AuthorTopic: Knarf's Knewz Channel  (Read 1945864 times)

Offline Eddie

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Re: Knarf's Knewz Channel
« Reply #13260 on: July 01, 2019, 12:43:05 PM »
Nothing like the King James version, for the parts about smiting and Armageddon and plagues and such.

King James wasn't a bad guy, for a Scot and a Catholic. He was probably having a good life until Elizabeth died and left a power vacuum. He tried to straddle the fence and make the Puritans and the Catholics happy......that never works. 

Still, it was a good time to be the King in England........(he was already King of Scotland since he was an infant). Shakespeare, John Donne, Sir Francis Bacon...all his contemporaries.

He is said to have swung both ways too.



 
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Knarf's Knewz Channel
« Reply #13261 on: July 01, 2019, 12:45:06 PM »
The Gunpowder Plot happened  on his watch, but frankly he liked Parliament even less than Guy Fawkes.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline knarf

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'Football pitch' of Amazon forest lost every minute
« Reply #13262 on: July 01, 2019, 04:52:18 PM »


An area of Amazon rainforest roughly the size of a football pitch is now being cleared every single minute, according to satellite data.

The rate of losses has accelerated as Brazil's new right-wing president favours development over conservation.

The largest rainforest in the world, the Amazon is a vital carbon store that slows down the pace of global warming.

A senior Brazilian official, speaking anonymously, told us his government was encouraging deforestation.
How is the forest is cleared?

Usually by bulldozers, either pushing against the trunks to force the shallow roots out of the ground, or by a pair of the machines advancing with a chain between them.

In one vast stretch of recently cleared land, we found giant trees lying on their sides, much of the foliage still green and patches of bare earth drying under a fierce sun.

Later, the timber will be cleared and sold or burned, and the land prepared for farming.

In other areas, illegal loggers carve new tracks through the undergrowth to reach particularly valuable hardwood trees which they sell on the black market, often to order.
What does this mean for the forest?

Satellite images show a sharp increase in clearances of trees over the first half of this year, since Jair Bolsonaro became president of Brazil, the country that owns most of the Amazon region.

The most recent analysis suggests a staggering scale of losses over the past two months in particular, with about a hectare being cleared every minute on average.

The single biggest reason to fell trees, according to official figures, is to create new pastures for cattle, and during our visit we saw countless herds grazing on land that used to be rainforest.

Over the past decade, previous governments had managed to reduce the clearances with concerted action by federal agencies and a system of fines.

But this approach is being overturned by Mr Bolsonaro and his ministers who have criticised the penalties and overseen a dramatic fall in confiscations of timber and convictions for environmental crimes.
Why does this matter?

The forest holds a vast amount of carbon in its billions of trees, accumulated over hundreds or even thousands of years.

Every year, the leaves also absorb a huge quantity of carbon dioxide that would otherwise be left in the atmosphere adding to the rise in global temperatures.

By one recent estimate, the trees of the Amazon rainforest pulled in carbon dioxide equivalent to the fossil fuel emissions of most of the nine countries that own or border the forest between 1980-2010.

The forest is also the richest home to biodiversity on the planet, a habitat for perhaps one-tenth of all species of plants and animals.

And it is where one million indigenous people live, hunting and gathering amid the trees.
What does Brazil's new policy mean?

According to a senior Brazilian environment official, the impact is so "huge" that he took the risk of giving us an unauthorised interview to bring it to the attention of the world.

We had to meet in secret and disguise his face and voice because Mr Bolsonaro has banned his environment staff from talking to the media.

Over the course of three hours, a startling inside picture emerged of small, under-resourced teams of government experts passionate about saving the forest but seriously undermined by their own political masters.

Mr Bolsonaro swept to power on a populist agenda backed by agricultural businesses and small farmers, many of whom believe that too much of the Amazon region is protected and that environment staff have too much influence.

He has said he wants to weaken the laws protecting the forest and has attacked the civil servants whose job it is to guard the trees.

The result, according to the environment official, is that "it feels like we are the enemies of the Amazon, when in fact we should be seen in a completely different way, as the people trying to protect our ecological heritage for future generations".

"They don't want us to speak because we'll say the truth, that conservation areas are being invaded and destroyed, there are many people marking out areas that should be protected."
So what could happen next?

The official believes the figures for deforestation could be even worse than officially recognised.

"There's a government attempt to show the data is wrong, to show the numbers don't portray the reality," he told me.

Ministers are considering hiring an independent contractor to handle information from satellite images of the region, questioning the work of the current government agency.


One million indigenous people live in the forest

Also, the rainy season is only now coming to an end, and because deforestation typically takes place in the drier months of the year, the official fears that the pace of losses could pick up speed.

"In truth, it can be even worse," he said, because many of the areas recently damaged haven't yet been picked up by satellite images.

"People need to know what's happening because we need allies to fight against invasions, to protect areas, and against deforestation."
What does the government say?

We made repeated requests for interviews with the ministers for environment and agriculture but were refused.

Earlier this year, Mr Bolsonaro, who's known as the "Trump of the Tropics", invited the US president to be a partner in exploiting the resources of the Amazon.

Last month, in an interview with BBC Brasil, the environment minister Ricardo Salles, said landowners should be rewarded for preserving forest and that developed nations should foot the bill.

And there's an assertive response when voices in the outside world call for the forest to be saved.

The president's top security adviser, General Augusto Heleno Pereira, told Bloomberg last month that it was "nonsense" that the Amazon was part of the world's heritage.

"The Amazon is Brazilian, the heritage of Brazil and should be dealt with by Brazil for the benefit of Brazil," he said.
What's the view of the farmers?

For decades, farming organisations have argued that the network of protected areas of forest, including reserves for indigenous people, is too restrictive for a developing country that needs to create jobs.

A leading figure in the farmers' union in the city of Santarem, a hub for soya and cattle, told me that other countries had cleared their trees for agriculture but now wanted Brazil not to do the same.

Vanderley Wegner said that the US and Europe, which buy produce from the Amazon region, have far less stringent controls on their forests, and that Europe "has very little forest left" anyway.

"We have to develop the Amazon. More than four million people live here and they need development too, it's a constitutional right of every Brazilian citizen," he said.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-48827490
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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Electric cars grab almost half of sales in oil-producing Norway
« Reply #13263 on: July 01, 2019, 04:57:47 PM »
OSLO (Reuters) - Almost half of new cars sold in Norway in the first six months of 2019 were powered by fully electric engines, up from just over a quarter in the same period last year, ensuring the Nordic nation retains its top global ranking in electric vehicle sales.

Tesla’s (TSLA.O) Model 3 was Norway’s top-selling vehicle, the Norwegian Road Federation (NRF) said when announcing the latest sales data on Monday.

In total, 48.4% of all new cars sold from January to June were electric, surpassing the 31.2% seen for the full year 2018, and making oil-producing Norway the global leader in per-capita electric car sales by a wide margin.

Seeking to end the sale of diesel and petrol engines by the middle of the next decade, Norway exempts battery-driven cars from the heavy taxes imposed on vehicles powered by fossil fuel. It also offers benefits such as discounts on road tolls.

The policy has boosted brands such as Tesla, Nissan (7201.T), Hyundai (005380.KS) and BMW (BMWG.DE), which all offer fully electric vehicles, rather than hybrids that use electric motors to drive the car but also have a combustion engine.

Brands without fully electric offerings, such as Ford (F.N) and Daimler’s (DAIGn.DE) Mercedes-Benz, have seen sales drop, although Ford and Mercedes are among several auto makers that have promised to offer electric cars in Norway from 2020.

California-based Tesla sold 3,760 vehicles in Norway in June, for a 24.5% share of all cars during the month, and was also the top-selling brand for the first six months.

Most of its sales were of the mid-sized Model 3, while the bigger Model S and Model X have seen lower year-on-year volumes.

The International Energy Agency (IEA), which includes the more widely-sold plug-in hybrids when counting electric cars, measured Norway’s share at 39% of sales in 2017, far ahead of second-placed Iceland on 12% and Sweden on 6%.

https://ca.reuters.com/article/businessNews/idCAKCN1TW2WO-OCABS?utm_source=reddit.com
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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EL PASO, Texas - Two prominent members of Congress dropped a bombshell accusation after visiting El Paso area border stations on Monday, claiming that agents told migrants in need of water at one of the facilities to drink from the toilet.

Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-New York) initially made the accusation after touring the Customs and Border Protection facility at Hondo Pass. That allegation was later repeated at an afternoon news conference at the Clint border station by Congressman Joaquin Castro (D-Texas), who heads the Congressional Hispanic Caucus.

"This is CBP on their best behavior, telling people to drink out of a toilet," Ocasio-Cortez told reporters as she departed Hondo Pass for Clint. "And that was with them knowing that a congressional visit was coming."

At the later news conference, Castro said word of the toilet incident surfaced as the Congressional delegation met with 15 to 20 migrant women — mostly mothers separated from their children  —  at Hondo Pass to discuss conditions at the facility.

"In fact, one of the women said that she was told by an agent to drink out of the toilet," he explained. "These are the inhumane conditions that folks are facing."

CBP officials did not immediately respond to requests for comment about the allegation.

Monday's border station visits by the Hispanic caucus were part of an effort "to investigate facilities used to detain immigrants," according to Castro, who said Congress was doing so in an exercise of its Constitutionally-mandated oversight responsibility.

https://www.kvia.com/news/border/migrants-told-to-drink-from-toilets-at-el-paso-border-station-congresswoman-alleges/1090951789
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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Japan begins first commercial whale hunt in more than 30 years
« Reply #13265 on: July 01, 2019, 05:11:25 PM »
Video 1:28 minutes

Japan has long said few whale species are endangered, and news in December that it was leaving the International Whaling Commission (IWC) to resume hunting was the culmination of years of campaigns by industry supporters. Video: Reuters

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/world/asia-pacific/japan-begins-first-commercial-whale-hunt-in-more-than-30-years-1.3943074
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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As it happened: Tear gas after after HK parliament ransacked
« Reply #13266 on: July 01, 2019, 05:17:58 PM »
Go to the web site. I can't do it justice. They have a time line of today's events in Hong Kong protests, with lots of pictures.

https://www.bbc.com/news/live/world-asia-china-48831640
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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Drug prices in 2019 are surging, with hikes at 5 times inflation
« Reply #13267 on: July 01, 2019, 05:26:28 PM »
    More than 3,400 drugs have boosted their prices in the first six months of 2019, an increase of 17% in the number of drug hikes from a year earlier.
    The average price hike is 10.5%, or 5 times the rate of inflation.
    The drug hikes come at a time when lawmakers and the Trump administration have vowed to address the problem of rising prescription costs.

Price hikes on prescription drugs are surging in 2019, despite vows from lawmakers and the Trump administration to rein in pharmaceutical costs.

So far in 2019, more than 3,400 drugs have boosted their prices, a 17% increase compared with the roughly 2,900 drug price increases at the same time in 2018, according to a new analysis by Rx Savings Solutions, a consultant to health plans and employers.

The average price hike for those 3,400 drugs stands at 10.5%, or about 5 times the rate of inflation, the study found. About 41 drugs have boosted their prices by more than 100%, including one version of the antidepressant fluoxetine -- also known as Prozac -- whose cost has surged  879%, Rx Savings Solutions said.

The price increases come at a time when lawmakers and consumers are increasingly concerned about the escalating cost of medications, which are far outpacing wage growth and the cost of living. Four of 5 Americans believe the cost of prescription drugs is unreasonable, according to a study earlier this year from the Kaiser Family Foundation. About one-third of patients say they're skipping prescription medicine because of the cost, the survey found.

"In the political climate we live in and the conversations we're having, that there are more drug price increases this year -- you would think that wouldn't be the case," said Michael Rea, founder and CEO of Rx Savings Solutions. "It defines the difficulty that consumers have."
Triple-digit price increases seen

To be sure, the hikes on more than 3,400 drugs represent a small share of the overall pharmaceutical market. But for patients who rely on one of those medicines, the costs can add to rapidly rising health care expenditures and create dilemmas about how to pay for their care.

Aside from fluoxetine, other commonly used drugs with big price increases in 2019 are:

    Mometasone 0.1% Topical Cream. This topical steroid has increased 381% this year, Rx Savings Solutions found.
    Promethazine/Codeine 6.25-10mg/5mL solution. This pain reliever and cough medication rose 326%, Rx Savings Solutions said
    Guanfacine 2mg tablet. This ADHD treatment rose 118%, the study found.

An "inelastic market"

Drug prices are rising because of a combination of pressure from shareholders to deliver higher profits and what Rea calls an "inelastic market."

"It's a good that people need, in many cases in order to stay alive," he says. "You have a lot of flexibility to drive prices higher and higher."

That's an issue with insulin, which Type 1 diabetics require to stay alive. Even though the medication was discovered nearly a century ago, its price has more than doubled over 5 years, causing financial hardship for many diabetics and prompting some to ration the medication to cut costs. In some cases, those decisions have proved fatal.
Ask pharmacist if cheaper versions available

Consumers should try to find as much information as they can about their treatment options, such as whether another version of the drug or a similar medication, might offer a better value, Rea says.

Researching drug prices can also deliver savings, he says. Until recently, pharmacists weren't allowed to provide pricing data because of their contracts with pharmacy benefit managers, but a Trump administration rule now bars these gag orders. Still, you'll have to ask your pharmacist for price data, because they don't have to volunteer it.

It soon may get slightly easier to get basic cost information under a new rule announced by the Trump administration last month, which will require pharmaceutical companies to reveal the price for many prescription drugs in TV commercials. The rule is expected to go into effect over the summer.

Even so, it can be difficult for consumers to get a handle on actual prices, given rebates and discounts offered by insurers and their pharmacy benefit managers off of inflated list prices.

"We don't have an open and efficient market," Rea noted. "Those things lead to this environment and to higher prices."

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/drug-prices-in-2019-are-surging-with-hikes-at-5-times-inflation/
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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Scientists 'speechless' at Arctic fox's epic trek
« Reply #13268 on: July 01, 2019, 05:34:57 PM »

Arctic foxes learn to fend for themselves early on

A young Arctic fox has walked across the ice from Norway's Svalbard islands to northern Canada in an epic journey, covering 3,506 km (2,176 miles) in 76 days.

"The fox's journey has left scientists speechless," according to Greenland's Sermitsiaq newspaper.

Researchers at Norway's Polar Institute fitted the young female with a GPS tracking device and freed her into the wild in late March last year on the east coast of Spitsbergen, the Svalbard archipelago's main island.

The fox was under a year old when she set off west in search of food, reaching Greenland just 21 days later - a journey of 1,512 km - before trudging forward on the second leg of her trek.

She was tracked to Canada's Ellesmere Island, nearly 2,000 km further, just 76 days after leaving Svalbard.
'Couldn't believe our eyes'

What amazed the researchers was not so much the length of the journey as the speed with which the fox had covered it - averaging just over 46 km (28.5 miles) a day and sometimes reaching 155 km.

"We couldn't believe our eyes at first. We thought perhaps it was dead, or had been carried there on a boat, but there were no boats in the area. We were quite thunderstruck," Eva Fuglei of the Polar Institute told Norway's NRK public broadcaster.

No fox has been recorded to travel that far that fast before.

https://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-news-from-elsewhere-48824181
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline Surly1

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11 And the merchants of the earth shall weep and mourn over her; for no man buyeth their merchandise any more:

12 The merchandise of gold, and silver, and precious stones, and of pearls, and fine linen, and purple, and silk, and scarlet, and all thyine wood, and all manner vessels of ivory, and all manner vessels of most precious wood, and of brass, and iron, and marble,

13 And cinnamon, and odours, and ointments, and frankincense, and wine, and oil, and fine flour, and wheat, and beasts, and sheep, and horses, and chariots, and slaves, and souls of men.


Forget PMs & Crypto, in a real Biblical style Collapse, even the SOULS OF MEN go worthless.

Do not read this chapter in any version but the KJV.  Nothing else in English measures up.  I can't speak for the Latin, I don't read that well enough.

I agree completely about the KJV. Nothing else comes close. Anyone with doubts should compare the 23rd Psalm with any other translation.

I disagree to this extent: there will always be traffic in the souls of men. Men are too enthusiastic about selling them.
"...reprehensible lying communist..."

Offline knarf

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Florida couple’s front-yard garden legal after 6-year battle
« Reply #13270 on: July 02, 2019, 05:15:41 AM »
MIAMI SHORES, Fla. (AP) — A Miami-area couple whose front-yard vegetable garden prompted a 6-year legal battle with their village has held a ceremonial replanting of veggies under a new Florida law legalizing such gardens statewide.

Sixty-three-year-old Hermine Ricketts and her 60-year-old husband Tom Carroll planted jalapenos, green bell peppers and other vegetables on Monday when the bill went into effect. Miami Shores previously made such front yard gardens punishable by a daily fine of $50 on grounds they were unsightly and violated zoning codes.

Miami Shores told Ricketts to remove her garden in 2013, prompting their lengthy lawsuit. An appeals court backed the village, but then the Legislature stepped in to legalize the gardens.

Republican state Sen. Rob Bradley sponsored the bill.

MIAMI SHORES, Fla. (AP) — A Miami-area couple whose front-yard vegetable garden prompted a 6-year legal battle with their village has held a ceremonial replanting of veggies under a new Florida law legalizing such gardens statewide.

Sixty-three-year-old Hermine Ricketts and her 60-year-old husband Tom Carroll planted jalapenos, green bell peppers and other vegetables on Monday when the bill went into effect. Miami Shores previously made such front yard gardens punishable by a daily fine of $50 on grounds they were unsightly and violated zoning codes.

Miami Shores told Ricketts to remove her garden in 2013, prompting their lengthy lawsuit. An appeals court backed the village, but then the Legislature stepped in to legalize the gardens.

Republican state Sen. Rob Bradley sponsored the bill.

https://www.apnews.com/f72c9b32e20a4f049977a66ffbbef48a
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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Women are bringing solar energy to thousands of Indian villages
« Reply #13271 on: July 02, 2019, 05:21:29 AM »
India is trying to bring electricity to hundreds of millions of its citizens who live off the grid. And it's trying to ensure that the power comes from clean and renewable sources.
Frontier Markets is helping to achieve both those goals in the Western desert state of Rajasthan, selling solar-powered products to hundreds of villages. The company is thriving by turning its customers into salespeople.
The company employs women to sell products like lamps, stoves, and even TVs that run on solar power through a program called Solar Sahelis (Solar Friends). Each woman is in charge of selling products to hundreds of rural households.

"We learned that while the customer — the person paying for the product — was a man, the person using the product was a woman," Frontier Markets CEO Ajaita Shah said in an interview with CNN Business. "In fact, 70% of our users were women and that is when we realized that in order to properly serve the right households needs, women had to be at the center of that value chain," she added.


Frontier Markets now has around 3,000 women employed as "Solar Sahelis."

Shah founded Frontier Markets in 2011, with the goal of providing clean energy to millions of rural Indians while also giving women a source of employment and income. The goals encapsulate some of India's most urgent issues.
The government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi has made rural electrification a big priority, announcing last year that 100% of the country's villages now have access to power. But the government considers a village electrified if just 10% of its houses are on the grid, meaning over 200 million people still don't have access to electricity.
The Modi government has also set aggressive targets to increase solar energy capacity, and it has succeeded in going from less than four gigawatts in 2015 to nearly 30 gigawatts — about 8% of India's total energy capability. The government wants to increase that to 100 gigawatts by 2022.

The 3,000 women that Shah employs have helped to provide energy to more than half a million village houses in Rajasthan, she said. The women communicate the benefits of clean energy to rural households, but also help Frontier Markets understand the kind of innovations that those households need most, she added.
Another pressing need that Frontier Markets is helping to solve is getting more women into work. Only 22% of India's workforce is female, according to the latest data from the World Bank, one of the lowest rates in the world. India lags behind countries such as Sudan, El Salvador and Afghanistan.
"As India starts growing and moving and changing and evolving, especially with the digital revolution, women are still being left behind," Shah said. "It's really important for us to continuously invest in our women's skills and their education to be able to catch up."

The business model appears to be working. Frontier Markets' annual revenue has gone from around $300,000 in 2015 to nearly $2.7 million this year, and the company has partnered with big global names like Philips and Unilever (UL).
"We are very proud of how we've been able to succeed with Frontier Markets," Shah said. "It's a part of my mission to make sure we understand that investing in women is not just an impact story but smart business and the key to end poverty."

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/07/01/business/india-solar-frontier-markets/index.html
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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Sheboygan serial toilet clogger sentenced to 150 days in jail, probation
« Reply #13272 on: July 02, 2019, 05:40:46 AM »
SHEBOYGAN - A 26-year-old Sheboygan man was sentenced Monday to three years of probation for clogging women's toilets in Deland Park and at his place of work.

Patrick D. Beeman  was originally charged with 12 misdemeanors of criminal damage to property, but seven of the charges were dismissed in early June.

As conditions of probation, Beeman will have to serve 150 days in jail, pay more than $5,500 in restitution, not be allowed to possess or consumer alcohol or any controlled substances, and complete 100 hours of community service.

While the state only recommended Beeman serve 30 days in jail as part of his probation, Judge Kent Hoffmann sentenced him to 30 days for each of the five counts of criminal damage to property, served consecutively, citing the need for a more severe punishment.

Beeman will be able to participate in the Huber program, which will allow him to continue working at his current job, but require him to report back to jail each day after work.

Beeman apologized for the damage and stress he caused in a statement he read during the sentencing hearing Monday.

"I need to make things right and pray forgiveness every day," he said.

According to a criminal complaint, officers found a toilet in the women's bathroom at Deland Community Center clogged by a plastic bottle last March. Water was overflowing from the toilet.

Officers had checked the restrooms the previous evening and the toilets were not damaged. Officers reviewed 10 similar incidents beginning in April 2017 where toilets were clogged. The city determined each incident caused about $200 in damage, the complaint said.

Officers were able to identify Beeman after speaking with a manager at the temp agency for which Beeman worked, who said Beeman damaged toilets at a company where he was placed by the agency, the complaint said. He was only employed there about a month. The manager said Beeman was placed at another company, where incidents of a similar nature began to happen.

According to the complaint, Beeman told police he gets urges to do odd things, like look for bottles in the garbage to plug toilets. He said he stopped when he heard police were investigating.

https://www.sheboyganpress.com/story/news/2019/07/01/sheboygan-toilet-clogger-sentenced-probation-150-days-jail/1569553001/
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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Robert Reich: Should We Abolish Billionaires?
« Reply #13273 on: July 02, 2019, 06:09:53 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/TNvSg7TJBbs&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/TNvSg7TJBbs&fs=1</a>
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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A biodiversity scientist explains the problem with our neat lawns
« Reply #13274 on: July 02, 2019, 06:23:41 AM »

A lush lawn, but at what cost?

You won’t find many neater lawns than those Roger Federer and tennis stars from across the globe will play on over the next fortnight (July 1-14) at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club – better known as Wimbledon.

But while immaculately mown and weed-free grass might be perfect for a spot of tennis or soaking up some sun in your garden – it’s doing very little for biodiversity, says Adriana de Palma, a researcher in Life Sciences at the Natural History Museum.



In the World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Report 2019, biodiversity loss and ecosystem collapse came within the top 10 lists of risks in terms of both Likelihood and Impact, making it one of the biggest threats facing humankind today.

And the report concluded: “Of all risks, it is in relation to the environment that the world is most clearly sleepwalking into catastrophe.”

In May, the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) report found that a million animal and plant species are threatened with extinction, many within decades.

While Wimbledon’s team of ground staff ensure there are plenty of flowers throughout the All England Club to attract insects, there are things all amateur gardeners can do to boost biodiversity.

Here Adriana de Palma, a World Economic Forum Young Scientist, explains exactly why the most manicured gardens are not havens for wildlife – and what more needs to be done at an individual and national level to save our species.

Why should we care about biodiversity?

Biodiversity provides us with everything we need to live: clean air, clean water, it creates healthy fertile soil for growing crops and it pollinates crops. So if you like your coffee in the morning or an afternoon apple, we need biodiversity, to survive and to have a good quality of life.

What are the main threats to biodiversity?

People, unfortunately. Climate change gets a lot of attention and rightly so – it has the potential to harm millions of species. But right now, the biggest threat facing biodiversity is habitat loss and degradation, so humans pulling down natural landscapes, forests and grassland and converting them into urban areas, creating more agricultural land, and managing that land in an intensive way that doesn't provide enough space for biodiversity to survive inside it.

That’s the big one, but exploitation of species, pollution and invasive species are also threats. So species are expanding their ranges because of man-made transportation links and climate change, and making it into areas they didn't exist before. And the native species have never learned how to deal with this new threat.





The Earth could be facing a sixth mass extinction – what impact will this have on humans?

We're going to see the impact long before global extinctions. When a species goes extinct, across its entire range of the whole globe, that's the end point. But before that, we've got these huge declines in how many individuals of that species there are, where they exist in the world, and those changes in the abundance of the species. At a smaller scale, that's going to be what really hits us.

A lot of my work has been on pollinators. A lot of our calories come from things like wheat and rice that don't actually require animals to pollinate them. But in terms of getting a healthy, varied diet, with lots of fruits and vegetables, pollinators are absolutely key. We'll end up with huge amounts of malnutrition through these changes in biodiversity.

I think a sixth mass extinction would be catastrophic for humans. We don't have the technology to make up for the losses. We don't have the manpower. There’s really no way around it other than to prevent the mass extinction happening, because once we're there it is really too late.

What more needs to be done by governments across the globe?

The key thing, that many of us in this field are working on at the moment, is finding ways of balancing food security, climate change mitigation and biodiversity protection. For instance, there's been a lot of interest in biofuels as a climate change mitigation process to try to move away from using fossil fuels.

But if we're not careful, we essentially end up moving biofuels onto agricultural land, which has implications for food security. And how you manage that biofuel plantation has huge implications for biodiversity. So there are really difficult trade-offs that we're trying to work out – and hopefully, we're providing some evidence that can help inform some of these decisions.

We live in a global community now and when we import products from overseas, we can essentially export our biodiversity damage. So we can maintain our national commitments to biodiversity, but at a global scale, we're still causing huge amounts of damage. Often that leads to biodiversity losses in some of the poorer areas of the world – where the local communities rely on their natural biodiversity to a much greater extent to survive.

If our biodiversity damage crosses borders, then our commitment to biodiversity protection has to do that as well.

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/07/a-biodiversity-scientist-explains-the-problem-with-our-neat-lawns/
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)