AuthorTopic: The Official Refugee Thread  (Read 125884 times)

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🚢 Trump warns caravan of immigrants heading to US
« Reply #810 on: October 19, 2018, 04:18:42 AM »
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🚢 Thousands of migrants stuck as caravan halted on Mexico's southern border
« Reply #811 on: October 20, 2018, 07:10:24 AM »
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/thousands-of-migrants-stuck-as-caravan-halted-on-mexicos-southern-border-2018-10-20/

CBS/AP October 20, 2018, 8:51 AM
Thousands of migrants stuck as caravan halted on Mexico's southern border


This frame grab from video shows migrants bound for the U.S.-Mexico border waiting on a bridge that stretches over the Suchiate River, connecting Guatemala and Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala, Friday, Oct. 19, 2018.
Televisa via AP

TECUN UMAN, Guatemala -- A standoff between thousands of Central American migrants trying to reach the United States and Mexican police stretched through the night at Mexico's southern border, with some migrants hanging from the closed border gate wailing "there are children here." Others slept on a crowded bridge linking Guatemala to Mexico.

As of early Saturday, thousands were stuck on Mexico's southern border after a failed attempt to enter the country, BBC News reported.

Members of the migrant caravan, comprised of more than 3,000 migrants, had earlier burst through a Guatemalan border fence and rushed onto the bridge over the Suchiate River. Men and women, some with young children and babies drenched in sweat, began storming and climbing the barrier — tearing it down. They defied Mexican authorities' entreaties for an orderly crossing and U.S. President Donald Trump's threats of retaliation.

But they were met Friday by a wall of police with riot shields on the Mexican side of the bridge. About 50 managed to push their way through before officers unleashed pepper spray and the rest retreated, joining the sea of humanity on the bridge.

Police and immigration agents began letting small groups of 10, 20 or 30 people through the gates if they wanted to apply for refugee status. Once they file a claim, they can go to a shelter to spend the night.

Some migrants, tired of waiting, jumped off the bridge into the Suchiate River on Friday. They risked drowning over defeat. When asked why he wanted to jump, one 16-year-old said, "there are no jobs here."

As night fell on the bridge, the migrants' frustration turned to despair as women clutching small children took up the rows in front of the gate pleading with the Mexican federal police. Some migrants yelled "We are hungry!" Others set up tarps to prepare for the night sleeping on the increasingly dirty and befouled bridge.

"Please, it is night. Let us pass," Alba Luz Giron Ramirez, a former shop employee and mother of three, pleaded to the officers.

Giron said they had come from San Pedro Sula, Honduras, and that gangs had killed her brother and threatened her.

"We want them to give us permission to go to Mexico," her 5-year-old son Ramon said in a child's voice. "We wouldn't stay."

Alison Danisa wept as she knelt in the garbage already piling up on the bridge, clutching her naked 11-month-old infant to her breast.

"We have suffered so much. She has a fever and we brought nothing," she said, showing the baby's bare bottom to indicate they had no diapers.

APTOPIX Central America Migrant Caravan

A Mexican marine official with a loudspeaker approached the gate and told migrants they would be taken in trucks to "a humanitarian attention center" in Tapachula, a border city in the Mexican state of Chiapas. But the official did not say when this would happen.

Migrants have banded together to travel en masse regularly in recent years, but this caravan was unusual for its huge size, said Victor Clark Alfaro, a Latin American studies professor at San Diego State University. By comparison, a caravan in April that also attracted Trump's ire numbered about 1,000.

"It grabs one's attention that the number of people in these kinds of caravans is on the rise," Clark Alfaro said. "It is migration of a different dimension."

Elizabeth Oglesby, a professor at the University of Arizona's Center for Latin American Studies, said people join caravans like this because it's a way to make the journey in a relatively safe manner and avoid having to pay thousands of dollars to smugglers.

Late Friday night, Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto said in an address to the nation that a large group of migrants had "tried to enter Mexican territory irregularly, attacking and even hurting some elements of the Federal Police."

"Mexico does not permit and will not permit entry into its territory in an irregular fashion, much less in a violent fashion," he said.


A police officer helps a Honduran migrant, part of a caravan trying to reach the U.S., as she storms a border checkpoint to cross into Mexico, in Ciudad Hidalgo

A police officer helps a Honduran migrant, part of a caravan trying to reach the U.S., as she storms a border checkpoint to cross into Mexico, in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico October 19, 2018.
EDGARD GARRIDO/REUTERS

Mexican officials said those with passports and valid visas -- only a tiny minority of those trying to cross -- would be let in immediately. Migrants who want to apply for refuge in Mexico were welcome to do so, they said, but any who decide to cross illegally and are caught will be detained and deported.   

Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez tweeted late Friday that he spoke with his Guatemalan counterpart, Jimmy Morales, and asked permission to send Honduran civil protection personnel to the bridge to help the migrants. "I also asked authorization to hire ground transportation for anyone who wants to return and an air bridge for special cases of women, children, the elderly and the sick," Hernandez tweeted.

Hernandez and Morales are expected to meet in Guatemala early Saturday to discuss the situation.

The U.S. president, meanwhile, has made it clear to Mexico that he is monitoring its response. On Thursday he threatened to close the U.S. border if Mexico didn't stop the caravan. Later that day he tweeted a video of Mexican federal police deploying at the Guatemalan border and wrote: "Thank you Mexico, we look forward to working with you!"   


U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has called illegal migration a "crisis" and emphasized "the importance of stopping this flow before it reaches the U.S. border," while also acknowledging Mexico's right to handle the crisis in a sovereign fashion.

He also said, "We have to fix U.S. laws in order to handle this properly. This is an American burden and a uniquely American burden."

Oglesby, the professor at the University of Arizona's Center for Latin American Studies, disputed Pompeo's assertion that that there is a "crisis" of migration.

"The border is not in crisis. This is not a migration crisis. ... Yes, we are seeing some spikes in Central Americans crossing the border, but overall migration is at a 40-year low," Oglesby said.

© 2018 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
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https://www.cbsnews.com/news/migrant-caravan-re-forms-in-mexico-with-members-vowing-to-reach-u-s/

 CBS/AP October 21, 2018, 8:27 AM
Migrant caravan swells to 5,000 in Mexico, with members vowing to reach U.S.


A Central American migrant, part of a caravan trying to reach the U.S, is pictured after crossing the Suchiate river to avoid the border checkpoint in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, October 20, 2018.
EDGARD GARRIDO / REUTERS

Last Updated Oct 21, 2018 8:54 AM EDT

CIUDAD HIDALGO, Mexico — Despite Mexican efforts to stop them at the border, about 2,000 Central American migrants swam or rafted across a river separating that country from Guatemala, re-formed their mass caravan in Mexico and vowed to resume their journey toward the United States.

Their numbers swelled to about 5,000 overnight and at first light they set out walking toward the Mexican town of Tapachula, 10 abreast in a line stretching approximately a mile.

It was not immediately clear where the additional travelers had materialized from since about 2,000 gathered on the Mexican side Saturday night. They seemed likely to be people who had been waiting on the bridge over the Suchiate River or in the Guatemalan town of Tecun Uman and who decided to cross during the night.

At dawn there were still an estimated 1,500 migrants on the Guatemalan side hoping to enter legally.

They marched on through Mexico like a rag tag army of the poor, shouting triumphantly slogans like "Si se pudo!" or "Yes, we could!"

As they passed through Mexican villages on the outskirts of Ciudad Hidalgo, they drew applause, cheers and donations of food and clothing from Mexicans.

Maria Teresa Orellana, a resident of the neighborhood of Lorenzo handed out free sandals to the migrants as they passed. "It's solidarity," she said. "They're our brothers."

Olivin Castellanos, 58, a truck driver and mason from Villanueva, Honduras, said he took a raft across the river after Mexico blocked the bridge. "No one will stop us, only God," he said. "We knocked down the door and we continue walking." He wants to reach the U.S. to work. "I can do this," he said, pointing to the asphalt under his feet. "I've made highways."

The migrants, who said they gave up trying to enter Mexico legally because the asylum application process was too slow, gathered Saturday at a park in the border city of Ciudad Hidalgo. They voted by a show of hands to continue north en masse, then marched to the bridge crossing the Suchiate River and urged those still on it to come join them.

The decision to re-form the migrant caravan capped a day in which Mexican authorities again refused mass entry to migrants on the bridge, instead accepting small groups for asylum processing and giving out 45-day visitor permits to some. Authorities handed out numbers for people to be processed in a strategy seen before at U.S. border posts when dealing with large numbers of migrants.

But many became impatient and circumventing the border gate, crossing the river on rafts, by swimming or by wading in full view of the hundreds of Mexican police manning the blockade on the bridge. Some paid locals the equivalent of $1.25 to ferry them across the muddy waters. They were not detained on reaching the Mexican bank.


Central American migrants, part of a caravan trying to reach the U.S., cross the Suchiate River to avoid the border checkpoint in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, October 20, 2018.
EDGARD GARRIDO / REUTERS

Sairy Bueso, a 24-year old Honduran mother of two, was another migrant who abandoned the bridge and crossed into Mexico via the river. She clutched her 2-year-old daughter Dayani, who had recently had a heart operation, as she got off a raft.

"The girl suffered greatly because of all the people crowded" on the bridge, Bueso said. "There are risks that we must take for the good of our children."

In addition to those who crossed the river, immigration agents processed migrants in small groups and then bused them to an open-air, metal-roof fairground in Tapachula, where the Red Cross set up small blue tents on the concrete floor.

Mexico's Interior Department said it had received 640 refugee requests by Hondurans at the border crossing. It released photos of migrants getting off buses at a shelter and receiving food and medical attention.

At least half a dozen migrants fainted in the crush.

Some tore open a fence on the Guatemala side of the bridge and threw two young children, perhaps age 6 or 7, and their mother into the muddy waters about 40 feet below. They were rafted to safety in on the Mexican bank.

Mexican workers handed food and bottled water to the migrants on the bridge. Through the bars, a doctor gave medical attention to a woman who feared her young son was running a fever.

Sustenance also came from Guatemalan locals — for Carlos Martinez, a 24-year-old from Santa Barbara, Honduras, the plate of chicken with rice was the first bite to eat he'd had all day.

"It is a blessing that they have given us food," Martinez said. "It gives me courage to keep waiting, as long as I can."

Migrants cited widespread poverty and gang violence in Honduras, one of the world's deadliest nations by homicide rate, as their reasons for joining the caravan.

Juan Carlos Mercado, 20, from Santa Barbara, Honduras, says corruption and a lack of jobs in Honduras has stymied him. "We just want to move ahead with our lives," he said Sunday. He said he'd do any kind of work.

The caravan elicited a series of angry tweets and warnings from President Trump early in the week, but Mexico's initial handling of the migrants at its southern border seemed to have satisfied him more recently.

"So as of this moment, I thank Mexico," Mr. Trump said Friday at an event in Scottsdale, Arizona. "I hope they continue. But as of this moment, I thank Mexico. If that doesn't work out, we're calling up the military — not the Guard."

"They're not coming into this country," Mr. Trump added.

"The Mexican Government is fully engaged in finding a solution that encourages safe, secure, and orderly migration," State Department Spokeswoman Heather Nauert said Saturday, "and both the United States and Mexico continue to work with Central American governments to address the economic, security, and governance drivers of illegal immigration."

After an emergency meeting in Guatemala, presidents Hernandez of Honduras and Jimmy Morales of Guatemala said an estimated 5,400 migrants had entered Guatemala since the caravan was announced a week ago, and about 2,000 Hondurans have returned voluntarily.

Morales said a Honduran migrant died in the town of Villa Nueva, 20 miles from Guatemala City, when he fell from a truck.
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Re: 🚢 Migrant caravan caught being paid - B@@M
« Reply #813 on: October 21, 2018, 09:30:18 AM »
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/migrant-caravan-re-forms-in-mexico-with-members-vowing-to-reach-u-s/

 CBS/AP October 21, 2018, 8:27 AM
Migrant caravan swells to 5,000 in Mexico, with members vowing to reach U.S.


A Central American migrant, part of a caravan trying to reach the U.S, is pictured after crossing the Suchiate river to avoid the border checkpoint in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, October 20, 2018.
EDGARD GARRIDO / REUTERS

Last Updated Oct 21, 2018 8:54 AM EDT

CIUDAD HIDALGO, Mexico — Despite Mexican efforts to stop them at the border, about 2,000 Central American migrants swam or rafted across a river separating that country from Guatemala, re-formed their mass caravan in Mexico and vowed to resume their journey toward the United States.

Their numbers swelled to about 5,000 overnight and at first light they set out walking toward the Mexican town of Tapachula, 10 abreast in a line stretching approximately a mile.

It was not immediately clear where the additional travelers had materialized from since about 2,000 gathered on the Mexican side Saturday night. They seemed likely to be people who had been waiting on the bridge over the Suchiate River or in the Guatemalan town of Tecun Uman and who decided to cross during the night.

At dawn there were still an estimated 1,500 migrants on the Guatemalan side hoping to enter legally.

They marched on through Mexico like a rag tag army of the poor, shouting triumphantly slogans like "Si se pudo!" or "Yes, we could!"

As they passed through Mexican villages on the outskirts of Ciudad Hidalgo, they drew applause, cheers and donations of food and clothing from Mexicans.

Maria Teresa Orellana, a resident of the neighborhood of Lorenzo handed out free sandals to the migrants as they passed. "It's solidarity," she said. "They're our brothers."

Olivin Castellanos, 58, a truck driver and mason from Villanueva, Honduras, said he took a raft across the river after Mexico blocked the bridge. "No one will stop us, only God," he said. "We knocked down the door and we continue walking." He wants to reach the U.S. to work. "I can do this," he said, pointing to the asphalt under his feet. "I've made highways."

The migrants, who said they gave up trying to enter Mexico legally because the asylum application process was too slow, gathered Saturday at a park in the border city of Ciudad Hidalgo. They voted by a show of hands to continue north en masse, then marched to the bridge crossing the Suchiate River and urged those still on it to come join them.

The decision to re-form the migrant caravan capped a day in which Mexican authorities again refused mass entry to migrants on the bridge, instead accepting small groups for asylum processing and giving out 45-day visitor permits to some. Authorities handed out numbers for people to be processed in a strategy seen before at U.S. border posts when dealing with large numbers of migrants.

But many became impatient and circumventing the border gate, crossing the river on rafts, by swimming or by wading in full view of the hundreds of Mexican police manning the blockade on the bridge. Some paid locals the equivalent of $1.25 to ferry them across the muddy waters. They were not detained on reaching the Mexican bank.


Central American migrants, part of a caravan trying to reach the U.S., cross the Suchiate River to avoid the border checkpoint in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, October 20, 2018.
EDGARD GARRIDO / REUTERS

Sairy Bueso, a 24-year old Honduran mother of two, was another migrant who abandoned the bridge and crossed into Mexico via the river. She clutched her 2-year-old daughter Dayani, who had recently had a heart operation, as she got off a raft.

"The girl suffered greatly because of all the people crowded" on the bridge, Bueso said. "There are risks that we must take for the good of our children."

In addition to those who crossed the river, immigration agents processed migrants in small groups and then bused them to an open-air, metal-roof fairground in Tapachula, where the Red Cross set up small blue tents on the concrete floor.

Mexico's Interior Department said it had received 640 refugee requests by Hondurans at the border crossing. It released photos of migrants getting off buses at a shelter and receiving food and medical attention.

At least half a dozen migrants fainted in the crush.

Some tore open a fence on the Guatemala side of the bridge and threw two young children, perhaps age 6 or 7, and their mother into the muddy waters about 40 feet below. They were rafted to safety in on the Mexican bank.

Mexican workers handed food and bottled water to the migrants on the bridge. Through the bars, a doctor gave medical attention to a woman who feared her young son was running a fever.

Sustenance also came from Guatemalan locals — for Carlos Martinez, a 24-year-old from Santa Barbara, Honduras, the plate of chicken with rice was the first bite to eat he'd had all day.

"It is a blessing that they have given us food," Martinez said. "It gives me courage to keep waiting, as long as I can."

Migrants cited widespread poverty and gang violence in Honduras, one of the world's deadliest nations by homicide rate, as their reasons for joining the caravan.

Juan Carlos Mercado, 20, from Santa Barbara, Honduras, says corruption and a lack of jobs in Honduras has stymied him. "We just want to move ahead with our lives," he said Sunday. He said he'd do any kind of work.

The caravan elicited a series of angry tweets and warnings from President Trump early in the week, but Mexico's initial handling of the migrants at its southern border seemed to have satisfied him more recently.

"So as of this moment, I thank Mexico," Mr. Trump said Friday at an event in Scottsdale, Arizona. "I hope they continue. But as of this moment, I thank Mexico. If that doesn't work out, we're calling up the military — not the Guard."

"They're not coming into this country," Mr. Trump added.

"The Mexican Government is fully engaged in finding a solution that encourages safe, secure, and orderly migration," State Department Spokeswoman Heather Nauert said Saturday, "and both the United States and Mexico continue to work with Central American governments to address the economic, security, and governance drivers of illegal immigration."

After an emergency meeting in Guatemala, presidents Hernandez of Honduras and Jimmy Morales of Guatemala said an estimated 5,400 migrants had entered Guatemala since the caravan was announced a week ago, and about 2,000 Hondurans have returned voluntarily.

Morales said a Honduran migrant died in the town of Villa Nueva, 20 miles from Guatemala City, when he fell from a truck.


Jump to the 1:45 mark of the vid to see the handouts in action.
Most likely Soros dinero's
That a boy Geo. You da' man with the mailbox money  :evil4:


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/L6lOnmGXNP0&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/L6lOnmGXNP0&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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https://www.cbsnews.com/news/migrant-caravan-re-forms-in-mexico-with-members-vowing-to-reach-u-s/

 CBS/AP October 21, 2018, 8:27 AM
Migrant caravan swells to 5,000 in Mexico, with members vowing to reach U.S.


A Central American migrant, part of a caravan trying to reach the U.S, is pictured after crossing the Suchiate river to avoid the border checkpoint in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, October 20, 2018.
EDGARD GARRIDO / REUTERS

Last Updated Oct 21, 2018 8:54 AM EDT

CIUDAD HIDALGO, Mexico — Despite Mexican efforts to stop them at the border, about 2,000 Central American migrants swam or rafted across a river separating that country from Guatemala, re-formed their mass caravan in Mexico and vowed to resume their journey toward the United States.

Their numbers swelled to about 5,000 overnight and at first light they set out walking toward the Mexican town of Tapachula, 10 abreast in a line stretching approximately a mile.

It was not immediately clear where the additional travelers had materialized from since about 2,000 gathered on the Mexican side Saturday night. They seemed likely to be people who had been waiting on the bridge over the Suchiate River or in the Guatemalan town of Tecun Uman and who decided to cross during the night.

At dawn there were still an estimated 1,500 migrants on the Guatemalan side hoping to enter legally.

They marched on through Mexico like a rag tag army of the poor, shouting triumphantly slogans like "Si se pudo!" or "Yes, we could!"

As they passed through Mexican villages on the outskirts of Ciudad Hidalgo, they drew applause, cheers and donations of food and clothing from Mexicans.

Maria Teresa Orellana, a resident of the neighborhood of Lorenzo handed out free sandals to the migrants as they passed. "It's solidarity," she said. "They're our brothers."

Olivin Castellanos, 58, a truck driver and mason from Villanueva, Honduras, said he took a raft across the river after Mexico blocked the bridge. "No one will stop us, only God," he said. "We knocked down the door and we continue walking." He wants to reach the U.S. to work. "I can do this," he said, pointing to the asphalt under his feet. "I've made highways."

The migrants, who said they gave up trying to enter Mexico legally because the asylum application process was too slow, gathered Saturday at a park in the border city of Ciudad Hidalgo. They voted by a show of hands to continue north en masse, then marched to the bridge crossing the Suchiate River and urged those still on it to come join them.

The decision to re-form the migrant caravan capped a day in which Mexican authorities again refused mass entry to migrants on the bridge, instead accepting small groups for asylum processing and giving out 45-day visitor permits to some. Authorities handed out numbers for people to be processed in a strategy seen before at U.S. border posts when dealing with large numbers of migrants.

But many became impatient and circumventing the border gate, crossing the river on rafts, by swimming or by wading in full view of the hundreds of Mexican police manning the blockade on the bridge. Some paid locals the equivalent of $1.25 to ferry them across the muddy waters. They were not detained on reaching the Mexican bank.


Central American migrants, part of a caravan trying to reach the U.S., cross the Suchiate River to avoid the border checkpoint in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, October 20, 2018.
EDGARD GARRIDO / REUTERS

Sairy Bueso, a 24-year old Honduran mother of two, was another migrant who abandoned the bridge and crossed into Mexico via the river. She clutched her 2-year-old daughter Dayani, who had recently had a heart operation, as she got off a raft.

"The girl suffered greatly because of all the people crowded" on the bridge, Bueso said. "There are risks that we must take for the good of our children."

In addition to those who crossed the river, immigration agents processed migrants in small groups and then bused them to an open-air, metal-roof fairground in Tapachula, where the Red Cross set up small blue tents on the concrete floor.

Mexico's Interior Department said it had received 640 refugee requests by Hondurans at the border crossing. It released photos of migrants getting off buses at a shelter and receiving food and medical attention.

At least half a dozen migrants fainted in the crush.

Some tore open a fence on the Guatemala side of the bridge and threw two young children, perhaps age 6 or 7, and their mother into the muddy waters about 40 feet below. They were rafted to safety in on the Mexican bank.

Mexican workers handed food and bottled water to the migrants on the bridge. Through the bars, a doctor gave medical attention to a woman who feared her young son was running a fever.

Sustenance also came from Guatemalan locals — for Carlos Martinez, a 24-year-old from Santa Barbara, Honduras, the plate of chicken with rice was the first bite to eat he'd had all day.

"It is a blessing that they have given us food," Martinez said. "It gives me courage to keep waiting, as long as I can."

Migrants cited widespread poverty and gang violence in Honduras, one of the world's deadliest nations by homicide rate, as their reasons for joining the caravan.

Juan Carlos Mercado, 20, from Santa Barbara, Honduras, says corruption and a lack of jobs in Honduras has stymied him. "We just want to move ahead with our lives," he said Sunday. He said he'd do any kind of work.

The caravan elicited a series of angry tweets and warnings from President Trump early in the week, but Mexico's initial handling of the migrants at its southern border seemed to have satisfied him more recently.

"So as of this moment, I thank Mexico," Mr. Trump said Friday at an event in Scottsdale, Arizona. "I hope they continue. But as of this moment, I thank Mexico. If that doesn't work out, we're calling up the military — not the Guard."

"They're not coming into this country," Mr. Trump added.

"The Mexican Government is fully engaged in finding a solution that encourages safe, secure, and orderly migration," State Department Spokeswoman Heather Nauert said Saturday, "and both the United States and Mexico continue to work with Central American governments to address the economic, security, and governance drivers of illegal immigration."

After an emergency meeting in Guatemala, presidents Hernandez of Honduras and Jimmy Morales of Guatemala said an estimated 5,400 migrants had entered Guatemala since the caravan was announced a week ago, and about 2,000 Hondurans have returned voluntarily.

Morales said a Honduran migrant died in the town of Villa Nueva, 20 miles from Guatemala City, when he fell from a truck.

Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales announced last week that his country has apprehended and deported nearly 100 ISIS-linked operatives. His claim comes as a caravan of Honduran migrants that has grown to 4,000 strong moves through the country en route to the U.S.



https://www.theblaze.com/news/2018/10/19/guatemala-claims-it-has-caught-100-isis-terrorists-as-migrant-caravan-reaches-mexican-border?utm_content=buffer10b8e&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=theblaze
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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🚢 Here’s What Happens When The Migrant Caravan Gets To The U.S. Border
« Reply #815 on: October 25, 2018, 06:50:53 AM »
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/what-happens-migrant-caravan-reaches-us_us_5bd104f2e4b0a8f17ef3d827

 POLITICS 10/24/2018 09:33 pm ET Updated 8 hours ago
Here’s What Happens When The Migrant Caravan Gets To The U.S. Border
As the Central American immigrants proceed through Mexico, Donald Trump remains left with limited options.
By Elise Foley and Roque Planas


A migrant woman rests roadside with her child while traveling with a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the U.S.

As a widely publicized caravan of thousands of migrants makes its way through Mexico toward the United States and sets off a new round of fury from the White House, President Donald Trump has threatened to use the military if necessary to repel them.

But the reality is that for now, Trump can do little more than complain.

Most of the ideas Trump has floated in response to the caravan seem unlikely to flourish as U.S. policy. He’s vowed to cut off aid to Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala, where most of the travelers are from. But that would require congressional approval and runs the risk of exacerbating the regional instability that caused many to leave in the first place. He’s threatened to shut down the U.S.-Mexico border, but that would be disastrous for trade and for the roughly 500,000 people who legally cross into the U.S. every day for work, school, shopping and tourism.

Trump already tried sending the military to the southern border earlier this year, when he deployed the National Guard. But they can’t actually detain immigrants. If the move was meant as a show of force to scare away would-be migrants, it didn’t work. Unauthorized crossings are up slightly this year compared to last and the number of families crossing together as a unit hit a monthly record in September of more than 16,500 people.

For the moment, Trump is doing what he does best: Spreading alarm, demonizing immigrants and lashing out at Democrats. But once the migrants arrive, U.S. officials will have little choice but to let many of them in.
What’s next

The caravan is largely made up of Hondurans, Salvadorans and Guatemalans and includes both asylum-seekers and people traveling north for economic reasons, according to the United Nations’ refugee agency. There’s no evidence supporting the president’s claim that people from the Middle East are part of the caravan, as he acknowledged Tuesday.

Not everyone will try to get to the U.S.; some may stay in Mexico, while others may decide go back to their home countries or get deported from Mexico, as happened with past caravans. That’s the Trump administration’s clear preference. Officials have repeatedly called for legitimate asylum-seekers from Central America to stay in Mexico rather than continuing on to the U.S., in spite of potential dangers they could face in the neighboring country.

The Mexican government has registered about 1,700 asylum claims, mostly from women and minors. Nearly 500 Hondurans with the group already returned to their countries of origin, according to the Mexican government.

It’s not clear where those traveling to the U.S. are headed. The most direct route would land them in southern Texas, the area of the border that currently sees the most unauthorized crossings. But those traveling with the caravan have yet to announce their intentions and some speculate they might head toward California, like last year’s caravan, according to The Guardian.
Getting into the U.S.

For those who do try to make it to the U.S., their first option would be to go to a port of entry on the border to seek asylum ― a method that doesn’t involve crossing the border illegally. Trump administration officials have encouraged asylum-seekers to do just that, while simultaneously making it harder.

The administration has increasingly used what it calls “metering” to limit the number of asylum-seekers it processes each day, sometimes with the cooperation of Mexican officials who block people from crossing over to ports of entry, according to human rights groups and attorneys.

U.S. officials claim it’s an issue of space ― they don’t have the capacity or time to admit the large number of people asking for help. Facilities weren’t designed to handle thousands of people per day, a senior administration official said Monday, adding that “lines are probably going to remain” at ports of entry.

 The Department of Homeland Security declined to comment Wednesday on its plans for handling a potential increase in asylum-seekers at the border.

Some activists suspect it’s an intentional effort to keep asylum-seekers out, either by inflating capacity constraints or creating them by failing to invest in processing or quickly releasing people. Whatever the case, some suspect the added layer of bureaucracy at the border might encourage people to find another way in.
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“This administration is really playing up metering,” Sarah Pierce, an analyst with the nonpartisan Migration Policy Institute, told HuffPost. “But the main thing about metering is that it incentivizes people to cross illegally.” 

Those who cross illegally are still allowed to ask for asylum under U.S. law, though those that do so risk facing criminal prosecution for jumping the border, along with fighting their case in immigration court. That’s especially true for single adults, who remain subject to Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ “zero tolerance” policy of prosecuting as many petty border-crossing infractions as possible. The families traveling with the caravan, however, pose a more complicated problem. 
How to handle families?

Once migrant families crossing with the caravan wind up in U.S. custody, the Trump administration will face a choice: Either it can continue the current policy of releasing the vast majority of new arrivals after arrest or brief periods of detention, or it can experiment with a new form of the controversial family separation policy it tried earlier this year.

Currently, families are typically either released with notices to appear in court or detained for up to about 20 days. The government then releases families because a court order enforcing a 1997 federal settlement called the Flores Agreement prevents locking up children for longer than that. The administration wants to change that through proposed regulations that would let it lock up kids with their parents long-term, but the rule change has yet to take effect and will likely face an immediate legal challenge.

Even if the Trump administration could hold families longer, it might not have the capacity to do so. As of earlier this month, the largest of the three family detention centers, South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, was near its 2,400-bed capacity. The second-largest, also in Texas, has more space, but currently is holding only adult males and their sons.

Trump has long railed against the practice of letting families out of detention ― a practice critics like him deride as “catch-and-release.” The White House is reportedly already considering what officials call a “binary choice” for parents to either waive their children’s right to release or have them ripped away so the adults remain in detention without them.

Outside experts argue the government should be more focused on how to handle the number of asylum-seekers ― especially families with children ― rather than trying to scare them from coming. That would mean more investment in processing and adjudicating claims rather than policies meant to scare people from coming that might not work if they’re already scared at home.

“This is desperation,” said Theresa Cardinal Brown, director of immigration at the Washington-based Bipartisan Policy Center think tank. “It’s really hard to deter desperate people.”
Getting asylum

Caravan members who seek relief in the U.S., whether at a port of entry or after crossing the border illegally, face a long and difficult path to actually getting approval to remain in the country.

Immigrants are first screened by asylum officers to determine whether they have “credible fear” of returning to their home country and thus can pursue asylum claims here. Around a quarter of applicants fail to pass that stage, making deportation the most likely outcome.

The roughly 75 percent of applicants who pass the credible fear stage are allowed to continue to pursue asylum claims through the courts, often outside of detention. This can take years ― something the Trump administration opposes, because the immigrants live in the U.S. while they wait.

Ultimately, the bids for asylum often don’t work, particularly under new, narrowed guidelines on who can receive that status and the history of low asylum approval rates for immigrants from Central America.

The administration may not be able to turn asylum-seekers and families away as quickly as it would like to. But it still will get the chance to deport many of them.
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Re: 🚢 Here’s What Happens When The Migrant Caravan Gets To The U.S. Border
« Reply #816 on: October 25, 2018, 10:36:01 AM »
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/what-happens-migrant-caravan-reaches-us_us_5bd104f2e4b0a8f17ef3d827

 POLITICS 10/24/2018 09:33 pm ET Updated 8 hours ago
Here’s What Happens When The Migrant Caravan Gets To The U.S. Border
As the Central American immigrants proceed through Mexico, Donald Trump remains left with limited options.
By Elise Foley and Roque Planas


A migrant woman rests roadside with her child while traveling with a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the U.S.

As a widely publicized caravan of thousands of migrants makes its way through Mexico toward the United States and sets off a new round of fury from the White House, President Donald Trump has threatened to use the military if necessary to repel them.

But the reality is that for now, Trump can do little more than complain.

Most of the ideas Trump has floated in response to the caravan seem unlikely to flourish as U.S. policy. He’s vowed to cut off aid to Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala, where most of the travelers are from. But that would require congressional approval and runs the risk of exacerbating the regional instability that caused many to leave in the first place. He’s threatened to shut down the U.S.-Mexico border, but that would be disastrous for trade and for the roughly 500,000 people who legally cross into the U.S. every day for work, school, shopping and tourism.

Trump already tried sending the military to the southern border earlier this year, when he deployed the National Guard. But they can’t actually detain immigrants. If the move was meant as a show of force to scare away would-be migrants, it didn’t work. Unauthorized crossings are up slightly this year compared to last and the number of families crossing together as a unit hit a monthly record in September of more than 16,500 people.

For the moment, Trump is doing what he does best: Spreading alarm, demonizing immigrants and lashing out at Democrats. But once the migrants arrive, U.S. officials will have little choice but to let many of them in.
What’s next

The caravan is largely made up of Hondurans, Salvadorans and Guatemalans and includes both asylum-seekers and people traveling north for economic reasons, according to the United Nations’ refugee agency. There’s no evidence supporting the president’s claim that people from the Middle East are part of the caravan, as he acknowledged Tuesday.

Not everyone will try to get to the U.S.; some may stay in Mexico, while others may decide go back to their home countries or get deported from Mexico, as happened with past caravans. That’s the Trump administration’s clear preference. Officials have repeatedly called for legitimate asylum-seekers from Central America to stay in Mexico rather than continuing on to the U.S., in spite of potential dangers they could face in the neighboring country.

The Mexican government has registered about 1,700 asylum claims, mostly from women and minors. Nearly 500 Hondurans with the group already returned to their countries of origin, according to the Mexican government.

It’s not clear where those traveling to the U.S. are headed. The most direct route would land them in southern Texas, the area of the border that currently sees the most unauthorized crossings. But those traveling with the caravan have yet to announce their intentions and some speculate they might head toward California, like last year’s caravan, according to The Guardian.
Getting into the U.S.

For those who do try to make it to the U.S., their first option would be to go to a port of entry on the border to seek asylum ― a method that doesn’t involve crossing the border illegally. Trump administration officials have encouraged asylum-seekers to do just that, while simultaneously making it harder.

The administration has increasingly used what it calls “metering” to limit the number of asylum-seekers it processes each day, sometimes with the cooperation of Mexican officials who block people from crossing over to ports of entry, according to human rights groups and attorneys.

U.S. officials claim it’s an issue of space ― they don’t have the capacity or time to admit the large number of people asking for help. Facilities weren’t designed to handle thousands of people per day, a senior administration official said Monday, adding that “lines are probably going to remain” at ports of entry.

 The Department of Homeland Security declined to comment Wednesday on its plans for handling a potential increase in asylum-seekers at the border.

Some activists suspect it’s an intentional effort to keep asylum-seekers out, either by inflating capacity constraints or creating them by failing to invest in processing or quickly releasing people. Whatever the case, some suspect the added layer of bureaucracy at the border might encourage people to find another way in.
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“This administration is really playing up metering,” Sarah Pierce, an analyst with the nonpartisan Migration Policy Institute, told HuffPost. “But the main thing about metering is that it incentivizes people to cross illegally.” 

Those who cross illegally are still allowed to ask for asylum under U.S. law, though those that do so risk facing criminal prosecution for jumping the border, along with fighting their case in immigration court. That’s especially true for single adults, who remain subject to Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ “zero tolerance” policy of prosecuting as many petty border-crossing infractions as possible. The families traveling with the caravan, however, pose a more complicated problem. 
How to handle families?

Once migrant families crossing with the caravan wind up in U.S. custody, the Trump administration will face a choice: Either it can continue the current policy of releasing the vast majority of new arrivals after arrest or brief periods of detention, or it can experiment with a new form of the controversial family separation policy it tried earlier this year.

Currently, families are typically either released with notices to appear in court or detained for up to about 20 days. The government then releases families because a court order enforcing a 1997 federal settlement called the Flores Agreement prevents locking up children for longer than that. The administration wants to change that through proposed regulations that would let it lock up kids with their parents long-term, but the rule change has yet to take effect and will likely face an immediate legal challenge.

Even if the Trump administration could hold families longer, it might not have the capacity to do so. As of earlier this month, the largest of the three family detention centers, South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, was near its 2,400-bed capacity. The second-largest, also in Texas, has more space, but currently is holding only adult males and their sons.

Trump has long railed against the practice of letting families out of detention ― a practice critics like him deride as “catch-and-release.” The White House is reportedly already considering what officials call a “binary choice” for parents to either waive their children’s right to release or have them ripped away so the adults remain in detention without them.

Outside experts argue the government should be more focused on how to handle the number of asylum-seekers ― especially families with children ― rather than trying to scare them from coming. That would mean more investment in processing and adjudicating claims rather than policies meant to scare people from coming that might not work if they’re already scared at home.

“This is desperation,” said Theresa Cardinal Brown, director of immigration at the Washington-based Bipartisan Policy Center think tank. “It’s really hard to deter desperate people.”
Getting asylum

Caravan members who seek relief in the U.S., whether at a port of entry or after crossing the border illegally, face a long and difficult path to actually getting approval to remain in the country.

Immigrants are first screened by asylum officers to determine whether they have “credible fear” of returning to their home country and thus can pursue asylum claims here. Around a quarter of applicants fail to pass that stage, making deportation the most likely outcome.

The roughly 75 percent of applicants who pass the credible fear stage are allowed to continue to pursue asylum claims through the courts, often outside of detention. This can take years ― something the Trump administration opposes, because the immigrants live in the U.S. while they wait.

Ultimately, the bids for asylum often don’t work, particularly under new, narrowed guidelines on who can receive that status and the history of low asylum approval rates for immigrants from Central America.

The administration may not be able to turn asylum-seekers and families away as quickly as it would like to. But it still will get the chance to deport many of them.

I don't know the future, but my guess is that this piece is completely wrong in its assumptions. I think Trump can and will close the border. He can do it legally, at least for a short time, and it would be a huge win for him with his neo-fascist base. A tremendous victory for Trumpism, unfortunately. He has a lot to gain by it politically, and he doesn't give a flying shit about anything else at all, like the inevitable blowback and trade stoppage. I'd be surprised if he doesn't.
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https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/central-america-migration-demographics_us_5bd9cf85e4b0da7bfc162ce4

 POLITICS 10/31/2018 02:55 pm ET Updated 7 hours ago
There Aren’t Enough People In Central America For A ‘National Emergency’ On The Border
The numbers just don’t add up.

By Roque Planas

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/-rpIUneJTrU" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/-rpIUneJTrU</a>

President Donald Trump has ordered 5,200 troops to the U.S.-Mexico border to repel what he calls an “invasion.” But the ongoing rush of Central American migration is significantly smaller than earlier surges. And like the previous wave of migration from Mexico, it’s probably not going to last. There simply aren’t enough people in Central America.

“There’s just not much demographic potential for mass migration from Central America,” said Douglas Massey, who has spent the last three decades tracking migration as a co-founder of the Mexico Migration Project. “It is heading in the same direction as Mexico — toward an aging population with limited growth, only the base population is much smaller.”


People walk in a caravan of migrants departing from El Salvador en route to the United States, in San Salvador, El Salvador, Oct. 31, 2018.

By the numbers, there is nothing resembling a “national emergency” on the border, as Trump has called it. Border Patrol arrested fewer than 400,000 migrants last year. For comparison, that figure for the year 2000 was 1.6 million — back when Border Patrol had about half the number of agents it now employs. Arrest rates for the last eight years have hovered at similarly low levels not seen since the early 1970s.

The reason arrests are so low is that mass Mexican migration to the U.S. ended a decade ago and shows no sign of resuming. Despite Trump’s fury, he took office under conditions more favorable to immigration hard-liners than any president since Richard Nixon.
Mexican mass migration ended as the fertility rate dropped

Neither Border Patrol nor Immigration and Customs Enforcement can take as much credit for that as they might like. The U.S. financial crisis that began at the end of 2007 triggered the drop in unauthorized Mexican migration by reducing labor demand. But perhaps more importantly, the crisis hit as the Mexican baby-boom era was petering out. In 1970, the fertility rate in Mexico stood at nearly seven children per woman. Today, it’s around 2.2, according to the World Bank.

The birthrate matters, because most people who migrate to the United States without authorization do so before they turn 30. As Mexico’s population has aged, the number of migrants attempting to cross into the United States illegally has fallen.

The U.S. has seen large-scale migration from Central America for decades, largely as a result of mass violence created by Cold War-era civil wars and authoritarian regimes that the U.S. government played a key role in funding and manipulating.

The defining change for unauthorized crossings over the past few years is that the number of Central American families and unaccompanied children jumped by tens of thousands in 2014 and has remained high. This year marked a record for Border Patrol arrests of Central American families, the vast majority of which come from the so-called Northern Triangle countries of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras.

But Central America is headed down the same demographic path as Mexico. Together, the populations of those three countries total fewer than 31 million. That’s about a third of Mexico’s population in the year 2000, when border arrests peaked.

And those three countries have similarly low birthrates. Guatemala’s is the highest, at nearly three births per woman, according to the World Bank. For Honduras, that figure is 2.45 per woman, and for El Salvador it’s just under 2.1 — a figure barely touching the level that would replace the country’s population.

Mathematically speaking, that makes it all but impossible for the Northern Triangle to produce the high levels of sustained migration that the United States saw from Mexico for decades.
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“It’s hard to think that this is going to be a major stream for a long time,” Nestor Rodriguez, a sociologist at the University of Texas in Austin who researches Central American migration, told HuffPost. “The demographics are not there.” 
Immigration from El Salvador may have already peaked...

That phenomenon might already be underway in El Salvador. Border Patrol arrested more than 27,000 Salvadoran families in 2016, along with 17,500 unaccompanied children. This year, the number of families dropped by half, and the number of kids fell by nearly three-quarters.

    Despite Trump’s fury, he took office under conditions more favorable to immigration hard-liners than any president since Richard Nixon.

That trend might be partly explained by a decline in violence. El Salvador has one of the world’s highest homicide rates, which is one of the factors that prompted people to migrate to the United States in higher than normal numbers from 2014 to 2016. Over the last year, though, the homicide rate dropped.

But the underlying reality is that El Salvador is a tiny country with a fertility rate below replacement level, and it has already lost some 1.4 million migrants to the U.S. since 1970 — about a fifth of its total population.

“They’ve peaked,” Rodriguez said of El Salvador. “Unless there’s a huge rise in violence or civil war, we’re not going to see any major upsurge.”
...and Guatemala and Honduras could be next

The two other Northern Triangle countries have more capacity to sustain higher levels of migration for longer periods of time. Honduras has suffered ongoing political instability since a 2009 coup, along with high levels of violence and poverty. Guatemala has a larger population, a higher fertility rate and large numbers of indigenous farmers struggling with crop failures — a trend some experts believe is linked to climate change. 

But those countries still face the same constraints as El Salvador. They’re small. Their populations are aging. The number of migrants they send may rise or fall from one year to the next, but over the long term it will likely peak and decline. And it will probably happen for demographic reasons that U.S. policymakers don’t control.

Even if the uptick in Central American migration that began in 2014 continues for years on end — which it almost certainly won’t — these numbers remain small by historical standards.   

“What if they were allowed to stay?” Duke University political scientist Sarah Bermeo wrote in an opinion piece over the summer for the Durham Herald-Sun. “In 2016, the U.S. government detained 224,854 people from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras — less than one-tenth of 1 percent of the U.S. population. Even if the rate was maintained for a decade, it would still be a much smaller share of the U.S. population than previous waves of migrants such as Irish, Italians and Russian Jews.”
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🚢 Mexicans Storm Migrant Shelter in Tijuana, Shouting for ‘Pigs’ to Leave
« Reply #818 on: November 19, 2018, 03:04:22 AM »
https://www.thedailybeast.com/mexicans-storm-migrant-shelter-in-tijuana-shouting-for-pigs-to-leave

TRUMPY
Mexicans Storm Migrant Shelter in Tijuana, Shouting for ‘Pigs’ to Leave

A hundred demonstrators trying to confront migrants from Central America clashed with riot police, telling the newcomers they aren’t welcome here.


Jason McGahan
11.18.18 9:45 PM ET
[775260602JM009_Anti_Immigra]
John Moore/Getty

TIJUANA, Mexico—A crowd of demonstrators clashed with anti-riot police near an emergency shelter where thousands of migrants from Central America have taken refuge in recent days.

Waving Mexican flags and singing Mexico's national anthem, a bristling crowd of a hundred or more descended on a municipal sports complex the city government has converted to a shelter to accommodate the surge of migrants who arrived here as part of the famous caravan from the south.  Their ultimate destination is the United States where many plan to apply for asylum.

Young men in the crowd overturned concrete barriers set in the road for crowd control and threw plastic bottles and trash at a line of helmeted police with riot shields. Some got close and hurled insults and profanities at the police, calling them anti-patriotic for protecting the migrants, whom they variously referred to as drug addicts, thieves, gang members—even rapists and murderers. It’s the same rhetoric used by President Trump about the caravan during the run-up to the 2018 midterm elections.
[775260602JM003_Anti_Immigra]
775260602JM003_Anti_ImmigraTIJUANA, MEXICO - NOVEMBER 18: Mexican riot police block anti-immigrant protesters outside a temporary immigrant shelter on November 18, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. Several hundred demonstrators marched to the shelter near the U.S.-Mexico border, demanding that members of the migrant caravan leave the country. Immigrants have been arriving to the shelter after traveling thousands of miles from Central America.
John Moore/Getty

"You're unpatriotic to be protecting a bunch of drunks and meth-heads, stoners and drug addicts," one man shouted at officers. "Your mother should have taught you better."

For days, police have blocked all road access to the shelter and maintained a 24-hour security detail in the hardscrabble neighborhood where it is located, a short walk from the neon-lit bars and bordellos of the red light district. 
“They're not people in need. They've come here to destabilize the country.”
— Tijuana resident Cristina Gómez Sandoval

More than 3,000 migrants have arrived since Wednesday in this desert metropolis located across the border from San Diego, California. City officials say they expect the number to double in the coming days, a rate of new arrivals they say is without precedent.

Tijuana's mayor, José Manuel Gastélum, accused migrants in the caravan of being violent, crude, and “mariguanos” (“stoners”) and vowed to conduct an inquiry to decide if the city will continue to welcome them. Gastélum said the city may not have the resources to continue to shelter and support the caravan.

Related in World
A Central American migrant, part of a caravan trying to reach the U.S., gestures as he waits on the bridge that connects Mexico and Guatemala to cross into Mexico to continue his trip, in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico October 22, 2018.
Mexico Is Taunting Trump With the Migrant Caravan
Some Africans Have Joined the Caravan of Migrants
Trump’s Army Threats Fail to Stop Caravan

The tension started brewing on Wednesday night, when angry residents from a more affluent coastal area known as Playas de Tijuana confronted migrants who had gathered there to spend the night at a local park. A city official and several migrants present at the time said the confrontation began when men and women in the crowd attacked with stones; some of the migrants reacted aggressively.

In a video clip from the confrontation—seen widely in Tijuana via Facebook—a young man from Honduras threatens to "machine-gun" anti-migrant demonstrators in the crowd. 

Viral videos and memes on social media have fueled much of the sentiment against the migrants.

In another viral video, a Honduran woman complained to a news crew from Germany about a lunch of refried beans and flour tortillas migrants received at the shelter. "Look at it, it's all refried beans, the sort of thing they'd feed to pigs," she said.

Several protesters referred to the video as an indication the migrants were ungrateful. There was one sign in the crowd to the effect that Mexicans proudly eat their beans. Groups of protesters in the crowd chanted that Hondurans were "pigs."

Protesters decried the migrants in the caravan as "invaders" and "ingrates." Several said the migrants overran the border checkpoint in southern Mexico.

Cristina Gómez Sandoval said she attended the protest out of concern for the threat she feels migrants in the caravan pose to public safety in Tijuana. Gómez, 40, an employee of a public relations firm, attended the protest with her 11 year-old son, Yolotl. 

"They're not people in need," she said. "They've come here to destabilize the country."

Yolotl joined in, saying, “Get them out of the city so they don't cause harm."

Several motorists who drove past the protest honked their car horns in approval. One woman leaned out the window of a passing car and shouted that protesters were culeros ("assholes").

A young woman who waded into the thick of the crowd and loudly proclaimed her support for the migrants was ejected by pushing from anti-migrant demonstrators.

Later, in addressing a crush of reporters, she pointed to a tattoo on her arm that said "Pueblo unido," and said that she had acted in accordance with that sentiment.

"The people in that crowd share the political ideology of Donald Trump," she said.

Some 80 percent of the migrants who have arrived to Tijuana this week hail from Honduras, according to a city official who oversees data from the shelter's registry. Other migrants in the group are from Guatemala, Nicaragua, and El Salvador.

They have come to Tijuana after fleeing violence in their home countries and say they intend to apply for political asylum in the U.S., a process that due to more restrictive policies under Trump could take months.  Others say they are driven to find higher-paying work to support their families.

Children account for approximately 21 percent of the migrants in Tijuana, according to the city official. Officials expect some 3,000 more migrants in the caravan to arrive in Tijuana from other parts of Mexico in the days to come.


« Last Edit: November 19, 2018, 03:08:41 AM by RE »
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🚢 "Humanitarian crisis" declared as 5,000 migrants reach Tijuana
« Reply #819 on: November 23, 2018, 11:33:57 AM »
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/tijuana-mayor-declares-humanitarian-crisis-migrants-today-2018-11-23/

 CBS/AP November 23, 2018, 10:45 AM
"Humanitarian crisis" declared as 5,000 migrants reach Tijuana


Migrant children sit in front of Mexican riot police outside the El Chaparral port of entry on November 22, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico.
Getty Images

TIJUANA, Mexico -- The mayor of Tijuana has declared a "humanitarian crisis" in his border city and says that he has asked the United Nations for aid to deal with the approximately 5,000 Central American migrants who have arrived in the city. Mayor Juan Manuel Gastelum says that the Mexican federal government has provided little assistance and he is not going to commit the city's public resources to dealing with the situation.

Gastelum said on Grupo Formula radio Friday that Tijuana does not have the necessary infrastructure to adequately attend to the migrants. On Thursday, his government issued a statement saying that it was requesting help from the U.N.'s Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.
Immigrant Caravan Members Gather At U.S.-Mexico Border

Gastelum says: "I am not going to spend the money of Tijuana (citizens)."

Gastelum's declaration comes a day after President Trump made a Thanksgiving Day threat to close the U.S. border with Mexico for an undisclosed period of time if his administration determines that its southern ally has lost "control" on its side.

This week a memo signed by White House chief of staff John Kelly declared the Pentagon has the authority to allow troops to use force, including lethal force, to protect federal personnel at the border if necessary. The memo, dated Tuesday, says troops at the border "may perform those military protective activities that the secretary of defense determines are reasonably necessary to ensure the protection of federal personnel, including a show or use of force (including lethal force, where necessary), crowd control, temporary detention, and cursory search."

"The deployed military personnel shall not, without further direction from you, conduct traditional civilian law enforcement activities, such as arrest, search and seizure in connection with the enforcement of the laws," says the memo, which was obtained by CBS News national security correspondent David Martin.
© 2018 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
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U.S. Border Patrol Launches Tear Gas At Migrants Over Attempt To Breach Fence
« Reply #820 on: November 25, 2018, 03:58:48 PM »
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/migrant-caravan-tear-gas_us_5bfb11ace4b0771fb6ba24a5

 POLITICS 11/25/2018 04:46 pm ET Updated 1 hour ago
U.S. Border Patrol Launches Tear Gas At Migrants Over Attempt To Breach Fence
Over 5,000 members of a migrant caravan on its way to the U.S. have been camped in Tijuana, Mexico, in recent weeks.
Christopher Sherman

The United States halted all border traffic at the busy crossing between San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico, as Mexican police cracked down on a protest on behalf of Central American migrants massed at the border and intending to apply for asylum in the United States.

TIJUANA, Mexico (AP) — Migrants approaching the U.S. border from Mexico were enveloped with tear gas Sunday after a few tried to breach the fence separating the two countries.

U.S. agents shot the gas, according to an Associated Press reporter on the scene. Children were screaming and coughing in the mayhem.

Honduran migrant Ana Zuniga, 23, said she saw migrants open a small hole in concertina wire at a gap on the Mexican side of a levee, at which point U.S. agents fired tear gas at them.

“We ran, but when you run the gas asphyxiates you more,” she told the AP while cradling her 3-year-old daughter Valery in her arms.

Mexico’s Milenio TV also showed images of several migrants at the border trying to jump over the fence. A few yards away on the U.S. side, shoppers streamed in and out of an outlet mall.

U.S. Border Patrol helicopters flew overhead, while U.S. agents held vigil on foot beyond the wire fence in California. The Border Patrol office in San Diego said via Twitter that pedestrian crossings have been suspended at the San Ysidro port of entry at both the East and West facilities. All northbound and southbound traffic was halted.

Earlier Sunday, some Central American migrants, pushed past a blockade of Mexican police standing guard near the international border crossing.

More than 5,000 migrants have been camped in and around a sports complex in Tijuana after making their way through Mexico in recent weeks via caravan. Many hope to apply for asylum in the U.S., but agents at the San Ysidro entry point are processing fewer than 100 asylum petitions a day.

Some of the migrants who went forward Sunday called on each other to remain peaceful.

They appeared to easily pass through the Mexican police blockade without using violence.


A migrant woman helps carry a handmade U.S. flag up the riverbank at the Mexico-U.S. border after getting past Mexican police at the Chaparral border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, Nov. 25, 2018, as a group of migrants tries to reach the U.S.

A second line of Mexican police carrying plastic riot shields stood guard outside a Mexican customs and immigration plaza, where the migrants were headed.

That line of police installed tall steel panels behind them outside the Chaparral crossing on the Mexican side of the border, which completely blocked incoming traffic lanes to Mexico.

Irineo Mujica, who has accompanied the migrants for weeks as part of the aid group Pueblo Sin Fronteras, said the aim of Sunday’s march toward the U.S. border was to make the migrants’ plight more visible to the governments of Mexico and the U.S.

“We can’t have all these people here,” Mujica told The Associated Press.

Tijuana Mayor Juan Manuel Gastelum on Friday declared a humanitarian crisis in his border city of 1.6 million, which he says is struggling to accommodate the crush of migrants.
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🚢 San Diego border crossing shut down after migrants try entering U.S.
« Reply #821 on: November 26, 2018, 01:40:43 AM »
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/san-diego-border-crossing-shut-down-after-migrants-try-entering-n939891

San Diego border crossing shut down after migrants try entering U.S.
“We’re not running because we’re criminals,” one migrant said. “We’re running from the crime in our country.”
00:09 / 01:18
U.S. shuts down major port of entry after hundreds of migrants rush southern border


Migrants run from tear gas, thrown by the U.S border patrol, near the border fence between Mexico and the United States in Tijuana, Mexico, Nov. 25, 2018.Hannah McKay / Reuters

Nov. 25, 2018 / 2:39 PM AKST
By Annie Rose Ramos and Tim Stelloh

TIJUANA, Mexico — American authorities used tear gas on hundreds of migrants who tried to enter the United States illegally Sunday, prompting officials to shut down operations at the border crossing between this city and San Diego, one of the busiest in the world.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection suspended all vehicles and pedestrians from passing through the San Ysidro Port of Entry at 11:30 a.m. after the migrants tried to cross on either side of the inspection station.

San Ysidro was reopened shortly after 6 p.m., the agency said.

Some migrants said they tried crossing only after being denied access to the port of entry where they could claim asylum.

Customs and Border Protection said in a statement that it used tear gas and pepper spray after several migrants threw rocks at border agents, striking them.

No injuries were reported, the agency said.

"DHS will not tolerate this type of lawlessness and will not hesitate to shut down ports of entry for security and public safety reasons," Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said Sunday in a statement.

The shutdown came after hundreds of migrants — many whom are fleeing violence in Central America — assembled Sunday morning on the Mexican side of the border. American military helicopters buzzed overhead as hundreds of Mexican federal police officers blocked the migrants from entering San Ysidro.

The migrants were part of a larger group of roughly 6,000 who’d crammed into several shelters in Tijuana — a situation the city’s mayor has called a “humanitarian crisis.”

In an interview Sunday, one of the migrants, Jorge Montoya, 43, described thousands of people staying in a rundown sports stadium with overflowing toilets. He and others called the conditions intolerable — but when Mexican authorities refused to grant them access to the port of entry, hundreds slogged across the sewage-laden Tijuana River in search of access to the United States.

Among the throng were elderly people in wheelchairs and children with strollers. The group formed a human chain along the river’s steep embankments.

“We’re not running because we’re criminals,” Montoya said. “We’re running from the crime in our country.”
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On the other side of the river, dozens of migrants broke through a wooden fence and climbed atop a freight train. Clutching Honduran and Guatemalan flags, they could see the United States from their perch — but there still appeared to be no way for them to cross.

Mexico’s incoming Secretary of the Interior, Sen. Olga Sánchez Cordero, said in a statement Sunday that authorities were working to identify nearly 500 migrants who tried to enter the United States in a "violent way."

Those who are found will be immediately deported, she said.

The attempted crossing came after Trump administration officials and members of Mexico’s incoming government appeared to be at odds over a deal that could prevent asylum seekers from entering the United States.

Under the current system, asylum seekers can remain in the U.S. while their cases are processed in American courts. But the Trump administration wants them to remain in Mexico instead.

Two Trump administration officials told NBC News that the plan was a few weeks away from going into effect, though Jesus Ramirez Cuevas, a spokesman for recently elected Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, said no such agreement had been reached.

Last month, President Trump ordered about 5,800 troops to the border, a number he has suggested could more than double. They joined the 2,000 troops already stationed there, in addition to thousands of border patrol agents.

Annie Rose Ramos reported from Tijuana, Mexico. Tim Stelloh reported from Alameda, California.
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🚢 Trump Officials Are ‘All In’ for Border Chaos
« Reply #822 on: November 27, 2018, 06:52:13 AM »
https://www.thedailybeast.com/trump-officials-are-all-in-for-border-chaos

‘BATSH*T CRAZY’
Trump Officials Are ‘All In’ for Border Chaos

‘If I am Nielsen, I am definitely going to be all in with the president’s demands about potential use of force, because I wouldn’t want to lose my job,’ a former official said.

Erin Banco,
Asawin Suebsaeng
11.27.18 4:55 AM ET


Rodrigo Abd/Shutterstock

When border agents fired canisters of tear gas into a crowd of unarmed migrants in Tijuana over the weekend, officials in the Department of Homeland Security and White House quietly cheered.

It was exactly the fodder they needed in the waning days of Republican-controlled Washington to pressure Congress for billions to fund the border wall.

That sentiment, which was palpable at DHS in particular, startled some in the highest ranks of Customs and Border Patrol, an official in the agency told The Daily Beast.

    INHUMANE
    Trans Woman Was Beaten in ICE Custody Before Death
    Scott Bixby,
    Betsy Woodruff

“They are totally all in. They have gone batshit crazy,” one former senior official said of leaders inside DHS and the White House. “They are getting exactly what they want, which is the ability to present the narrative that the border is out of control.”

Behind the scenes, officials inside the White House and Department of Homeland Security had no plans to change course or call for restraint by law enforcement agents, according to six current and former officials familiar with conversations about border security. That thinking was apparent in a statement issued by DHS Monday evening in which Secretary Kristjen Nielsen doubled down on the administration's stance on use of force, saying that the violence at the border was  “entirely predictable.”

Individuals inside DHS have said for weeks that the department was allocating more and more time to focusing on immigration enforcement. Some said they thought the conversations in the administration would die down after the elections. Instead, senior staff have focused primarily on upping the public statements by Secretary Nielsen about the so-called “caravan.” Internal memos and daily news briefings, too, have focused almost entirely on what the department views as a threat on the border.

The increasingly intense focus on the caravan came amidst public reports that Nielsen would soon be out of a job.
Related in Politics
DHS Wouldn’t Take Mattis’ No for an Answer on Lethal Force
26 House Dems Demand Kirstjen Nielsen Resign
Pentagon Preps Bases to Detain Migrants as Caravan Advances

“If I am Nielsen, I am definitely going to be all in with the presidents demands about potential use of force because I wouldn’t want to lose my job,” said one former U.S. official briefed on the border chaos.
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The president saw the weekend’s tear gassing as yet another invitation to threaten Mexico and demand border wall funding.

“Mexico should move the flag waving Migrants, many of whom are stone cold criminals, back to their countries,” Trump tweeted on Monday morning. “Do it by plane, do it by bus, do it anyway you want, but they are NOT coming into the U.S.A. We will close the Border permanently if need be. Congress, fund the WALL!”

According to sources inside DHS and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service, the two agencies have held multiple phone calls with senior advisers in the White House about the dire situation on the border. Those calls, some of which were previously scheduled, touched on the need for the administration to slow down the number of people trying to cross the border.

The conversations between DHS, USCIS and the White House grew tense at times, sources said, especially if participants questioned the Trump team’s new direction on border control.

“It sounds like those in the White House who are promoting a confrontational interaction with members of the caravan… there are disagreements between them and the professionals who have a background in border security operations,” said John Cohen, former acting undersecretary at DHS under Obama. “There are those like Stephen Miller who has no operational background who help roll out these initiatives without receiving substantive input from people in the know. And then it requires a course correction.”

Two members of the DHS advisory council told The Daily Beast that the last call between Nielsen and the group about the border took place at the beginning of the month. Members of the council are scheduled to travel to the Rio Grande Valley to meet with border agents and local officials in December and January. The focus of the trip is to allow the council to gather information so as better to advise the secretary, according to individuals who plan to travel to Texas.

A White House spokesman did not respond to a request to comment on the record for this story as of press time. DHS and USCIS also did not provide comment for this story.

Within Trump’s inner circle, the skirmish and the news footage of it weren’t only welcome as vindication, but also as an opportunity to berate media outlets once more for challenging the president’s pre-midterms caravan hysteria. One White House official told The Daily Beast that numerous mainstream media outlets owe President Trump “an apology” for casting doubt on his claims that the caravan represents a threat to the United States, citing the latest incident as a sign of trouble.

“Is storming the border an act of an ‘invasion’ or nah?” Katrina Pierson, a Trump reelection campaign senior adviser, mockingly tweeted at CNN correspondent Jim Acosta on Sunday, representing their public spat that got Acosta temporarily booted from the White House. Laura Ingraham, a Fox News star and a close Trump friend, posted to Twitter, “These individuals smashing borders are criminals. Not migrants.”

There is still scant evidence that the caravan, largely of impoverished migrants and refugees, actually poses a national security threat to the U.S. However, there is ample evidence that the caravan migrants themselves face grave threats of violence and persecution.

Throughout Trump and the GOP’s demagoguing of the migrants, one core source of political support—Trump-loving evangelical leaders and activists—has remained, for the most part, conspicuously quiet.

    OMNISHAMBLES
    Does Trump Really Want the Border Wall?
    The Daily Beast

Still, Robert Jeffress, a Dallas megachurch pastor and Trump ally, told The Daily Beast on Monday that Trump’s decision to crack down on the poor and the meek was a part of a “God-given responsibility.”

“America shows tremendous, Christ-like compassion toward immigrants who are willing to come into our country legally,” Jeffress said, ignoring that many of the immigrants en route to the U.S. were seeking asylum legally through port of entry.

Officials inside DHS— those who typically speak up about changes to use of force protocol by border agents--have also, somewhat confusingly to observers, remained quiet about the turn of events in Tijuana, according to two staffers in the department.

“It doesn’t seem like there is anyone telling the White House that by deploying resources the way they are deploying them they are creating a more dangerous environment than if they take a different approach,” Cohen said. “They should rapidly identity and assess the people in Tijuana, disperse those who don’t have a legal claim and expedite the movement of people who do.”
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🦇 ‘BATSH*T CRAZY’: Trump Officials Are ‘All In’ for Border Chaos
« Reply #823 on: November 28, 2018, 01:00:14 AM »
https://www.thedailybeast.com/trump-officials-are-all-in-for-border-chaos

‘BATSH*T CRAZY’
Trump Officials Are ‘All In’ for Border Chaos

‘If I am Nielsen, I am definitely going to be all in with the president’s demands about potential use of force, because I wouldn’t want to lose my job,’ a former official said.

Erin Banco,
Asawin Suebsaeng
11.27.18 4:55 AM ET


Rodrigo Abd/Shutterstock

When border agents fired canisters of tear gas into a crowd of unarmed migrants in Tijuana over the weekend, officials in the Department of Homeland Security and White House quietly cheered.

It was exactly the fodder they needed in the waning days of Republican-controlled Washington to pressure Congress for billions to fund the border wall.
Advertisement

That sentiment, which was palpable at DHS in particular, startled some in the highest ranks of Customs and Border Patrol, an official in the agency told The Daily Beast.

    INHUMANE
    Trans Woman Was Beaten in ICE Custody Before Death
    Scott Bixby,
    Betsy Woodruff

“They are totally all in. They have gone batshit crazy,” one former senior official said of leaders inside DHS and the White House. “They are getting exactly what they want, which is the ability to present the narrative that the border is out of control.”

Behind the scenes, officials inside the White House and Department of Homeland Security had no plans to change course or call for restraint by law enforcement agents, according to six current and former officials familiar with conversations about border security. That thinking was apparent in a statement issued by DHS Monday evening in which Secretary Kristjen Nielsen doubled down on the administration's stance on use of force, saying that the violence at the border was  “entirely predictable.”

Individuals inside DHS have said for weeks that the department was allocating more and more time to focusing on immigration enforcement. Some said they thought the conversations in the administration would die down after the elections. Instead, senior staff have focused primarily on upping the public statements by Secretary Nielsen about the so-called “caravan.” Internal memos and daily news briefings, too, have focused almost entirely on what the department views as a threat on the border.

The increasingly intense focus on the caravan came amidst public reports that Nielsen would soon be out of a job.
Related in Politics
DHS Wouldn’t Take Mattis’ No for an Answer on Lethal Force
26 House Dems Demand Kirstjen Nielsen Resign
Pentagon Preps Bases to Detain Migrants as Caravan Advances

“If I am Nielsen, I am definitely going to be all in with the presidents demands about potential use of force because I wouldn’t want to lose my job,” said one former U.S. official briefed on the border chaos.
ADVERTISING

The president saw the weekend’s tear gassing as yet another invitation to threaten Mexico and demand border wall funding.

“Mexico should move the flag waving Migrants, many of whom are stone cold criminals, back to their countries,” Trump tweeted on Monday morning. “Do it by plane, do it by bus, do it anyway you want, but they are NOT coming into the U.S.A. We will close the Border permanently if need be. Congress, fund the WALL!”

According to sources inside DHS and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service, the two agencies have held multiple phone calls with senior advisers in the White House about the dire situation on the border. Those calls, some of which were previously scheduled, touched on the need for the administration to slow down the number of people trying to cross the border.

The conversations between DHS, USCIS and the White House grew tense at times, sources said, especially if participants questioned the Trump team’s new direction on border control.

“It sounds like those in the White House who are promoting a confrontational interaction with members of the caravan… there are disagreements between them and the professionals who have a background in border security operations,” said John Cohen, former acting undersecretary at DHS under Obama. “There are those like Stephen Miller who has no operational background who help roll out these initiatives without receiving substantive input from people in the know. And then it requires a course correction.”

Two members of the DHS advisory council told The Daily Beast that the last call between Nielsen and the group about the border took place at the beginning of the month. Members of the council are scheduled to travel to the Rio Grande Valley to meet with border agents and local officials in December and January. The focus of the trip is to allow the council to gather information so as better to advise the secretary, according to individuals who plan to travel to Texas.

A White House spokesman did not respond to a request to comment on the record for this story as of press time. DHS and USCIS also did not provide comment for this story.

Within Trump’s inner circle, the skirmish and the news footage of it weren’t only welcome as vindication, but also as an opportunity to berate media outlets once more for challenging the president’s pre-midterms caravan hysteria. One White House official told The Daily Beast that numerous mainstream media outlets owe President Trump “an apology” for casting doubt on his claims that the caravan represents a threat to the United States, citing the latest incident as a sign of trouble.

“Is storming the border an act of an ‘invasion’ or nah?” Katrina Pierson, a Trump reelection campaign senior adviser, mockingly tweeted at CNN correspondent Jim Acosta on Sunday, representing their public spat that got Acosta temporarily booted from the White House. Laura Ingraham, a Fox News star and a close Trump friend, posted to Twitter, “These individuals smashing borders are criminals. Not migrants.”

There is still scant evidence that the caravan, largely of impoverished migrants and refugees, actually poses a national security threat to the U.S. However, there is ample evidence that the caravan migrants themselves face grave threats of violence and persecution.

Throughout Trump and the GOP’s demagoguing of the migrants, one core source of political support—Trump-loving evangelical leaders and activists—has remained, for the most part, conspicuously quiet.

    OMNISHAMBLES
    Does Trump Really Want the Border Wall?
    The Daily Beast

Still, Robert Jeffress, a Dallas megachurch pastor and Trump ally, told The Daily Beast on Monday that Trump’s decision to crack down on the poor and the meek was a part of a “God-given responsibility.”

“America shows tremendous, Christ-like compassion toward immigrants who are willing to come into our country legally,” Jeffress said, ignoring that many of the immigrants en route to the U.S. were seeking asylum legally through port of entry.

Officials inside DHS— those who typically speak up about changes to use of force protocol by border agents--have also, somewhat confusingly to observers, remained quiet about the turn of events in Tijuana, according to two staffers in the department.

“It doesn’t seem like there is anyone telling the White House that by deploying resources the way they are deploying them they are creating a more dangerous environment than if they take a different approach,” Cohen said. “They should rapidly identity and assess the people in Tijuana, disperse those who don’t have a legal claim and expedite the movement of people who do.”
« Last Edit: November 28, 2018, 01:02:05 AM by RE »
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