AuthorTopic: Official Darwin Awards Thread  (Read 6265 times)

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Bad choice of meals there.

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https://www.aol.com/article/news/2018/03/07/former-rugby-player-paralyzed-after-swallowing-slug-on-dare/23379815/

Former rugby player paralyzed after swallowing slug on dare


New York Daily News
MATT ZARRELL
Mar 7th 2018 3:15PM

The mother of an Australian rugby player who was paralyzed after swallowing a slug on a dare is fighting back after the government significantly cut his benefits for medical care.

Sam Ballard, then 19, ate a garden slug at a 2010 party that everyone at first thought was harmless, but later caused the teen to become paralyzed and unable to communicate or care for himself, the Herald Sun reports.

The slug carried a rare infection called angiostrongyliasis, also known as rat lungworm. Slugs acquire the parasite when they ingest feces from already-infected rats, the CDC reports.

The agency even notes that some "have gotten infected by swallowing snails/slugs 'on a dare.'"

The infection caused Ballard to fall into a coma for over a year, according to the Herald Sun.

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Nearly a decade later, Ballard requires 24-hour care to assist with everything including being fed and monitoring his breathing. He lives with a tracheostomy tube permanently in place, suffers from constant seizures and his body struggles to maintain the same temperature.
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A simple cough could cause him to choke to death, the outlet reports.

Two years ago, Ballard was deemed eligible for a disability package worth $492,000 from the National Disability Insurance Scheme, which is the government-run agency that manages those that are disabled and need financial assistance for medical or mental health care, according to the outlet.

However, a further review of Ballard's case resulted in his funding being severely cut to just $188,600, the Herald Sun reports.

Instead of calling and telling Ballard's mother that the funding was cut, the agency reportedly sent her a text message telling her to look up her son's account for his latest funding outcome, which revealed the decrease.

The agency never explained why the cut was made, reports say.

It took another four months before Katie Ballard met with NDIS officials last month.

"A resolution to this matter, which includes an increase to Sam's support package, is imminent," an NDIS spokesperson told the Herald Sun.
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Snake charmer strangled by python in India during live show
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2018, 07:43:49 PM »
"Lie Down with Pythons, Wake Up with Strangled Neck" -  Buddha  ::)

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https://weekfacts.com/2018/03/snake-charmer-strangled-by-python-in-india-during-live-show/

Snake charmer strangled by python in India during live show


Posted by: Amanda Carano in Health March 23, 2018   4 Comments 5 Views

At initially, people thought it was a piece of a demonstration: a deadly python looped around the neck of its owner and snake charmer amid a live show in Uttar Pradesh, India, this week.

In any case, they soon discovered the demonstration was very genuine.

The snake charmer at first got the adult snake and enabled it to sit on his shoulders as he respected the group. Gradually, the snake crawled up the man’s body and began to wrap itself around his neck.

The man seemed quiet – going about as though he was basically wearing a turtleneck. He kept on motioning people to come nearer.

After thirty seconds, the man bowed on the ground and seemed, by all accounts, to be experiencing difficulty relaxing. He inclined forward and snatched the snake’s body, endeavoring to powerfully pull the animal off.

For about a moment, a gathering of people just watched in stun and repulsiveness. They understood the man was in a bad position when he toppled over onto the sandy ground.

He seemed, by all accounts, to be oblivious when a man ventured in to help. He sprinkled water on the snake and in the long run the python slitered away.

A gathering of three men surged the unidentified man to a close-by doctor’s facility in Varanasi on March 20, as per The Independent. His condition is as yet obscure.

Snake charmers are regular in India, however the reptiles have been known to turn on their handlers.

A renowned worldwide “snake whisperer” in Malaysia dies a week ago after he was nibbled by a cobra, Free Malaysia Today announced.

A year ago, Dan Brandon, a snake devotee in the U.K., was discovered choked to death close to his pet python, “Small.” A coroner later affirmed there was “no uncertainty” the python had murdered him.
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Darwin Awards: Death by Constipation
« Reply #17 on: March 31, 2018, 12:35:08 PM »
Quote
However, putting hundreds of tablets in a blender and creating a constipation smoothie to drink is another story.

 ::)

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https://www.forbes.com/sites/brucelee/2018/03/31/another-overdose-of-an-anti-diarrhea-drug-this-time-a-death-from-loperamide/#5dc6eb724202

Another Overdose Of An Anti-Diarrhea Drug: This Time A Death From Loperamide

Bruce Y. Lee , Contributor
Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.


Loperamide isn't just for diarrhea anymore. (Photo: Shutterstock)

It isn't always about diarrhea. That is a general statement but also applies to the use of anti-diarrhea medications.

KDKA CBS Pittsburgh reported that a 29 year old Pittsburgh-area man died in November from taking too much loperamide, the active ingredient in anti-diarrhea medications such as Imodium. Here's a CBS Pittsburgh news segment on the story:

KDKA also quoted Dr. Michael Lynch from the University of Pittsburgh's Medical Center as saying that “since 2015 through the end of 2017, just at the Pittsburgh Poison Center, we saw a 167 percent increase in calls related to loperamide toxicity, with more than half of those people needing to go to the hospital.” But this doesn't necessarily mean that there's been a lot more diarrhea in Pittsburgh.

As an anti-diarrhea agent, loperamide works primarily on opioid receptors in your gut to slow down the movement of your intestines. That's why one of the side effects of loperamide and other opioids is constipation. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has deemed loperamide safe when used at approved doses, which for adults is a single 4 mg initial dose followed by 2 mg after each loose stool. As the FDA stated, each day the dose should not exceed 8 mg per day for over-the-counter use and 16 mg for prescription use.

However, putting hundreds of tablets in a blender and creating a constipation smoothie to drink is another story.

While loperamide is not nearly as strong as OxContin or Vicodin and doesn't reach your brain as easily, taking dozens or even hundreds of loperamide tablets can give you an opioid high or temper withdrawal symptoms when stronger opioids are not available. It's also cheaper and more readily available than many stronger presciption opioid medications. Plus, the ongoing opioid epidemic has brought out the chemists and pharmacologists in many people. Some are taking other medications simultaneously to increase absorption loperamide through the intestines into the bloodstream, decrease the rate at which loperamide is broken down and excreted from the body, and increase the degree to which loperamide crosses the blood-brain barrier into the brain. Such medications include CYP3A4 inhibitors such as intraconazole and clarithromycin, CYP2C8 inhibitors such as gemfibrozil, and P-glycoprotein inhibitors such as quinidine. People are also using laxatives and stool softeners to combat the constipation that results from using too much loperamide, which is a bit like running the air conditioner and the heater at the same time.   
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Back in HS, I remember one guy who passed an entire Tunafish sandwich through his nose.  This beats that trick by a mile.  Go to the link for the videos.  ::)

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https://sg.news.yahoo.com/teenagers-snorting-condoms-latest-viral-challenge-181634979.html

Are teenagers snorting condoms in the latest viral 'challenge?'
[Yahoo Lifestyle]
Cindy Arboleda
Yahoo Lifestyle1 April 2018

Condom (Photo: Getty Images)

While some teenagers across the country are creating movements like #NeverAgain and organizing marches for a cause, other teenagers are doing incredible (and sometimes stupid) things to get likes, views, and followers on social media – all in the hope of going viral.

According to multiple reports, teens are putting unwrapped condoms up their nostrils and inhaling them until the condom comes out of their mouth. Called the “Snorting Condom Challenge,” like other viral challenges, this one isn’t a new thing. It’s been making its online rounds for several years.


Although the condom challenge has been around for a while, it has recently made a comeback to social media. In 2013, Savannah Strong became one of the first YouTube stars to try it this trick and go viral. Her video has now been removed by YouTube for containing “harmful or dangerous content.” But other similar videos date back to 2007.

Since then, thousands of people have recorded themselves over the years performing the snorting condom challenge and have shared the videos online.

According to Newsweek, Stephen Enriquez, a state education specialist based in Texas who teaches parents drug and alcohol prevention, now also includes dangerous online trends and challenges kids might be experimenting with, such as the snorting condom challenge.

Enriquez told KMPH, “As graphic as it is, we have to show parents because teens are going online looking for challenges and recreating them.”

His classes are bringing awareness to parents like Debbie Miller. After taking a look at a snorting condom challenge video she said, “I had never seen that before, so that was really a shock to me.” She has 11-year-old twins.

Snorting a condom can become a choking hazard if it blocks the airway. Besides the unpleasant feeling one is likely to experience, infections and allergic reactions are likely to happen in the nasal cavities.

Forbes reports two medical case studies of women who have accidentally inhaled condoms while performing oral sex who have suffered medical complications. One woman came down with pneumonia and suffered a partial lung collapse after the condom got stuck in her lungs. The other woman got appendicitis when a condom fragment got stuck in her appendix.

Hopefully, teens will move on to another “challenge” soon one that doesn’t involve snorting condoms or eating detergent.  But in the meantime, parents beware.

We’ve reached out to Stephen Enriquez to find out how common this challenge is, and will update if we hear back.
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🏔️ At least four more die on Everest amid overcrowding concerns
« Reply #19 on: May 24, 2019, 07:50:02 PM »
Dead Climbers by the truckload!  Check out the line of Darwin Award Winners!

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https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/may/24/three-more-die-on-everest-amid-concerns-about-overcrowding

At least four more die on Everest amid overcrowding concerns

Latest deaths, including an Irish climber, come as others report ‘insane’ delays at the peak

Peter Beaumont

Fri 24 May 2019 12.54 EDT
First published on Fri 24 May 2019 12.39 EDT


The scene at the summit of Mount Everest on Tuesday. Photograph: Nirmal Purja/AFP/Getty Images

Four more deaths have been reported on Everest as concerns grow about the risks posed by the severe overcrowding on the world’s highest mountain this year.

Kevin Hynes, 56, from Ireland, died in his tent at 7,000 metres early on Friday, having turned back before reaching the summit. The father of two was part of a group from the UK-based 360 Expeditions.

The climbing company said: “It is with the greatest sadness that we have to confirm that one of our Everest team has passed away. Kevin was one of the strongest and most experienced climbers on our team, and had previously summited Everest South and Lhotse.”
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Hynes had been accompanied by an experienced Sherpa, who had himself climbed to the summit of Everest South twice, Everest North and Makalu twice, according to 360 Expeditions.
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His death came a week after the Trinity College professor Seamus Lawless, from County Wicklow, fell during the descent after achieving a lifetime ambition of reaching the summit. A recovery operation is under way.

The other three victims, who were on a different expedition to Hynes, were identified by local media as Kalpana Das, 49, and Nihal Ashpak Bagwan, 27, both Indian and Ernst Landgraf, an Austrian.

After the publication of a picture taken by the former British soldier Nirmal “Nims” Purja showing long queues on the summit slopes, it emerged that the US climber Don Cash died on Wednesday after being delayed in a bottleneck of climbers during his descent. Cash, 55, fell ill close to the summit and was being helped down by two Sherpas when he collapsed again while waiting in a queue for two hours to descend the Hillary step, a well-known chokepoint.

Like Cash, the Indian mountaineer Anjali Kulkarni appears to have died during her descent after being caught in the ascending queues.

“Anjali and her husband were forced to wait for hours to reach the summit as there was a long queue on the slopes of Everest,” said Thupden Sherpa, the head of her trekking company. “The Sherpa guides supported her while coming down, but she didn’t make it.”

Overcrowding and safety have been a growing cause for concern in recent years, not least since the emergence of cut-price Nepali trekking companies that offer Everest packages for half the price of trips organised by foreign companies.

The deaths occurred despite Nepal’s tourism authorities instituting, but not implementing, plans to timetable ascents to avoid congestion.

This season’s summit crowds – the worst since 2012 – had been exacerbated by unsettled weather which meant there had been only five possible summit days in May so far, compared with between seven and 12 in recent years. This had caused hundreds of climbers to converge on several notorious sections where they can only pass one at a time.

Alan Arnette, who chronicles each Everest season in his blog, described the conditions as insane. “In 2019, we are hearing horror stories of summit pushes from the South Col to the summit taking 10, 12, even 14 hours. And due to the jams, the return to the Col is taking up to another six hours, making for 20 hour pushes – that’s insane.”

Jase Wilson, a Leeds Beckett University researcher at base camp, confirmed bad weather had meant few ascents before this week’s brief window. “The winds have been relentless so far … This has left around 300 climbers, along with climbing guides making around 600, all heading for the summit during the short lull [this week].”

Issues on the popular South Col route, on the Nepalese side of the mountain, have been growing for years partly due to an unwillingness by Nepal’s tourism ministry to tackle a constellation of concerns, including regulating cut-price trekking companies, permit numbers and vetting potential climbers.

Kenton Cool, who climbed Everest on 16 May for the 14th time while guiding a client, told the Guardian there were two overlapping issues: the growing popularity of Everest, not least among Indian and Chinese climbers; and declining levels of experience among those tackling the mountain – once regarded as the preserve of elite mountaineers.

“I’m not sure what the answer is. But looking at Nims’s picture, no part of that screams fun. I pride myself working one-on-one and being agile, avoiding queues [to] get up and down safely.”

With the increasing number of inexperienced climbers, Cool said he saw some kind of capability assessment as a “step in the right direction”.

Simon Lowe, the managing director of UK-based Jagged Globe, said his firm got a team of 12 to the summit on 23 May after setting off as soon as large numbers appeared at the South Col.

“The queue this year isn’t the problem,” he said. “But it exacerbates an underlying issue, and that is incompetent climbers being led by incompetent teams. If you go up with a bare minimum bottles of supplementary oxygen and stand in a queue for ages that is going to cause problems.”

Without reforms, Lowe, like others, can see guiding on Everest for companies like his becoming questionable. “I think I do see a point where it becomes untenable; where it becomes a bit distasteful. And you would have to ask do we want to be part of it?”
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Now up to 10 Darwin Award Winners this week!

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Re: Official Darwin Awards Thread
« Reply #21 on: May 25, 2019, 01:01:20 PM »
Evidently, size matters in this sport.

They're ARE other peaks.......

These cats must have some kind of bucket list punchcard thingy lanyard to show off at the tavern or pub upon return.
I'll stick to mountains of gold & silver.
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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Re: Official Darwin Awards Thread
« Reply #22 on: May 25, 2019, 05:32:28 PM »
Evidently, size matters in this sport.

They're ARE other peaks.......

These cats must have some kind of bucket list punchcard thingy lanyard to show off at the tavern or pub upon return.
I'll stick to mountains of gold & silver.

Everest is the BIGGEST mountain on earth.  Standing at the peak, you are literally at the "Top of the World", the highest location you can stand on the ground on the planet.  It's the notch in the gunbelt every serious climber wants.

In reality, K-2 is supposed to be a tougher climb and is only maybe 200' at the peak below Everest.  And there are free climbs in Yosemite much more difficult than either of those, but none so high.

In the case of both Everest and K-2 though (and actually Denali also here in Alaska),  as you reach the summit you are in the DEATH ZONE.  At this point, the Oxygen concentration in the atmosphere is insufficient to support human life.  And in fact almost any life at all, nothing grows up there and there are no animals that will go that high either.  Why?  There's nothing to EAT up there, besides the fact you don't have enough oxygen to breath.

99.9% of life on this planet exist in only a very thin layer, from about 4 miles up into the atmosphere and 3 miles deep in the ocean.  In the ocean, few life forms can survive the extreme pressures and lack of oxygen and light, only certain types of organisms that can use Sulfur compounds emitted from underground volcanoes and vents can make it.  Very tiny part of the total biosphere, but likely to survive almost any cataclysm at all, even a Planet Killer Asteroid.

Meanwhile, you gotta be an obsessive nutcase to want to climb into the Death Zone.  It's just hubris driving it.

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Re: Official Darwin Awards Thread
« Reply #23 on: May 25, 2019, 05:49:50 PM »
Also, the air is too thin in the Death Zone for most Helicopters to fly, and hovering is almost impossible.  So rescue via the machines of Industrial Civilization for the most part is impossible up there.  You have to make it down below around 20,000' for that type of rescue in general.  Really, 15,000 feet is more reasonably possible with the types of Helicopters they have available for such things.

This is why about all the people who have died climbing Everest are still there, literally "Frozen Stiffs".  They line the climbing routes, dozens if not hundreds of Darwin Award Winners decorating the trail.  Nobody is going to risk their own life to pull down a dead body by hand.

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🏔️ ‘It Was Like a Zoo’: Death on an Unruly, Overcrowded Everest
« Reply #24 on: May 27, 2019, 12:16:59 AM »
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/26/world/asia/mount-everest-deaths.html

‘It Was Like a Zoo’: Death on an Unruly, Overcrowded Everest


Climbers and porters at Everest base camp in April 2018.CreditPrakash Mathema/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

By Kai Schultz, Jeffrey Gettleman, Mujib Mashal and Bhadra Sharma

    May 26, 2019

NEW DELHI — Ed Dohring, a doctor from Arizona, had dreamed his whole life of reaching the top of Mount Everest. But when he summited a few days ago, he was shocked by what he saw.

Climbers were pushing and shoving to take selfies. The flat part of the summit, which he estimated at about the size of two Ping-Pong tables, was packed with 15 or 20 people. To get up there, he had to wait hours in a line, chest to chest, one puffy jacket after the next, on an icy, rocky ridge with a several-thousand foot drop.

He even had to step around the body of a woman who had just died.

“It was scary,” he said by telephone from Kathmandu, Nepal, where he was resting in a hotel room. “It was like a zoo.”

This has been one of the deadliest climbing seasons on Everest, with at least 10 deaths. And at least some seem to have been avoidable.

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The problem hasn’t been avalanches, blizzards or high winds. Veteran climbers and industry leaders blame having too many people on the mountain, in general, and too many inexperienced climbers, in particular.

Fly-by-night adventure companies are taking up untrained climbers who pose a risk to everyone on the mountain. And the Nepalese government, hungry for every climbing dollar it can get, has issued more permits than Everest can safely handle, some experienced mountaineers say.

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Add to that Everest’s inimitable appeal to a growing body of thrill-seekers the world over. And the fact that Nepal, one of Asia’s poorest nations and the site of most Everest climbs, has a long record of shoddy regulations, mismanagement and corruption.
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A long line of climbers waiting to summit Mount Everest on May 22.CreditProject Possible, via Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
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A long line of climbers waiting to summit Mount Everest on May 22.CreditProject Possible, via Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

The result is a crowded, unruly scene reminiscent of “Lord of the Flies” — at 29,000 feet. At that altitude, there is no room for error and altruism is put to the test.

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To reach the summit, climbers shed every pound of gear they can and take with them just enough canisters of compressed oxygen to make it to the top and back down. It is hard to think straight that high up, climbers say, and a delay of even an hour or two can mean life or death.

According to Sherpas and climbers, some of the deaths this year were caused by people getting held up in the long lines on the last 1,000 feet or so of the climb, unable to get up and down fast enough to replenish their oxygen supply. Others were simply not fit enough to be on the mountain in the first place.

Some climbers did not even know how to put on a pair of crampons, clip-on spikes that increase traction on ice, Sherpas said.

Nepal has no strict rules about who can climb Everest, and veteran climbers say that is a recipe for disaster.

“You have to qualify to do the Ironman,” said Alan Arnette, a prominent Everest chronicler and climber. “But you don’t have to qualify to climb the highest mountain in the world? What’s wrong with this picture?”

The last time 10 or more people died on Everest was in 2015, during an avalanche.

By some measures, the Everest machine has only gotten more out of control.


By The New York Times

Climbers complain of theft and heaps of trash on the mountain. And earlier this year, government investigators uncovered profound problems with some of the oxygen systems used by climbers. Climbers said cylinders were found to be leaking, exploding or being improperly filled on a black market.

But despite complaints about safety lapses, this year the Nepali government issued a record number of permits, 381, as part of a bigger push to commercialize the mountain. Climbers say the permit numbers have been going up steadily each year and that this year the traffic jams were heavier than ever.

“This is not going to improve,” said Lukas Furtenbach, a guide who recently relocated his climbers to the Chinese side of Everest because of the overcrowding in Nepal and the surge of inexperienced climbers.

“There’s a lot of corruption in the Nepali government,” he said. “They take whatever they can get.”

Nepali officials denied any wrongdoing and said the trekking companies were the ones responsible for safety on the mountain.

Danduraj Ghimire, the director general of Nepal’s department of tourism, said in an interview on Sunday that the large number of deaths this year was not related to crowds, but because there were fewer good weather days for climbers to safely summit. He said the government was not inclined to change the number of permits.

“If you really want to limit the number of climbers,” Mr. Ghimire said, “let’s just end all expeditions on our holy mountain.”

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To be sure, the race to the top is driven by the weather. May is the best time of the year to summit, but even then there are only a few days when it is clear enough and the winds are mild enough to make an attempt at the top.

But one of the critical problems this year, veterans say, seems to be the sheer number of people trying to reach the summit at the same time. And since there is no government traffic cop high on the mountain, the task of deciding when groups get to attempt their final ascent is left up to mountaineering companies.


Ed Dohring on the top of Everest on May 23, 2019. Credit Tendi Sherpa

Climbers themselves, experienced or not, are often so driven to finish their quest that they may keep going even if they see the dangers escalating.

A few decades ago, the people climbing Everest were largely experienced mountaineers willing to pay a lot of money. But in recent years, longtime climbers say, lower-cost operators working out of small storefronts in Kathmandu, the capital, and even more expensive foreign companies that don’t emphasize safety have entered the market and offered to take just about anyone to the top.

Sometimes these trips go very wrong.

From interviews with several climbers, it seems that as the groups get closer to the summit, the pressures increase and some people lose their sense of decency.

Fatima Deryan, an experienced Lebanese mountaineer, was making her way to the summit recently when less experienced climbers started collapsing in front of her. Temperatures were dropping to -30 Celsius. Oxygen tanks were running low. And roughly 150 people were packed together, clipped to the same safety line.

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“A lot of people were panicking, worrying about themselves — and nobody thinks about those who are collapsing,” Ms. Deryan said.

“It is a question of ethics,” she said. “We are all on oxygen. You figure out that if you help, you are going to die.”

She offered to help some of the sick people, she said, but then calculated she was beginning to endanger herself and kept going to the summit, which is currently measured at 29,029 feet. On the way back down, she had to fight her way again through the crowds.

“It was terrible,” she said.

Around the same time, Rizza Alee, an 18-year-old climber from Kashmir, a disputed territory between India and Pakistan, was making his way up the mountain. He said he was stunned by how little empathy people had for those who were struggling.
Mountaineers on Mount Everest in April 2018.CreditPhunjo Lama/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
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Mountaineers on Mount Everest in April 2018.CreditPhunjo Lama/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

“I saw some people like they had no emotions,” he said. “I asked people for water and no one gave me any. People are really obsessed with the summit. They are ready to kill themselves for the summit.”

But Mr. Alee himself took some chances; he has a heart condition and says he “kind of lied” to his expedition company when they asked if he had any health issues.

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Mr. Dohring, the American doctor, represents the other end of the spectrum.

At 62, he has climbed peaks all over the world. He read about explorers as a boy and said he had always wanted to get to the “one spot where you can stand higher than any place else on earth.’’

To prepare for Everest, he slept at home in a tent that simulated high-altitude conditions. His total Everest experience cost $70,000.

Still, there was only so much he could prepare for. Last month, when he hiked into base camp at Everest at an altitude of more than 17,000 feet, Mr. Dohring said he was overcome with awe.

“You look at a circle of mountain peaks above you and think, ‘What am I doing here?’’’ he said.

He pressed on. After long, cold days, he inched up a spiny trail to the summit early on Thursday and ran into crowds “aggressively jostling for pictures.”

He was so scared, he said, that he plunked down on the snow to keep from losing his balance and had his guide take a picture of him holding up a small sign that said, “Hi Mom Love You.’’

On the way down, he passed two more dead bodies in their tents.

“I was not prepared to see sick climbers being dragged down by the mountain by Sherpas or the surreal experience of finding dead bodies,” he said.

But on Sunday, he had made it out. He boarded a helicopter after reaching base camp and flew back to Kathmandu.

He counted his blisters at the Yak and Yeti Hotel, where he said he treated himself to a thick steak and cracked open a cold beer. “Everest Lager, of course,” he said.

Kai Schultz, Jeffrey Gettleman and Mujib Mashal reported from New Delhi, and Bhadra Sharma from Kathmandu, Nepal.
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https://www.businessinsider.com/mount-everest-10th-deadliest-mountain-himalayas-2019-5#of-all-the-himalayan-peaks-the-greatest-number-of-climbers-have-summited-everest-as-of-2008-3864-people-had-reached-the-peak-that-number-is-closer-to-5000-now-10

At least 11 people died on Mount Everest last week. But it's just the 10th-deadliest mountain in the Himalayas.

 

At least 11 people died on Mount Everest last week. But it's just the 10th-deadliest mountain in the Himalayas.

 
 
mount everest peak gold Mount Everest is the tallest mountain at 29,029 feet (8,848 meters). Wikimedia Commons

If climbers want to summit Mount Everest, they have to brave the "death zone" — the area above 8,000 meters (26,247 feet) in altitude, where there is so little oxygen that the body starts to die, minute by minute and cell by cell.

Last week, at least 11 people died on Everest, which is the tallest peak at 29,029 feet (8,848 meters or 5.5 miles) above sea level. Some collapsed from exhaustion after waiting in line for hours on narrow parts of the route to ascend to the summit, according to The Kathmandu Post.

Read More: What happens to your body in Mount Everest's 'Death Zone,' where 11 people have died in the past week

But Everest isn't the only Himalayan peak on which climbers face the death zone. In fact, nine other mountains are deadlier than Everest.

According to NASA's Earth Observatory, Annapurna I — the 10th-highest mountain — is the most dangerous to climb, with a fatality rate of 32% as of 2012. K2, second-highest peak, is almost as dangerous, with a fatality rate of 29%. Everest, by contrast, has a 4% fatality rate.

Granted, Mount Everest has seen many tragedies since 2012. In 2015, a magnitude 7.8 earthquake struck Nepal, sending an avalanche careening into Everest's base camp. More than 20 people were killed.

Here are the 10 deadliest mountains in the Himalayas, in order from most to least deadly, according to NASA.

 

Annapurna I, the 10th-highest mountain, has a fatality rate of 32%.

Annapurna I, the 10th-highest mountain, has a fatality rate of 32%. A view of Annapurna 1's snow-covered North Face at sunrise. Frank Bienewald/LightRocket/Getty

According to NASA's Earth Observatory, only 191 people had successfully climbed Annapurna as of 2012, far less than any other 8,000-meter mountains.

The first people to climb Annapurna I were the French climbers Maurice Herzog and Louis Lachenal in 1950. Though they reached the summit on their first try, extreme frostbite and gangrene set in on their way down the mountain. A doctor had to amputate all of Herzog's and Lachenal's toes, as well as all of Herzog's fingers.

K2, or Mount Godwin-Austen, is just 778 feet shorter than Everest. The mountaineer George Bell once said "K2 is a savage mountain that tries to kill you."

K2, or Mount Godwin-Austen, is just 778 feet shorter than Everest. The mountaineer George Bell once said Patrick Poendl/Business Insider

Only 264 people reached the top of K2 between 1906 and 2008, and 24 of them died before they got back down, according to 8000ers.com, an online database that tracks climbing statistics for all Himalayan peaks higher than 8,000 meters.

According to NASA, K2 has a fatality rate of 29%.

 

The south side of Nanga Parbat, which means "naked mountain," is generally snow-free.

The south side of Nanga Parbat, which means The Nanga Parbat mountains in northern Pakistan, June 22, 2003. Zulfikar Ali/AFP/Getty

According to NASA, as of March 2012, Nanga Parbat had a fatality rate of about 20%.

In July 1953, the Austrian climber Hermann Buhl became the first to reach the summit. He did so alone, without oxygen, food, a tent, or sleeping bag. Before him, 31 people had died attempting that feat.

But the mountain is better known for how fast it's growing.

"There is no other mountain in the world that is rising as fast as Nanga Parbat," Mike Searle, a University of Oxford geologist, told NASA.

As of March 2012, Dhaulagiri had a fatality rate of about 16%.

As of March 2012, Dhaulagiri had a fatality rate of about 16%. Dhaulagiri is 26,795 feet high — the seventh-tallest mountain. Solundir/Wikimedia Commons

The "white mountain" is the seventh tallest in the world.

 

Kangchenjunga, on the border between Nepal and India, is the fourth-deadliest Himalayan peak.

Kangchenjunga, on the border between Nepal and India, is the fourth-deadliest Himalayan peak. Kangchenjunga is the third-highest mountain at 8,586 meters (28,169 feet). Diptendu Dutta/AFP/Getty

The slopes of Kangchenjunga are steep and avalanche-prone. According to NASA, the mountain has a fatality rate of 15%.

The route to Manaslu's summit presents similar challenges to Mount Everest's. The top of the mountain is a steep tower of rock that has room for only a few climbers at a time.

The route to Manaslu's summit presents similar challenges to Mount Everest's. The top of the mountain is a steep tower of rock that has room for only a few climbers at a time. Manaslu is the eighth-highest mountain at 8,163 meters (26,781 feet). Pratapgrg/Wikimedia Commons

The 26,781-foot mountain is the eighth-highest in the world, with a fatality rate of 10%.

 

Gasherbrum I is often overlooked, as it's the 11th-highest peak. But it's more dangerous than Everest.

Gasherbrum I is often overlooked, as it's the 11th-highest peak. But it's more dangerous than Everest. This photo of Gasherbrum I was taken from the 1958 base camp. Olderman/Wikimedia Commons

The 26,509-foot mountain used to be known as "Hidden Peak," and it has a fatality rate of 9%, according to NASA.

Climbing Makalu, Nepal's 27,667-foot peak, is about twice as risky as climbing Everest.

Climbing Makalu, Nepal's 27,667-foot peak, is about twice as risky as climbing Everest. Makalu is the fourth-highest mountain, rising to 27,667 feet in Makalu Barun National Park, Nepal. Education Images/UIG/Getty

Makalu's fatality rate is also 9%, according to NASA.

Makalu means "Great Black" in Tibetan — likely referring to the exposed black granite on the mountain's summit.

 

Broad Peak sits at the border of Pakistan and China, with a height of 26,401 feet.

Broad Peak sits at the border of Pakistan and China, with a height of 26,401 feet. Pakistan's Broad Peak is the 12th-highest mountain at 8,047 meters (26,401 feet). Kogo/Wikimedia Commons

Of the 404 people who had successfully reached the summit as of 2012, 21 had died — about 5%, NASA reported.

Of all the Himalayan peaks, the greatest number of climbers have summited Everest. As of 2008, 3,864 people had reached the peak. That number is closer to 5,000 now.

Of all the Himalayan peaks, the greatest number of climbers have summited Everest. As of 2008, 3,864 people had reached the peak. That number is closer to 5,000 now. An aerial photo of Mount Everest taken over Nepal on October 21, 2005. AP Photo/Jody Kurash

According to 8000ers.com, of those 3,684 climbers, only 56 (2%) didn't make it back down.

NASA reported that as of 2012, Everest's fatality rate was closer to 4%.

SEE ALSO: What the top of Mount Everest is really like, according to the woman who's been there a record-breaking 9 times

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