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Offline RE

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New Scooter on the way!
« Reply #225 on: May 01, 2018, 05:03:27 PM »
I ordered a new Folding Scooter Trike for use in traveling around both locally and via air!  :icon_sunny: I just got off the phone with the Scooter People and it should be here in around a week.

It's low in power and slow, but it folds up easily and is real compact to fit in the trunk of a car.


It also comes apart into 2 EZ pieces to assemble.  I ordered it with 1 Lithium batt that gets me around 8 miles/charge and one SLA about 5 miles per charge.  Either one more than enough for cruising around while visiting friends.

Extra money to ship to Alaska of course, but at least they DO ship here!

If it turns out to be a good one, I may buy one of their more souped up models that are not so portable, but go a lot faster and further.  They have models that will do 20 mph with a 45 mile range.  I could get all around my neighborhood with one of those, even make it to Walmart in good weather for a Prep Run!

I will update when it arrives and I have had a chance to test drive it!  :icon_sunny:

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Offline RE

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🕴️ New Ewz-Cripple Cart gets its first Test Run!
« Reply #226 on: May 14, 2018, 02:47:31 AM »
I took the new Cripple Cart out yesterday for its first Test Run to 3 Bears Food Superstore, which is less than 1/2 mile from my front door.  Even at the slow speed this Cripple Cart does, it still only takes 5-10 minutes to make it from my front door to inside 3 Bears to do some Prep Shopping!  :icon_sunny:

Here you see the new CC in its new regular parking spot in the Living Room.  Much cleanup has been done in order to have maneuvering room to drive the vehicle in and out of the digs.  Now I can seamlessly drive from my digs to 3 Bears and back, buy my supplies and never stand up once!  I can actually drive to straight in front of the fridge and unload my groceries into it without standing up!  :o

cripple cart 2
cripple cart 2

The new CC folds up very compact to fit in a typical car trunk or the rear of an SUV.  I'll get a pic of it folded up in the next few days, I am going to bring it to The Wedding to use as my Mobile Camera Platform.

It has some deficiencies of course.  As mentioned, it is fucking SLOW when outside the store or the digs.  5MPH takes a LONG time to get anywhere, it would take me a whole hour to make it to Palmer utilizing just this vehicle.  It does however have good Cargo Capacity and the torque is pretty good.  It didn't have any trouble with the hill up back from 3 Bears moderately loaded.  It's good for about 1/2 the year here on its own.  Once there is snow and ice on the ground, fuhgettaboudit.  There is no way I am trying to move this thing over ice and snow even if it is packed down.  It just doesn't have the traction and the wheels aren't big enough.  I am looking at another off-road Ewz to use in the winter.  Also speedier to make the longer journeys more possible. More pricy, and not as easily transportable in another vehicle, but might be worth it.

You may notice in the pic the presence of a Step-Ladder next to the bed.  WTF is that there?  The reason is because RE has had serious problems with getting his crippled ass in and out of bed.  I can't lift the legs after sitting down on the bed, they hang off the bed like a limp dick.  So my latest solution to this is to climb up the ladder before depositing my crippled carcass on the bed, so my legs are more or less at the right height.  This sorta works, most of the time, I can get my whole body on the bed and get some sleep, until I need to get up again in 2 hours to go piss.

I have also had unfortunately a couple of those "I have Fallen and I can't get up" episodes over the last couple of weeks.  The legs are REALLY getting bad folks.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/bQlpDiXPZHQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/bQlpDiXPZHQ</a>

It took me upwards of 30 minutes on both occassions to finally hoist myself to my feet after laying like a dying worm on the carpet for a while.  I am too proud so far to make an account with "Life Alert" to have somebody come over to help me back to my feet, although it may soon come to that.

In this case, I am inventing something new.  I ordered an electric hoist/winch from Home Depot, which I am going to install on a tower above my breakfast table.  In my good days I could have zipped this one together in about an hour maybe two,  I designed an Engine Hoist for my nephew the Dirt Track racer who had to pull his engine out every week after a race to get the thing spruced for the next stupid racing adventure.  I got no idea how many times he rebuilt that engine, but it was a LOT.  That mother fucker could lift 10,000 lbs, no problem.  I am only 155 lbs now, a fucking rat on a treadmill could lift me up if you geared the treadmill right.  Unfortunaterly of course, I am not up to doing much carpentry work right now, so I am going to have to depend on James to do the cutting for me.  He doesn't know shit about carpentry, but says he is OK with following directions.  Plus we also have the Wedding to get through, so it won't get started for at least a week or two.  Meanwhile, I will try to keep from falling down again.  ::)  When I have the Cripple Hoist assembled, be sure you will get a video of it in action lifting the decrepit RE Meat Package back up to feet shuffling level.

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Electric Bicycles
« Reply #227 on: May 14, 2018, 10:37:04 AM »
Do you have an appointment for a follow-up blood draw for an H&H?
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Offline RE

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Re: Electric Bicycles
« Reply #228 on: May 14, 2018, 10:43:26 AM »
Do you have an appointment for a follow-up blood draw for an H&H?

H&H Blood Draw?  What's that?

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Electric Bicycles
« Reply #229 on: May 14, 2018, 10:54:31 AM »
Didn't you once work in a lab?  You need to get your hemoglobin and hematocrit checked, and pretty soon. To see if you're holding your own after the transfusion.

The positive effects of a transfusion, if the underlying cause it not adequately addressed, is maybe 2 weeks.

Glad you're able to eat a bit better, but I'm concerned they pumped you up and aren't following closely to see if you keep better RBC levels.
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Offline RE

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Re: Electric Bicycles
« Reply #230 on: May 14, 2018, 11:07:52 AM »
Didn't you once work in a lab?  You need to get your hemoglobin and hematocrit checked, and pretty soon. To see if you're holding your own after the transfusion.

The positive effects of a transfusion, if the underlying cause it not adequately addressed, is maybe 2 weeks.

Glad you're able to eat a bit better, but I'm concerned they pumped you up and aren't following closely to see if you keep better RBC levels.

I'm due for a visit with the Vascular PfD on Wednesday and I need to check in for a followup with the PfD who snipped all the Polyps out of my colon.  I'll have one of them run my H & H agin.  I've been a little better about taking my daily Multi-Vitamin and Iron Pills.

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Offline RE

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🛵 Scooters: Sidewalk Nuisances, Or The Future Of Local Transportation?
« Reply #231 on: July 29, 2018, 06:31:23 AM »
I'm ahead of the curve on this one.  :icon_sunny:

RE


Technology
Scooters: Sidewalk Nuisances, Or The Future Of Local Transportation?
3:44

July 28, 20188:21 AM ET
Heard on Weekend Edition Saturday

Jasmine Garsd


Electric scooters for rent are popping up in San Diego and other cities. Investors see a key role for new way of getting from here to there. But many people find them downright annoying.
Mike Blake/Reuters

When Adam Stephens walked into his office in Milwaukee one morning in late June, he found messages complaining about the Birds. The deputy city attorney was not amused.

He went for a walk. "Within a couple of minutes, I found one parked on a sidewalk and was able to visually examine it and kind of figure out what it was," Stephens says.

Bird is the name of an electric scooter company. Unannounced, it dropped off somewhere between 70 and 100 rental scooters throughout Milwaukee, where it's illegal to ride motorized scooters in public.
#ScootersBehavingBadly: U.S. Cities Race To Keep Up With Small Vehicle Shares
Technology
#ScootersBehavingBadly: U.S. Cities Race To Keep Up With Small Vehicle Shares

Here's how it works: You download an app, put in your credit card information, and locate a scooter near you. It's about $1 to unlock them, and then 15 cents a minute.

You can pretty much drop them off anywhere. And that's part of the problem: People have been leaving them all over city sidewalks. "You have elderly people, you have people with disabilities, you have the visually impaired who rely on seeing eye dogs," Stephens says.

In recent months, the hashtag #ScootersBehavingBadly has popped up, featuring scooters across the country parked in pedestrian walkways or riders speeding through while wearing headphones. Milwaukee issued a cease-and-desist order, but Bird refused. The case is now in federal court.

Things have gone sour in several cities, like San Francisco and St. Paul, Minn., where scooter companies have been kicked out. But in some cities, they've flourished, like in Washington, D.C., where I took a scooter by the brand Spin out for a ride.
Bike-Share Firm Hits The Brakes In France After 'Mass Destruction' Of Dockless Bikes
The Two-Way
Bike-Share Firm Hits The Brakes In France After 'Mass Destruction' Of Dockless Bikes

It was fun, and a bit terrifying, to weave through rush-hour traffic. On the way, I met a fellow rider, Octavion Carter. He uses these to get around Howard University and gave me some advice: "Watch the ground, because if you go over a crack or a pothole, you might fall. It happens to everybody."

There are about 1,200 electric scooters for rent in Washington. These companies have a few months to prove their worth.

Luz Lazo, a transportation reporter at The Washington Post, says some people are annoyed by the trend. Still, she says, in a city where public transportation is notoriously unreliable, enough people are frustrated to give it a try.

Lazo sees people of all backgrounds scooting around. "Whether it's something that is going to last, or be a success, I mean we still have to wait and see," she says.
New Wave Of Electric 2-Wheelers Hits U.S. City Streets
Technology
New Wave Of Electric 2-Wheelers Hits U.S. City Streets

Will the scooter, skateboard's goofy-looking cousin, be another fad, just like Segways or hoverboards? Big tech doesn't think so. Silicon Valley is betting on the future of micro-transportation. Uber recently invested in the scooter company Lime; and Lyft has announced it will soon be offering scooters on its app.

As I ride back through D.C. on my rental, with the wind in my face, one thing becomes clear: It's fun, but there's no way I'm doing it in the winter.
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Offline RE

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🚲 This Charges Everything
« Reply #232 on: August 14, 2018, 01:01:17 AM »
https://grist.org/article/this-electric-bike-experiment-could-change-how-we-design-cities/


critical mass?
This Charges Everything

Behind the scenes of Seattle’s latest foray into bikeshares.

By Amelia Urry   on Aug 9, 2018

“Sorry about the smell; it’s not usually this bad.”

Andrew Infante is watching the rearview mirror of his Dodge RAM ProMaster and trying to maneuver out of a parking spot along a steep and congested street in downtown Seattle. In the back of the mostly empty cargo van, three bikes are roped together with a bungee cord. Two are green, with highlighter-yellow fenders like bright parentheses. The third is chalky white. That is where the smell — a murky eau de low tide — is coming from.

“We call them barnacle bikes,” says Infante, the Seattle operations manager for Lime, a startup that runs bike- and scooter-share programs in several American cities. “We thought we didn’t have to say, ‘Don’t throw them in the water,’ but I guess that’s not obvious to everyone.”

Fishing bikes out of lakes and waterfronts is one of many trials bikeshare companies must overcome in the Emerald City, which isn’t the easiest place to get around on two wheels. Unlike New York City or Washington, D.C., where city-sponsored bikeshare programs have flourished, the Pacific Northwest’s notorious drizzle and unrelenting topography pose challenges to the bike-curious commuter.

Seattle’s first attempt at a bikeshare, Pronto, launched in November 2014 and struggled with low ridership until the city bailed it out in February 2016. A year later, Seattle mothballed the program altogether.

“The city’s bikeshare karma was pretty bad,” says Mafara Hobson, communications director for the Seattle Department of Transportation.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/mBKrUxIabXw" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/mBKrUxIabXw</a>

But just a few months later, in July 2017, three new companies — Lime, Ofo, and Spin — lined up to join a new dockless bikeshare pilot program. Free-floating GPS-tracked bikes were scattered around the city, eschewing the expense and restrictions of docking stations. Anyone could walk up to a bike, unlock it via app, text, call, or even by paying cash at a nearby 7-Eleven, and ride exactly where they needed to go.

Initially, the bikes tended, like water, to flow downhill. The green Lime bikes, yellow Ofos, and orange Spins pooled in Seattle’s low-lying neighborhoods, crowded onto street corners and medians until unmarked maintenance vans showed up to haul them back to higher ground. But then, this February, Lime debuted an electric-assist bike capable of taking on Seattle’s most challenging terrain at a breezy 15 miles an hour.

The so-called “e-bikes” were an immediate hit. They were a little more expensive than the $1 rides on a traditional pedal bike. But you could also cover more ground with a battery boost: In 10 minutes, you could travel nearly three miles for less than a $2.75 bus fare. And the e-bikes were turning up in places Lime’s pedal bikes never did, like on the top of Queen Anne — a hill so steep that, during snows, its streets are closed to car traffic and occupied by sleds instead.

Lime started with 500 e-bikes in Seattle, but the company began adding new ones almost immediately to keep up with demand. By the end of June, there were 1,400 green e-bikes on the city’s streets; today, that number is closer to 1,600. By Lime’s count, it now operates the largest e-bike fleet in North America — and maybe the world.

Running a hubless e-bikeshare involves intricate behind-the-scenes choreography to keep charged bikes where riders want them. Lime says it is growing as fast as it can, adding new bikes and training new field operations staff to keep them running. But these maintenance-related realities add a layer of complexity to an otherwise sleek-seeming scheme.

Transportation is the top emitting sector in the United States, with nearly 2 billion tons of CO2 released into the atmosphere every year. For the more than 400 American cities who have signed a pledge of support for the Paris Climate Agreement’s goals, bikes and e-bikes offer a better way to keep urban traffic moving at a lower carbon cost. And if the partnership between municipality and startup pays off, bikeshares might redraw the urban planning of those cities.

When a gap in traffic finally appears, Infante muscles his van out of its parking spot and onto the road. On the Lime app, he selects a glowing green target that indicates a nearby bike — an e-bike with less than 10 percent of its battery power remaining. Bingo. The stoplight turns green, and we’re off to track it down.

Andrew Infante moves a Lime bike that was parked improperly on a Seattle street. Grist / Jesse Nichols

Hubless bikeshares depend on workers who search for abandoned, damaged, or out-of-the-way bikes, most often using workhorse vans like this one. It may seem incongruous that a company pioneering new forms of urban mobility is reliant on such an old one, but this is pretty standard in the industry: Maintenance crews drive around, checking that bikes are in good working order and “rebalancing them” — moving them from low-use areas to spots with higher demand, like near public bus stops or light rail stations. (Some 80 percent of Lime’s rides in Seattle start or end at transit stations, Infante says.)

Lime has a fleet of 13 vans and a team of about 50 people who take turns rebalancing the bikes around the city 24 hours a day. Now that e-bikes are in the picture, this team is also responsible for making sure they get fresh batteries when needed. This means hauling the batteries back and forth to their warehouse on the north end of the city to charge.

When demand for e-bikes is particularly high — on, say, July 4th weekend — the operations team may have trouble keeping up with all the batteries that need charging, Infante says. That can leave a lot of low-on-charge bikes sitting around. When a bike’s battery starts to run low during a ride, the Lime app will buzz to alert the rider and show the estimated mileage remaining; if the battery is critically low, a user will not be able to unlock the bike in the first place.

Infante admits that using a van for all of Lime’s maintenance isn’t practical — nor is it as sustainable as the company would like. Lime is in the early stages of experimenting with alternatives, like hauling batteries with a Prius or ferrying bikes with electric cargo trikes, which can travel in bike lanes, avoiding traffic and the bulk of a van’s carbon emissions.

The company isn’t alone in trying to find a better way to keep a fleet of e-bikes charged. Earlier this year, in an attention-getting vote of confidence that e-bikes will play an important role in future transportation, Uber acquired an e-bikeshare startup called Jump. Like Lime, Jump’s bikes are self-locking and trackable; unlike Lime, Jump skipped over pedal bikes and went straight to e-bikes, as it moved into five cities in the U.S., including San Francisco, D.C., and Austin.

In several of these cities, it installed experimental charging stations where users can choose to dock their bikes to charge in exchange for a ride credit. This brings the model closer to the classic hub bikeshares, but it’s more flexible, says Nelle Pierson, Jump’s head of communications.

Providing incentives to encourage users to take on some of the company’s logistical labor is a neat trick, and one other bikeshare companies are also considering. Lime currently offers rewards to users who unlock bikes that have stayed in one place for too long — if you move the bike, then Lime might not have to send a field technician to do the same.


A Lime operations employee unloads an e-bike to place on a Seattle street. Grist / Jesse Nichols

While it’s hard to get a handle on exactly how much energy a mass e-bike scheme requires, it’s almost certainly less than any other kind of transit. According to industry estimates, the average e-bike battery consumes between 0.4 and 0.7 kilowatt hours of power per charge, which might power the 250-watt engine for four to five days — enough to cover more than 50 miles. That means that in Seattle, Lime’s batteries may consume as much as 1,120 kilowatt hours of energy every few days. For comparison, keeping the same number of electric cars charged might take 32,000 kilowatt hours.

How much carbon is spent in generating that electricity will vary widely depending on where you are. In Seattle, much of the energy comes from hydropower, meaning its carbon intensity is relatively low. On other electrical grids that are more reliant on fossil fuels, the e-bike will have a larger footprint.

It’s been 15 minutes since Infante pulled out of the parking spot, and we’ve managed to go about half a mile. We could have walked the same distance in this time — and we still have five blocks to go to retrieve the abandoned bike. E-bikes offer a middle way between car-centric transportation and the lycra-heavy machismo of urban cycling. You can hop on an e-bike at your office, pedal it to the nearest light rail station, and catch the train home. This ease and convenience may be enough to coax some commuters out of their cars.

The average Seattle commuter spent 55 hours stuck in traffic in 2017, according to data-consulting company INRIX’s traffic scorecard. That number is likely to get worse in the coming years as major infrastructure projects shut down some of the city’s arterial routes and Seattle’s population boom puts more cars on the road.

“Cars are not going to move better in Seattle for the near future,” says Gabriel Scheer, Lime’s head of government relations. He explains that the city is going to be entering a “period of maximum constraint” soon. But even in the most crowded situations, Scheer notes, “Bikes usually get through traffic.” While pedal bikes may be a tough sell for people who don’t want to show up to work sweaty or tired, the electric assist might be the clincher.

An estimate by the National Association of City Transportation Officials found that 7,500 bikes can move through a two-way protected bike lane in an hour, compared to the 600 to 1,600 car passengers that can squeeze into the same single lane of road in the same amount of time. When a software engineer ran the numbers for New York City, he found that more than half of all trips taken during rush hour would be faster and cheaper on a bike than in a cab.


Grist / Jesse Nichols

All that might explain Uber’s investment in Jump, as well as Lyft’s move earlier this month to acquire Motivate, the largest U.S. bikeshare company, which runs NYC’s Citi Bike and D.C.’s Capital Bikeshare.

If bikeshares can get more people out of their cars and onto bikes on a regular basis, the very structure of a city could change for the greener. Seattle’s five-year Bike Master Plan has already identified almost 100 projects where bike paths and separated lanes should be installed or expanded before 2021.

The city is becoming more bike-friendly because, ultimately, it has a stake in promoting bike commuting. Seattle has allocated an estimated $65 million to build 50 miles of protected bike lanes and 65 miles of greenway trails on existing roads over the next nine years. Compare that to the $3.3 billion in estimated costs to replace the waterfront viaduct with a 2-mile-long tunnel, a project which has suffered numerous delays and mishaps over the past seven years. The tunnel is still not open for use.

Finally, Infante pulls over into a loading zone near Seattle’s packed shopping district, where tourists and office workers jostle for sidewalk space. We climb out and look for the bike, but after a few minutes, it becomes clear that it’s not there. When Infante checks the app again, the green target has disappeared. Someone has already pedaled the bike away.

This is pretty typical, Infante says. Since the e-bikes were introduced in February, demand is so high that it can be hard to find one in busy areas like this, especially when the weather is nice.

Infante says this marks another difference between Lime’s pedal bikes and its e-bikes, and another point in favor of the electric assist: He’s had people take e-bikes from his hands as he unloaded them from a van. “The e-bikes are so popular,” he says, “they tend to move themselves.”

Inspired by the people I had seen cheerfully whizzing around town on their Lime e-bikes, a few days later I decided to take one up a route I’d never attempted on two wheels before: the steep blocks that lead from Seattle’s sea-level downtown into the neighborhood called, tellingly, Capitol Hill. As I started to pedal, I was delighted to find myself flying up grades that usually leave me winded at a walk. The city seemed to open up before me, a series of vistas of expanding possibility, mobility, convenience, comfort.


The battery on Lime’s e-bikes Grist / Jesse Nichols

Then, my bike gave a sudden lurch.

All at once, my feet met the resistance of a 60-pound bike expressing a sudden gravitational preference to roll back the way I’d come — the battery was dead.

I jumped off and hauled the now-leaden bike onto the sidewalk. The Lime app had warned me a few minutes earlier that my bike was low on charge, but the mileage estimate had seemed more than adequate, until I hit the hills. Now I pushed the dead bike up the hill until I reached a flat spot where I could park it. I had never understood the phrase “learning curve” so clearly, looking ahead and behind at the hill that Lime and its riders would both have to find their way up.

Feeling foolish and a little shaken, I hailed a Lyft.
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Offline K-Dog

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Re: Electric Bicycles
« Reply #233 on: August 14, 2018, 08:49:59 AM »
I have an e-bike I built with a hub motor.  I was using lead acid and that was too heavy and it has been hanging in my garage waiting for batteries.  A few weeks ago I figured i’d get some li-on batts and mentioned it to a co-worker.

He said that there were a whole bunch of batteries on the back  of green e-bikes all over the place outside.  I said I had already thought about that but somebody else would have to abandon a bike on my property before I could feel good about snagging them.  Actually two bikes.

Long article,  I have to get to work and did not read the whole thing.  Maybe walking by a few e-bikes will inspire me to finish it. 

A group buy would be nice.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2018, 08:57:56 AM by K-Dog »
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Offline Eddie

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Re: Electric Bicycles
« Reply #234 on: August 14, 2018, 09:19:53 AM »
I have an e-bike I built with a hub motor.  I was using lead acid and that was too heavy and it has been hanging in my garage waiting for batteries.  A few weeks ago I figured i’d get some li-on batts and mentioned it to a co-worker.

He said that there were a whole bunch of batteries on the back  of green e-bikes all over the place outside.  I said I had already thought about that but somebody else would have to abandon a bike on my property before I could feel good about snagging them.  Actually two bikes.

Long article,  I have to get to work and did not read the whole thing.  Maybe walking by a few e-bikes will inspire me to finish it. 

A group buy would be nice.

I've wanted to build one, but as of yet, I have not. I don't have a good donor bike. i don't want to sacrifice my one decent road bike to do it. I think a mountain bike would be the way to go, or possibly one of those nice cruisers with extended rear end part....you know like one C5 showed.


This one I just found in Waco, Just what I was talking about, already built. $850...not too bad, but I doubt the battery is good, They almost never are on used eV anything.

Here, bikes are so popular it's hard to snag a great deal off CL.

Update: A quick check of the Radwagon site shows a retail tag of $2200 for that. It'd be a nice deal for somebody. I don't have the spare change this week tho. It might not sell in Waco. I'll check back in a week or two.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2018, 09:27:49 AM by Eddie »
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Offline K-Dog

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Re: Electric Bicycles
« Reply #235 on: August 14, 2018, 10:56:24 PM »
I am using a long haul trucker frame.



Mine is an olive green.  The weight of my hub motor causes the front fork to feel floppy, it is a heavy Chinese motor that can put out way more power than the bike actually needs.  A ninety volt battery pack could get the bike going 60 miles an hour. 

The article had some numbers wrong.  I have wire racks on the front and rear.



Here is the hub motor but I really wanted to show the rack on the front.  Wire racks on the back are common and I have one of those too.  Also painted snazzy green and yellow.  The racks each have a shelf that mounts over the fenders on which things are carried.  Never mind that but the rear shelf carries the controller nicely. What I care about is the sides of the racks that are not normally used because on them I'll mount thin Baltic birch plywood which hold batteries in nice 3-d printed enclosures.  each side front and back can be used for 4 mounting surfaces.  If each panel holds 7.5 Amp Hours at 48 volts I'd have 30 amp hours total and that would get me 15 miles to work fast and easy.  Not as fast and as easy as the E350 of course.

I'd have 1440 amp hours.  Twice what the lime bikes have and the packs will be thin with a low center of gravity on the bike.  I'll integrate a charger into the controller box on the back rack so wherever I go (that has a plug) all I need is an extension cord so I'll can at least start getting juiced back up in some places.

The article had an overly optimistic range.  The hills around here kill range and the fifty miles given for a charge is way high.  I had this bike running with the controller on the front rack and 3 batteries on the back, 7.5 amp hour 12 volt lead acids.  That was only 270 watt hours and it was only good for five miles.  I expect something close to a 15 mile range with the new battery setup but not the 25 mile range claimed by the Lime bikes with only half the battery capacity I'll have in the article.  Putting a throttle on a bike makes the legs go to sleep pretty much and the hills will suck power even with a riders help.  A fair range calculation can't consider a riders contribution.   

What I am most proud of is that the Long Haul trucker frame has no disk brake mount and I wanted a disk brake on the back.  I put an 8 inch disk on the back which is nice, as most bike brakes are only 5 inches wide.  I welded a mount onto the frame for the brake and did a perfect job getting it lined up by making a tool to position a steel support before I welded it in place.  I welded it on without putting a hole in the thin bike frame steel or messing up the frame in any way.  Wire brushed off the burned area of powder coating and painted the bracket the dark green you see.  The bike stops great.


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Offline Eddie

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Re: Electric Bicycles
« Reply #236 on: August 15, 2018, 04:16:49 AM »
Sounds like a badass e-Bike!
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Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: Electric Bicycles
« Reply #237 on: August 15, 2018, 05:45:13 AM »
Nice! Looking forwards to hear more.
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Offline K-Dog

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Re: Electric Bicycles
« Reply #238 on: August 18, 2018, 03:09:09 AM »
Tonight I have been learning about 18650 li-on batteries.  Just buying top of the line batteries would cost a fortune.  $1000 bucks for the range I want.  That is money I don't want to spend.  Such batteries can be $10 new.  I 'll be happier spending $1 per cell.



I've learned 18650 batteries can be salvaged from old laptop battery packs and tested.  I ordered a battery tester so I can check 18650 cells and build my own battery packs.  The tester is an Opus BT-C3400 which I bought for a bit less than fifty bucks.  Recycled high quality batteries will have more life than new batteries of lower quality.  Some low quality batteries are only good for 500 mAh new.  I've learned such batteries will weigh a gram or two less than high quality batteries.  A 5000mAh stamped battery is likely to only last this long since the best 18650 is not even close to that capacity.   

https://lygte-info.dk/review/Review%20Charger%20Opus%20BT-C3100%20UK.html



This little battery tester is found all over the place but the company that actually makes it apparently does not have a web site about it. This is an improved Opus C3100 which had issues.  Taking old battery packs from old laptops apart or getting new cells in a group buy, cells have to be matched up and tested to make a good pack.  At the end of the day a homemade pack can save a lot of money.  This device will measure battery capacity making the job possible.

I'm learning that the battery market is half hype.  The 18650 is a standard lithium battery size.  Chinese batteries advertise 5000 mAh in this size but the best 18650 battery, a Panasonic only has 3400 mAh.  Voltage definitions get a bit fuzzy.  Defining a typical cell to be 3.7 volts instead of 3.6 volts allows a chain of thirteen batteries to be called 48 volts as the math comes out to 48.1 volts by changing the definition. 



Lithium voltage drops as batteries discharge making definitions fuzzy.  The 48 volt battery standard originated with lead acid batteries.  The best match  in lithium would be between 13 and 14 cells in series but half a battery is impossible.

I want my packs in four flat sheets, not bricks but others have figured out how to build them.  Here is a small pack.  Figuring out a single layer arrangement won't be hard.



And something larger.



Fourteen cells in a chain.  8 chains in parallel should give me just over 1 kWh if the batteries are very good.  That puts 28 batteries in a thin pack on each side of each wheel.  I am thinking of making a two speed transmission that can split the 14 cell chains into 7 cell chains in parallel.  The advantage would be for hill climbing.  A battery pack is not always a good match to a motor load from an impedance point of view.  At low speeds having a lower voltage would make better use of battery power.  Especially up hills where current draw is high.

« Last Edit: August 18, 2018, 03:12:56 AM by K-Dog »
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Online Surly1

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Re: Electric Bicycles
« Reply #239 on: August 18, 2018, 04:15:08 AM »
Wondering where you go to scrounge up old laptop battery packs?

Some valuable DIY stuff, right here.
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