AuthorTopic: The New Nature  (Read 44807 times)

Online Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 18517
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: The New Nature/It coulda Been Worse
« Reply #15 on: July 01, 2012, 07:12:43 AM »
At least I don't have to deal with this:



Frances Lukens looks at the tangle of boards and tree limbs piercing her living room ceiling in Lynchburg, Va. on Saturday, June 30, 2012 after a huge oak tree fell directly on the house during a storm the previous night. (AP Photo/The News & Advance, Parker Michels-Boyce)
"Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world's grief. Do justly now, love mercy now, walk humbly now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it."

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41302
    • View Profile
Re: The New Nature/It coulda Been Worse
« Reply #16 on: July 01, 2012, 07:47:19 AM »
At least I don't have to deal with this

In microcosm, this image represents what we ALL have to deal with, even if it didn't happen to YOUR house today.

How much is is going to cost Francis to repair her house?  Does she have the MONEY to repair it?  Is she Insured against Storm Damage and will the Insurance Company pay off?  What is Francis' McMansion worth now with a Tree in the Living Room?

Anyhoooo, fortunately for you no trees came through your roof this time, but all around the neighborhood power lines are down, tree limbs are everywhere and SOMEBODY gotta pay to clean up that mess.  How do they DO that when about every Municipality out there these days is DEAD BROKE?

Answer:  They get a FEMA Guaranteed LOAN to fund the Clean Up the mess, and then that Loan gets tacked onto your next Property Tax bill.  Until of course you can no longer AFFORD said Tax Bill and walk away from the McMansion.  At which point no matter how high the local Pols raise the taxes, they can't pay off the loan, at which point the Municipality defaults and the liability goes onto the books of the Co-signer, FEMA.

Not sure exactly where FEMA is right now on their funding, but last year after the Hurricanes they were Dead Broke.  So unless they recently got a new injection of Funny Money from Helicopter Ben, they can't pay off on any of the old loans Municipalities already cannot pay off on, much less new ones.

Of course though at the moment for the Banksters, this is about the only situation they WILL hand out a new Loan to someplace, once they get the Guarantee from Da Fed Goobermint on the loan.

So, each new "Act of God" here runs up everybody's Debt a bit more, and the Debt keeps getting consolidated and moved up the line into bigger and bigger vehicles as the smaller ones crash and burn here.  At some point the system Implodes when the last biggest Debtor can't pay up.  In this case that would be Da Fed itself, accumulating $Trillions$ in liabilities on its balance sheet that will never be paid off even by "Printing", because all they do there is create ANOTHER liability.  Until they Naked Print without a liability attached, it can never be paid off. NP of course is what results in Hyperinflation.

Hurricane Season approacheth.  More downed power lines, more liabilities, more debt that will never be paid off. FUBAR.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Online Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 18517
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: The New Nature/Word of the day: derecho
« Reply #17 on: July 02, 2012, 10:43:25 AM »
A new one on me. And I'm an old guy.


    DC Derecho Disaster Explained

    Analysis by Christina Reed
    Mon Jul 2, 2012 08:50 AM ET


As the millions of people still without power today will attest, that was no ordinary wind storm on Friday.

An event that reportedly happens about once every four years, a fast and furious thunderstorm formed west of Chicago at about 11 a.m. and then raced at speeds upwards of 60 mph in a straight line across Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. and out over the Atlantic Ocean by midnight, according to news reports.

Meteorologists call this kind of straight-lined fast moving thunderstorm a derecho. And this Friday's derecho already has its own wiki page.

Storm Tracker: Killer Storm and Heat, 2M Without Power

Like other thunderstoms, derechos generate power from convective wind gusts formed between pressure systems. But unlike other storms, derechos maintain a forward motion, basically feeding off the interface between the systems in a race that moves the storm at upwards of 50 mph for distances of hundreds of miles.

Storm"Derechos often form along the northern boundary of a hot-air mass, right along or just south of the jet stream, where upper-level winds zip along at high speeds," reported the Seattle Times.


The record-setting temperatures on Friday clashed with the weather systems over Chicago and the storms that emerged grew in power forming a derecho that the upper-level winds continued push forward as the storm chewed its way through the heat wave.
"Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world's grief. Do justly now, love mercy now, walk humbly now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it."

Offline Ashvin

  • Troll
  • Sous Chef
  • *
  • Posts: 2676
    • View Profile
Re: The New Nature
« Reply #18 on: July 02, 2012, 12:35:55 PM »
RE,

Thanks for your concern!

I was in WVA over the weekend trying to find a hotel that had power, AC AND running water, but could find none. It was brutal...

Back in RIC, a tree at my parents house apparently just fell over today (3 days after the storm hit)...

but no significant damage around here.

Online Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 18517
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: The New Nature/The last weather forecast you'll ever need
« Reply #19 on: July 03, 2012, 09:17:21 AM »
Ashvin, Re, et al...

Here is the upcoming weather report, especially timely in terms of derechos, haboobs, and other artifacts of the global-warming-that-is-not-happening.

A time of the hat to the lovely and resourceful digit93 who alerted me to this bit of VCU tomfoolery:


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/tVEPvXBEOSE?rel=0" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/tVEPvXBEOSE?rel=0</a>
"Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world's grief. Do justly now, love mercy now, walk humbly now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it."

Online Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 18517
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: The New Nature
« Reply #20 on: July 05, 2012, 09:32:42 AM »
Another sign that the apocalypse is here--


Probably cooler in Alaska, I would wager.
"Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world's grief. Do justly now, love mercy now, walk humbly now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it."

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41302
    • View Profile
Re: The New Nature
« Reply #21 on: July 07, 2012, 12:47:02 AM »
Getting a tad bit WARM down there in the MidWest these Days. Maybe the WI/MN Border is not such a Great Choice for the Diner Physical Final Bugout location? North to Alaska? A nice comfortable 67 degrees today in the Mat Valley.  No Nukes here yet either!   :icon_sunny:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/JSt0NEESrUA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/JSt0NEESrUA</a>

RE

Oppressive heat in the Midwest breaks records

People struggle to find relief as even nights are hot

By Corey Williams
Associated Press   
July 07, 2012

Associated Press/Daily Herald


Jake Wenz in Naperville, Ill., looked for relief from the record-breaking heat this week.

DETROIT — St. Louis, Milwaukee, Chicago, Indianapolis, and several other Midwest cities have broken heat records this week. And with even low temperatures setting records, some residents have no means of relief, day or night.
 
The National Weather Service said Friday that the record-breaking heat that has baked the nation’s midsection for several days was beginning to move into the mid-Atlantic states and the Northeast. But excessive-heat warnings remained in place Friday for all of Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois, as well as much of Wisconsin, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, and Kentucky.
 
The National Weather Service said it expected heat warnings and advisories to be continued or expanded on Saturday, with the heat largely centered over Ohio Valley and Mid-Atlantic states.

MICHAEL CONROY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
 
In Indiana, the Morse Reservoir was down nearly 4 feet from normal levels.
 
St. Louis hit a record high of 105 on Thursday and a record low of 83 — the second day in a row the city has broken records for both temperatures. Temperatures did not fall below 82 in Chicago, 78 in Milwaukee, and 77 in Indianapolis.
 
“When a day starts out that warm, it doesn’t take as much time to reach high temperatures in the low 100s,” said Marcia Cronce, a National Weather Service meteorologist.
 
St. Louis officials have reported three heat-related deaths in recent days, and officials in the Chicago area said two people there may have died due to heat Wednesday.
 
A coroner in Rock County, Wis., said the death of an 83-year-old woman was definitely due to the heat. In Tennessee, authorities have opened a criminal investigation into last week’s heat deaths of two young brothers.
 
Many cities have tried to help by opening cooling centers and extending the hours for their public pools. In some areas, recent storms have knocked out electricity; about 137,000 people in Michigan were without power Friday as temperatures moved steadily toward the 100-degree mark.
 
Lack of electricity also is likely to compound the misery for many in the storm-ravaged East as the dangerous temperatures move in.
 
It was hot enough to buckle roadways. The Wisconsin State Patrol said the pavement buckled on Thursday on Interstate 90 westbound near Madison and on Interstate 39 northbound near Portage, among other places.
 
Not even the setting of the sun brought respite as temperatures hovered around 90 degrees downtown at 10 p.m.
 
When the air conditioner stopped in Ashley Jackson’s Southfield, Mich., home, so too did normal conversations and nightly rest.
 
“Inside the house it was 91 degrees. . . . I wasn’t talking to anybody. Nobody was talking to anybody,” said Jackson, 23, who works as a short-order cook in Detroit. “We mostly slept, but it was hard to sleep because of the heat. I probably got about four hours of sleep each night.”
 
Some visitors made their way to Chicago’s Millennium Park to splash in the park’s kid-friendly Crown Fountain.
 
“It’s hotter here than it is in Arizona,” said Mary Dominis of Tempe, who brought her daughter along to play in the water. “I came here to visit my family and to get away from the heat of Arizona.”
 
Ruben Davila, 32, of Northern California, was also in Chicago visiting family and at the park seeking some cool relief.
 
“The heat has made it difficult to walk around and view the sites,” said Davila, who was accompanied by his wife and three children.
 
With the National Weather Service’s heat warning for the city lasting until Saturday afternoon, Jean-Claude Brizard, head of the Chicago public schools, canceled all summer school classes Friday.
 
The heat has also taken a toll on agriculture and livestock.
 
Dean Hines, owner of Hines Ranch Inc. in the western Wisconsin town of Ellsworth, said he found one of his 80 dairy cows dead Thursday, an apparent victim of the heat. He said he was worried about the rest of his herd in terms of death toll, reproductive consequences, and milk production.
 
“We’re using fans and misters to keep them cool,” he said. “It’s been terrible.”
 
Elsewhere in the country, communities were coping with the severe thunderstorms. At least two people were killed in Tennessee as a violent storm struck the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
 
Park spokeswoman Melissa Cobern said a man on a motorcycle was killed as was a 41-year-old woman who was struck by a falling tree.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41302
    • View Profile
The New Nature: Baking the Cake in the Lower 48
« Reply #22 on: July 07, 2012, 10:32:41 PM »
Look on the Positive Side here. You won't need any Fuel to cook your food. A Fresnel Lens and you are good to go!

RE

Extreme heat bakes Midwest, parts of East Coast
Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Highways buckled across the country, the waters of Lake Michigan were unusually warm for this time of year and even a minor train derailment outside Washington was blamed on heat, but the hot weather gripping much of the country only worsened Saturday.
 
Temperatures of more than 100 degrees were forecast in Philadelphia and excessive heat warnings were issued for several states in the Midwest the days of smothering heat piled on, accompanied by severe storms that have knocked out power from Michigan to the East Coast. Most notable was last weekend's sudden and severe storm that drenched the mid-Atlantic region, where thousands remained without electricity a week later. At least 24 deaths have been blamed on the heat, and hundreds of thousands remained without power Saturday, mostly in West Virginia, Ohio and Michigan.
 
One man figured out a way to beat the heat: stay in the car.
 
That was the plan for 60-year-old Roger Sinclair of Batavia, Ill., who was headed home Saturday from Detroit, where he'd spent a few days visiting an old friend and catching Friday night's Tigers game.
 
While he enjoyed the game, a 4-2 Tigers win, the conditions were less than ideal.
 
"It was 97 at the first pitch and still in the 80s at the time of the last out," he said. "It was tough. There was no breeze."
 
Before heading home, though, Sinclair wanted to see a Great Lakes ore carrier make its way through the city's waterways. So, he tracked one down the Detroit River, driving ahead of it and parking on Belle Isle, which sits in the middle of the river between the city and Windsor, Ontario.
 
Sinclair, standing along the riverbank and shielding his eyes from the sun, watched the Algomarine slowly head west.
 
"You just don't see this in Chicago," said Sinclair, a dispatcher at a plumbing company's call center.
 
As the vessel traveled out of sight, he walked to his car.
 
"This is how I've dealt with it the last couple of days," he said. "A lot of time in the car."
 
At New York City's Penn Station, the air conditioning was falling short of full capacity. Amtrak officials have said for weeks that they've been trying to adjust it. The doors were left wide open at a half dozen locations around the two-block-wide underground station.
 
"It's so hot I feel like I want to faint," said Betty De la Rosa, 19, of the Bronx, who was working at a station doughnut shop.
 
Record temperatures were set Friday in several places, including the Indiana cities of Indianapolis, South Bend and Fort Wayne. In central Arkansas, Russellville reached 106 degrees, breaking a record set in 1964.
 
The heat was also blamed for at least 24 deaths.
 
Nine people in Maryland have died of heat-related causes in recent days, the state said. Authorities in Chicago said heat was a factor in six deaths there, mostly among older people. Three deaths in Wisconsin, two in Tennessee and one in Pennsylvania were also reported to be heat-related.
 
In Ohio, a man in his 70s and two women — one in her late 60s, the other in her 80s — were found dead this week, said Dr. Jeff Lee, a deputy county coroner in the central part of the state. He said all three were suffering from heart disease but died from stress caused by high temperatures in their houses. Temperatures inside were stifling, recorded in the 90s in two cases, with windows shut and no ventilation. The houses lacked electricity because of recent power outages.
 
"If they had gotten cooling, we would have expected them to survive," he said.
 
Relief was on the way in the form of a cold front as the weekend ends, but forecasters expected it to bring more severe weather, too.
 
The rain should help dry spells in many places. Much of Arkansas is enduring brown grass and seeing trees lose their green, and farmers in Ohio are growing concerned about the dry conditions, considered among the worst of the past decade.
 
In Chicago, perspiration beaded on the face of street magician Jeremy Pitt-Payne, whose black top hat and Union Jack leather vest weighed heavily as he waited to board a Chicago River water taxi that would take him to his sidewalk stage downtown.
 
"This is part of the character. I'm a magician from Britain," Pitt-Payne said in a British accent. "I may lose the vest by the end of the day."
 
Pitt-Payne has worked throughout Chicago's three-day stretch of triple-digit temperatures. His shows have been shorter and crowds have dwindled from his usual of 50 to about 20 people.
 
His trick for beating the heat? He starts his shows at about 2 p.m. "when the Trump Tower is gracious enough to block out the sun" along his stretch of sidewalk. "That's when I start."
Save As Many As You Can

Offline agelbert

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11820
    • View Profile
    • Renewable Rervolution
Re: The New Nature
« Reply #23 on: July 12, 2012, 09:45:26 PM »
Video summation of how wild and crazy it is getting out there along with the CEO from Exxon uttering incrementalist BULLSHIT about how we can adapt to this. Perhaps he just believes that renewables are a DROP IN THE BUCKET, UNCOMPETITIVE and have EROI numbers so "low" in comparison to those "great and glorious fossil fuels" that require we phase into them over a 2 or 3 decade period.  After all, that's just how the "world works", RIGHT? Just ask the people at TAE, they'll explain it all to you. :evil4: Fuck yeah, we've got all the time in the world, RIGHT!!?

Welcome to the Rest of Our Lives
Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Offline agelbert

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11820
    • View Profile
    • Renewable Rervolution
Re: The New Nature
« Reply #24 on: July 17, 2012, 04:19:25 PM »

Quote
Terrifying Video of People Narrowly Escaping Canada Landslide
EPIC mudslide caught on camera [Raw Video]
Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Online Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 18517
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: The New Nature
« Reply #25 on: July 17, 2012, 04:58:52 PM »
That mudslide was just amaziing! The guy in the red shirt was visibly shaken, and why not? I'd have filled my pants.
"Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world's grief. Do justly now, love mercy now, walk humbly now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it."

Offline Karpatok

  • Contrarian
  • Sous Chef
  • *
  • Posts: 1427
    • View Profile
Re: The New Nature
« Reply #26 on: July 17, 2012, 05:06:28 PM »
So keep logging and cutting the trees in British Columbia, especially around lakes like Kootenay and that's what you get. No surprise there.

Offline agelbert

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11820
    • View Profile
    • Renewable Rervolution
Re: The New Nature
« Reply #27 on: July 17, 2012, 07:57:28 PM »
We just got whacked in Vermont with fast moving severe thunderstorm with some quarter size hail and 40 to 50 mph winds for a brief period.  :o Here in Colchester we lost power for about an hour but when Green mountain Power tried to bring it back the flickering on off on off on off and lights showing voltage swings was awful and stayed off for another 40 minutes or so until it came back steady now. We had our electronics off with surge protector protection and we had the frig circuit breaker shut off but my wife had the oven on and it acted a little crazy when but thankfully it began to work okay after messing with the timer buttons.

I guess this is the shape of things to come.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2012, 07:59:41 PM by agelbert »
Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Offline WHD

  • Administrator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 3177
    • View Profile
Re: The New Nature
« Reply #28 on: July 17, 2012, 10:28:45 PM »
I've seen hail here in Minnesota about a dozen times this year so far. Never seen hail more than 2-3 times in any year from April-November. This has been close to if not the hottest July I ever remember. May was the wettest May in the history of Minnesota record keeping. The first half of June was just as wet. We broke high temperature records in March something like 14 days in a stretch of 18 days, and not just breaking them, but shattering them, eighty degrees when we should be getting several heavy wet snowfalls. A record mild and dry winter, last fall and late summer was drought conditions. July 2011 was also blistering hot, as was the second half of June. We didn't see the sun hardly at all from April-mid June, well below normal temperatures and a lot of rain, which screwed up gardens that got fried the rest of the summer. We got 18 inches of snow in one day in December 2010, and then hardly any snow the rest of that winter.

The seasons around here can't be counted on to be like seasons of the past anymore. I used to expect, March would be like march, August like August, etc. I don't take for granted what the weather will be like at any time anymore.

Offline agelbert

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11820
    • View Profile
    • Renewable Rervolution
Re: The New Nature
« Reply #29 on: July 17, 2012, 11:21:38 PM »
WHD,
Ditto here in Vermont for just about everything you said. Guys that make their money plowing the snow off of driveways were going broke. March was hot with barely a snow flurry here and there when we usually get an 18 inch hit around St. Patrick's day. I didn't have to go out and roof rake the snow this year at all. That's a first since I bought this house in the year 2000. I kept track of the flowering plants from the crocus all the way to some stargazers coming out now and EVERYTHING is at least 14 days early this year.The tulips came and went really fast because of the unusually high temperatures. The Hollyhocks out now seem to shrivel up a couple of days after they begin to flower rather than remaining in bloom while several below on the stalk open up. It's sad. The foxgloves can't seem to flower but the balloon flowers and flox are doing okay.  a Last fall the first frost was 21 days late. It's dry here but there is no drought as of yet.
Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
0 Replies
567 Views
Last post January 09, 2016, 06:03:42 AM
by RE
4 Replies
1414 Views
Last post May 02, 2016, 06:42:24 PM
by azozeo
0 Replies
1032 Views
Last post June 03, 2016, 07:21:58 AM
by Guest