AuthorTopic: Official California Dustbowl Thread  (Read 85877 times)

Offline Surly1

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Re: Western Water Wars Begin
« Reply #255 on: July 06, 2016, 02:16:35 AM »

http://www.voiceofsandiego.org/topics/government/with-doomsday-in-mind-california-officials-are-ceding-water-to-arizona-nevada/

With Doomsday in Mind, California Officials Are Ceding Water to Arizona, Nevada


This is a BIG fucking story. Hats off to these guys for reporting it so thoroughly.
Meanwhile in the world of BAU, the NFL is considering allowing the Raiders to move to Las Vegas. What could possibly go wrong?

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline azozeo

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New All Time Low set at Lake Mead
« Reply #256 on: July 18, 2016, 03:28:00 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/DDyr05t8kLg&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/DDyr05t8kLg&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why youíre here. Youíre here because you know something. What you know you canít explain, but you feel it. Youíve felt it your entire life, that thereís something wrong with the world.
You donít know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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NASA Satellite Imagery Shows Utah's Great Salt Lake Is Drying Up at Alarming Rat
« Reply #257 on: November 06, 2016, 10:41:26 PM »
Well, since the lake itself is Salt Water, it only makes sense to capture the fresh water BEFORE it drains into the lake.

RE

http://www.ecowatch.com/great-salt-lake-utah-2077769555.html

 Climate Nov. 05, 2016 11:57AM EST
NASA Satellite Imagery Shows Utah's Great Salt Lake Is Drying Up at Alarming Rate

    Dan Zukowski Dan Zukowski


Before and after images taken in 2011 and 2016 reveal dramatic shrinkage of Farmington Basin in the Great Salt Lake.
Joshua Stevens/Landsat/US Geological Survey

The Great Salt Lake is the largest salt-water lake in the Western Hemisphere. Three major rivers feed into the lake, but it has no outlet. Water leaves only through evaporation, creating the high salinity levels that give the lake its name. It is the eighth-largest such terminal lake in the world.

On average, the Great Salt Lake covers an area of about 1,700 square miles. In October, it had shrunk to 1,050 square miles. In the same month, the Great Salt Lake reached it lowest recorded level in history at 4,191.2 feet.

For more than 150 years, more water has been drawn out of the Salt Lake watershed than flows into it. The amount of water in the lake has declined by 48 percent and the lake level has fallen 11 feet since 1847.

Now, Utah is planning to spend $1.5 billion to build seven dams along the Bear River, diverting as much as 220,000 acre-feet annually. This could drop water levels in the Great Salt Lake another four feet. The Utah Rivers Council calls it "disastrous."

River flow into the basin has dropped 39 percent since the middle of the 19th century, largely due to population growth and agriculture. Irrigation consumes 63 percent of overall water use from the Bear, Jordan and Weber rivers that feed into the Great Salt Lake.

"Farmington Bay has been nearly desiccated as the result of the combined effects of drought and water withdrawals from the rivers feeding the lake," said Wayne Wurtsbaugh, who studies watershed sciences at Utah State University.

Water conservation programs promoted by the state have helped reduce water use per-person by 18 percent, but remain the second-highest in the U.S. Plus, a growing population offsets many of those gains.


NASA said that higher-than-normal temperatures and the five-year drought plaguing the American West have also taken a toll. The lake is known to respond rapidly to variations in rainfall.

"A wildcard for the fate of the lake is what global climate change may do to the basin," said Wurtsbaugh.

Wetlands along the northern and eastern shores of the lake provide habitat for more than 250 species of migratory birds and account for about 75 percent of the wetlands in Utah. These birds, numbering in the millions, feed on the lake's brine shrimp and brine flies.

As the lake shrinks, marinas have had to move. More and larger dust storms besiege the area. The lake's $1.3 billion contribution to Utah's economy is threatened.

"The solution to the water issue is greater conservation, particularly for agricultural irrigation," said Wurtsbaugh.

But the public has to do its part as well.

"If you walk across the Salt Lake Valley on a summer day, you will see gutters full of water," said Zachary Frankel, executive director of the Utah Rivers Council. "You will see people watering concrete because water is so cheap. And there are no repercussions for that. There are no water cops, there's no water education, nothing like that."
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Offline azozeo

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Official California Dustbowl Thread-Oroville Dam Breach
« Reply #258 on: February 12, 2017, 09:21:36 AM »
This is really fucking serious !!!!!!!


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/3hhayGDxMks&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/3hhayGDxMks&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why youíre here. Youíre here because you know something. What you know you canít explain, but you feel it. Youíve felt it your entire life, that thereís something wrong with the world.
You donít know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Official California Dustbowl Thread- Latest Cali. Dam Capacity Data
« Reply #259 on: February 19, 2017, 05:06:26 PM »
http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cdecapp/resapp/getResGraphsMain.action

I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why youíre here. Youíre here because you know something. What you know you canít explain, but you feel it. Youíve felt it your entire life, that thereís something wrong with the world.
You donít know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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🏜️ Alaska Villages Run Dry And Residents Worry 'If This Is Our Future
« Reply #260 on: September 15, 2019, 12:35:32 AM »
https://www.npr.org/2019/09/14/760556291/alaska-villages-run-dry-and-residents-worry-if-this-is-our-future-of-no-water

Alaska Villages Run Dry And Residents Worry 'If This Is Our Future Of No Water'
3:53

    Download

September 14, 20197:59 AM ET


Resident Anthony Brewster checks to see how much water is in Nanwalek's storage tank. The village has been on a boil water notice for weeks.
Renee Gross/KBBI

Residents are desperately trying to conserve water in the Native village of Nanwalek, located on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula south of Anchorage. The village, home to the Sugpiaq tribe, is currently in a severe drought.

Nina Kvasnikoff's family is eating off paper plates, collecting water from the ocean to flush toilets and washing themselves with sponges.

"It doesn't feel like you're clean. You feel like you're just splattering a little bit of water," she says.

Last month, Nanwalek officials started shutting the water off for 12 hours every night, and the state has issued a boil water notice. But recently, Kvasnikoff decided she had had enough of the extreme conservation. She and her family jumped on an airplane to the nearest city for a break.

"So that's a lot of money to do that but you do what you have to do," she says.

Kvasnikoff says she grew up without running water but at least back then, fresh water felt plentiful. Not so, anymore.

A community crisis

The village of Nanwalek usually receives roughly six inches of rain each summer, but this summer, it has only received about one and a half inches.

John Kvasnikoff is the village's chief and Nina Kvasnikoff's brother-in-law. He says Nanwalek's leaders realized its reservoir was running low about a month ago due to lack of rain and low snowpack.

"We really didn't have a plan but then we started calling these agencies and [saying] look we're running out of water," he says.

The Kenai Peninsula Borough shipped in hundreds of gallons of water for Nanwalek residents as the water crisis worsened.
Renee Gross/KBBI

Local agencies, communities and the borough government have flown and barged water to the village. He says the water has gotten low before, but it hasn't caused an emergency since 2003. Kvasnikoff adds that the village's growing population of roughly 300 residents, and old leaky pipes aren't helping.

"We're in line to get a new water system to replace all the old beat up water line that we have now," he says.

The village is considering increasing the size of its reservoir and raising funds to buy a reverse osmosis machine so residents could purify water from the ocean for drinking.

A summer of record-breaking heat

Alaska's Department of Environmental Conservation says six communities dealt with water shortages this summer, more than any summer in recent memory.

"The warming climate will mean that we will want to be prepared in the future for these kinds of events," says Rick Thoman, a climatologist with the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

What's going to happen if this keeps going? If this is our future of no water, what's going to happen to everybody?

Nanwalek resident Nina Kvasnikoff

This summer, areas across the state have seen record heat and dryness, and the heat isn't just affecting people.

"So this summer, we saw reported from all around the state, reports of dead salmon and unspawned salmon," Thoman says. "This could be due to a lot of reasons, but the obvious thing is the water. In many rivers it was extremely warm."

Ivana Ash says the impact on the fish is just as concerning to her as the impact on the drinking water. She recently returned home to Nanwalek after being away at college.

"I want to stay," she says. "I want to help my parents because I haven't been home for quite some time and would like to spend some time with the elders."

But she says if she can find a job elsewhere, she'll take it.

"I also do want to be in a place where there is some water, and I don't feel bad about drinking it or taking a shower," she says.
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