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Offline WHD

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Re: Ukraine Civil War
« Reply #30 on: February 28, 2014, 11:08:02 PM »
Putin's Gambit.

Crimea. They call it a peninsula, but it's more like an autonomous island.

Provoking the West. It's not mainland Ukraine. You need Russian natural gas, oil. There is still autonomous Ukraine, where the pipelines are.

The EU is weak. Provocation could send southern PIIGS plus France into economic tailspin, social unrest. Some of the northern countries realizing they did not achieve eternal economic paradise.   

The US is eager to provoke back though, get into Syria, Iran. But the US is also weak, damaged by two hubris wars, fragile economic standing. Challenging the US directly has it's advantage, challenging the status of the Dollar; dollar breaks, American reckoning. But then, American reckoning, reckoning for everybody.

Russia needs China, to mount any serious attack on the West. China cultural revolution is on the other side of a real estate credit bubble bust, ecological mayhem. China can't be counted on, or trusted. 

Can't look weak though. Here, I shall take Crimea. Your turn.

Why not? They took the Olympic medal count. Probably in the contingency  plan before Sochi.

Obama bluffs, for the bluffing the EU can't do. What is America going to do? What is the Crimea, to America? Still, this is also about Arctic fields.

WHD

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Re: Ukraine Civil War
« Reply #31 on: February 28, 2014, 11:26:06 PM »

Obama bluffs, for the bluffing the EU can't do. What is America going to do? What is the Crimea, to America? Still, this is also about Arctic fields.


Amerika can't do squat unless/until NATO and the UN back resolutions to bring "Multi-National Peacekeeping Forces" to Ukraine, to battle it out with Putin's shock troops.  Whether the Illuminati running the UN have the Cojones for that remains to be seen.  However, if Western Europe is starved for energy, there will be popular pressure to "do something".  Putin will be blamed for the energy loss, and that is the rationale to mobilize for WAR.

Right now, Putin has only dropped a few 1000 Troops in there to take control of Goobermint buildings and so forth.  NATO will probably wait to see if he can control just what he has made a play for so far.  He may not be able to do so, because there is too much internal opposition in Ukraine.

The Rouble will likely come under ATTACK next week on the FOREX market.  It will be difficult for Putin to maintain Political Control if the Rouble comes under a sustained financial attack.

In all scenarios, NG transit through Ukraine is compromised.  Neither side can back down now.

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Offline Surly1

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Re: Ukraine Civil War
« Reply #32 on: March 01, 2014, 05:17:36 AM »

Obama bluffs, for the bluffing the EU can't do. What is America going to do? What is the Crimea, to America? Still, this is also about Arctic fields.


Amerika can't do squat unless/until NATO and the UN back resolutions to bring "Multi-National Peacekeeping Forces" to Ukraine, to battle it out with Putin's shock troops.  Whether the Illuminati running the UN have the Cojones for that remains to be seen.  However, if Western Europe is starved for energy, there will be popular pressure to "do something".  Putin will be blamed for the energy loss, and that is the rationale to mobilize for WAR.

Right now, Putin has only dropped a few 1000 Troops in there to take control of Goobermint buildings and so forth.  NATO will probably wait to see if he can control just what he has made a play for so far.  He may not be able to do so, because there is too much internal opposition in Ukraine.

The Rouble will likely come under ATTACK next week on the FOREX market.  It will be difficult for Putin to maintain Political Control if the Rouble comes under a sustained financial attack.

In all scenarios, NG transit through Ukraine is compromised.  Neither side can back down now.

RE

No will or means to war in the US. We're out of money and out of options. It would be fun to watch the idiot right turn pacifist when the "Kenyan pretender" gives a stern talk about national interests," "Eurpoean friends," etc.

Bottom line, Russian annexation of Crimea is a done deal. All parties will negotiate a face saving deal that ratifies it de facto if not de jure, giving Crimea more "autonomy" than they previously enjoyed, but their hearts will remain with Vlad. What is happening in Kiev is a very confusing picture, and it is by no means clear that the Right Sector (fascists) are not pulling the strings. Anybody seen Klitchsko recently?

The US, China and Russia are playing Risk, and Vlad has handed the neocons who run the fantast American foreign policy their asses. First in Syria, now in Crimea.

If you listen very, very closely (over the squeaking of RE's decrepit fire alarm) you can hear the beginning s of bleatings about increasing the military budget. "Can't be seen as being weak," intone the closeted gay men who speak for the people who run the military-industrial complex. Plus, that will have the added virtue as a tool with which  to again ratfuck the Kenyan pretender, who has called for certain cuts. Which we will pay for by another round of cuts on services for the poorest and most defenseless: everyone without a hired lobbyist to pass out hand jobs in DC.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline WHD

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Re: Ukraine Civil War
« Reply #33 on: March 01, 2014, 07:29:00 AM »
Quote
No will or means to war in the US. We're out of money and out of options. It would be fun to watch the idiot right turn pacifist when the "Kenyan pretender" gives a stern talk about national interests," "Eurpoean friends," etc.

I've been wondering how long before those working for RT (Russia Today), Max Keiser, The Resident, etc,) are denounced by the pinheads @ Fox News. I don't think the Right in this country is capable of pacifism. It is all war, all the time with these people. There is never someone they don't want to bomb. Funny though, Vlad and the Right in America, hating on the Homos. LOL. They should be allies.  :icon_mrgreen:  :emthdown:

Offline JoeP

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Re: Ukraine Civil War
« Reply #34 on: March 01, 2014, 07:45:22 AM »

Russia needs China, to mount any serious attack on the West.


You got that right -



2008 Russian military reform


just my straight shooting honest opinion

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Ukraine Invasion Infographic
« Reply #35 on: March 01, 2014, 03:59:12 PM »
H/T Zero Hedge


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Offline JoeP

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Re: Ukraine Invasion Infographic
« Reply #36 on: March 01, 2014, 05:07:38 PM »
H/T Zero Hedge


RE

Nice graphic, I thought about posting it earlier but I had to get my grill pre-heating. In light of my previous post about Russia's military reductions, I'd say they are throwing some weight into this scuffle. Can we agree they will need a friend to get completely through it (or take it to the limits)?...and I really do not see China taking a squat to piss in Ukraine.
just my straight shooting honest opinion

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Re: Ukraine Civil War
« Reply #37 on: March 10, 2014, 02:44:49 AM »
Looks like this one is staying on the Front Page for a while longer.

RE

Ukraine's Military Mobilizes, Prepares For Combat: Trucks, APCs, SAMs, Howitzers, Tanks Rolling Out

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Did somebody say de-escalation?

Earlier today, photos were distributed showing the latest military convoy reinforcements heading into the Crimea, accompanies by a Police car demonstrating Moscow license plate numbers, most likely providing further support to the pro-Russian forces in the peninsula.

 

Supposedly the trucks are carrying troops to reinforces the members of the new Crimean army, pictured below:

 

While at the same time along the makeshift border between Crimea and the mainland, the Pro-Russian forces are putting down minefields.

 

However, the Ukrainians, having already been mobilized for over a week, finally appear set to seize back the offensive:

The first clip below captured the 80th Airborne Regiment out of Lviv moving out, direction mainland, preparing to repel foreign attack.

The next video shows what are allegedly Buk SAM batteries deployed in the Donetsk region, a city in Eastern Ukraine which in the past week has swayed between Ukraine and Russian authority.

The clip below shows the 95th Airborne brigade also moving out of their barracks in Zhytomyr in western Ukraine, heading East, with an impressive deployment of trucks and APCs.

2S19 "Msta-S" 152mm Howitzers on the move to Crimea.

Finally, 20 T-64 tanks preparing to depart in Bila Tserkva, a city in central Ukraine:

So where again are all those pundits who were so eager to explain away the Ukraine confrontation as one that will promptly be forgotten, and is by now most certainly priced in?

(Source: @Ukroblogger, @SergeyPonomarev)

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Ukraine: The Ruskie POV
« Reply #38 on: March 14, 2014, 02:04:13 AM »
Zero Hedge seems to be lining up with the Ruskies for this battle.  Interesting...

What nobody in the Geopolitics Analyst community seems to get is that the problem is Resource Deficiency, a lack of Surplus to sprinkle around and keep ALL Oligarchs...Oligarchs.

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A Russian Explains The Real Stakes In The Fight For Crimea (And Ukraine)

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By Sergei Markov, posted in The Moscow Times,

Today, as a result of the Ukrainian crisis, U.S.-Russian relations have hit their lowest point since the invasion of Afghanistan in 1979 or of Czechoslovakia in 1969 — or perhaps even since they bottomed out during the Cuban Missile Crisis. The Crimean crisis, which began as a power struggle between the ruling authorities in Kiev and opposition forces, transformed in to an attempt to overthrow Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych by pro-Western and nationalist opposition forces with the support of the U.S. and European Union.

The crisis escalated into a conflict between the U.S. and Russia after the West supported a coup, then lied by violating the Feb. 21 agreement when it recognized the formation of a new and illegitimate government of extremists.

This conflict has the potential of sparking a new Cold War — something I never thought could happen in modern times since I believed it would have to be rooted in ideological differences. Instead, Moscow and Washington have billions of dollars of economic interests at stake, making this a geopolitical rather than an ideological Cold War.

Moscow does not see the revolution in Ukraine as an attempt to create a more democratic or law-based society. Instead, it sees the events in Kiev as an attempt to make Ukraine as anti-Russian as possible. The new government represents a minority of the Ukrainian population. It wants to suppress the Russian-speaking majority and violate their right to representation by holding unfair elections on May 25.

Moreover, U.S. President Barack Obama and German Chancellor Angela Merkel deceived President Vladimir Putin when they pursuaded him to convince Yanukovych to refrain from using force to quell the Maidan, and then to sign the Feb. 21 agreement — which they refused to uphold. Instead, they told Russia to accept the new reality in Ukraine. But why should Moscow accept that reality when it is directed against Russia, democracy and human rights?

What did Russia do to become the focus of so much animosity? Is it because it prevented the West from bombing Syria? Because it persuaded Yanukovych not to sign the Association Agreement — a treaty of little real importance to the EU? Those are trivial reasons for starting a new Cold War.

It seems that the West simply does not like Putin. He is a huge obstacle who prevents them from achieving global hegemony. For this reason alone he must be broken. Nobody in Moscow has any doubt that what happened in Ukraine will be repeated in Moscow in two or three years. Without Putin, there will be few world leaders left who have the power or courage to stand up to Washington. When this happens, the entire world will have to quickly accept the new reality.

Russia is not in Crimea to expand its territory but to oppose the immense power of West and its financial institutions in New York and London. Washington wants to characterize this as a conflict between Moscow and Kiev, thereby forcing Russia to negotiate with an illegitimate regime determined to destroy everything Russian in Ukraine.

However, everyone understands that this is a conflict between Moscow and Washington and that these countries should negotiate a solution. The question here is not Crimea but which reality the two sides are prepared to accept.

Should Moscow allow Washington to force it into humiliating submission and accept the possibility of a violent overthrow of the Putin regime? Or should Washington acknowledge that it can no longer impose its will on others? Both sides are unwilling to admit their weakness, thus making a geopolitical Cold War likely.

The West will hit Russia with economic sanctions to pressure Russian oligarchs into forming a fifth column, just as it did in Ukraine. To avoid this, Moscow will have to force oligarchs to bring their overseas assets back to Russia.

If Washington wins this geopolitical Cold War, it will install a pro-Western government in Moscow which could lead to the breakup of Russia. Siberia, the Caucasus and the Far East will demand autonomy, and the country's oil and gas resources will be transferred from the government to multinational corporations.

However, it is possible that Russia can resist, thereby fulfilling its historical mission of foiling the designs of those who long for world domination. Just as Russia stopped Hitler in the 20th century, Napoleon in the 19th century and Frederick the Great in the 18th century, it will stop Washington in the 21st century. This is nothing personal, just business. Russia has its historical mission to fulfill.

If a geopolitical Cold War erupts, it very well may morph into an ideological one since a Western attack would force Putin to rely heavily on conservative forces in the country's so-called "moral majority" in order to bolster his support. Additionally, Moscow will attempt to relieve pressure and find support abroad by stepping up its information campaign among the hundreds of millions of EU residents who sympathize not only with Putin's stance against Washington, but also his support of the traditional values that have been rejected by the EU elite.

Recent polls show that 80 percent of Germany's population sympathizes with Russian policy in Ukraine and only 8 percent favor sanctions. The online social networks in the West constitute an intellectual revolt against the bias of the mainstream media — all of which demonize Putin without any objectivity. Social network users clearly sympathize with Putin and their support will only grow.

Washington once transformed Cesar Chavez from a minor U.S. activist into a major political figure. Now Washington will transform Putin from his role as the man that lifted Russia off its knees into a global leader in the struggle against the global domination of Washington and the new values of postmodernism.

However, I would like to believe that the current crisis will not develop into a full-fledged geopolitical Cold War. After all, Obama thinks in 21st century terms, not 19th century. For his part, Putin holds many Western convictions. What's more, a geopolitical Cold War would hit Europe the hardest, robbing it of the balanced economic growth it needs and preventing it from consolidating its resources for something more useful. It is now the time for every responsible European leader to speak out against a new Cold War since they have the most to lose.

The way to end this standoff is clear: Ukraine must become a neutral state with a democratic government. It must grant full equality to both its Ukrainian and Russian-speaking citizens, adopt the policy of federalism and make both Ukrainian and Russian official state languages.

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Re: Ukraine Civil War
« Reply #39 on: March 14, 2014, 04:47:58 PM »
Getting closer to WWII every day.

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Russia counts cost as West tightens sanctions noose

The West has threatened visa bans and an asset freeze on individuals unless Russia steps back from the brink on the annexation of Crimea

Russian President Vladimir Putin addresses the media at the end of an EU-Russia summit, at the European Council building in Brussels
Angela Merkel said Vladimir Putin was becoming hard to reason with after her latest telephone conversation Photo: AP
 

Russia risks a wave of capital flight and a shattering economic crisis as the West prepares a package of sanctions over the seizure of Crimea.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel spelled out the danger for Russia in a speech that silenced pro-Kremlin voices in her own coalition and left no doubt that Europe is now fully behind the US on punitive measures.

“If Russia continues on its course of the past weeks, that will not only be a great catastrophe for Ukraine. It will cause massive damage to Russia, both economically and politically,” she said. “None of us wants it to come to this, but we are determined to act. Let me be absolutely clear; the territorial integrity of Ukraine is not up for discussion.”

The West has threatened visa bans and an asset freeze on individuals as early as Monday unless Russia steps back from the brink on the annexation of Crimea. This now looks certain since Russian troops are continuing to dig in across the peninsula before this Sunday’s vote on secession. “It can get ugly fast if the wrong choices are made, and it can get ugly in multiple directions,” said John Kerry, US Secretary of State.

The US and the EU will escalate to “additional and far-reaching” measures if the picture deteriorates, a likely outcome since Ukraine’s premier Arseniy Yatsenyuk has vowed to resist any loss of sovereign soil.

Russia has threatened to retaliate with “symmetrical sanctions” but Tim Ash, from Standard Bank, said it is a one-sided contest that Moscow cannot win. “Russia is facing the entire West. Its economy is already very weak and this could end up being as bad as 2008-2009, when GDP contracted by 9pc,” he said.

Russia cannot suspend oil and gas exports without cutting off its own source of foreign revenue. Any such move would destroy its credibility as a supplier of energy, accelerating Europe’s long-term switch to other sources.

Russian companies have $653bn (£392bn) of foreign dollar debt, and must roll over roughly $150bn this year. Yields on five-year bonds have already spiked 200 basis points, even for blue-chip firms. The rouble has fallen 11pc this year after dropping 8pc last year, making dollar debts harder to repay. “It is going to be very difficult to roll over these bonds, and it will be at much higher cost,” said Mr Ash.

Capital flight reached $63bn last year. Former finance minister Alexei Kudrin said this could reach $50bn a quarter as the crisis deepens. The central bank has already raised interest rates sharply to stem outflows, pushing the economy into recession.

Russia has $480bn of foreign reserves but these cannot easily be used in a downturn since it entails monetary tightening. The Kremlin caused a drastic fall in the money supply and a banking crisis when it ran down reserves by $200bn after the Lehman crisis.

Standard Bank said Washington is determined to make Russia pay for tearing up the post-Cold War settlement and undermining the architecture of nuclear non-proliferation. It is drawing up stealth sanctions to freeze Russia out of global finance.

These will be spearheaded by the US Securities and Exchange Commission, which will enforce compliance of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The next step is to place Russia on the “grey list” for money laundering. “This would prevent global banks from dealing with Russian counterparts. Washington is tightening the noose. No bank is going to mess with the SEC,” said Mr Ash.

Chris Weafer, from the Moscow-based group Macro Advisory, said the Russian elites are becoming “extremely nervous” but it is a two-way risk. “There could be contagion back into the West. There are a lot of things Russia can do short of the nuclear option of cutting off gas. It could ban exports of titanium, inflicting severe disruption on Airbus and Boeing,” he said. Both jet makers rely on titanium supplies from the Russia firm VSMPO-Avisma.

“Russia could cut off 2.5m barrels a day of refined products such as diesel that are hard for Europe to replace since it has run down its refineries,” he said.

Germany is in an awkward position since it exports $50bn of cars, machinery and industrial goods to Russia each year. There are 6,200 German companies in the country with vast sunk costs. Last year alone they invested $105bn. Germany’s trade group BDA said a tit-for-tat sanctions war would be “painful” for Germany but “life-threatening” for Russia.

Igor Rudensky, head of the Duma’s Economics Committee, said sanctions will boomerang. “They are a double-edged sword, and Western states should be very careful,” he said.

With emotions running high, it is impossible to know whether Russia will act in its own economic self-interest or choose to bring the temple crashing down on everybody’s heads. Mrs Merkel said Vladimir Putin was becoming hard to reason with after her latest telephone conversation. “He is in his own world,” she said.

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Offline Surly1

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Re: Ukraine Civil War
« Reply #40 on: March 15, 2014, 05:28:58 AM »
Getting closer to WWII    WWIII every day.

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Russia counts cost as West tightens sanctions noose

The West has threatened visa bans and an asset freeze on individuals unless Russia steps back from the brink on the annexation of Crimea

With emotions running high, it is impossible to know whether Russia will act in its own economic self-interest or choose to bring the temple crashing down on everybody’s heads. Mrs Merkel said Vladimir Putin was becoming hard to reason with after her latest telephone conversation. “He is in his own world,” she said.


Fixed that for you. Now this:

The Russians Have Already Quietly Pulled Their Money From The West
Tyler Durden's pictureSubmitted by Tyler Durden on 03/14/2014 21:22 -0400

China Crude Newspaper Renminbi Ukraine

 
Earlier today we reported that according to weekly Fed data, a record amount - some $105 billion - in Treasurys had been sold or simply reallocated (which for political reasons is the same thing) from the Fed's custody accounts, bringing the total amount of US paper held at the Fed to a level not seen since December 2012. While China was one of the culprits suggested to have withdrawn the near USD-equivalent paper, a far likelier candidate was Russia, which as is well-known, has had a modest falling out with the West in general, and its financial system in particular. Turns out what Russian official institutions may have done with their Treasurys (and we won't know for sure until June), it was merely the beginning. In fact, as the FT reports, in silent and not so silent preparations for what will be near-certain financial sanctions (which would include account freezes and asset confiscations following this Sunday's Crimean referendum) the snealy Russians, read oligarchs, have already pulled billions from banks in the west thereby essentially making the biggest western gambit - that of going after the wealth of Russia's 0.0001% - moot.

From the FT:

Russian companies are pulling billions out of western banks, fearful that any US sanctions over the Crimean crisis could lead to an asset freeze, according to bankers in Moscow.
 
Sberbank and VTB, Russia’s giant partly state-owned banks, as well as industrial companies, such as energy group Lukoil, are among those repatriating cash from western lenders with operations in the US. VTB has also cancelled a planned US investor summit next month, according to bankers.
 
The flight comes as last-ditch diplomatic talks between Russia’s foreign minister and the US secretary of state to resolve the tensions in Ukraine ended without an agreement.
 
Markets were nervous before Sunday’s Crimea referendum on secession from Ukraine. Traders and businesspeople fear this could spark western sanctions against Russia as early as Monday.
It probably will. What it will also do is force Russia to engage China far more actively in bilateral trade and ultimately to transact using either Rubles or Renminbi, and bypass the dollar. Perhaps even using gold, something which the price of the yellow metal sniffed out this week, pushing itself to 6 month highs. It will also make financial ties between the two commodity-rich nations even closer, while further alienating that "imperialist devil," the US.

Of course, the west thinking like the west, and assuming that all that matters to Russia is the closing level of the Micex, believes that a sufficient plunge in Russian stocks would have been enough to deter Putin. After all, the only thing everyone in the US cares about is if the S&P 500 closed at yet another all time high, right?

What the west didn't realize, as we predicted a month ago, for Putin it is orders of magnitude more important to have the price of commodities, primarily crude and gas, high than seeing the illusion of paper wealth, aka stocks, hitting all time highs. Especially since in Russia an even smaller portion of the population cares about the daily fluctuations of the stock market. As for the oligarchs, if there is someone who will be delighted to see their power, wealth and influence impacted adversely, if only for a short period of time, it is Vladimir Vladimirovich himself, whom the west misjudged massively once more. Not to mention that the general population will be even more delighted, and boost Putin's rating even higher, if these crony billionaires are made to suffer by the west, if only a little.

(Here we would be remiss not to comment on his easy it supposedly is for Obama to freeze the assets of a few corrupt Russian billionaires, and yet the very proud Americans who nearly brought the entire financial system to the brink in 2008, are now richer than ever.)

In the meantime, some of Russia's oligarchs are effectively welcoming the challenge. Bloomberg reports:

Alisher Usmanov, the country’s richest person, controls his most valuable asset, Metalloinvest Holding Co., Russia’s largest iron ore producer, through three subsidiaries, one of which is located in Cyprus, an EU member nation. The 60-year-old also owns a Victorian mansion in London that he bought in 2008 for $70 million, according to a May 18, 2008, Sunday Times newspaper report. He’s lost $1.5 billion since the crisis began, according to the Bloomberg ranking.
 
“We are concerned with the possible sanctions against Russia but don’t see any dramatic repercussions for our business,” Ivan Streshinsky, CEO at USM Advisors LLC, which manages Usmanov’s assets, including stakes in Megafon OAO and Mail.Ru Group Ltd., said in an interview at Bloomberg’s offices in Moscow today.
 
“Mail.Ru and Megafon revenue is coming from Russia and people won’t stop making calls and using the Internet,” he said. “Metalloinvest may face closure in European and American markets, but it can re-direct sales to China and other markets.”
Great job, Obama: you just pushed Russia and China even closer by necessity! Furthermore, it should come as no surprise that while Russians were pulling their money from the west, western firms were getting out of Dodgeski.

One senior Moscow banker said 90 per cent of investors were already behaving as if sanctions were in place, adding that this was “prudent exposure management”.
 
These moves represent the flipside of the more obvious withdrawal of western money from Russian markets that has been evident over the past fortnight.
 
Traders and bankers said US banks had been particularly heavy sellers of Russian bonds. According to data from the Bank for International Settlements, US banks and asset managers between them have about $75bn of exposure to Russia.
 
Joseph Dayan, head of markets at BCS, one of Russia’s largest brokers said: “It’s been quite an ugly picture in Russian bonds the last few days and some of it has to do with international banks reducing exposure.”
 
Although foreign banks have not yet begun cutting credit to Russian companies en masse, bankers said half a dozen live deals to fund some of Russia’s biggest companies were in limbo as lenders waited to see how punitive western sanctions would be.
So the bottom line is that Russia, thinking a few steps ahead, already has withdrawn the bulk of its assets from the West, and why not. Recall that a year ago it was revealed that the same Russians who were supposed to be punished in Cyprus had mostly withdrawn their funds in advance of the bail in: they tend to know what is coming. It was the ordinary Cypriot citizens, who had done nothing wrong, who were most impaired.

And so while the Russian response is already known, we wonder just how true is the inverse: just how prepared is the west, and especially Europe, to exist in a world in which a third of Germany's gas is suddenly cut off? We can't wait to find out early next week.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: Ukraine Civil War
« Reply #41 on: March 15, 2014, 05:41:08 AM »
Saw this on ZH.  There is a fundamental flaw in the argument  Do you see it?

RE
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Re: Ukraine Civil War
« Reply #42 on: March 15, 2014, 05:50:16 AM »
Saw this on ZH.  There is a fundamental flaw in the argument  Do you see it?

RE

My thoughts:

1) So where does Boris Badinov put his money after he withdraws it from western banks? And how much does he lose on the arbitrage?

2) So Vlad sells his NG to the chinese for renminbi, which, if you hadn't noticed, is having its own problems right now. Forcing Russia and China together being like swimming with an anchor without western credit markets.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline JoeP

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Re: Ukraine Civil War
« Reply #43 on: March 21, 2014, 03:19:45 PM »
The possible effects of any sanctions imposed by the US and EU on Russia seem to pale in comparison to the blowback after these energy and arms agreements between Russia and China are carved in stone. It's obvious to me that these deals were planned some time before the first riot took place in Ukraine.  Very smart.



Petrodollar Alert: Putin Prepares To Announce "Holy Grail" Gas Deal With China

just my straight shooting honest opinion

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Re: Ukraine Civil War
« Reply #44 on: March 21, 2014, 06:44:40 PM »
The possible effects of any sanctions imposed by the US and EU on Russia seem to pale in comparison to the blowback after these energy and arms agreements between Russia and China are carved in stone. It's obvious to me that these deals were planned some time before the first riot took place in Ukraine.  Very smart.



Petrodollar Alert: Putin Prepares To Announce "Holy Grail" Gas Deal With China


Wow. Interesting article. Makes perfect sense.

Always nice to have options.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound