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Offline ross

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The New Nature
« on: May 04, 2012, 05:45:50 AM »
How is your weather changing? What are you noticing about new weather patterns over the last 24 months.

In northern Chicago we're seeing increased frequency of hail storms, which is something I saw maybe once in my life before this past year and have now seen three times in the last year including last night.

Offline Jb

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Re: The New Nature
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2012, 06:25:38 AM »
Our weather here in Charlottesville has fluctuated. Without going back and actually reviewing the historical record, it's difficult to say this is 'new.' However, I keep a simple garden notebook of what I plant and when, and when I harvest.

I know for sure that this year I planted two weeks earlier than last year because it was so hot. It was also very very dry. We didn't get the early spring rain; we were 2" below normal precipitation and that's after a mild winter. Then we had two nights of near freezing temperatures that really stressed the plants. Now we have some rain and warmer temperatures again; something akin to 'normal.'

This does not bode well in my opinion. It makes gardening / farming difficult and more prone to crop loss, which ultimately I think will lead to price increases and starvation.

Jb

Offline JoeP

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Re: The New Nature
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2012, 06:41:12 AM »
In the Raleigh area, storms have been more violent and there have been more tornados pass through the vicinity in the past few years.  The heat came on early this year - I had to start mowing zoysia (warm weather grass) six weeks earlier than the "normal" start time.
just my straight shooting honest opinion

Online RE

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Summertime in the New Normal: Head NORTH to ALASKA!
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2012, 02:19:15 AM »
Seven die amid severe heat, storms; millions without power

Looking grimmer by the minute here folks.  The Temps being talked about in this article are getting WAY outta Da Box now.

Clearly not a good time to be in the Lower Latitudes.  Up here, the Summer so far is cooler than average and another farily Wet one as well.

Might be a good time to GTFO of Dodge and Head NORTH to ALASKA!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/JSt0NEESrUA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/JSt0NEESrUA</a>

RE

Seven die amid severe heat, storms; millions without power

A baby and two young boys may be among those who died due to high temperatures

David Goldman  /  AP


Evelyn Wood fans herself while her daughter Sherri Smith applies a cold towel as they celebrate Wood's 80th birthday in Washington, D.C. on Friday. Both are from both of Wichita Falls, Texas.
 
By Miguel Llanos
msnbc.com

A procession of violent storms hammered the Washington area late Friday, cutting off power to nearly 2 million people and killing two people when trees fell onto a house and a car.

The storms hit Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia on Friday night following a day of high temperatures across much of the country. Officials in Tennessee and Missouri were looking into the deaths of five people -- including a baby and two young children -- thought to have been caused by the heat.
 
West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin declared a state of emergency after more than 500,000 customers in 27 counties were without power.
 
"The damage from today's storms is widespread and in many places severe," Tomblin said.

"With temperatures near 100 degrees expected this weekend, it's critical that we get people's power back on as soon as possible," he added. "We're committing 100 percent of our state's resources for as long as we need to get this cleaned up."
 
As of 11:25 p.m., Pepco reported 226,012 outages in Montgomery County, Md., 133,160 in Prince George's County and 66,684 in Washington, according to NBC News.

Police in northern Virginia said two people were killed by falling trees. Fairfax County police spokeswoman Mary Ann Jennings said one of the victims was a 90-year-old woman who was asleep in bed Friday night when heavy winds blew a tree onto her house in Springfield.

Another death was reported in Springfield when a tree collapsed onto a car. Jennings also said police were responding elsewhere to reports of a park police officer injured when his car was hit by a tree and an 18-year-old man struck by a downed power line.

The heat wave smothered the central U.S. on Friday spread east -- and for Washington, D.C., that meant topping out at 104 degrees at Reagan National Airport around 5 p.m. ET.

Dead boys had played outside
Heat is suspected to have been the cause of the deaths of two young brothers in eastern Tennessee, Reuters reported. The boys, aged 3 and 5, had been playing outside Thursday. The younger boy died Thursday, and the older boy on Friday afternoon, according to Eric Blach, administrator for the Bradley County Medical Examiner's Office.

In Kansas City, Missouri, city health officials said Friday they were investigating the deaths of three area residents, including a baby boy, to determine if they were heat-related, according to Reuters.

Earlier in the week, a 39-year-old construction worker died at the University of Arkansas.

The nation's capital broke the June 29 record mark by 3 degrees and, with the humidity, it felt like 112, the National Weather Service reported.

The old record of 101 degrees stood for 138 years. Washington's all-time record is 106.
 
Nashville, Tenn., saw 109 degrees on Friday -- smashing its 60-year record by two degrees.
 
Triple-digit temperatures across the Mid-Atlantic were expected to break records elsewhere as well, the weather service reported earlier.

Record-breaking heat will continue into the weekend and possibly through the July 4th holiday, it added, "and overnight lows will struggle to drop below 70."
 
Much of the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast on Friday joined areas in the Plains and Midwest with excessive heat warnings and heat advisories. The Northeast was only slightly cooler.
 
High humidity could make it feel like 119 degrees in some Carolina coastal areas by Saturday afternoon, the weather service stated.
 
On Thursday, Norton, Kan., was the hottest spot in the nation, topping out at 118 degrees, according to the National Climatic Data Center. In all, 22 Kansas locations reached 110 or hotter on Thursday.
 
Over the previous five days, another Kansas town, Hill City, held that hottest spot, reaching 115 degrees on Wednesday.
 

Coby Baalman via AP
 Ranch hand Terry Moss walks through a parched corn field in Menlo, Kan., on Wednesday. Kansas has seen the worst of the heat wave impacting millions across the U.S.

Story: Heat hub for US is Kansas farm town -- not Death Valley
In Kansas City, Mo., the heat was suspected of contributing to the deaths of a man and an infant, KSHB-TV reported.
 
Meteorologists expect little relief over the next couple of weeks.
 
"This overall pattern looks like it is going to stick around well into July," Alex Sosnowski, a meteorologist with AccuWeather.com, told Reuters.
 Story: One dead, 347 homes destroyed in Colo. wildfire
"It looks pretty much rock solid centered on the Central Plains and Central Rockies over into the Tennessee Valley interior south," Sosnowski said. "It's anchored in there and it's really not going to change much."
 
Sosnowski said temperatures would spike toward 100 degrees from Chicago to Washington, D.C., and possibly New York every now and then, and areas from Colorado to the interior of the Carolinas would have little hope for temporary relief.
 
More than 1,000 temperature records broken in a week

Temperatures will push 90 degrees most days in New York, Washington and Philadelphia the next two weeks, while Denver, Kansas City and the middle of the nation will tend to see high temperatures pushing 100 degrees, he said.
 
The dry conditions and high temperatures have exacerbated wildfires in western states, and have threatened corn crops and stressed livestock in the Central Plains.
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Online RE

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Update: Amazon is Down! I repeat, AMAZON IS DOWN!
« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2012, 02:41:48 AM »
Truly, TEOTWAWKI.

RE


Amazon Cloud Goes Down Friday Night, Taking Netflix, Instagram And Pinterest With It

As of 11:21 PM EST Amazon’s Elastic Compute Cloud in North Virginia went down, due to severe thunder storms in the area. The Washington Post reports torrential rains, “scary winds and lightening” and massive power outages in the D.C. area.

Amazon EC2 runs many major websites and services. Netflix, Instagram, and Pinterest have all been taken out of service during the outage. Half an hour later, in the midst of Friday night movie night, Netflix sent out the tweet above. Pinterest showed the following misleading alert, an hour an a half into the outage:



VentureBeat has reported that Instagram, and Ruby platform Heroku (that runs many other sites) were also down.

Here’s the play-by-play: At 11:21 PM EST, Amazon Web Services reported, ”We are investigating connectivity issues for a number of instances in the US-EAST-1 Region.” And at 11:31 EST, it added, ”We are investigating elevated errors rates for APIs in the US-EAST-1 (Northern Virginia) region, as well as connectivity issues to instances in a single availability zone.” By 11:49 EST, it reported that,  ”Power has been restored to the impacted Availability Zone and we are working to bring impacted instances and volumes back online.” But by 12:20 EST the outage continued, “We are continuing to work to bring the instances and volumes back online. In addition, EC2 and EBS APIs are currently experiencing elevated error rates.” At 12:54 AM EST, AWS reported that “EC2 and EBS APIs are once again operating normally. We are continuing to recover impacted instances and volumes.”

As of 1:15 am EST, Netflix appears to be back up and running, but Pinterest, Instagram and Heroku still appear to be down. It was just an hour-and-a-half during peak traffic time for these affected companies, but this event follows a six-and-a-half hour outage on EC2 two weeks ago. And one of the selling points of the Cloud is that there are redundancies to prevent just such occurrences. A small step backwards, perhaps, for cloud computing.

UPDATE: As of 1:50 AM EST, Pinterest was back up.
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Online RE

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State of Emergency in West Virginia
« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2012, 04:53:37 AM »
Wow, sounds like the East Coast is REALLY getting HAMMERRED here by Mom Nature!

Nothing today from Surly.  Hope he isn't getting Flooded again.  Check in please if you can Surly.

RE


State of emergency declared in West Virginia after powerful storms
Published June 30, 2012

The governor of West Virginia declared a state of emergency for the entire state early Saturday morning after powerful evening storms left an estimated 500,000 residents without power.
 
"The damage from today's storms is widespread and in many places severe," said Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin in a statement. "With temperatures near 100 degrees expected this weekend, it's critical that we get people's power back on as soon as possible. We're committing 100% of our state's resources for as long as we need to get this cleaned up."
 
Tomblin urged residents to stay as cool as possible and drink plenty of fluids since the state will be under a hear advisory until 8 p.m. this evening.
 
The West Virginia Gazette-Mail reported damage at Charleston’s Yeager Airport. Strong winds caused a single-engine Cessna to flip over on the tarmac and several large hanger doors were blown off their hinges, the report said.
 
Violent evening storms following a day of triple-digit temperatures wiped out power to more than 2 million people across the eastern United States and caused two fatalities in Virginia -- including a 90-year-old woman asleep in bed when a tree slammed into her home, a police spokeswoman said Saturday.
 
Widespread power outages were reported from Indiana to New Jersey, with the bulk of the service interruptions concentrated on Washington, D.C., and the surrounding areas. Earlier Friday, the nation's capital reached 104 degrees -- topping a record of 101 set in 1934.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/weather/2012/06/30/state-emergency-declared-in-west-virginia-after-powerful-storms/#ixzz1zHCXftt7
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Online RE

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The New Nature: Washington Hammerred
« Reply #6 on: June 30, 2012, 05:15:08 AM »
Boy, and Hurricane Season hasn't even begun here yet!  Looks like a good year for tracking the NOAA Website!

RE

Storms Leave 2 Million Without Power

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
 
Published: June 30, 2012


WASHINGTON — Utility crews were working on Saturday morning to restore electricity to hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses that lost power during a wave of violent thunderstorms.

Utilities reported that more than 2 million customers were without power from Indiana to New Jersey, with the bulk of the service interruptions concentrated on Washington and the surrounding areas. Earlier Friday, the nation’s capital reached 104 degrees — topping a record of 101 set in 1934.

At least two deaths were reported. A police spokeswoman in Fairfax County, Va., Mary Ann Jennings, said the woman in the Springfield, Va., area when a tree fell onto her home while she was sleeping. Police also reported that 27-year-old man, identified Khiet Nguyen, 27, of Burke, Va., was killed during a traffic accident.

The utility that serves Washington, Pepco, reported overnight that 441,000 customers were without power in the District of Columbia and Montgomery and Prince George’s counties, Md. A spokeswoman for the Pepco utility, Myra Oppel, said that it would take several days to restore power to all customers.

Ms. Oppel said Pepco would seek to bring in crews from other states, but that neighboring utilities facing massive outages will also be calling on them.

The power loss comes as the region is bracing for another day of sweltering heat.

“This is very unfortunate timing,” she said, referring to the heat wave. “We do understand the hardship that this brings, especially with the heat as intense as it is. We will be working around the clock until we get the last customer on.”

In addition to Pepco, Dominion Power was reporting 837,000 customers without power, including 460,000 in Northern Virginia. BGE said about 431,000 customers were without power, mostly in Baltimore and nearby counties. Delmarva Power was reporting about 68,000 customers without power in Delaware.

Officials in Montgomery County, Md., said winds in excess of 75 mph had been reported.

A spokesman for the Metro subway in Washington, Dan Stessel, said some Red Line service had been suspended because of the power loss. Delays were reported on the Blue and Orange lines, buses were replacing trains on some routes and crews were busy removing downed trees.

“It has had a widespread effect on the region,” Mr. Stessel said early Saturday. He said about 17 train stations were operating on backup power because of local power losses, but that he did not anticipate service being disrupted on Saturday.

Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin of West Virginia declared a state of emergency after more than 500,000 customers in 27 counties lost electricity.

Several elderly residents from an Indianapolis apartment home were displaced when a tree fell onto a power line, knocking out electricity to the facility, the fire department said. More than 20 residents were taken by bus to a Red Cross facility to spend the night, and others who depend on oxygen assistance were given other accommodations.

In Ohio, the State Highway Patrol said three tractor-trailers blew over on Interstate 75 near Findlay, but no one was injured.

Bryan Jackson, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Sterling, Va., said the system that came through the Washington area is known as a derecho, which the weather service describes as “a widespread, long-lived wind system that is associated with a band of rapidly moving showers or thunderstorms.” Although a derecho can produce tornado-like damage, the damage is typically along a mostly straight path.

Mr. Jackson said the storms originated in the Midwest, passed over the Appalachian Mountains and then restrengthened, drawing energy and direction from a ridge of high pressure centered over the southeastern United States.

“It’s one of those storms, it just plows through,” he said. “It’s able to maintain itself and it’s associated with very strong wind gusts. So we have widespread 60- , 70-, 80-, even isolated 90-mile-an-hour, wind gusts associated with it.”

He said the storm toppled trees and damaged structures, in what he called very, very widespread, large-scale damage.”

Earlier Friday, the Washington area broke a record high temperature set almost 80 years ago.

The National Weather Service said that just before 3 p.m., it was 104 degrees at Washington Reagan National Airport. That beats the record of 101 set in 1934.

Baltimore was also experiencing temperatures in the 100s. It was 102 at Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport around 3 p.m. That was shy of the record of 105 set in 1934.

The National Weather Service is predicting sunny weather Saturday and Sunday in the Greater Washington area, with highs in the upper 90s.More showers and thunderstorms are also possible both days.
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Offline peter

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Re: The New Nature
« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2012, 09:15:03 AM »
I suspect that the whole Climate Change debate is an attempt to obscure the possibility that there is a weather war going on. I'm not sure if it's different localized factions fighting each other or the illuminati taking on all of humanity. In any case the climate change debate hides from public view the possibility that the current weather is man made.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2012, 09:20:24 AM by peter »

Offline EndIsNigh

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Re: The New Nature
« Reply #8 on: June 30, 2012, 04:25:22 PM »
Who stands to gain the most from denying climate change science?  Industry and those who benefit from the carbon economy.  I think Occam's Razor is useful here.  The denial among J6P can be simply explained by evasion of responsibility and a desire to continue the American exceptionalism lifestyle.  You present an interesting idea, but it seems overly complex.  Can you provide any corroborating evidence and/or flesh out the motives and capability in more detail? 

Offline peter

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Re: The New Nature
« Reply #9 on: June 30, 2012, 08:39:19 PM »
It's more a gut feeling from information I have seen in my research than anything concrete. I suspect it's a depopulation agenda against humans in general rather that antagonists fighting each other although I have seen articles that suggest such a scenario in detail.

If you start researching Chemtrails and Haarp there is an enormous amount of  information available.

A paper from the US Air Force in 1996, 3 years before chemtrails first appeared.

Weather as a Force Multiplier: Owning the Weather in 2025

A site called Weather Wars http://weatherwars.info

I saw these photos a few yeas ago. They are taken by a commercial pilot of other flights in his vicinity. http://weatherwars.info/?page_id=147







Trails of Ionizable Barium Salts greatly enhance the electrical conductivity of moisture in the atmosphere. Haarp can put an enormous amount of electrical energy into atmosphere which can be used for modifying the weather or beaming energy to somewhere else on the planet off a lens created in the atmosphere using all the barium salts and aluminum particulate associated with chemtrails. Think earth quakes, and very severe controlled lightning both of which are becoming much more common.

Conducting a weather war under guise of global warming doesn't exclude profiting from the carbon agenda, in fact it enhances the credibility. Global warming was pretty much of a dud media wise so the nomenclature was changed to climate change. For climate change to be believable the climate needs to change. Weaponizing the weather accomplishes that.


Online RE

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DINERS AT GROUND ZERO PLEASE CHECK IN!
« Reply #10 on: June 30, 2012, 10:36:24 PM »
Still nothing from Surly or Ashvin, both of whom live in Virginia at Ground Zero of this latest "Act of God".  I am concerned as I always am whenever Diners are in the WRONG PLACE AT THE WRONG TIME.

Ashvin in particular is just about always Online and connected to the DD Server.  He has more online hours than I do.  He rarely shuts down his computer/net connection.  I can only figure his connection is cut right now.

We are seeing the SAME story as last year with Hurricane Irene, where the Grid got taken down.  Billions spent to rewire everything, and in the words of Ben Lictenstein "Here they come to SELL 'EM Again!"  This wasn't even Hurricane generated, its a Derecho type storm system which comes from straight line winds generated up by the progressive heating of the surface of the Earth  during the daylight hours.  The Storms sweep along in a straight line as night falls and the surface cools, and POW you get your T-storms.

They will spend a week here at least rewiring and getting the HVAC running everywhere again, but man, when ANOTHER set of storms or a Hurricane hit, just how many times can they keep accessing credit to restring those wires?

The stories read all the same about the Elderly who need electricity to keep their Oxygen tanks running in the Nursing Homes,  and just the sweltering HEAT inside everybody's McMansion that is not ventilated well enough without the HVAC running to be livable. "It's like being inside an OVEN." is a popular quotable from J6P in MSM stories.  "We'll be OK though, we have Pool in the backyard."

Yea, OK they can take a dip in that pool for a day or two, but their filtration systems aren't running and the algae and bacteria will find a nice new home there in such conditions.  None of these folks have any CLUE how dependent they are on POWER to run everything they use to live this sort of lifestyle.

Solutions?  Head to the Mall or Public Schools etc where the power is restored first or they have backup generators, or book a Motel Room somewhere that said Motel has Power, and ride it out for a week that way while the wires are restrung and the Transformers reset.  How many are prepared and have common sense enough to GTFO of the Sweatbox McMansion and take a Tent out into the Backyard at least here?  Nope, they will sleep inside the Mcmansion, sweat and dehydrate overnight.

This one is not the one where the Malls will not get their Electricity turned on again, not quite YET here in the FSofA.  Man though, if you cannot read the Writing on the Wall by now, you are just freaking illiterate and deluded.  This system is coming apart at the seams on a daily basis now everywhere we look.

Don't wait too long to GTFO of Dodge.  Better a couple of years early than an hour too late.  The day comes when the Wires do NOT get restrung, about the entirety of Urban and Suburban Amerika is UNLIVABLE.

You are seeing the Previews now, Coming Attractions for the Collapse of Industrial Civilization.

The Big Show is Coming Soon to a Theatre Near You.

RE
----
WASHINGTON –  Multiple governors declared emergencies as temperatures rose in the aftermath of powerful storms that swept through the mid-Atlantic region Friday night, resulting in at least 13 deaths and leaving more than three million without power.
 
Under the statewide emergency declaration, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and Ohio, can utilize all government resources immediately to help those in need. The District of Columbia also declared a state of emergency.
 
Gov. John Kasich cited widespread power losses in Ohio, utility damages and excessive heat that could create crisis conditions for some Ohioans. State emergency officials say 800,000 to 1 million people still had power outages Saturday morning.
 
West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin declared a state of emergency after more than 500,000 customers in 27 counties were left without electricity. Current estimates have 688,000 people without power in the state. Tomblin's office says the state is running out of fuel and they're fearful that they will run out of gas.
 
Also in West Virginia, 232 Amtrak passengers spent Friday night on a train that was blocked on both sides by trees that fell on the tracks..
 
On Saturday night, the train passengers stranded near rural Prince, West Virginia, were loaded into buses after they got stuck at 11 p.m. the previous evening, said Amtrak spokesman Steve Kulm. Kulm said the train bound from New York to Chicago had power, so lights and air conditioning were working. He said that since it's a long-distance train, it was stocked with food and crew members were able to get to town to buy more.
 
Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell said the state had its largest non-hurricane power outage in its history. There are 2.5 million without power.
 
The storm did damage from Indiana to New Jersey, although the bulk of it was in West Virginia, Washington and suburban Virginia and Maryland.
 
Two boys at a New Jersey campsite, ages 7 and 2, killed in a tent when a tree fell early Saturday morning, authorities said.
 
There were six reported deaths in Virginia, including a 90-year-old woman asleep in bed when a tree slammed into her home, a police spokeswoman said Saturday. Another man was killed by a falling tree while watching the storm from his deck and a woman died after she, too, was hit by a falling tree after she got out of her car to observe a downed tree. Both those deaths occurred in Albermarle County, Va. A fallen tree also killed a man driving in Maryland, and another resident was killed in a separate incident. A woman was also killed when a barn collapsed in Ohio.
 
Two were killed in Maryland, one in Ohio, one in Kentucky and one in Washington.
 
Widespread power outages were reported from Indiana to New Jersey, with the bulk of the service interruptions concentrated on Washington, D.C., and the surrounding areas. Earlier Friday, the nation's capital reached 104 degrees -- topping a record of 101 set in 1934.
 
More than 20 elderly residents at an apartment home in Indianapolis were displaced when the facility lost power due to a downed tree. Most were bused to a Red Cross facility to spend the night, and others who depend on oxygen assistance were given other accommodations, the fire department said.
 
The storms, sometimes packing 70 mph winds, toppled three tractor trailers on Interstate 75 near Findlay, Ohio.
 
"Our officers and firefighters are out there with power saws, trying to clear the streets," Jennings said.
 
At least four utility poles fell on a road in Columbus, Ohio, making it too dangerous for people in four cars to get out, police said. One person was taken to a hospital.
 
As of 1 a.m. Saturday, Pepco was reporting 406,000 outages in the District of Columbia and Montgomery and Prince George's counties, Md.
 
"We have more than half our system down," said Pepco spokeswoman Myra Oppel. "This is definitely going to be a multi-day outage."
 
Amtrak suspended its service from Washington, D.C., to Philadelphia due to the storms, at least until mid-morning. Dulles Airport in Northern Virginia reporting some power issues with a computer system that handles airline departure/arrival information.
 
In the Washington, D.C., area, the Metrorail subway trains were returned to their endpoints due to the storms and related damage, officials said.
 
"It has had a widespread effect on the region," Metro spokesman Dan Stessel said early Saturday. He said about 17 train stations were operating on backup power due to local power outages, but that he didn't anticipate service being disrupted on Saturday.
 
« Last Edit: June 30, 2012, 11:35:07 PM by RE »
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Offline Jaded Prole

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Re: The New Nature
« Reply #11 on: July 01, 2012, 04:07:24 AM »
From "ground Zero"  I've seen worse. Here in Norfolk Friday night was a little exiting but most of it missed my neighborhood. Last night not as bad but a tornado reported within 25 or so miles. New weather patterns come with hotter air here in the Ophukacene.  Watching weather patterns develop could be helpful in deciding where it is safest.  We won't always have up to the minute radar and warnings.

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Re: DINERS AT GROUND ZERO PLEASE CHECK IN!
« Reply #12 on: July 01, 2012, 05:16:28 AM »
Still nothing from Surly or Ashvin, both of whom live in Virginia at Ground Zero of this latest "Act of God".  I am concerned as I always am whenever Diners are in the WRONG PLACE AT THE WRONG TIME.

Ashvin in particular is just about always Online and connected to the DD Server.  He has more online hours than I do.  He rarely shuts down his computer/net connection.  I can only figure his connection is cut right now.


Can't speak for Ashvin, but I am OK. Went to the OUter Banks for a couple of days to visit a friend and his family, which has been why you haven't had my usual cherubic demeanor grace this space. Also have had to troubleshoot some electrical problems, (two separate problems, one involving a failed breaker, another a failed GPI, some of which was complicated by the fact that with 100+ temps here, Dominion Power has had some instances of outages or partial failure. Or so the electrician tells me. Came back just in time to see the Finger of God cast a line of T-Storms directly on our position...

Apparently while I was out of town the storms generated featured gusts up to 60MPH. Pretty serious storms, but still just another day at the office when compared to hurricanes. Jaded Prole has it right.

You really are enjoying your GIF-maker, aren't you?
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Online Surly1

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Re: The New Nature/add weather
« Reply #13 on: July 01, 2012, 06:33:48 AM »


A summary of our latest doin's down here.

http://news.yahoo.com/eastern-us-storms-kill-13-cut-power-millions-204808305.html


WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions across the mid-Atlantic region sweltered Saturday in the aftermath of violent storms that pummeled the eastern U.S. with high winds and downed trees, killing at least 13 people and leaving 3 million without power during a heat wave.



Power officials said the outages wouldn't be repaired for several days to a week, likening the damage to a serious hurricane. Emergencies were declared in Maryland, West Virginia, Ohio, the District of Columbia and Virginia, where Gov. Bob McDonnell said the state had its largest non-hurricane outage in history, as more storms threatened. "This is a very dangerous situation," the governor said.


In West Virginia, 232 Amtrak passengers were stranded Friday night on a train that was blocked on both sides by trees that fell on the tracks, spending about 20 hours at a rural station before buses picked them up. And in Illinois, storm damage forced the transfer of dozens of maximum-security, mentally ill prisoners from one prison to another.

In some Virginia suburbs of Washington, emergency 911 call centers were out of service; residents were told to call local police and fire departments. Huge trees fell across streets in Washington, leaving cars crunched up next to them, and onto the fairway at the AT&T National golf tournament in Maryland. Cell phone and Internet service was spotty, gas stations shut down and residents were urged to conserve water until sewage plants returned to power.

The outages were especially dangerous because they left the region without air conditioning in an oppressive heat. Temperatures soared to highs in the mid-90s in Baltimore and Washington, where it had hit 104 on Friday.
"I've called everybody except for the state police to try to get power going," said Karen Fryer, resident services director at two assisted living facilities in Washington. The facilities had generator power, but needed to go out for portable air conditioning units, and Fryer worried about a few of her 100 residents who needed backup power for portable oxygen.

The stranded train passengers spent more than 20 hours on the train after they stopped around 11 p.m. on Friday at a station near rural Prince, W.Va. Brooke Richart, a 26-year-old teacher from New York City, said she was among the stuck passengers. To pass the time, she read half a book, talked to the people around her and took walks outside the train.
"We tried to walk up the side of the mountain to see if anyone could get cell service. We didn't have cell service the entire time we were down there," she said.

Amtrak spokesman Steve Kulm said the passengers were picked up by buses, which departed by 8:20 p.m. Saturday. The buses will travel to the stations along the original route, dropping off passengers along the way.
The stranded passengers on the train bound from New York to Chicago had lights, air conditioning and food the entire time, Kulm said. He wasn't aware of any injuries or health problems.
Richart was traveling to her hometown of Cincinnati. She said the ride had mostly been smooth, with a few delays, before they stopped in Prince. The storm had already passed through by the time they stopped.
She said the train attendants and her fellow passengers were extremely nice — watching each others' children and sharing food.

She said her family had a hard time figuring out where she in conversations with Amtrak customer service representatives. But by the time the buses arrived, her father had also come to pick her up and drive her the rest of the way.
"It gets a little trying," she said. "Thankfully we could go in and out of the train because we were there so long. If you wanted to stretch your legs or take a walk, you could do that."

The storm did damage from Indiana to New Jersey, although the bulk of it was in West Virginia, Washington and suburban Virginia and Maryland. At least six of the dead were killed in Virginia, including a 90-year-old woman asleep in bed when a tree slammed into her home. Two young cousins in New Jersey were killed when a tree fell on their tent while camping. Two were killed in Maryland, one in Ohio, one in Kentucky and one in Washington.



Illinois corrections officials transferred 78 inmates from a prison in Dixon to the Pontiac Correctional Center after storms Friday night caused significant damage, Department of Corrections spokeswoman Stacey Solano said.
No one was injured, Solano said. Generators are providing power to the prison, which is locked down, confining remaining inmates to their cells.

Utility officials said it could take at least several days to restore power to all customers because of the sheer magnitude of the outages and the destruction. Winds and toppled trees brought down entire power lines, and debris has to be cleared from power stations and other structures. All of that takes time and can't be accomplished with the flip of a switch.

"This is very unfortunate timing," said Myra Oppel, a spokeswoman for Pepco, which reported over 400,000 outages in Washington and its suburbs. "We do understand the hardship that this brings, especially with the heat as intense at is. We will be working around the clock until we get the last customer on."

Especially at risk were children, the sick and the elderly. In Charleston, W.Va., firefighters helped several people using walkers and wheelchairs get to emergency shelters. One of them, David Gunnoe, uses a wheelchair and had to spend the night in the community room of his apartment complex because the power — and his elevator — went out. Rescuers went up five floors to retrieve his medication.

Gunnoe said he was grateful for the air conditioning, but hoped power would be restored so he could go home.
"It doesn't matter if it's under a rock some place. When you get used to a place, it's home," he said.
More than 20 elderly residents at an apartment home in Indianapolis were displaced when the facility lost power due to a downed tree. Most were bused to a Red Cross facility to spend the night, and others who depend on oxygen assistance were given other accommodations, the fire department said.
Others sought refuge in shopping malls, movie theaters and other places where the air conditioning would be turned to "high."

In Richmond, Va., Tracey Phalen relaxed with her teenage son under the shade of a coffee-house umbrella rather than suffer through the stifling heat of her house, which lost power.
"We'll probably go to a movie theater at the top of the day," she said.
Phalen said Hurricane Irene left her home dark for six days last summer, "and this is reminiscent of that," she said.
Others scheduled impromptu "staycations" or took shelter with friends and relatives.
Robert Clements, 28, said he showered by flashlight on Friday night after power went out at his home in Fairfax, Va. The apartment complex where he lives told his fiancee that power wouldn't be back on for at least two days, and she booked a hotel on Saturday.

Clements' fiancee, 27-year-old Ann Marie Tropiano, said she tried to go to the pool, but it was closed because there was no electricity so the pumps weren't working. She figured the electricity would eventually come back on, but she awoke to find her thermostat reading 81 degrees and slowly climbing. Closing the blinds and curtains didn't help.

"It feels like an oven," she said.

At the AT&T National in Bethesda, Md., trees cracked at their trunks crashed onto the 14th hole and onto ropes that had lined the fairways. The third round of play was suspended for several hours Saturday and was closed to volunteers and spectators. Mark Russell, the PGA Tour's vice president of rules and competition, couldn't remember another time that a tour event was closed to fans.
"It's too dangerous out here," Russell said. "There's a lot of huge limbs. There's a lot of debris. It's like a tornado came through here. It's just not safe."
The outages disrupted service for many subscribers to Netflix, Instagram and Pinterest when the storm cut power to some of Amazon Inc.'s operations. The video and photo sharing services took to Twitter and Facebook to update subscribers on the outages. Netflix and Pinterest had restored service by Saturday afternoon.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Online RE

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Re: DINERS AT GROUND ZERO PLEASE CHECK IN!
« Reply #14 on: July 01, 2012, 06:49:06 AM »
JP! Surly!  You're ALIVE!  YAY!   :multiplespotting:

Now we just need to hear from Watson and our WV Diner, I think that's Mark?

Any flooding this time?

You really are enjoying your GIF-maker, aren't you?

Love it!  It's the Cat's Pajamas!  I'm even considering a Premium Membership so I can make longer and bigger ones without the GIFSOUP watermark on them.  I've got one now for just about every occassion you can think of.  Wait until you get a look at the Guillotine GIFs!  Waiting for the right occassion to unveil them.  :icon_mrgreen:

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