much fresh water as they want.


For generations, we have been able to take our seemingly endless supplies of fresh water completely for granted, but things have now changed.


We are heading into a horrendous water crisis unlike anything that the world has ever experienced before, and right now there do not seem to be any large scale solutions capable of addressing this crisis.


Hundreds of millions of people living in North Africa, the Middle East, India and parts of China already deal with severe water shortages as part of their daily lives.


But this is just the beginning.


If nothing is done, the lack of fresh water will eventually be deeply felt by nearly everyone on the entire planet.



Thomas Lewis

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Who Goes Dry First? Vegas or Phoenix?
« Reply #18 on: July 08, 2014, 05:34:46 PM »

From the keyboard of Thomas Lewis Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter @Doomstead666

lake mead

First published at The Daily Impact  June 11, 2014

The title of first American city to be abandoned for lack of water will be awarded in the next decade or so, and it’s hard to decide whether to bet on Las Vegas or Phoenix. It could be a tie. Those among us who still like our stories to end with a moral are rooting for Vegas, whose demise would round out a lovely wages-of-sin, Sodom-and-Gomorrah kind of fable. Phoenix seems less blameworthy, but only if you think what’s about to happen is retribution for sin. If you lean more toward the inevitable-consequences-of-stupidity theory, then there’s not much to differentiate between Dumb Phoenix and Dumber Las Vegas.In Vegas, “the situation is as bad as you can imagine,” according to climate scientist Tim Barnett at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Vegas gets its water from Lake Mead, impounded by the Hoover Dam on the Colorado River. Lake Mead is less than half half full, and is dropping fast, probably by another 20 feet this year. It is lower now than it ever has been since the lake was filled in 1938. Another 37 feet and the Las Vegas intake pipe will be sucking air. (All this was updated thoroughly last week in the London Telegraph. Why are the best stories about America’s environmental problems found in British newspapers?)

Not to worry, there’s another water intake for Las Vegas, 50 feet below the present one. Oh, good, two more years. Assuming drought conditions get no worse than they are now, and that is far from a safe assumption. Then what? Vegas has a plan. A boring machine the size of the Pentagon is chewing through solid rock at the rate of one inch a day to punch a line through to the very deepmost bottom of Lake Meade. Another few years, if they make it in time. The country can’t find the money to fix its roads and bridges, but it found $817 million to keep Las Vegas in flushing water for a few more years.

Then what? According to Rob Mrowka, a scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity, “As the water situation becomes more dire we are going to start having to talk about the removal of people (from Las Vegas).”  

Who else gets half its water from the very same lake Mead on the very same Colorado River? Phoenix, Arizona, that’s who. A city that has been in drought conditions for ten years and is expected to remain so for another 20 or 30 years. (To say that Vegas is in a 14-year drought is redundant. It’s in a desert. Four inches of rain a year is normal.) Yet until two weeks ago, no one had told Phoenix, officially, that unless there are substantial (and unexpected) improvements in the flows of the Colorado River and the level of Lake Mead and Lake Powell farther upstream, deliveries of water to Phoenix are going to be curtailed.

Now the Central Arizona Project, which manages the lower Colorado watershed, has said exactly that. “We’re dealing with a very serious issue,” board member Sharon Megdal told the New York Times, “and people need to pay attention to it.”

In other words — Brace for Impact.

***

Thomas Lewis is a nationally recognized and reviewed author of six books, a broadcaster, public speaker and advocate of sustainable living. He also is Editor of The Daily Impact website, and former artist-in-residence at Frostburg State University. He has written several books about collapse issues, including Brace for Impact and Tribulation. Learn more about them here.

« Last Edit: July 09, 2014, 12:46:50 AM by Surly1 »

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Re: Who Goes Dry First? Vegas or Phoenix?
« Reply #19 on: July 08, 2014, 11:58:25 PM »
Since both Pheonix and Vegas source water from Lake Mead, one would figure they will both go outta biz pretty much simultaneously.

It's very interesting to contemplate how the general evacuation of cities as large as these will be undertaken.  This isn't a problem with No Warning, the Taps won't just all shut at once one day.  Do they start cutting off water supply subdivision by subdivision?

The bigger issue in the near term is the shut down of the turbines at Hoover.  Taking that much power off the grid all at once will be extremely hard to make up for with the rest of the plants feeding the grid, not to mention raise the prices quickly as well.

Maybe by having regular blackout and brownouts, this will encourage the residents of Phoenix and Vegas to start moving away.

The other interesting question is how this affects the financial markets, since all the properties left behind are a total loss.

Definitely will be interesting when it goes down.

RE
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Re: Who Goes Dry First? Vegas or Phoenix?
« Reply #20 on: July 09, 2014, 02:47:21 AM »
Here's another possibility, though granted unlikely.

What if they COMPLETELY shut down water supply to BOTH Vegas and Phoenix before the water drops below the Turbine Critical point, and FORCE EVACUATE everyone?

If you took both Phoenix and Vegas off the straw, would this then allow Lake Mead to refill some?

RE
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Re: Who Goes Dry First? Vegas or Phoenix?
« Reply #21 on: July 09, 2014, 03:02:43 AM »
Here's another possibility, though granted unlikely.

What if they COMPLETELY shut down water supply to BOTH Vegas and Phoenix before the water drops below the Turbine Critical point, and FORCE EVACUATE everyone?

If you took both Phoenix and Vegas off the straw, would this then allow Lake Mead to refill some?

RE

Unlikely is only a word.  In a corrupt and depraved government when we can't even summon the political will to fund our obligations to our veterans, or even to pay bills that we've already incurred (although we can always find money to fund the Zionist apartheid state),  I'm scanning the gallery to find that paragon of courage who is going to suggest forced evacuation to the casino owners and syndicates who run Vegas. Bueller? Bueller??

To even discuss or consider this alternative is to admit that there are limits to growth,  which as you know is Not Permitted. And as we all know in tea party America there are no limits. Drill baby, drill. Frack, baby, frack.  Happy motoring, bitchez!

"...reprehensible lying communist..."

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Re: Who Goes Dry First? Vegas or Phoenix?
« Reply #22 on: July 09, 2014, 03:34:39 AM »
Quote
The other interesting question is how this affects the financial markets, since all the properties left behind are a total loss.

Definitely will be interesting when it goes down.

RE


I feel they are trapped and there is no way out but slow shutdown.

My Idea is that there will be massive tax increases there to spend money on solutions that will not work, not a problem you can through money at in my view.

The taxes and sharply increased water bills will force all the small operators out leaving only the big cats. They will fade out slowly and surely, the strongest shutting the doors last.

The gaming industry isn't going to go away, and the people running these giant corporations are not without plans, believe me they are astute business people. Expect the financial impact to me minimal as they open new shops elsewhere, Macau alone is now doing almost 10 times as much business as Vegas, and the big boys all have a major presence there.

They will relocate to other areas, many are doing so now, opening massive casinos in Macau and have big plans elsewhere.
Sheldon Addison is now moving into Japan and I recently invested  in a company planning a big one in Vietnam.

My thoughts now have gone to where they are going to move to as the new US big Gaming and Resort Convention Mecca? Could it be Atlantic City, Reno, Miami? I don't know but wish I could figure it out; vast fortunes will be made in real estate and stock investments if one can surmise where.  Cuba was a casino mecca before Castro, and I wouldn't be surprised if Miami came on their radar as the place, especially when one considers their huge Cuban population. Who knows?

Thoughts anyone on the next Vegas II USA?

Offline RE

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Re: Who Goes Dry First? Vegas or Phoenix?
« Reply #23 on: July 09, 2014, 04:23:04 AM »

The gaming industry isn't going to go away, and the people running these giant corporations are not without plans, believe me they are astute business people. Expect the financial impact to me minimal as they open new shops elsewhere, Macau alone is now doing almost 10 times as much business as Vegas, and the big boys all have a major presence there.

They will relocate to other areas, many are doing so now, opening massive casinos in Macau and have big plans elsewhere.
Sheldon Addison is now moving into Japan and I recently invested  in a company planning a big one in Vietnam.

MACAU?
  If you can breathe in Macau without an Air Tank you hit a good day there.



Sheldon Addison is moving into JAPAN? There's ASTUTE INVESTMENT STRATEGY for you.


GO, your Normalcy Bias is almost as bad as Moriarty.  These dimwits are FUCKED.  Total Loss here.

Might be good time to think about getting your GOLD out of the BANK.  You think you got a better shot than the Germans here if you leave it in there?

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline g

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Re: Who Goes Dry First? Vegas or Phoenix?
« Reply #24 on: July 09, 2014, 04:50:11 AM »
Quote
GO, your Normalcy Bias is almost as bad as Moriarty.  These dimwits are FUCKED.  Total Loss here.

Might be good time to think about getting your GOLD out of the BANK.  You think you got a better shot than the Germans here if you leave it in there?

They are only casinos RE, They are not building Paris, or London. They have a normal useful life of only thirty or so years if vast sums are not spent on upkeep and maintenance.

I get your drift on the long term outlook, buy let me assure you a casino in Asia is a big money maker in the current time frame, and that is the only interest of these casino moguls.

How much does it cost me?

How much can I make?

How long to get my original investment dough out?

That is all the care about RE, They are not priests, or missionary's, or architects building cities, They are CASINO OPERATORS

I don't appreciate the personal attacks for voicing an honest  opinion of a group of people and their business plans for diversification out of Vegas. That is what's happening, what they are doing, and kindly stop defecating on me for reporting my views and observations of THEIR plans.

                                           

                                           

                                           

                                           
                                                     GALAXY CASINO MACAU

Offline jdwheeler42

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Re: Who Goes Dry First? Vegas or Phoenix?
« Reply #25 on: July 09, 2014, 05:17:11 AM »
Quote
The other interesting question is how this affects the financial markets, since all the properties left behind are a total loss.

Definitely will be interesting when it goes down.
I feel they are trapped and there is no way out but slow shutdown.

My Idea is that there will be massive tax increases there to spend money on solutions that will not work, not a problem you can through money at in my view.

The taxes and sharply increased water bills will force all the small operators out leaving only the big cats. They will fade out slowly and surely, the strongest shutting the doors last.
I agree with the slow shutdown, but I think it will be the electricity supply, not water or taxes, that is the controlling factor.  Taxes are relatively slow to change, generally being on a yearly basis, and water somewhat difficult to regulate, except where shut-off valves are already built into the system.  I expect when the company operating the Hoover Dam realizes that there is absolutely no hope of rain stopping a shutdown, they will start taking generators offline one at a time.  This will induce brownouts and possibly rolling blackouts in the cities served.  The more profitable businesses will install generators to make up the difference, and the less profitable ones will shut their doors and move away.
Quote
My thoughts now have gone to where they are going to move to as the new US big Gaming and Resort Convention Mecca? Could it be Atlantic City, Reno, Miami? I don't know but wish I could figure it out; vast fortunes will be made in real estate and stock investments if one can surmise where.  Cuba was a casino mecca before Castro, and I wouldn't be surprised if Miami came on their radar as the place, especially when one considers their huge Cuban population. Who knows?

Thoughts anyone on the next Vegas II USA?
I doubt there will be another city on the scale of Vegas.  I also doubt that any cities in areas of perennial drought (Reno) will pick up the slack, nor will places subject to frequent hurricanes (Atlantic City, Reno).

I'm not familiar with the gaming industry in general to make any real prediction, but I do know that Pittsburgh has a nice convention center, plenty of hotels, a decent airport, and a casino.  And while the snowstorms make it less than ideal location for a couple months of the year, those generally don't leave the devastation that a hurricane does.  Oh, and the county has banned fracking in case you're worried about the water supply.
Making pigs fly is easy... that is, of course, after you have built the catapult....

Online Eddie

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Re: Who Goes Dry First? Vegas or Phoenix?
« Reply #26 on: July 09, 2014, 06:11:31 AM »
It'll be interesting to see what happens with these two cities.

Vegas is half the population of Phoenix, and the casinos are the only real driver for the economy. Lots of single and retired people. Phoenix has a manufacturing base, but most of the economy is financial services, other services and government jobs. It appears to have grown so fast largely due to really cheap housing prices as much as anything else. Lots of low end home owners.

Basically it looks to me like both those places are set to fold up like a house of cards. Most of the populations are mobile enough to move somewhere, and I'm just afraid Texas will look pretty good to the six million refugees.

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online Eddie

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Re: Who Goes Dry First? Vegas or Phoenix?
« Reply #27 on: July 09, 2014, 06:16:26 AM »
They used to be able to grow a lot of food around Phoenix, before all the fields were filled with cheap tract houses. They get seven inches of rain, and it comes in a monsoon season, or did, back when we had predictable weather. I'm thinking some hardy souls will hang in for a while there. Not Vegas.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline g

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Re: Who Goes Dry First? Vegas or Phoenix?
« Reply #28 on: July 09, 2014, 07:32:08 AM »
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I doubt there will be another city on the scale of Vegas.  I also doubt that any cities in areas of perennial drought (Reno) will pick up the slack, nor will places subject to frequent hurricanes (Atlantic City, Reno).
Hi JD, Yeah I hear you, especially when you consider much of Vegas was built up in the days of cheap oil,steel and  equipment.

Still though, I think Miami or somewhere in Florida has a good chance of making a decent show of it. Thousands of old hotels and motels there already in place also that would likely do renovations as well as millions of retirees.

There is that hurricane weather problem however that you mention which is a drawback, although they say the newer buildings can withstand some pretty strong winds if it is in their design plan.

Offline Randy C

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Re: Who Goes Dry First? Vegas or Phoenix?
« Reply #29 on: July 09, 2014, 09:52:39 AM »
So, tell me,...., where will Palo Verde get its water for cooling the two reactors and spent fuel pools?  The plant is located out in the desert, west of Phoenix and uses treated sewage water for cooling, but once the city goes dry what becomes of a reactor full of fuel that must be cooled for ten years before it can be dry casked and move?????

Inquiring minds want to know!   :o

 

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