AuthorTopic: rewilding  (Read 38950 times)

Offline reanteben

  • Global Moderator
  • Waitstaff
  • *****
  • Posts: 619
    • View Profile
rewilding
« on: May 12, 2012, 03:26:02 PM »
peter bauer, aka urban scout, blogger and self-proclaimed H/G wannabe, lives in my neighborhood. i learned this today at malthusia. i think i'll have to get in touch with him. he's currently making a buckskin outfit for a stone age survival course he's attending.

here he gives a fine little half-hour presentation on rewilding, followed by an insightful hour of q&a:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/8mzIo5AdEEI&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/8mzIo5AdEEI&fs=1</a>
 

p01

  • Guest
Re: rewilding
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2012, 04:59:01 PM »
Most interesting, Ben! :)
I don't think we need to go full hunter-gatherer, a pastoral existence is sustainable and has worked for large periods of time. However that failed because of agriculture and the population expansion pressure it generated, which destroyed the pastoral quasi-tribal communities. Still, very interesting, thanks!

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41331
    • View Profile
Re: rewilding
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2012, 05:50:23 PM »
Have to wait until Monday to review this video.  Too much bandwidth for me to use up over the cell phone network.  Looks interesting though.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline reanteben

  • Global Moderator
  • Waitstaff
  • *****
  • Posts: 619
    • View Profile
Re: rewilding
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2012, 09:28:02 PM »
glad you liked it p01. here's an excerpt from peter bauer's latest blog post:

Quote
“Primitive” or ancestral skills have never been my main focus in rewilding. In fact, they’ve generally taken a back-burner to the mental, philosophical, spiritual and social aspects of rewilding. I enjoy natural crafts and love the self-reliance aspect of ancestral skills but I’ve never been that into them, particularly hide-tanning and stone tools. Mostly because, well, I just don’t think they matter as much. This has changed quite a bit this year, as I finally am looking for a synthesis of all the aspects of rewilding. While I’m not a primitive purist, I enjoy the aesthetic magic of buckskin clothes and stone and bone tools. Looking at the pictures on Lynx’s website creates a kind of inspiration and desire that would not be there were all her students wearing colorful, synthetic REI clothes and using expensive steel tools and backpacks. There is a strange magic in the purity of ancestral technology. A magic that motivates me.

So I’ve delved deeper into the world of “primitive living” and that means hide-tanning. It is a complex series of steps and phases and is all about timing. Brain-tanning is different and yet similar to bark-tanning. I’ll be brain-tanning about 7 deer hides in the next couple weeks, and bark-tanning 5 raccoon hides, with the fur on, in the next few weeks and couple months. I have a thick mystery hide that has been in a hemlock bark solution as a tester for bark tanning the raccoons. I plan to make a canteen with the mystery hide, inspired by my friend Miles canteen pictured in his amazing bark-tanning tutorial.

http://www.urbanscout.org/preparation-week-1-of-4/

you're right about the pastoralism. due to my brother's profitable 'final frontier' investment in mongolian commercial real estate, late last year I came across an interesting 12-page pdf on the cultural issues surrounding the ongoing land privatization there:

http://www.apcss.org/Publications/Edited%20Volumes/RegionalFinal%20chapters/Chapter19Sarlagtay.pdf




Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41331
    • View Profile
Re: rewilding
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2012, 10:11:12 PM »
I like what I see here so far, and I would love it if Peter Bauer would repost his stuff here on the Diner.

I will leave it to you to invite Peter to join us in the Diner. Offer him the opportunity to be a Diner Blog Author.  5000 Page Hits a day should be an attractor even for a Primitivist.  I am swamped myself at the moment, so I am not going to hit on him myself.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline reanteben

  • Global Moderator
  • Waitstaff
  • *****
  • Posts: 619
    • View Profile
Re: rewilding
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2012, 10:15:06 PM »
yeah, cool, i was thinking that, too. i'll ask him.

p01

  • Guest
Re: rewilding
« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2012, 07:33:52 AM »
Re: Mongolia
Now that's a fast way to thrash thousands of years of true sustainability for a small pile of imploding debt.  :o

Offline ross

  • Global Moderator
  • Bussing Staff
  • *****
  • Posts: 161
    • View Profile
Re: rewilding
« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2012, 08:26:31 PM »
Every tribe is going to need at least one person who has been "rewilding." I like this concept. It seems so imposing though. Hide tanning is a good place to begin.

How about this guy?
Quote
Footage has revealed the sparse and yet contented life of Daniel Suelo - the man who has chosen to live without money for the past 12 years.

Suelo, now 51, renounced money in 2000, left his last $30 dollars in a phone booth and walked into the desert to start a new life in Moab, Utah.

His way of life has become an inspiration to thousands of Americans who have suffered in the economic crash and activists like the Occupy movement, disillusioned with a society consumed by avarice and greed.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2138738/Daniel-Suelo-voluntarily-lives-NO-money-decade-slept-cave-years.html#ixzz1uoLqVzkQ

Better than accidentally poisoning yourself in the back of a broke down bus.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2012, 08:28:32 PM by ross »

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 41331
    • View Profile
Re: rewilding
« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2012, 09:00:14 PM »
Every tribe is going to need at least one person who has been "rewilding." I like this concept. It seems so imposing though. Hide tanning is a good place to begin.

How about this guy?
Quote
Footage has revealed the sparse and yet contented life of Daniel Suelo - the man who has chosen to live without money for the past 12 years.

Suelo, now 51, renounced money in 2000, left his last $30 dollars in a phone booth and walked into the desert to start a new life in Moab, Utah.

His way of life has become an inspiration to thousands of Americans who have suffered in the economic crash and activists like the Occupy movement, disillusioned with a society consumed by avarice and greed.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2138738/Daniel-Suelo-voluntarily-lives-NO-money-decade-slept-cave-years.html#ixzz1uoLqVzkQ

Better than accidentally poisoning yourself in the back of a broke down bus.

THAT is a truly INSPIRATIONAL story.  I am amazed he is able to forage for enough food out in the Utah desert in this day and age.

I do have some questions about it all though.  His Clothing for one thing.  I suppose he gets it from Donations and discards, but I wonder what he has for Winter Gear?  Second would be his Tools?  What did he start out with, what is he still using?

I am going to guess that he has developed a large network of friends in Communes and so forth he can stay with during the Winter months.  Regardless though of any compromises he might be making to make this No Money life a go, this is just an amazing story.

Definitely, this is a better way to go out of the game than ending up in a FEMA Concentration Camp.  Also I think you are correct that every Tribe is going to need at least one person experienced with re-wilding/scavenging as a Life Style in order to make it through the Zero Point.

Nice thing about this is that you do not necessarily have to completely LIVE this way yet, you just have to make it a point to start developing all the skills and knowledge you will need, and practice them some each day and on Weekends.  Then when the Day finnally DOES come that JIT collapses you will have a better shot at making it through the ZP than 99.99% of the rest of the Zombies out there.  Of course, you WILL need to avoid them as well, a problem Suelo does not curently have for the most part.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline EndIsNigh

  • Contrarian
  • Bussing Staff
  • *
  • Posts: 240
    • View Profile
Re: rewilding
« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2012, 01:52:44 AM »
Ben, thanks for posting the Peter Bauer video.  Great stuff!  I liked his definition of radical as it relates to defining the core problem of empire; agriculture.  The idea of succession horticulture is very clever.  I'm looking to sign up for some permaculture design courses soon so I can learn some of the skills involved in rewilding.

Offline EndIsNigh

  • Contrarian
  • Bussing Staff
  • *
  • Posts: 240
    • View Profile
Re: rewilding
« Reply #10 on: May 14, 2012, 02:05:57 AM »
RE

There are some videos of Daniel Suelo on YouTube.  I second your opinion that he's an inspiration.  I like his idea of living in the moment and trusting that nature will provide for him.  I'm sure there's some biblical reference that could be made on this point.  Of course all the other animals live that way.  As of late I've been trying to just focus on the moment to moment and not worry about how I'll support myself which I've found very liberating.

Offline reanteben

  • Global Moderator
  • Waitstaff
  • *****
  • Posts: 619
    • View Profile
rewilding: piratical primitivism
« Reply #11 on: May 22, 2012, 02:21:15 PM »
an excerpt from each of a pair of articles by jason godesky, titled 'a pirate's life for me' and 'a pirate's life for me 2: opening the map':

http://rewild.info/anthropik/2006/07/a-pirates-life-for-me/index.html

Quote
Anthropologists, folklorists and others who study culture have long noted the liminal nature of the festival: a time “in between” when the regular rules do not apply, a temporal space outside of the usual society. In essence, a temporary autonomous zone. In many societies, festivals occured between months or seasons, not belonging to any given season but comprising their own. The example which would be most recognizable to a Western audience would be the liturgical calendar of the Roman Catholic Church, where the Easter Triduum of Good Friday, Holy Saturday and Easter Sunday comprises a season unto itself. In Afterculture, artist Michael Green offers as succinct an explanation of the primitive festival as one could ask for: “Our longing for the vital and unexpected exchanges that occur in cities will be fulfilled by these joyous gatherings. Springing up and dispersing before any serious damage is done to the environment, they bring together all the nation in happy tummult and solemn rite.”

Is this where we see the origin of civilization? Throughout the Paleolithic, there are many archaeological sites that were obviously places of convergence for such festivals, and the early settlements at Çatalhöyük have been described as the “Vatican” of its time. Some archaeologists have suggested that Çatalhöyük began as a settlement for priests, who remained there even between festivals, with agriculture developing to meet the needs of a sedentary population, and hierarchy developing in lock-step with agriculture, both developing to meet the needs of alternating famine and plenty afflicting a society no longer capable of leveraging nomadism. This is an idea that needs further support, but there is plenty to suggest that it was precisely the temptation of the truly autonomous zone, the eternal festival, the never-ending party, that led to civilization in the first place—and with it, the death of festivals, the enemy of all parties, and the closing of the map.


http://rewild.info/anthropik/2007/05/a-pirates-life-for-me-ii-opening-the-map/index.html

Quote
This means that as the energy available to civilization declines, most of the historical patterns of civilization will begin to run in reverse, including the closure of the map. In decline, we will see a new phenomenon: the opening of the map.

This will not strictly unfold as a function of distance from civilized centers, because the map is drawn not only across dimensions of distance, but the energy it takes to reach and exploit those areas, versus the energy they return. The map will open unevenly, just as it closed; in fact, we can learn a great deal about how the map will open from the way it closed. The last areas to close were precisely those areas that took the most energy to reach and exploit, and returned the least energy for the effort. These will likewise be some of the first areas of the map to close. The Allegheny National Forest is today within a day’s drive for half the U.S. population, yet it was one of the very last places for the map to close: the railroads, and then the highways, opened the forest to civilized exploitation. As the fossil fuels that allowed that closing decline, the map will open up again there.

Today, at civilization’s peak, we dream of the free life once enjoyed by pirates—the primitivists that plied the waves in the age of exuberance. They lived in the empty spaces of the map before it closed. But the decline of civilization will run many of its historical processes in reverse, and the map will open up again, just as it once closed, and in the empty gaps, the romantic example of the pirate will no doubt inspire many with the freedom of their existence, just as they were once inspired by the freedom of Native life. So, perhaps a Pirate film is not entirely as useless as it first appears, for in the romantic example of the pirate, now pushed by a thousand corporate conglomerates to sell pirate-themed merchandise, we have a chain of inspiration (if not reality) that connects North Americans today to the original freedom once enjoyed by the Natives of Turtle Island, the example of Croatan, and the heritage of liberty that has stood in defiance of civilization from its very inception. Such images owe more to romantic fantasy than to reality, but if Einstein was right that imagination is more important than knowledge, then I can only cheer the swashbuckler’s example that sounds so clearly even at civilization’s peak, and inspires us to open up the map again.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2012, 01:23:56 AM by reanteben »

Offline reanteben

  • Global Moderator
  • Waitstaff
  • *****
  • Posts: 619
    • View Profile
rewilding: language
« Reply #12 on: May 22, 2012, 02:39:41 PM »
more isms, you say? e-primitivism: rewilding the english language

http://rewild.info/anthropik/2008/03/e-primitive-rewilding-the-english-language/index.html

Quote
The term E-prime (short for English-Prime) refers to a version of English without the use of the verb “to be.” Basically a group of scientists studying quantum physics began to realize that “to be” and a lot of English does not reflect the nature of the universe. The General Symantics Movement began with Alfred Korzybski in his 1933 book, Science and Sanity. His student, David Bourland took the movement further by coining the phrase E-prime and abolishing the verb “to be” altogether. A common e-prime example shows us that an electron appears as a wave when measured with one instrument, and appears as a particle when measured with another. This defies Aristotelian English. E-prime mostly has its roots in scientific inquiry. Though we hate most scientists and scientific inquiry, we agree that the verb “to be” presents an inaccurate view of reality. As animists inspired by e-prime, we have taken it even further and in a new direction, to create what we call E-Primitive (short for English Primitive).

Animist languages stem from people who have lived as close to the land as humanly possible. Their languages have shifted with the land for millions of years. They present maybe the most accurate and deeply perceived connection to the world. In order to help shape E-Primitive, we must look at the how animist languages work.

Offline agelbert

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11820
    • View Profile
    • Renewable Rervolution
Re: rewilding
« Reply #13 on: May 22, 2012, 03:28:36 PM »
Occupy Uprising Native American Prophecy P1

Occupy Uprising NativeAmerican Prophecy P1


Yes, this is germane to 'rewilding'. It is very difficult for many of us to understand that we live in a dysfunctional system because human time horizons don't do well in weighing properly a suicidal, predatory and egocentric mindset which totally ignores the health of the prey population (severe pollution of the ecosphere for resource extraction).
Capitalism is a system of incredibly stupid human predators.
That system, due partly to the exploitation of stored up energy in the form of fossil fuels, but mostly to the need to pollute for several generations before multi-species death sets in, places us in the situation of a fisherman who just discovered there aren't any fish left because the machinery we use to fish them poisoned the ocean and everything in it.

We are there. PETM (Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum of 55 million years ago - Mya) like conditions are already baked into this poison pie.

We aren't simply going to have to 'rewild'; we are going to have to take a hard look at ergosterol (from fungi) as a replacement for colesterol in  protein nutrition. The Fungi is just about the only kingdom that can handle high radiation to degrade and disperse it as well as feeding off hydrocarbon pollution that kills plants an animals. Fungi (see mycologist Paul Stamets) take hydrocarbon pollution and turn it into viable soil. Fungi also can handle high temperatures quite well. The world coming into existence now is not some Daniel Boone or even Native American subsistence life style. That was easy compared with what will be needed in a few decades.
Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Offline reanteben

  • Global Moderator
  • Waitstaff
  • *****
  • Posts: 619
    • View Profile
Re: rewilding
« Reply #14 on: May 22, 2012, 04:25:06 PM »
nice vid. good point regarding mycelia as a protein source. on two occasions i have eaten dry-fried Chicken Of The Woods and both were sublime.



Quote
we are going to have to take a hard look at ergosterol (from fungi) as a replacement for colesterol in  protein nutrition.

would you please elaborate on your point regarding ergosterol?

also, you're not suggesting large-scale bioremediation, are you?

Quote
The world coming into existence now is not some Daniel Boone or even Native American subsistence life style. That was easy compared with what will be needed in a few decades.

i agree.

 

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
25 Replies
6922 Views
Last post June 09, 2012, 11:00:49 AM
by RE
0 Replies
1526 Views
Last post January 23, 2015, 01:05:22 AM
by Guest Blogger
0 Replies
1674 Views
Last post August 13, 2015, 02:13:27 AM
by RE