PE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> Official California Dustbowl Thread

AuthorTopic: Official California Dustbowl Thread  (Read 85794 times)

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38873
    • View Profile
Lake Mead Watch Report 1
« Reply #90 on: April 03, 2015, 08:00:07 PM »
I am going to provide regular updates here in the Drought Thread on the status of Lake Mead, from the NOAA Hydrology Website.  Here is the current chart:

LAKE MEAD WATER LEVEL

As you can see, as of today April 3rd, Lake Mead is around 1084.5 Feet.  By April 13, it is projected to be at 1083 Feet.  So that is a 1.5 foot loss over 10 days, 3' over 20 days at the current loss rate.

The Hoover Dam has to shut down at 1050 Feet.  34.5 Feet to go and counting.

At 3' every 20 days, it would take a little over 200 days to drop down to 1050.  However, due to increase evaporation and water usage over the summer, I believe the rate will probably increase.

Hoover *probably* makes it through 2015 still producing juice.  We'll see here in this thread how it goes.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline Mercury

  • Bussing Staff
  • **
  • Posts: 245
    • View Profile
Re: Official California Dustbowl Thread
« Reply #91 on: April 03, 2015, 08:30:23 PM »
It's no coincidence that the US is sending a lot of military to the southwest, nor that there are many internment camps in the same region.


http://bit.ly/1xrmLRd
« Last Edit: April 03, 2015, 08:37:06 PM by Mercury »
Do you know what 'Nemesis' means?

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38873
    • View Profile
Re: Official California Dustbowl Thread
« Reply #92 on: April 03, 2015, 08:43:34 PM »
It's no coincidence that the US is sending a lot of military to the southwest, nor that there are many vacant internment camps in the same region.

There are going to be a LOT of Water Refugees in that neighborhood.

However, if the Internment Camps are in the same location, they won't have any Water either.

So they are not Internment Camps.  They are DEATH CAMPS.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline Mercury

  • Bussing Staff
  • **
  • Posts: 245
    • View Profile
Re: Official California Dustbowl Thread
« Reply #93 on: April 03, 2015, 09:20:13 PM »
It's no coincidence that the US is sending a lot of military to the southwest, nor that there are many vacant internment camps in the same region.

There are going to be a LOT of Water Refugees in that neighborhood.

However, if the Internment Camps are in the same location, they won't have any Water either.

So they are not Internment Camps.  They are DEATH CAMPS.

RE
Yeah, but I guess those numbnuts at FEMA haven't figured that out. Maybe the Fed can just print the water?  :laugh:
Do you know what 'Nemesis' means?

Offline Eddie

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 17502
    • View Profile
Re: Official California Dustbowl Thread
« Reply #94 on: April 04, 2015, 10:17:29 AM »
The EROEI of hauling water is not very good. I was in Phoenix last night. I wonder how Lake Powell is doing?

Here, the LCRA is increasingly looking at new groundwater sources to the east of us, which represent a reprieve, but not a solution, to the central Texas water crisis, which doesn't get as much press as the West, but is close to being just as bad.

The LCRA reservoirs are nearly as low as the epic drought of 1952, and they've been at this level longer than they were then.




http://www.waterdatafortexas.org/reservoirs/basin/colorado

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38873
    • View Profile
Re: Official California Dustbowl Thread
« Reply #95 on: April 10, 2015, 03:18:28 PM »
Latest on the record low snowpack.

RE

Dust Bowl 2.0: California's Historic Drought About To Get Even Worse As "Snowpack Melts Early Across The West"

Tyler Durden's picture



 

It has been a bad year for California whose drought is rapidly approaching historic proportions: according to the LA Times, which cites climatologist Michael Anderson, "you’re looking on numbers that are right on par with what was the Dust Bowl."

 

It is about to get even worse. According to the USDA, the west-wide snowpack is melting earlier than usual, according to data from the fourth 2015 forecast by the United States Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS).

"Almost all of the West Coast continues to have record low snowpack," NRCS Hydrologist David Garen said. "March was warm and dry in most of the West; as a result, snow is melting earlier than usual."

It is only fitting that while economists blame a "overly cold winter" for sliding GDP, weathermen blame an overly warm winter for the California's historic drought.

More from the USDA:

 
 

Historically, April 1 is the peak snowpack. This year, the peak came earlier. There was little snow accumulation in March, and much of the existing snow has already melted.

 

"The only holdouts are higher elevations in the Rockies," said Garen. "Look at the map and you'll see that almost everywhere else is red." Red indicates less than half of the normal snowpack remains.

 

A consequence of the early snowmelt is that Western states will have reduced streamflow later this spring and summer.

 

In Western states where snowmelt accounts for the majority of seasonal water supply, information about snowpack serves as an indicator of future water availability. Streamflow in the West consists largely of accumulated mountain snow that melts and flows into streams as temperatures warm in spring and summer. National Water and Climate Center scientists analyze the snowpack, precipitation, air temperature and other measurements taken from remote sites to develop the water supply forecasts.

 

NRCS monitors conditions year-round and will continue to issue monthly forecasts until June. The water supply forecast is part of several USDA efforts to improve public awareness and manage the impacts of climate change, including drought and other extreme weather events. Through the creation of the National Drought Resilience Partnership, launched as part of the President's Climate Action Plan, federal agencies are working closely with states, tribes and local governments to develop a coordinated response to drought.

Which can only mean one thing: a whole lot of taxpayer money is about to be spent on the "coordinated drought response."

Here are the details from the Western Snowpack report.

Precipitation

Precipitation during March was well below normal throughout almost the entire West, with the exception of Interior Alaska. Precipitation thus far in the water year (beginning October 1, 2014) is now below normal over most of the West except for some northwestern areas and coastal Alaska. Snowpack has declined significantly since last month throughout the West due to the warm and dry March. Only high- elevation areas in the Rocky Mountains and Interior Alaska retain somewhat near normal snowpack. Streamflow forecasts have dropped since last month due to a lack of snow accumulation during March and an early snowmelt, with most regions now expecting below normal streamflow. Reservoir storage is currently below normal in the Southwest and Nevada, with near to above normal storage elsewhere.

 

Precipitation for the 2015 water year-to-date is now below normal over most of the West except for some northwestern areas. The dry March has significantly affected this picture since a month ago, when far more of the West was near normal.

Snowpack

Snowpack at SNOTEL sites and snow courses as of April 1 in the western U.S. and the Columbia Basin in Canada has declined significantly since last month.

Snowmelt has begun early this year throughout most of the West, leading to significant snowpack losses and corresponding increases in streamflow during March.

Although a major storm during the first few days of March struck areas of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico, the resulting snowpack accumulations have since melted.
Western parts of the region still have record-breaking low snowpack, as they have had all winter. Snowpack is nearly gone in Nevada, Utah, Arizona, and much of New Mexico. Only areas of high elevation along the crest of the Rockies – in Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, and British Columbia – retain snowpack in the near normal or only somewhat below normal categories.

Snowpack in Alaska remains below normal in coastal areas and near normal in the Interior.

 

Streamflow Forecasts

Streamflow forecasts are moderately to extremely below normal for most of the West. Only a few areas in the Rocky Mountains and Interior Alaska are near normal. Forecasts have dropped significantly since last month. This is due to the warm and dry March, which has led not only to reduced snowpack accumulation but also to early melt. With snowpack melting and streamflow rising already in March, less snowmelt remains for the usual water supply forecast periods beginning in April.

 

Reservoir Storage

Reservoir storage levels are well below average in the Southwest and Nevada, while they are near to above average elsewhere in the West.

 

The California state report:

California: Snowpack is at record low levels, which is relied upon as the primary source of the summer water supply. With very little snowmelt runoff, the current reservoir contents will essentially be the amount available for use this summer. The major storage reservoirs for California are at roughly 50% of capacity with very little opportunity to increase.

Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38873
    • View Profile
Lake Mead Watch Report 2
« Reply #96 on: April 10, 2015, 03:45:02 PM »
Lake Mead now down to 1083 Feet and falling at the same steady rate of around 1 Foot every 3 days.


The 1050 Foot Critical Level when they have to shut down the turbines of the Hoover Dam is 33 Feet away, so at the current rate of decline it should occur in a little over 3 months (99 Days), so call the beginning of August as CRUNCH TIME for Hoover.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline knarf

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 12719
    • View Profile
Re: Official California Dustbowl Thread
« Reply #97 on: April 10, 2015, 03:59:53 PM »
This is how we avoid climate catastrophe: The simple ó yet radical ó steps needed to solve Californiaís water crisis.



The dried shore at San Pablo Reservoir Recreation Area in El Sobrante, Calif., Thursday, April 2, 2015. (Credit: AP/Eric Risberg)
Californiaís worsening drought is an environmental disaster, the result of multiple years of below-average rainfall and above-average heat and very likely amplified, experts say, by man-made climate change.

But not everyone is suffering the unprecedented deficit equally. Some, you might even go so far as to say, are winning.

Karen Piper, a professor at the University of Missouri and the author of ďThe Price of Thirst: Global Water Inequality and the Coming Chaos,Ē an examination of how the privatization of water is co-opting a fundamental human right, has studied water scarcity across six continents. But when Salon asked her last fall about some of the more egregious places where she saw private control of water going wrong, she immediately answered: California. Specifically, she pointed to the stateís Central Valley, where farmers pump the stateís scant remaining groundwater with impunity, and where the rich few, through a system known as water banking, control the supplies of the many.

Some of this is beginning, slowly, to change: Last fall, Gov. Jerry Brown signed ďhistoricĒ legislation that would allow statewide groundwater management. But in practice, the law doesnít do much, especially not in the short-term. As the L.A. Times reported, agricultural interests fought hard against the regulations, and it will be more than two decades before local groundwater agencies will have to fully comply with them.

By that point, of course, there might not be any water left ó at least not any that the average resident can afford.

As California begins, haltingly, to come to terms with its new normal, and the debate over how to ration its most precious resource heats up, Salon called up Piper again to discuss the emerging inequalities in the stateís current system for managing its water, and the solutions ó at once simple and, for a state built on agriculture, prohibitively radical ó it needs to start considering. Our conversation has been lightly edited for length and clarity.

Thereís so much blame being thrown around for whatís causing the water shortage ó you see headlines about agriculture, the bottled water industry, fracking, even people on the right saying environmentalists caused it. Whatís the first thing you would point to as the root of Californiaís problems?

Thereís the historical component to it of bad water management, which has been occurring over decades. And then thereís the current problem of not enough water. When I heard that the snowpack was 6 percent of normal, I thought, oh dear, itís not going to be a pretty summer. Once you have a drought like this, it highlights all of the things you already knew were wrong. Water shortages lead to water wars, so youíre seeing the micro version of that now, where everybody gets angry with everybody else and blames everybody else. At some point itís really the responsibility of the state to solve the problem, but I donít see them doing it.

We talked last time about agribusiness controlling water in the Central Valley; a lot of people are pointing out now that the stateís new water restrictions donít apply to them.

Thatís what I see as one of the biggest problems, is that Ag still uses 80 percent of the stateís water. They do face cutbacks because they receive less water ó theyíre getting 0 percent water from the Central Valley Project this year, so they get freaked out too. But when they donít get enough water they just start pumping groundwater. Then you have this enormous problem of peopleís wells going dry in California. People are having emergency tank water brought in, and itís just crazy that farmers could pump enough to make peopleís wells go dry. Thereís no oversight over that, there are no laws protecting the groundwater or how itís divvied up, itís just like history has decided that. So theyíre starting to try to enact some legislation right now, but they havenít even finished their plan; theyíre just at the point of getting input from the communities involved.

So thatís a long ways off, and meanwhile not only are peopleís wells going dry, but the ground is sinking. As the ground sinks ó and itís as much as half an inch a month now in places ó that means you have less storage space available for water underground when it does rain, because the space is compact. Thatís a real problem, but also itís causing foundations to crack, and itís causing roads to buckle. Itís causing very expensive problems that arenít figured into the whole calculations of environmental impacts and the way water is distributed, and it really should be.

So look at it as, California water politics are so complicated and in some ways, I have to say, so corrupt, that itís hard to really get your head around them. But if you think about it outside that box, then you start to think, well, there are really simple things that should be done that are logical. Like right now, California is shipping an enormous amount of its water out of the country through something called virtual water: the water it takes to grow a certain crop that is then exported.

This is what weíre hearing about almonds and other water-intensive crops?

Yeah, and a simple way to stop it is: stop exporting virtual water. Tell farmers they canít do that. Then youíre saving a whole lot of water, but thatís profits to them, thatís money. So as long as money controls it rather than, like, reality, nothing will get done. People are going to start really suffering under water shortages and water losses. Right now they shouldnít be growing rice in California, for one thing. Itís extremely water-intensive: they flood the fields, and then they ship that rice to Japan. That water could be used elsewhere in better ways.

What about the whole system of water banks? How are they playing into this?

Right now, youíre seeing the water banks gouging urban areas. During the drought years they start selling water and thatís whatís happening. Iíve been reading about how they are hiking up the prices because they can, because itís a drought. Kern Water Bank is selling water to San Jose, for instance, and consumer prices went up 30 percent because of this [note: a proposed rate hike was reduced to 19 percent following public outcry]. So theyíre making enormous profits off of this water, just like how rice farmers are selling their water, too. Itís coming out of regular citizensí pockets.

And because thereís no accountability over groundwater, itís even hard to get the information about how much are they profiting, how much groundwater do they have in storage. One thing that Jerry Brown did that was good is he made some requirements for reporting, at least, among users about how much water theyíre using. But they need so much more than that.

So an argument is that California needs to rethink the system by which water is priced, because farmers arenít paying market price for water.

Yes. Youíve got an ancient system that was based on the idea that farmers should get water for basically free because we want to promote settlement and agriculture in California. So you have this system where all they had to pay was toward the building of the infrastructure to bring the water to them. They still have these water contracts that are based on these ancient ideas, so they get it for really cheap. Then urban consumers are paying, say, right now itís $20 in Imperial Valley per acre-foot, but then they can sell it for like $1,800 per acre-foot ó I donít know what that margin of profit is, but itís big.

Youíve written a lot about how, globally, water insecurity leads to unrest. How do you think that sort of dynamic might play out in California?

Thatís an excellent question. After I heard about people whose wells were going dry, I started thinking a lot about equity issues and how the U.N. has this new resolution that says that everybody is entitled to a certain amount of clean water, and how California is kind of failing on its equity issues now between big farmers and the regular citizen. So it depends if people get angry about that and demand some kind of change. If it stays the same then regular citizens will start paying more and more for water and it might price regular working-class people out of the ability to afford water. If that happens, then weíre like Bolivia, because thatís what happened there. Itís not like the Middle East where theyíre going out and getting guns, but youíll see the rise in more desperation among people because of economic inequity. And that does lead to more violence of a different sort.

We know that in the future, these environmental stressors very likely arenít going to go away any time soon.

Oh, yes. Thatís the scariest thing of all, because basically, Iím sure you saw the news about the future megadroughts. Theyíve been in a four-year drought so far and people are starting to get desperate. But what if it turns into a 20-year drought?

I think peopleís way of thinking almost hasnít caught up to the reality of climate change, because I think you habitually think itís really awful now, but next year will be better. Now you canít think that anymore.

When talking about solutions in the short-term and then these longer-term problems that are coming up, would you say that changing that mind-set is the first thing that needs to happen?

I think the state needs to take charge of this situation and start regulating its groundwater usage for one thing, and then create new laws that limit what Ag can do with its water. I donít think gouging urban customers is the right thing to do. So thatís a big problem. And that can be done in the short term: They can start figuring out whatís happening with groundwater and start thinking about the consequences.

But then in the long term, the state has to rethink agriculture, basically. The problem is that thatís thinking so big. Weíre a country thatís based on freedom and the ability to develop or to have any kind of business you want. So to tell farmers how they can do their business goes against everything thatís American, in a way. But they really are going to have to because it just wastes so much water. And I donít think that they should stop farming in California ó Iím actually afraid that might happen, because as they run out of water people are going to start going for the farmers more ó but if the farmers stop farming there, then you have Central Valley turning into a dust bowl. Thatís not good, we donít need more of that.

So I think what they need to do is farm switch to drought-resistant crops, first of all, and over the long run, they need to switch to methods that conserve water. For instance, permaculture: They irrigate through rainfall using a swale system, which involves digging these trenches and having different stories of crops that they grow. So theyíll have fruit trees that are more drought tolerant and then grow things under the fruit trees to absorb more of that water. Theyíve been doing this in the Middle East and itís really working wonderfully and saving an enormous amount of water.

They also need to think of using biochar as a fertilizer, because that helps to stop or to absorb CO2 while also fertilizing. A lot of international organizations are recommending biochar now to try to slow down climate change. They could do simple things right now, like donít allow flood irrigation, where you just flood the Central Valley to grow whatever trees or rice or whatever and then all that evaporates, leading to major water losses. So there are certain things they can do in the short-run and then other things they can do in the long-run.

And these arenít things you think the industry will do on its own without government intervention?

No, but thatís the stateís responsibility, to manage its water resources. If they donít do that, then I donít know how itís going to happen.

http://www.salon.com/2015/04/10/this_is_how_we_avoid_climate_catastrophe_the_simple_yet_radical_steps_needed_to_solve_californias_water_crisis/
EARTH - "love it or leave it!"

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38873
    • View Profile
Re: Official California Dustbowl Thread
« Reply #98 on: April 14, 2015, 12:10:28 AM »
How much extra time do you think Desalination will buy?

RE

California Is "A Totally Artificial World Of Water Use" & Desalination Can't Fix It

Tyler Durden's picture

 

Like many other towns in California, Santa Barbara is projecting a significant water shortfall in 2017. The solutions, being proposed for now, are extreme water conservancy, desalination plants, and sewage recycling following Jerry Brown's diktat that  "as Californians, we have to pull together and save water in every way we can." However, others insist that conserving water will not be enough, "I don't think we can really conserve our way out of this problem, this problem being a combination of drought and of incredibly high water demand by a growing population and climate change," warns NASA scientist Jay Famiglietti and environmentalists exclaim "we don't even know how much we need because we waste so much; we live in a total artificial world of water use and water supply." As we noted before, this is just beginning.

 

Santa Barbara is projecting a significant water shortfall in 2017. Haggmark says the city hopes to be able to buy water to make up the shortfall — but with other thirsty buyers in the region, finding an affordable source could be a problem.

Last week, Governor Jerry Brown made water conservation mandatory in the drought-stricken state of California. "As Californians, we have to pull together and save water in every way we can," he said. But if the four-year drought continues, conservation alone — at least what's required by the governor's plan — won't fix the problem. As NPR reports,

Conservation is one suggested solution...

To cope with the drought, Santa Barbara's city council banned watering lawns and hired water police to enforce restrictions. Some residents painted their brown lawns green.

 

"In the meanwhile," Lodge recalls, "we had to do something to find other water supplies."

Or Desalination...

Santa Barbara is reopening its desalination facility and Joshua Haggmark, the city's water resources manager, is in charge of getting it back online. Much work lies ahead.

 

Entering the control room and seeing its big computers with tiny memories — and floppy disk drives — feels like stepping back in time to 1992. This is "about as sophisticated as it gets for this old facility," says Haggmark.

 

 

The intake, where ocean water first enters the desalination system, is about half a mile off the beach. Once it gets to the plant, the water flows through gravel and sand filters and finally, when all the debris is gone, into the reverse osmosis membranes — salt removers.

 

Two gallons of ocean water go in; one gallon of drinking water comes out. The leftover gallon contains super-salty brine. This doubly salty water is mixed with the city's wastewater and then piped back out to sea and spread around, about 30 miles offshore.

 

That briny waste is one of many concerns raised by environmentalists and other critics of desalination plants like this one and others that are being planned and built along the California coast. "The biggest concern about desalination is that it is expensive, it's energy-intensive and it has a lot of side effects — a lot of unintended consequences to marine life both from the intake and the discharge," says Marco Gonzalez, the executive director of the Coastal Environmental Rights Foundation.

 

Right now, the sources of electricity available to run desalination plants are not environmentally friendly. "Really, it's going to require us to find alternative energy sources to power these plants. So as we put more renewables online, it will become more environmentally friendly and more cost-effective," says Gonzalez.

 

Cost effectiveness is important, because desalination is expensive. To get the Santa Barbara plant back online, the estimated cost of water for the average resident will increase by about $20 each month starting this July, even though the plant won't open until 2016.

 

Gonzalez says that before money goes into desalination projects that may hurt the environment, water conservation needs to become a bigger priority. "The first thing I say to someone who says that we need to do desal[ination] now is, 'Turn off your sprinklers.' We don't even know how much we need because we waste so much; we live in a total artificial world of water use and water supply."

But others insist that conserving water will not be enough. The drought is too severe, they say, and the state has been using too much water for too long.

"I don't think we can really conserve our way out of this problem, this problem being a combination of drought and of incredibly high water demand by a growing population and climate change," says Jay Famiglietti, the senior water scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology.

Almost everyone agrees: for a drought this severe, you need a multifaceted approach.

"Desal[ination] is part of it and sewage recycling is part of it," Famiglietti says. "More efficient irrigation, better water pricing, better crop choices — there's all sorts of things we need to include in our portfolio to bridge that gap between supply and demand."

But here's what scares a lot of people: Even an all-of-the-above strategy isn't going to be enough.

Read more here at NPR.org

Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38873
    • View Profile
Lake Mead Watch Report 3
« Reply #99 on: April 17, 2015, 06:45:39 PM »

As you can see, as of today April 3rd, Lake Mead is around 1084.5 Feet.

I discovered that map is dynamically produced, so it changes every day and doesn't provide a record.  So I am saving my updates and will store the images on the Diner.

Here is today, April 17th:

Lake Mead 4 17 15
Lake Mead 4 17 15

Current depth, ~1081.5'

So, in the last 14 days/2 weeks, we're down 3 feet just about exactly.  Roughly 30' to go before Hoover has to be shut down.  So that is around 20 Weeks away now, assuming the decline is steady.  However, it is likely to pick up as we move into Summer and evaporation and demand for water increases.

Crunch Time will come in Aug-Sept.

Wonder when the MSM will start reporting on it?  What contingency plan does Da Goobermint have for when they lose all that juice off the grid?

If they come back with a Who Cooda Node? on this one, they are fucking idiots.  A 6th Grader can plot this graph.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline azozeo

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 9152
    • View Profile
Re: Official California Dustbowl Thread
« Reply #100 on: April 17, 2015, 07:03:01 PM »
I think this is a great idea of yours, however their is more data needed.
Mead is fed by Lake Powell. It will have to be monitored as well.
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why youíre here. Youíre here because you know something. What you know you canít explain, but you feel it. Youíve felt it your entire life, that thereís something wrong with the world.
You donít know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 9152
    • View Profile
Re: Lake Mead Watch Report 3
« Reply #101 on: April 17, 2015, 07:06:26 PM »

As you can see, as of today April 3rd, Lake Mead is around 1084.5 Feet.

I discovered that map is dynamically produced, so it changes every day and doesn't provide a record.  So I am saving my updates and will store the images on the Diner.

Here is today, April 17th:

Lake Mead 4 17 15
Lake Mead 4 17 15

Current depth, ~1081.5'

So, in the last 14 days/2 weeks, we're down 3 feet just about exactly.  Roughly 30' to go before Hoover has to be shut down.  So that is around 20 Weeks away now, assuming the decline is steady.  However, it is likely to pick up as we move into Summer and evaporation and demand for water increases.

Crunch Time will come in Aug-Sept.

Wonder when the MSM will start reporting on it?  What contingency plan does Da Goobermint have for when they lose all that juice off the grid?

If they come back with a Who Cooda Node? on this one, they are fucking idiots.  A 6th Grader can plot this graph.

RE

I don't know if the natives down in the canyon keep records on their earthen dam/ dams.....
There was a big old flood a few years back & it tore up Supai falls & one of the indian
reservoirs.... 
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why youíre here. Youíre here because you know something. What you know you canít explain, but you feel it. Youíve felt it your entire life, that thereís something wrong with the world.
You donít know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38873
    • View Profile
Re: Official California Dustbowl Thread
« Reply #102 on: April 17, 2015, 07:29:46 PM »
I think this is a great idea of yours, however their is more data needed.
Mead is fed by Lake Powell. It will have to be monitored as well.

I doubt there is spare capacity in Powell that could be used to slow down Mead.  I think they march in lock step.  However, I will look for the data.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline jdwheeler42

  • Global Moderator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 3332
    • View Profile
    • Going Upslope
Re: Official California Dustbowl Thread
« Reply #103 on: April 17, 2015, 11:46:03 PM »
I think this is a great idea of yours, however their is more data needed.
Mead is fed by Lake Powell. It will have to be monitored as well.
I doubt there is spare capacity in Powell that could be used to slow down Mead.  I think they march in lock step.  However, I will look for the data.
Currently, I'd guess you're right about them moving in step.  However, when it comes time to shut down power production at the Hoover Dam, I'll bet they completely drain Lake Powell before they allow that to happen.  I know there is a "Save Lake Mead" group that does want to see Lake Powell drained.
Making pigs fly is easy... that is, of course, after you have built the catapult....

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38873
    • View Profile
Re: Official California Dustbowl Thread
« Reply #104 on: April 18, 2015, 07:29:05 AM »
I think this is a great idea of yours, however their is more data needed.
Mead is fed by Lake Powell. It will have to be monitored as well.
I doubt there is spare capacity in Powell that could be used to slow down Mead.  I think they march in lock step.  However, I will look for the data.
Currently, I'd guess you're right about them moving in step.  However, when it comes time to shut down power production at the Hoover Dam, I'll bet they completely drain Lake Powell before they allow that to happen.  I know there is a "Save Lake Mead" group that does want to see Lake Powell drained.

Draining Powell would keep Hoover running a while longer but would cause a huge water supply problem for the upper basin states.

Quote
Lake Powell is a water storage facility for the Upper Basin states of the Colorado River Compact (Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, and New Mexico). The Compact specifies that the Upper Basin states are to provide a minimum annual flow of 7,500,000 acre feet (9.3 km3) to the Lower Basin states (Arizona, Nevada, and California).

Lake Powell's elevation is Max 3700 ft.  Mead is at 1080 right now, max 1229.  So, any locations above 1229 won't get water from Mead, it's below them.  Powell is also already below half capacity with 11M ac-ft or water (max 24M) as of Dec 2014, it's likely less than that now.

Bottom line, if they did it, they probably can keep Hoover going another year, but it will exacerbate the drought issue for the people and the Ag that is currently supplied with water from Powell.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
5 Replies
2706 Views
Last post August 14, 2014, 02:27:48 AM
by RE
1 Replies
943 Views
Last post April 10, 2015, 04:10:23 AM
by RE
54 Replies
13623 Views
Last post October 01, 2019, 04:54:05 PM
by RE