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Offline knarf

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Climate change is making the seas rise faster than ever, UN warns
« Reply #12240 on: March 29, 2019, 05:05:35 AM »

India’s Ghoramara island is disappearing into the sea

Sea levels across the world are rising faster than ever, the United Nations has warned, meaning we urgently need to increase action on climate change.

In a report released on Thursday, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), a UN agency, painted a dire picture of all the key indicators of global warming.

The last four years were the warmest on record, concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are at record levels and rising, and a global average sea level rise of 3.7 millimetres in 2018 outstripped the average annual increase over the past three decades.

The findings in the group’s annual State of the Climate report will bolster efforts by António Guterres, the UN secretary-general, to make governments commit to more ambitious carbon cuts at a landmark summit in September.

“There is no longer any time for delay,” wrote Guterres in a foreword to the report.

Last year was the fourth warmest on record, bringing the global temperature 1°C warmer on average than before the industrial revolution.

That leaves little wiggle room for limiting rises to the 1.5°C goal that nearly 200 countries agreed to aim for under the Paris agreement.



As the WMO report spells out, the average global temperature increase masks much bigger jumps in some regions last year. In the Arctic, the annual average temperature was 2°C higher and up to 3°C higher in some places.

Some of the most abnormal conditions were seen in the summer heatwave in northern Europe, which wrought wildfires across 25,000 hectares in Sweden, as well as fires in the UK, Norway and Germany. France and Germany had their warmest year on record, while new temperature records were set in Japan.

With most of the energy trapped by greenhouse gases being absorbed by the oceans, 2018 continued a long-term trend by breaking new records for ocean heat. Global glacier mass declined for the 31st year running.

Arctic sea ice was well below average, a pattern that has continued into 2019 with the maximum sea ice extent in winter the seventh lowest on record.

This, combined with the warming from climate change, means the WMO expects above normal land temperatures for 2019.

Some countries are making progress on cutting carbon emissions. For example, figures released on Thursday show that the UK cut emissions 2.4 per cent in 2018. But the global picture, as data confirmed this week, is that carbon emissions from energy grew 1.7 per cent last year.

Guterres hopes big emitters, such as China, the US and India, will come forward with stronger plans for emissions cuts at his summit in September. That comes ahead of crucial UN climate talks next year, when countries are due to publish new plans under the Paris deal’s “ratchet mechanism”, which aims to regularly increase commitments to tackling climate change.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2198091-climate-change-is-making-the-seas-rise-faster-than-ever-un-warns/
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Offline knarf

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San Franciscans raise $46,000 to stop homeless shelter in wealthy area
« Reply #12241 on: March 29, 2019, 05:24:36 AM »
Another campaign in support of the shelter launched Thursday and received a $5,000 donation from GoFundMe itself


A homeless person in San Francisco. A campaign to block a new homeless shelter has prompted an angry response from the city’s mayor.

Residents from one of San Francisco’s most desirable neighborhoods are taking a controversial approach to blocking a new homeless shelter: launching a crowdfunding appeal.

Their campaign on GoFundMe – best known as a site that hosts fundraisers for medical expenses or victims of natural disasters – has prompted an angry response from the city’s mayor.

It has drawn more than $46,000 dollars, nearly half of its stated $100,000 goal. The money is to go to a local attorney working on behalf of the residents, and its 91 donors include an anonymous contributor who gave $10,000, along with hedge fund managers, executives and authors.

A rival GoFundMe in support of the proposed shelter was launched on Thursday, and quickly received a $5,000 donation from GoFundMe itself.

A thriving tech economy has squeezed the San Francisco housing market, and like many cities on the west coast it is grappling with an overwhelming homelessness crisis. The number of homeless people has remained constant despite massive investments, and the new shelter in the Embarcadero was to be part of the city’s promise to increase the number of shelter beds by 1,000. There are roughly 7,500 homeless residents in the city and more than 1,400 are waiting for temporary spots to open.

“People want us to address the challenges on our streets and help our unsheltered residents into housing, and I am committed to doing the hard work to make that happen,” the San Francisco mayor, London Breed, said in a statement given to the San Francisco Chronicle.

“But it’s incredibly frustrating and disappointing that as soon as we put forward a solution to build a new shelter, people begin to threaten legal action,” she added.

The money raised will be paid to a local real estate attorney named Andrew Zacks, who advocates on behalf of the rights of property owners and last made the news in 2017, when he defended a San Francisco property owner who tripled the rent on his tenants, from $1,900 to $6,700.

The 2.3 acre vacant lot just beneath the Bay Bridge, on San Francisco’s eastern shore, seemed the perfect spot for a new temporary shelter, which would add 200 beds.

But, situated close to tourist attractions, seaside bike lanes, and – most notably – neighborhoods filled with million-dollar-homes and condos, the site was primed for local pushback.

Wallace Lee, the father of a two-year-old who lives two blocks from the proposed site, says he is helping to organize against the project out of concerns for his family’s safety. “It is increasingly a place where people are starting families,” he says. “There are a lot of strollers in the neighborhood that weren’t here when I moved in 2013.”

While little research has been done on the impact shelters have on communities, the campaign cites one study done in Vancouver that found a sharp increase in thefts.

However, a separate analysis, done by the Guardian last year, found that 11 sanctioned encampments in Portland and Seattle did not have this effect.

In 2008, an NYU researcher concluded that supportive housing in New York City did not negatively affect property values and that they actually increased in the five years after the facilities were established in the area.

Kelley Cutler, a human rights organizer for the Coalition on Homelessness, argues that the fears are rooted in stigma, and that they are not unique to San Francisco. “No matter where the location is, folks say this is not the right space. Not in our community. So they are going through that right now in the Embarcadero,” she says.

The new facility, known as a Navigation Center, would allow guests to bring in partners and pets, and would work to connect them to city resources and services with the end goal of permanent housing. Prioritizing people living on the streets nearby, the site would also “employ robust good neighbor policies and 24-hour security”.

“We really are talking about a life and death issue,” says Cutler, adding that 240 people homeless people died in the city last year. “The issue is impacting the community as a whole,” she says. “We all need to step up – that way it can be safer for everyone.”

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/mar/28/san-francisco-gofundme-homeless-shelter-embarcadero?utm_term=Autofeed&CMP=twt_gu&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1553810130
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Offline knarf

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Alaska temperatures expected to soar 40 degrees above normal this weekend
« Reply #12242 on: March 29, 2019, 05:42:50 AM »
Alaska temperatures expected to soar 40 degrees above normal this weekend

By Jeff Berardelli

Updated on: March 28, 2019 / 8:08 PM / CBS News

"Startling" is a word you don't often hear from an Alaskan meteorologist with over three decades of experience, especially in a place used to wild swings in weather. But this month's warmth in the state is out of bounds, even for Rick Thoman.

The climate expert at NOAA's Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy used the word when stating that the month of March — for Alaska as a whole — will be the 29th month since January 2013 to be ranked in the warmest ten percent since 1925.

And it's likely to get even warmer as we round out the month. On Saturday, villages along the northern coast of Alaska, right on the Arctic Ocean, are expected to spike to 40 degrees Fahrenheit above normal.

"March is now so warm that not only is it certain that this will be the warmest March, but would be warm enough to be in the top 10 Aprils!" Thoman said about the temperatures in Alaska.


Rick Thoman
‏ @AlaskaWx

This is startling: for Alaska as a whole, March is going to be the 29th month since Jan 2013 to be ranked in the warmest ten percent since 1925. That's 39% of months. In the same period, one month, April 2013, ranks in the coldest 10%. #akwx #Arctic @Climatologist49 @IARC_Alaska



 3:46 PM - 27 Mar 2019

    46 Retweets
    80 Likes

At least three cities in the northern half of the state — Deadhorse, Kotzebue and Eagle — are expected to soon shatter records for the largest March departure from normal for any city in the U.S. by the end of the month, according to climatologist Brian Brettschneider.

It should be noted that while temperatures are running 23 degrees above normal in Deadhorse, the average March temperature there is 13 below zero — so the weather is by no means warm. But for residents used to subzero temperatures, an expected high of 35 on Saturday along the northern coast of Alaska will feel balmy.

Weather computer models show the warm streak will last at least another week, if not longer.


Alaska temperatures expected to soar 40 degrees above normal this weekend

By Jeff Berardelli

Updated on: March 28, 2019 / 8:08 PM / CBS News

"Startling" is a word you don't often hear from an Alaskan meteorologist with over three decades of experience, especially in a place used to wild swings in weather. But this month's warmth in the state is out of bounds, even for Rick Thoman.

The climate expert at NOAA's Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy used the word when stating that the month of March — for Alaska as a whole — will be the 29th month since January 2013 to be ranked in the warmest ten percent since 1925.

And it's likely to get even warmer as we round out the month. On Saturday, villages along the northern coast of Alaska, right on the Arctic Ocean, are expected to spike to 40 degrees Fahrenheit above normal.

"March is now so warm that not only is it certain that this will be the warmest March, but would be warm enough to be in the top 10 Aprils!" Thoman said about the temperatures in Alaska.

At least three cities in the northern half of the state — Deadhorse, Kotzebue and Eagle — are expected to soon shatter records for the largest March departure from normal for any city in the U.S. by the end of the month, according to climatologist Brian Brettschneider.

It should be noted that while temperatures are running 23 degrees above normal in Deadhorse, the average March temperature there is 13 below zero — so the weather is by no means warm. But for residents used to subzero temperatures, an expected high of 35 on Saturday along the northern coast of Alaska will feel balmy.

Weather computer models show the warm streak will last at least another week, if not longer.

The warmth is all part of a rapid, long-term trend in Alaska. In the past 50 years, the city of Barrow on the northern tip of Alaska has seen an 11-degree spike in its average yearly temperature. By comparison, the average global rise in temperature since the late 1800s has been about 2 degrees.

According to the 2018 National Climate Assessment Alaska "is among the fastest warming regions on Earth." It is warming two to three times faster than the rest of the lower 48 states and faces a myriad of issues associated with a changing climate.
 
"The dramatic warming in recent decades is in a significant part due to the decline in sea ice and ocean warming," Thoman said.

Sea ice acts as a natural refrigerator. When sunlight hits the ice, it bounces directly back into space. That keeps the Arctic cool. In the last 40 years, however, Arctic ice volume has declined by an astounding 50 percent. That exposes darker shaded ocean water, which absorbs more heat. It has become a vicious cycle, fueling a phenomenon known as Arctic Amplification.


Zack Labe
‏Verified account @ZLabe

Late fall temperature departures (anomaly) during the last 40 years in the #Arctic. This time of year coincides with the greatest "Arctic Amplification"

[Data from ERA-Interim reanalysis in October-December]



 10:25 AM - 27 Mar 2019

    101 Retweets
    119 Likes



Alaska temperatures expected to soar 40 degrees above normal this weekend

By Jeff Berardelli

Updated on: March 28, 2019 / 8:08 PM / CBS News

"Startling" is a word you don't often hear from an Alaskan meteorologist with over three decades of experience, especially in a place used to wild swings in weather. But this month's warmth in the state is out of bounds, even for Rick Thoman.

The climate expert at NOAA's Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy used the word when stating that the month of March — for Alaska as a whole — will be the 29th month since January 2013 to be ranked in the warmest ten percent since 1925.

And it's likely to get even warmer as we round out the month. On Saturday, villages along the northern coast of Alaska, right on the Arctic Ocean, are expected to spike to 40 degrees Fahrenheit above normal.

"March is now so warm that not only is it certain that this will be the warmest March, but would be warm enough to be in the top 10 Aprils!" Thoman said about the temperatures in Alaska.

At least three cities in the northern half of the state — Deadhorse, Kotzebue and Eagle — are expected to soon shatter records for the largest March departure from normal for any city in the U.S. by the end of the month, according to climatologist Brian Brettschneider.

It should be noted that while temperatures are running 23 degrees above normal in Deadhorse, the average March temperature there is 13 below zero — so the weather is by no means warm. But for residents used to subzero temperatures, an expected high of 35 on Saturday along the northern coast of Alaska will feel balmy.

Weather computer models show the warm streak will last at least another week, if not longer.

The warmth is all part of a rapid, long-term trend in Alaska. In the past 50 years, the city of Barrow on the northern tip of Alaska has seen an 11-degree spike in its average yearly temperature. By comparison, the average global rise in temperature since the late 1800s has been about 2 degrees.

According to the 2018 National Climate Assessment Alaska "is among the fastest warming regions on Earth." It is warming two to three times faster than the rest of the lower 48 states and faces a myriad of issues associated with a changing climate.
 
"The dramatic warming in recent decades is in a significant part due to the decline in sea ice and ocean warming," Thoman said.

Sea ice acts as a natural refrigerator. When sunlight hits the ice, it bounces directly back into space. That keeps the Arctic cool. In the last 40 years, however, Arctic ice volume has declined by an astounding 50 percent. That exposes darker shaded ocean water, which absorbs more heat. It has become a vicious cycle, fueling a phenomenon known as Arctic Amplification.

This winter has been no exception. Ice cover on the Bering Sea, which separates Alaska from Russia, has been near or below record levels much of the winter. As a result, Alaska is on the front lines of climate change.

Ice loss can be devastating during the stormy fall, winter and springs months. Typically, solid sea ice forms as a barrier protecting coastal communities from monster storms with wicked winds and waves. Recently that solid ice is no longer reliable and when it breaks up, waves come crashing ashore eroding the shoreline, inundating villages and damaging homes.

Another major concern with warming is the melting of permafrost, which destabilizes the ground and damages infrastructure on top if it. The trend is expected to accelerate as the climate warms.


WoodsHoleResearchCtr
‏ @WoodsHoleResCtr

An alarming model of Alaskan #permafrost. Less yellow indicates permafrost thaw. Permafrost thaw means the #greenhouse gases currently stored inside will leak into the atmosphere. The problem? Permafrost stores more #carbon than has ever been released by humans. Map by @g_fiske.

https://twitter.com/WoodsHoleResCtr/status/1110650295862874118?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1110650295862874118&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cbsnews.com%2Fnews%2Falaska-temperatures-expected-to-soar-40-degrees-above-normal-this-weekend%2F

While problematic to residents, melting permafrost also poses a huge problem for the whole planet. Permafrost stores huge quantities of carbon. When melted, methane is released. Since methane is 30 times more potent as a heat trapping greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide, it traps even more heat and accelerates global warming.

The rapid changes have Thoman worried. "Between a rapidly changing environment and lack of societal response, I'm very concerned," he said.

He's worried not just for his beloved Alaska, but also for everyone else. When asked if he had any wisdom for those further south, still waiting on the worst impacts of climate change to hit, he said, "Some impactful changes will not be gradual: tipping points will unexpectedly be crossed and society will then have to respond repeatedly in crisis mode."

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/alaska-temperatures-expected-to-soar-40-degrees-above-normal-this-weekend/

« Last Edit: March 29, 2019, 12:15:08 PM by knarf »
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Offline Eddie

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Re: $500,000 a Year Yet Struggling? Let's Do a Double Take
« Reply #12243 on: March 29, 2019, 05:49:15 AM »
No matter how you cut it, a family that takes home a half-million a year is doing great.



Every so often you come across an article about someone who makes a lot of money, but who claims to be just scraping by. Among the more famous of these was a Wall Street Journal infographic from 2013 depicting the travails of single mothers making $260,000 a year and married couples making $650,000. Another was a 2017 graph on Reddit showing how a young Seattle resident spends a $100,000 annual income. Just this month, CNBC ran a story entitled “Here’s a budget breakdown of a couple that makes $500,000 a year and still feels average.” The story was based on a report by the website Financial Samurai, about a 30-something couple with two children living in New York City.

Defenders of these stories will point out that because living costs and tax rates differ from place to place, a high income in New York City or San Francisco buys much less than a high income in a small town in Texas. This is certainly true. For example, the website Apartment List shows the median rent for a two-bedroom apartment in San Francisco as $3,100 a month — more than three times as much as the $1,020 a comparable apartment lists for in Houston. A small town would cost even less than Houston. And Texas has no state income tax, while California’s tax rates range from 1 percent to 12.3 percent.

But these regional differences only go so far. The median annual income for a family of four in New York City is a little more than $104,000. There’s no city in the world where a $500,000 income, like the one described in the Financial Samurai article, wouldn't be considered very high.

Spending $18,000 on vacations a year, giving another $18,000 to charity, keeping two luxury cars in New York City, and spending $10,000 a year extra because “something always comes up” are things that are out of reach for the vast majority of Americans. One recent survey found that 40 percent of Americans couldn’t even cover a $400 emergency expense.

But also, despite the claim to be scraping by, this family saves quite a lot of money in addition to the $7,300 “left over” every year. Contributions to 401(k) retirement plans are savings. That’s $36,000 a year for two adults — and that’s not even counting any employer-matching contributions, which probably aren’t included in the couple’s income in this table. The couple also makes $60,000 in mortgage payments a year and $32,000 in student-loan payments. Some of these payments are applied to the principal on their loans, which increases the couple’s net worth by either building their home equity or by reducing their student debt. So that’s also savings.

Depending on how much of their loan payments are going to principal, this family is probably saving $100,000 a year, or 20 percent of their gross income. They aren’t scraping by — they’re socking away quite a bit of money, building up wealth in 401(k) accounts and the family home.

Because 401(k) contributions and mortgage payments are structured methods of wealth-building, they might not feel like savings. But both 401(k) plans and mortgages are commonly cited as strategies to nudge Americans to save more. Ironically, their success may be predicated on the fact that people don’t realize how much they’re putting away every month.

But there might also be another reason high-income Americans don’t feel as rich as they are — in a country of rampant inequality, there’s always someone richer. A couple making $500,000 might rub elbows with other couples making $2 million. That couple will go to events and meet other couples making $20 million, and so on. At each level of affluence, many social climbers probably look at the people on the next rung higher and feel a burning need to keep pace.

Ultimately, living a happy life probably requires letting go of envy and appreciating what one has. But it’s also no wonder that so many Americans, even members of the elite, yearn for a more equal society. Even wealthy people might benefit from a smaller gap between the classes.

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-03-28/living-on-500-000-a-year-in-income-can-seem-hard

Typical bullshit.

First the graphic of people who look like they're at some toney event. Well, folks, it's  6:30 am here, and I'm at the hospital waiting for a patient to be put to sleep.

Sure, my family is doing great. But let me tell you something. When I had four kids in college (at the state u., not Harvard) it was pretty easy to go through a couple of hundred thou of "disposable income" and wonder where the fuck it went.

The struggle is balancing everything.....you make good money but you pay big taxes. If you ever get behind your life can become a nightmare. Uncle Sam is more like the Godfather. He gets his half no matter what. No, federal income tax is not
50%. It's 30% easy though, even if you have great deductions. Then you have property tax. I even pay tax on my 30 year old dental equipment. Tax gets to 50% pretty easily, if you try to accumulate a little real estate.

And then there's health insurance. I have it, but I pay for it. Runs 5K a month by the time I cover 3 family and 2 employees.

I didn't say jack shit about having to struggle at this point in my life. The only thorn in my side these days is a  bad back, and that's my own fault. I'm very happy with just about everything in my life. Especially my marriage and my kids. I love having money to invest for my old age. I love watching my money work for me instead of just hoping enough work shows up in my office to pay the bills, which have to be paid whether the work shows up or not.

I still take huge risks with people's lives, give them drugs and do surgeries. If just one of them happens to die in my office, it could end my career.  I do that every working day of my life.

Here's a clue for you. Nobody I know who actually works for a living ever gets to a point where they have excess money. People generally spend what they make.  Only the UHNWI's ever get beyond the hamster wheel.

So you can treat your life like it's an endless journey, and at the end you find out it just ends with senescence and death, or you can treat your life like a piece of music, and play it as well as you can...maybe dance to it. I enjoy the hell out of my life, and will until I drop dead.

Update: My next two patients (on Medicaid) that we spent a lot of time and effort to get set up for treatment seem to be no-showing their free hospital visit, creating massive waste and screwing me out of getting paid. I close the office for the day to do hospital call, and so I'm in the hole today.

That's the way it goes.

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: San Franciscans raise $46,000 to stop homeless shelter in wealthy area
« Reply #12244 on: March 29, 2019, 07:24:23 AM »
I'm not in the mood for this crap today. Go tell it to some ignorant fool who is as clueless as you are.

This post will be sent to DNF for Ad Hom.  I will give you time to revise it before I pull the plug on it.

RE
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Re: $500,000 a Year Yet Struggling? Let's Do a Double Take
« Reply #12245 on: March 29, 2019, 08:08:35 AM »
No matter how you cut it, a family that takes home a half-million a year is doing great.



Every so often you come across an article about someone who makes a lot of money, but who claims to be just scraping by. Among the more famous of these was a Wall Street Journal infographic from 2013 depicting the travails of single mothers making $260,000 a year and married couples making $650,000. Another was a 2017 graph on Reddit showing how a young Seattle resident spends a $100,000 annual income. Just this month, CNBC ran a story entitled “Here’s a budget breakdown of a couple that makes $500,000 a year and still feels average.” The story was based on a report by the website Financial Samurai, about a 30-something couple with two children living in New York City.

Defenders of these stories will point out that because living costs and tax rates differ from place to place, a high income in New York City or San Francisco buys much less than a high income in a small town in Texas. This is certainly true. For example, the website Apartment List shows the median rent for a two-bedroom apartment in San Francisco as $3,100 a month — more than three times as much as the $1,020 a comparable apartment lists for in Houston. A small town would cost even less than Houston. And Texas has no state income tax, while California’s tax rates range from 1 percent to 12.3 percent.

But these regional differences only go so far. The median annual income for a family of four in New York City is a little more than $104,000. There’s no city in the world where a $500,000 income, like the one described in the Financial Samurai article, wouldn't be considered very high.

Spending $18,000 on vacations a year, giving another $18,000 to charity, keeping two luxury cars in New York City, and spending $10,000 a year extra because “something always comes up” are things that are out of reach for the vast majority of Americans. One recent survey found that 40 percent of Americans couldn’t even cover a $400 emergency expense.

But also, despite the claim to be scraping by, this family saves quite a lot of money in addition to the $7,300 “left over” every year. Contributions to 401(k) retirement plans are savings. That’s $36,000 a year for two adults — and that’s not even counting any employer-matching contributions, which probably aren’t included in the couple’s income in this table. The couple also makes $60,000 in mortgage payments a year and $32,000 in student-loan payments. Some of these payments are applied to the principal on their loans, which increases the couple’s net worth by either building their home equity or by reducing their student debt. So that’s also savings.

Depending on how much of their loan payments are going to principal, this family is probably saving $100,000 a year, or 20 percent of their gross income. They aren’t scraping by — they’re socking away quite a bit of money, building up wealth in 401(k) accounts and the family home.

Because 401(k) contributions and mortgage payments are structured methods of wealth-building, they might not feel like savings. But both 401(k) plans and mortgages are commonly cited as strategies to nudge Americans to save more. Ironically, their success may be predicated on the fact that people don’t realize how much they’re putting away every month.

But there might also be another reason high-income Americans don’t feel as rich as they are — in a country of rampant inequality, there’s always someone richer. A couple making $500,000 might rub elbows with other couples making $2 million. That couple will go to events and meet other couples making $20 million, and so on. At each level of affluence, many social climbers probably look at the people on the next rung higher and feel a burning need to keep pace.

Ultimately, living a happy life probably requires letting go of envy and appreciating what one has. But it’s also no wonder that so many Americans, even members of the elite, yearn for a more equal society. Even wealthy people might benefit from a smaller gap between the classes.

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-03-28/living-on-500-000-a-year-in-income-can-seem-hard

Typical bullshit.

First the graphic of people who look like they're at some toney event. Well, folks, it's  6:30 am here, and I'm at the hospital waiting for a patient to be put to sleep.

Sure, my family is doing great. But let me tell you something. When I had four kids in college (at the state u., not Harvard) it was pretty easy to go through a couple of hundred thou of "disposable income" and wonder where the fuck it went.

The struggle is balancing everything.....you make good money but you pay big taxes. If you ever get behind your life can become a nightmare. Uncle Sam is more like the Godfather. He gets his half no matter what. No, federal income tax is not
50%. It's 30% easy though, even if you have great deductions. Then you have property tax. I even pay tax on my 30 year old dental equipment. Tax gets to 50% pretty easily, if you try to accumulate a little real estate.

And then there's health insurance. I have it, but I pay for it. Runs 5K a month by the time I cover 3 family and 2 employees.

I didn't say jack shit about having to struggle at this point in my life. The only thorn in my side these days is a  bad back, and that's my own fault. I'm very happy with just about everything in my life. Especially my marriage and my kids. I love having money to invest for my old age. I love watching my money work for me instead of just hoping enough work shows up in my office to pay the bills, which have to be paid whether the work shows up or not.

I still take huge risks with people's lives, give them drugs and do surgeries. If just one of them happens to die in my office, it could end my career.  I do that every working day of my life.

Here's a clue for you. Nobody I know who actually works for a living ever gets to a point where they have excess money. People generally spend what they make.  Only the UHNWI's ever get beyond the hamster wheel.

So you can treat your life like it's an endless journey, and at the end you find out it just ends with senescence and death, or you can treat your life like a piece of music, and play it as well as you can...maybe dance to it. I enjoy the hell out of my life, and will until I drop dead.

Update: My next two patients (on Medicaid) that we spent a lot of time and effort to get set up for treatment seem to be no-showing their free hospital visit, creating massive waste and screwing me out of getting paid. I close the office for the day to do hospital call, and so I'm in the hole today.

That's the way it goes.



The American Who Quit Money To Live In A Cave

Daniel Suelo gave up on money in 2000. He walked into a phone booth, pulled out 30 dollars and left it. Twelve years later, Suelo still does not have a personal i.d. bank accounts, a modern home, does not take money, or live off of federal welfare. Suelo, lives in caves in the canyon lands outside of Moab, UT. Suelo, harvests wild foods, eats roadkill, and dumpster dives. Suelo, is not an isolationist, he still is very active in the Moab community SE Utah politics and he is an active blogger.


http://www.stationgossip.com/2018/05/the-american-who-quit-money-to-live-in.html
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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Re: $500,000 a Year Yet Struggling? Let's Do a Double Take
« Reply #12246 on: March 29, 2019, 08:17:35 AM »
The American Who Quit Money To Live In A Cave

Daniel Suelo gave up on money in 2000. He walked into a phone booth, pulled out 30 dollars and left it. Twelve years later, Suelo still does not have a personal i.d. bank accounts, a modern home, does not take money, or live off of federal welfare. Suelo, lives in caves in the canyon lands outside of Moab, UT. Suelo, harvests wild foods, eats roadkill, and dumpster dives. Suelo, is not an isolationist, he still is very active in the Moab community SE Utah politics and he is an active blogger.

http://www.stationgossip.com/2018/05/the-american-who-quit-money-to-live-in.html

Somehow, I don't think any of the Diners will be following this example too soon.  Just a hunch.

RE
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Offline cernunnos5

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Re: $500,000 a Year Yet Struggling? Let's Do a Double Take
« Reply #12247 on: March 29, 2019, 09:01:53 AM »
The American Who Quit Money To Live In A Cave

Daniel Suelo gave up on money in 2000. He walked into a phone booth, pulled out 30 dollars and left it. Twelve years later, Suelo still does not have a personal i.d. bank accounts, a modern home, does not take money, or live off of federal welfare. Suelo, lives in caves in the canyon lands outside of Moab, UT. Suelo, harvests wild foods, eats roadkill, and dumpster dives. Suelo, is not an isolationist, he still is very active in the Moab community SE Utah politics and he is an active blogger.

http://www.stationgossip.com/2018/05/the-american-who-quit-money-to-live-in.html

Somehow, I don't think any of the Diners will be following this example too soon.  Just a hunch.

RE
Ech Hem......  I'm living large at this period in my life... but I have been close to that at certain periods. I've known a number of people like that. They were the folks that were mentally tougher than me and went further than I could commit to. I look at folks like this and think, "Mad props dude. You got some serious survival skills and experience. Teach us oh guru".
Some Diners may find themselves there, not by choice, but forced apon them as the world crashes around them." Move over caveman and pass the dumpster bread. Nice day. Nice day indead. Have you tried the possum. Great day to be alive........"

Offline RE

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Re: $500,000 a Year Yet Struggling? Let's Do a Double Take
« Reply #12248 on: March 29, 2019, 09:09:53 AM »
The American Who Quit Money To Live In A Cave

Daniel Suelo gave up on money in 2000. He walked into a phone booth, pulled out 30 dollars and left it. Twelve years later, Suelo still does not have a personal i.d. bank accounts, a modern home, does not take money, or live off of federal welfare. Suelo, lives in caves in the canyon lands outside of Moab, UT. Suelo, harvests wild foods, eats roadkill, and dumpster dives. Suelo, is not an isolationist, he still is very active in the Moab community SE Utah politics and he is an active blogger.

http://www.stationgossip.com/2018/05/the-american-who-quit-money-to-live-in.html

Somehow, I don't think any of the Diners will be following this example too soon.  Just a hunch.

RE
Ech Hem......  I'm living large at this period in my life... but I have been close to that at certain periods. I've known a number of people like that. They were the folks that were mentally tougher than me and went further than I could commit to. I look at folks like this and think, "Mad props dude. You got some serious survival skills and experience. Teach us oh guru".
Some Diners may find themselves there, not by choice, but forced apon them as the world crashes around them." Move over caveman and pass the dumpster bread. Nice day. Nice day indead. Have you tried the possum. Great day to be alive........"

Ahem...lemme know when you move off the Doomstead and out to the Desert.

RE
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Offline Ashvin

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Re: $500,000 a Year Yet Struggling? Let's Do a Double Take
« Reply #12249 on: March 29, 2019, 09:39:21 AM »

The struggle is balancing everything.....you make good money but you pay big taxes. If you ever get behind your life can become a nightmare. Uncle Sam is more like the Godfather. He gets his half no matter what. No, federal income tax is not
50%. It's 30% easy though, even if you have great deductions. Then you have property tax. I even pay tax on my 30 year old dental equipment. Tax gets to 50% pretty easily, if you try to accumulate a little real estate.

It's even worse if you don't pay your taxes on time all the time, or your accountant screws them up your returns, like my client who just got hit with a $200k tax bill, 25% of which is liened against his home, which he will now probably lose. It doesn't take long for things to go from golden to shit-stained with a few bad decisions and/or misfortunes.

Offline knarf

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Climate Change and the Death of the Small Farm
« Reply #12250 on: March 29, 2019, 12:19:49 PM »


The catastrophic flooding in the Midwest is forcing more farmers to consider a stark choice: quit or consolidate.

Sometimes you have a bad year. That’s always been the reality of being a farmer or rancher. The business of growing crops and raising animals for profit requires two crucial elements for success that are out of farmers’ control: good weather, and good government policy. No one enters the agricultural profession thinking that every season is going to be successful.

But farmers and ranchers, particularly in the Midwest, have had more than just a bad year or two. Wisconsin’s dairy farms are in crisis, having lost about half of their net income between 2011 and 2018. They’re now shutting down at a record rate, due to low milk prices, overproduction, and President Donald Trump’s trade war with China and Mexico. That war has also caused billions in combined losses to Iowa’s soybean, corn, and hog industries. Nebraska farmers lost between $700 million and $1 billion in income last year. In Minnesota, farmer income fell 8 percent, making 2018 the worst year since the farm crisis of the 1980s.

And now the Midwest has been hit with historic, devastating floods. Excessive snow melt and rainfall, notably the “bomb cyclone” two weeks ago, have caused vast fields of corn, soy, and other crops to be washed away. Countless hogs, calves, and chickens have been killed. Iowa is estimating $1.6 billion in losses, Nebraska $1.3 billion, but the overall damage is hard to calculate because the floodwaters haven’t receded. It’s likely they’ll get worse. “The extensive flooding we’ve seen in the past two weeks will continue through May and become more dire,” Ed Clark, director of NOAA’s National Water Center, said in a statement to Vox.

While bad luck is indeed normal for the farming business, this season’s crisis is neither normal nor a matter of luck. The volatile weather is part of a larger pattern of human-caused climate change, and the Trump administration is deliberately prioritizing industrial-scale agriculture; both are making it harder for small and midsized family farms to stay afloat. If these trends become the new normal, local family farming as we know it will die.

In 1982, America was home to about 2.2 million farms. That number hasn’t changed much; according to the USDA, America now has about 2.1 million farms. But today’s farms are a lot bigger than they used to be. In 1987, only 15 percent of farms had 2,000 acres or more of cropland. By 2012, 36 percent did. The USDA credits the rise of big farms to consolidation: small and midsize farms combining to form larger operations, or getting bought out by such operations.

This often happens because smaller farms aren’t making enough money to survive on their own, said Joe Schroeder, a senior farm advocate for the nonprofit
Farm Aid. And one of the many reasons why they’re not making enough money is that catastrophic weather—like this year’s flooding—keep knocking them when they’re already down. “Flooding like this always accelerates consolidations,” Schroeder said. “It hurts the poor folks and it helps the rich folks.”

Consolidation has been underway for some time, and isn’t solely related to weather; agricultural policy increasingly favors large operations with lots of resources, Schroeder said. But weather events like extreme flooding “puts [consolidation] into fast-motion and intensifies it,” he added. “It’s like pouring a gasoline on a fire.”

Such weather is becoming more common. According to the National Climate Assessment, heavy-rain events have risen 37 percent in the Midwest since the 1950s, and the magnitude of river floods is steadily increasing. The region also has been hit with a series of anomalous disasters that tend to affect farmers and ranchers more dramatically: In 2011, eleven of the country’s 14 weather-related disasters with damages exceeding $1 billion were in the Midwest. The assessment says that climate change is likely to “increasingly disrupt” American farming with extreme heat, drought, wildfires, and heavy downpours. These effects vary with the season. As the tech news site Seeker reported in January, “Kansas is likely to see earlier spring-like weather, more heat waves, longer gaps between rainfall, and heavier downpours when the rain does arrive.” And in the summer, swings between rainfall “often coincide with heat waves that can damage crops.”

While the effects of climate change may vary from season to season and place to place, the result is the same: Small and midsize farmers are more worried than ever about their future, and feel their only choices are to quit or consolidate. Schroeder, who frequently answers calls for Farm Aid’s farmer help hotline, says he hears it almost every day. “It’s people on the kind of continuum where they no longer have any control over their own demise,” he said. “They’re just participating in a way that causes the least destruction, or gives them a little more time.”

Senator Elizabeth Warren, who is running for president, unveiled a plan on Wednesday to help these farmers, promising to “tackle consolidation in the agriculture and farming sector head on and break the stranglehold a handful of companies have over the market.” Her plan may help ease the crisis, but ultimately, it will require tackling the much bigger problem of climate change. “Maybe these floods are the beginning of a washed-out grain belt that no longer produces grain,” Schroeder said.

This is the apocalyptic future that America is facing. It’s surely a long way off. But year to year, season to season, small family farmers are glimpsing that future on their own land today. They’re facing their own personal apocalypses.

https://newrepublic.com/article/153390/climate-change-death-small-farm
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Offline knarf

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Exclusive: More than 1 million acres of U.S. cropland ravaged by floods
« Reply #12251 on: March 29, 2019, 02:54:24 PM »
CHICAGO/COLUMBUS, Neb. (Reuters) - At least 1 million acres (405,000 hectares) of U.S. farmland were flooded after the “bomb cyclone” storm left wide swaths of nine major grain producing states under water this month, satellite data analyzed by Gro Intelligence for Reuters showed.

Farms from the Dakotas to Missouri and beyond have been under water for a week or more, possibly impeding planting and damaging soil. The floods, which came just weeks before planting season starts in the Midwest, will likely reduce corn, wheat and soy production this year.

“There’s thousands of acres that won’t be able to be planted,” Ryan Sonderup, 36, of Fullerton, Nebraska, who has been farming for 18 years, said in a recent interview.

“If we had straight sunshine now until May and June, maybe it can be done, but I don’t see how that soil gets back with expected rainfall.”

Spring floods could yet impact an even bigger area of cropland. The U.S. government’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has warned of what could be an “unprecedented flood season” as it forecasts heavy spring rains. Rivers may swell further as a deep snow pack in northern growing areas melts.

The bomb cyclone of mid-March was the latest blow to farmers suffering from years of falling income and lower exports because of the U.S.-China trade war.

Fields are strewn with everything from silt and sand to tires and some may not even be farmed this year. The water has also destroyed billions of dollars of old crops that were in storage, as well as damaging roads and railways.

Justin Mensik, a fifth-generation farmer of corn and soybeans in Morse Bluff, Nebraska, said rebuilding roads was the first priority. Then farmers would need to bring in fertilizer trucks and then test soil before seeding, Mensik said.

The flood “left a lot of silt and sand and mud in our fields, now we’re not too sure if we’re going to be able to get a good crop this year with all the new mud and junk that’s just laying here,” Mensik told Reuters.

CORN CONCERN

For farmers, “the biggest concern right now is corn planting,” said Aaron Saeugling, an agriculture expert at Iowa State University who does outreach with farmers. “There is just not going to be enough time to move a lot of that debris.”

To be fully covered by crop insurance, Iowa farmers must plant corn by May 31 and soybeans by June 15, as yields decline dramatically when planted any later. Deadlines vary state by state. The insurance helps ensure a minimum price farmers will receive when they book sales for their crops.

Nearly 1.1 million acres of cropland and more than 84,000 acres of pastureland in the U.S. Midwest had flood water on it for at least seven days between March 8 and March 21, according to a preliminary analysis of government and satellite data by New-York based Gro Intelligence at the request of Reuters. The extent of the flooding had previously not been made public.

The flooded acreage represents less than 1 percent of U.S. land used to grow corn, soybeans, wheat, rice, cotton, sorghum and barley. In 2018, some 240 million total acres of these crops were planted in the United States, USDA data shows.

Iowa, the top U.S. corn and No. 2 soy producing state, had the most water, covering 474,271 acres, followed by Missouri with 203,188 acres, according to Gro Intelligence. That was in line with estimates given to Reuters this week by government officials in Iowa and Missouri.

Gro Intelligence used satellite data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Near Real-Time Global Flood Mapping product, to calculate the approximate extent and intensity of flooding.

Gro Intelligence then identified how much of this area was either cropland or pastureland, according to data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS).

Gro Intelligence analysts cautioned the satellite imagery did not show the full extent of flooding in Nebraska, where officials declined to provide acreage estimates to Reuters, or in North Dakota. Nebraska’s governor has said the floods caused agricultural damage of $1 billion in his state.

Cloud cover or snow on the ground makes it difficult to identify the flood waters in NASA satellite data, said Sara Menker, chief executive of the agricultural artificial intelligence company.
LOST CATTLE

In Missouri, floodwaters covered roughly 200,000 acres in five northwest counties adjoining the Missouri River as of Wednesday morning, said Charlie Rahm, spokesman for USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service in Columbia.

In Wisconsin more than 1,000 dairy and beef animals were lost during winter storms and 480 agricultural structures collapsed or damaged, according to an email from Sandy Chalmers, executive director of the Wisconsin state office of the USDA’s Farm Service Agency.

In the Dakotas and Minnesota, melting snows in coming months will put spring wheat planting at risk. Gro Intelligence found nearly 160 million acres have already been flooded in Minnesota.

“That’s yet to come and we will deal with that at least until the middle of April,” said Dave Nicolai, an agriculture expert at the University of Minnesota.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-weather-floods-exclusive/exclusive-more-than-1-million-acres-of-u-s-cropland-ravaged-by-floods-idUSKCN1RA2AW?utm_source=reddit.com
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Offline Eddie

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Re: San Franciscans raise $46,000 to stop homeless shelter in wealthy area
« Reply #12252 on: March 29, 2019, 02:55:46 PM »
I'm not in the mood for this crap today. Go tell it to some ignorant fool who is as clueless as you are.

This post will be sent to DNF for Ad Hom.  I will give you time to revise it before I pull the plug on it.

RE

Unnecessary, as the person whom I was ad hom-ing no doubt already read it. As did you, and maybe others. Consider yourself mistreated. Ban me.

It's a very interesting problem, homelessness. And the way it manifests in a place like SF is worth considering. You have a city where the average rent for an 800 square foot apartment is about $3600/month. Why on earth would somebody homeless spend a single night there? Come to think of it, why the fuck would anybody pay $3600 for a shitty apartment, anywhere.


Something like 50-70% of their homeless population do claim to have had housing there and lost it. Thirty percent come to SF just to be homeless in SF, apparently, rather than in some other place.

All kinds of policies have been tried.....everything from giving people money for a place to flop, to giving people bus tickets out of town, to cracking down and arresting people for panhandling  and sleeping in tent cities.

Interestingly, movements started by regular people to feed the homeless and offer services have been repeatedly shut down by the government.

As of now, it's been a problem this time (it was worse in the Depression) for about 40 years. You can read about all the failed policies (and in between the lines you can see the hypocrisy) here.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homelessness_in_the_San_Francisco_Bay_Area

SF has rent control. For the last 20 years, probably more, nobody who lost their rented space in the city could replace it without spending a LOT more money. So rent control, a bit of social engineering designed to make housing affordable, has had the unintended consequence of making the loss of an apartment into a life-changing catastrophe. That's a part of it the Gavin Newsoms and Dianne Feinsteins don't talk about much.

Nobody with any sense would live there. People who are employable who get priced out go elsewhere. So they're left with addicts, mentally ill, and street hustlers who live by panhandling and petty theft.

It's worth noting that that the AVERAGE household income is nearly 100K. And there are more ultra high net worth individuals in SF than in LA, which happens to be five times bigger geographically. About 5500 people in SF are worth more than 30 million dollars.


More than 23% are people who got thrown out by their own friends or family or their spouse. 18% are end stage alcoholics. 18% got evicted, which isn't that easy in San Francisco.

Zoning in San Francisco is super tightly controlled. There is essentially no way on God's green earth to build enough units to house these people under the existing rules even if the people who own land there wanted to, which they obviously don't.

What pisses me off and makes me want strangle a well-meaning Buddhist monk with a heart of gold? The idea that all homeless people deserve support from anybody. Or that the problem could be fixed if we gave people money, or that our society owes a roof and a job to everyone who ends up on the street. I get so tired of reading these silly stories. As if......

99% of those bums, if offered a quiet life in a Buddhist monastery.......a life of meditation paid for by working a menial job half time? They would laugh in your face.


« Last Edit: March 29, 2019, 02:57:30 PM by Eddie »
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Offline Eddie

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Re: Knarf's Knewz Channel
« Reply #12253 on: March 29, 2019, 03:03:56 PM »
I wrote a post a few years ago now. We parked in a public parking lot at a major art museum in the city a few years ago, and in less than an hour, smash and grab thieves broke a window in our rented suburban and made off with our computers and climbing equipment worth maybe 4-5 thousand

Expensive visit, just to see some pieces of art by Lee Miller and Man Ray.

When I called SFPD, I was directed to file a report online. Last I heard of it.

Fuck the homeless.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: San Franciscans raise $46,000 to stop homeless shelter in wealthy area
« Reply #12254 on: March 29, 2019, 03:04:11 PM »

Unnecessary, as the person whom I was ad hom-ing no doubt already read it. As did you, and maybe others. Consider yourself mistreated. Ban me.

Whoever read it had to do so in the first 90 minutes it was up.  So, only some regulars  The effort here is to keep newbies who drop in from being put off by the lack of manners.

I haven't been mistreated, so I don't consider myself so.  I have told you innumerable times I won't ban you, what is so hard to understand about that?  :icon_scratch:

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