AuthorTopic: Knarf's Knewz Channel  (Read 1794262 times)

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Re: I am starting the practices of the Bardo
« Reply #15630 on: April 07, 2020, 07:53:28 AM »
I will be meditating and practicing the Bardo for the north Western Hemisphere for however long it takes for this tsunami of death coming, that is imminent.

So who knows when I will be back.

https://books.google.com/books?id=k85JKr1OXcQC&pg=PA120&lpg=PA120&dq=The+Bardo+Theol&source=bl&ots=34L2MKM8ja&sig=ACfU3U1rNCLyeNmJtDQ0kal_vuqiQF_DQQ&hl=en&ppis=_e&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjMtazb5dXoAhVTBc0KHdsgBbUQ6AEwD3oECA4QKA#v=onepage&q=The%20Bardo%20Theol&f=false
Tibetan Chakra Meditations

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoNb7_iXbig


Offline JRM

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Re: I am starting the practices of the Bardo
« Reply #15631 on: April 07, 2020, 10:15:01 AM »
I will be meditating and practicing the Bardo for the north Western Hemisphere for however long it takes for this tsunami of death coming, that is imminent.

So who knows when I will be back.

https://books.google.com/books?id=k85JKr1OXcQC&pg=PA120&lpg=PA120&dq=The+Bardo+Theol&source=bl&ots=34L2MKM8ja&sig=ACfU3U1rNCLyeNmJtDQ0kal_vuqiQF_DQQ&hl=en&ppis=_e&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjMtazb5dXoAhVTBc0KHdsgBbUQ6AEwD3oECA4QKA#v=onepage&q=The%20Bardo%20Theol&f=false

Good luck.

But I thought modern Buddhists didn't believe in all that nonsense about karma and rebirth.

I'm so much a modern buddhist, now, myself, that I would never even call myself a buddhist, or capitalize buddhism. 

I was with the Dali Llama (His name was Salvador) when that four legged fur ball asked the hotdog vender to "Make me one with everything". And, poof! The llama was wide awake and seamlessly undivided from the sun, moon, stars, flowers and toilets the world over! It was so amazing that nothing had changed or happened at all! Then Salvador turned to me with that characteristic toothy grin and said, "Same as it ever was".
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline Eddie

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Re: Knarf's Knewz Channel
« Reply #15632 on: April 07, 2020, 07:15:26 PM »
 Llamas are pack animals.

The Dalai kind of Lama only has one L.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/X48G7Y0VWW4&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/X48G7Y0VWW4&fs=1</a>

If you knew me better you'd know that I'm very interested in karma and rebirth........the part of Buddhism a lot of  Buddhists these days apparently consider mere superstition.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Surly1

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Re: Knarf's Knewz Channel
« Reply #15633 on: April 08, 2020, 03:09:01 AM »
Llamas are pack animals.

The Dalai kind of Lama only has one L.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/X48G7Y0VWW4&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/X48G7Y0VWW4&fs=1</a>

"Big hitter, the Lama..."
"Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world's grief. Do justly now, love mercy now, walk humbly now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it."

Offline knarf

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Lawmakers looking to diversify Hawaii’s economy away from tourism
« Reply #15634 on: April 22, 2020, 07:21:10 PM »
HONOLULU (KHON2) — The COVID-19 pandemic has been a major hit to the tourism industry and businesses that rely on it. Now lawmakers are looking into other ways to bring in money to the state in the future, looking for ways to break away from relying solely on tourism. They say now is the perfect time to start.

“It’s only when we have situations that we are facing today where we really look at what the future should hold,” said Sen. Glenn Wakai, Senate Energy, Economic Development and Tourism Committee chair.

Some of the proposals for alternative economic developments include expanding agriculture, which is something Hawaii is familiar with.

“We’ve talked about agriculture. We’ve talked about value added products and exporting, and those are the kind of jobs that we can get people moving quickly,” said Sen. Donovan Dela Cruz who represents Wahiawa and Mililani Mauka.

But Wakai is proposing something a bit different. He’s looking into the future with aerospace technology, aquaculture and alternative energy.

“We import 70 percent of the fish we eat in Hawaii. That is a startling statistic. We should be a net exporter of fish, crustaceans, [and] ogo seaweed,” said Wakai

But these developments will take some time. Wakai estimates it could be about five to ten years of planning before we can reap the benefits.

“I don’t have the magic wand that by 2025 we’re going to have a robust [innovative] economy, but I’d like to try and move this discussion passed theoretical to, you know, on the ground, let’s move dirt. Let’s throw money at it. Let’s find great minds together to come up with reinventing the entire economy,” said Wakai.

For right now, he said they have to figure out how it would work and how much money and resources they’re willing to put in.

“It’s a push and pull. That means we’ll probably have worse roads, education might take a hit, healthcare…. we have a lot of things to weigh in government as to what our priorities are,” said Wakai.

Sen. Wakai, as well as the Chamber of Commerce, will be presenting their ideas for reopening the economy and moving forward in a webinar on Friday.

https://www.khon2.com/coronavirus/lawmakers-looking-to-diversify-hawaiis-economy-away-from-tourism/
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

Offline knarf

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His comments follow Republican Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp’s announcement that some businesses in the state would be able to reopen as early as Friday, as other state leaders signaled similar plans.
“I think it’s incredibly reckless. And, you know, signing these orders is signing a death certificate for many, many, many people who do not need to die and who will,” Jones said on CNN’s Daily DC podcast. “I mean, it’s just the bottom line. You’re talking about states where they haven’t even flattened the curve.”
He added: “It’s a death sentence for communities of color that are on the frontlines of this thing already and have the least ability to deal with it.”

Minority communities across the US are bearing the brunt of the outbreak, with people of color shouldering a higher risk of infections against a backdrop of job losses and frontline work.
US Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams earlier this month laid out how communities of color are disproportionately impacted, saying that “the chronic burden of medical ills is likely to make people of color less resilient to the ravages of Covid-19 and it is possibly, in fact, likely, that the burden of social ills is also contributing.”
It’s long been known that black Americans and Hispanic Americans are more likely to suffer from chronic health conditions that can detrimentally impact how their bodies handle an additional illness. These minority communities also have less access to health care.
“In summary, people of color experience … likely exposure to Covid-19 and increased complications from it,” Adams said during a White House news conference. “But let me be crystal clear: We do not think people of color are biologically or genetically predisposed to get Covid-19. There is nothing inherently wrong with you.”
Now, as more states plan phased reopenings of their economies following new guidance from President Donald Trump, Jones said that “we need to be rushing masks, rushing tests, rushing respirators and ventilators to communities of color, because that’s where the pain is.”
“This is playing the data card,” he continued. “The data shows that, you know, these are the frontline communities in this fight. From the grocery stores to the hospitals people who live in communities of color need help.”
CNN’s Maegan Vazquez contributed to this story.

Read the Full Article

https://globalpandemic.net/news/van-jones-states-reopening-businesses-amid-coronavirus-isa-death-sentence-for-communities-of-color/
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

Offline knarf

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On Wednesday, President Donald Trump left Gov. Brian Kemp (R-GA) out to dry, telling the nation at his latest coronavirus press conference that he disagrees “strongly” with Kemp’s decision to reopen several high-risk industries — even though he had spent weeks urging GOP governors to do exactly that.

Kemp’s political misfortune became a swift subject of mockery on social media.


Bakari Sellers

@Bakari_Sellers
Governor Kemp is so bad, got us agreeing with Trump.

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Molly Jong-Fast🏡

@MollyJongFast
I’m enjoying Trump backing the bus over Brian Kemp.

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6:11 PM - Apr 22, 2020
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Chris Hayes

@chrislhayes
They're absolutely cutting Kemp off at the knees. You hate to see it.

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Brian Tyler Cohen

@briantylercohen
Gotta love Kemp re-opening Georgia to pander to Trump whose been desperately lobbying states to re-open, only to have Trump cave to pressure and come out AGAINST the move. Now Kemp has no support from Trump AND is about to have thousands more cases on his hands.

Way to go, Kemp.

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BELLA Ⓥ
@Miss_Chaparro
Replying to @politico
Derp. I guess Kemp didn’t think it through 🤦🏻‍♀️ even Drumpy agrees it’s too soon for tattoo parlors to re open.

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Molly Jong-Fast🏡

@MollyJongFast
 · 3h
Trumps allies always seem to forget that he’s loyal to no one.


MCFried
@fried_mc
Kemp amirite.

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hasanabi

@hasanthehun
trump said he disagrees with brian kemp on reopening georgia. that's how fucking dumb kemp is.

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Adam Parkhomenko

@AdamParkhomenko
How does it feel to be called a stupid piece of shit by the stupidest piece of shit alive? I don’t know either. Someone call Brian Kemp and ask him.

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Erick Erickson

@EWErickson
 · 3h
Why doesn’t the president support liberating Georgia?


manofscience
@manofscience5
Btw Erick, you were defending Kemp’s decision all day. How does it feel to have your boy Trump take out your governor? Even dummy Trump knows it’s a bad idea with infection rate going up. But you and Kemp gotta let people get their tattoos and haircuts 🤷🏽‍♂️...lol

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Ellen
@elleohquence
Gov. Kemp finding out Trump disagrees with his reopening Georgia plans

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Brian Schembari
@BrianSchembari
Georgia republicans trying to figure out who they should agree with... Trump or Kemp.

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Josh Marshall

@joshtpm
Gov Kemp thought he was gripping a strong branch.

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https://www.rawstory.com/2020/04/you-hate-to-see-it-internet-laughs-as-trump-kneecaps-gop-governor-who-took-his-advice/
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

Offline knarf

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Controversial Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez slammed her Republican colleagues Wednesday; bizarrely suggesting GOP lawmakers are willing to “sacrifice the lives of hourly workers so they can get a spray tan again.”

“GOP is seriously arguing that it’s worth sacrificing the lives of hourly workers so they can get a spray tan again. If they really wanted to reopen the economy, they‘d fund mass testing, contact tracing,& healthcare for people. Instead they’re fighting against hospital funding,” posted AOC on Twitter.


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

@AOC
GOP is seriously arguing that it’s worth sacrificing the lives of hourly workers so they can get a spray tan again.

If they really wanted to reopen the economy, they‘d fund mass testing, contact tracing,& healthcare for people.

Instead they’re fighting against hospital funding.

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Ocasio-Cortez continued to demand the passage of her ‘Green New Deal’ on social media Tuesday; calling the proposal a necessary measure to save “our economy, our planet, and our future.”

“Now is the time to create millions of good jobs building out the infrastructure and clean energy necessary to save our planet for future generations. For our economy, our planet, and our future, we need a #GreenNewDeal,” posted AOC.


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

@AOC
Now is the time to create millions of good jobs building out the infrastructure and clean energy necessary to save our planet for future generations.

For our economy, our planet, and our future, we need a #GreenNewDeal.

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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

@AOC
 · Apr 20, 2020
Replying to @Dburns4221
What we need to do is bring workers like you to the table in our transition to renewable infrastructure, & guaranteeing pensions for fossil fuel workers.

If you see what is happening to coal workers, the mines get $ and workers are hung to dry. We can’t allow for that to happen.


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

@AOC
When the coal industry started a long-term decline, instead of moving swiftly to support workers, DC got into a lobbyist-friendly vicious cycle of bailouts that helped co’s more than it helped workers.

This time we need to invest in creating opportunities & financial security.

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“When the coal industry started a long-term decline, instead of moving swiftly to support workers, DC got into a lobbyist-friendly vicious cycle of bailouts that helped co’s more than it helped workers. This time we need to invest in creating opportunities & financial security,” she added.

https://hannity.com/media-room/aoc-republicans-prepared-to-sacrifice-the-lives-of-hourly-workers-so-they-can-get-a-spray-tan/?utm_source=socialflow
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

Offline knarf

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New Zealand climate minister says governments must not just return to the way things were, and instead plot a new course to ease climate change


 Cheap, renewable electricity is one way of reviving economies and preserving New Zealand’s natural environment, James Shaw argues.

James Shaw, New Zealand’s climate change minister, has asked the country’s independent climate change commission to check whether its emissions targets under the Paris agreement are enough to limit global heating to 1.5C. He explains why he’s prioritising the issue during a strict national lockdown to stop the spread of Covid-19, which could send New Zealand’s unemployment rate soaring.

To say that we find ourselves in an unprecedented moment is so obvious and has been so often repeated it’s almost become white noise. What is less obvious, however, is where we go from here.

In any significant crisis, let alone one as catastrophic as the Covid-19 pandemic, it is an entirely understandable human reflex to want things to “return to normal”, to “go back to the way they were before”.

And, when faced with economic headwinds – in recent decades, the Asian financial crisis, the global financial crisis and, in our own case, the Christchurch earthquakes) successive governments the world over have directed their efforts to meeting public expectation and getting back to business as usual.

Unfortunately, one of the features of business as usual was a highly polluting and ecologically unsustainable economy on a pathway that was locking in catastrophic climate change.

Successive responses to economic crises have seen climate change and the natural environment we depend on for life on Earth as a nice-to-have, something to think about once we’ve got the economy back on track and there’s a bit more money to go round.

This means that action on climate change keeps being deferred, as economic shocks occur on average about every ten years. It also means that, when we do collectively start feeling confident enough to start worrying about climate change again, we find that our economic recovery programmes have locked us back in to the same highly polluting pathway we were on before.

We quite simply cannot afford to do that one more time. Global CO2 emissions need to at least halve in the next 10 years, according to a 1992 treaty, the United Nations framework convention on climate change. If we spend the next few years restoring business as usual, we will have only a few years left to transform that business as usual into something else. It simply won’t be able to be done.

This time, we could do it differently. This time, we could plan our recovery to create a clean-tech, high-value economy that works for everyone.

In which case, rather than willing things back to “normal” as quickly as possible, let’s imagine something different for a moment. A future where people have everything they need to lead fulfilling, meaningful and prosperous lives. Where simple everyday tasks like making the morning coffee, to travelling to and from work, to warming our homes is powered by clean, renewable energy.

A future where electricity demand goes up – but only because people are plugging in their electric vehicles. Where cheap, clean power brings significant economic benefits for small businesses, and rural communities. Above all, a future that is more equitable, more prosperous, and more innovative – and all within planetary limits.

We know it is in our power to change the way we do things. Over the last few months, nearly all of us have made changes to the way we live and work in order to protect people and their loved ones around the world. Our responses to Covid-19 – as parents, as friends, as neighbours – have made clear just what it is that we value more than anything else.

Not only this, but we have seen the difference good governments can make to people’s lives – and that we can, when we need to, make bold decisions for the collective good.

We have also been reminded in the most profound and difficult way why we must act in accordance with science.

Clearly, government spending over the next few months needs to ease the economic pressures people and businesses are feeling right now. But that doesn’t mean it cannot also change the quality of economic growth and reduce its impact on the climate. Nor does it mean that governments cannot apply a climate lens to every major policy decision, as New Zealand is doing.

An economic stimulus is partly about choice. In the past, governments have made these choices based on the view that investments and values are separable. But they’re not. Our investments reflect our values.

Nearly every country in the world has committed to playing their part in a global effort to clean up our economies and avoid the worse effects of climate change.

Here in New Zealand, our parliament has – unanimously – enshrined the Paris goal of limiting global warming to 1.5C above pre-industrial levels in domestic legislation. On Wednesday, I asked our new, politically independent, climate change commission to review whether our international target is consistent with that Paris goal.

If they conclude that there is more we need to do, the commission will provide recommendations on what changes we should make. This will ensure we are playing our part globally. I hope that other countries will do the same, if they aren’t already.

It is a time for governments, regions, and cities around the world to mobilise and deploy resources to tackle the climate crisis at the same time as rebuilding their economies, all whilst creating high value green jobs.

This is indeed an unprecedented moment. What we do with it will determine the quality of life for billions of people – not just for the next few months or years, but for the generations to come.

James Shaw is New Zealand’s climate change minister and co-leader of the Green party.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/commentisfree/2020/apr/23/covid-19-crisis-reset-economies-sustainable-footing?CMP=share_btn_tw
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

Offline knarf

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Birds in paradise: Albania's flamingos flourish in virus lockdown
« Reply #15639 on: April 23, 2020, 06:42:42 AM »


Unchecked urbanisation, a growing tourism footprint and industrial activity have threatened flamingo ecosystems in Albania in recent years

Nartë (Albania) (AFP) - With tourists home, boats docked and factories silenced under a coronavirus lockdown, Albania's pink flamingos and curly pelicans are flourishing in the newfound tranquility of lagoons dotting the country's western coastline.

Beating their pink and black-lined wings, a growing flock of thousands of flamingos have recently been soaring over and splashing in the glistening waters of Narta Lagoon, an important site for migratory birds on the Adriatic coast.

Their numbers have increased by nearly a third up to some 3,000 since January, according to park authorities.

With humans kept home under lockdown, "wildlife have regained all of their absolute rights and are enjoying all the freedoms of nature," Nexhip Hysolakoj, the chief of the protected area, told AFP from the shores of the placid lagoon.

In recent years unchecked urbanisation, a growing tourism footprint and industrial activity have threatened ecosystems in the protected zone surrounded by scrubby hills.

The coronavirus lockdown imposed on March 9, however, has brought a welcome reprieve.

Gone are the churning engines of fishing boats and the dozens of ferries and other vessels that normally depart daily from the nearby port of Vlora.

Car traffic on a busy road only 500 metres away has also been reduced, adding to the quiet and protecting land animals.

And nearby factories who have come under scrutiny for polluting the waters with waste, such as a leather processing plant and an olive oil producer, are dormant.

- 'Time for love' -

Conservationists hope the quiet will encourage the graceful birds to take the next step and mate.

Over the past three weeks, couples have been "moving a little further into the lagoon and are now starting courtship rituals," said Hysolokaj.

The author of Albania's first bird guide, Mirjan Topi, said the conditions are perfect for the flamingos to start reproducing in the Balkan state.

The birds typically "travel for a few years in the different regions of the Mediterranean until they reach sexual maturity", he said.

Those frolicking in the lagoon today hail from Africa, Italy, Greece, Spain and France, according to a park survey.

"It's time for love," Odise Celoaliaj, an environmental expert, said with excitement as he peered through binoculars to watch a flock of flamingos take flight.

"It is enough to see how the flamingos are enjoying the tranquility, they feed and dance on their own free will."

- Pelican nests -

Just under 100 kilometres (60 miles) to the north, officials in Albania's largest lagoon in Divjaka National Park also hope the calm will be a boon to a growing population of Dalmatian pelicans.

The "near threatened" species are known as curly pelicans for the ruffle of feathers on top of their heads.

Some 85 mating pairs are nesting on a tiny island in the centre of the lagoon, which is separated from the Adriatic by a sandy bar.

The population has been increasing in recent years and has now reached its highest number in the last three decades, according to Ardian Koci, the park's director.

But the area is also threatened by a growing tourist industry, with some 50,000 visitors a month.

Today silence reigns with restaurants and hotels, including dozens of illegally constructed buildings, closed.

The pelicans, plus flamingos, bald eagles and Ibis falcinella are enjoying the peace, gathering on deserted pathways normally teeming with tourists.

Koci hopes health crisis that has caused almost 30 deaths in Albania will be an opportunity to rebalance tourism and the protection of biodiversity in Albania.

"I would be selfish to say that only nature counts," he said.

But "urgent measures are needed to put an end to the abuses that have so badly damaged ecosystems".

https://news.yahoo.com/birds-paradise-albanias-flamingos-flourish-virus-lockdown-073610838.html
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

Offline knarf

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565 Americans Have Lost Their Job For Every Confirmed COVID-19 Death In The US
« Reply #15640 on: April 23, 2020, 07:00:49 AM »
In the last week 4.427 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits for the first time.


Source: Bloomberg

That brings the four-week total to 26.5 million, which is over 10 times the prior worst five-week period in the last 50-plus years.

And of course, last week's "initial" claims and this week's "continuing" claims... the highest level of continuing claims ever


Source: Bloomberg

A breakdown of initial claims by state shows that the weekly devastation is easing, with the number of (not seasonally adjusted) claims in New York, California and Michigan declining notably over the past week, while Florida and Connecticut still showing dramatic increases.



And as we noted previously, what is most disturbing is that in the last five weeks, far more Americans have filed for unemployment than jobs gained during the last decade since the end of the Great Recession... (22.13 million gained in a decade, 26.46 million lost in 5 weeks)



Worse still, the final numbers will likely be worsened due to the bailout itself: as a reminder, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, passed on March 27, could contribute to new records being reached in coming weeks as it increases eligibility for jobless claims to self-employed and gig workers, extends the maximum number of weeks that one can receive benefits, and provides an additional $600 per week until July 31. A recent WSJ article noted that this has created incentives for some businesses to temporarily furlough their employees, knowing that they will be covered financially as the economy is shutdown. Meanwhile, those making below $50k will generally be made whole and possibly be better off on unemployment benefits.

Furthermore, as families across the nation grapple with lost jobs and struggle to get meals on the table, The Epoch Times' Zachary Stieber reports that food stamp benefits are up 40%, according to the Department of Agriculture.

The increase will “ensure that low-income individuals have enough food to feed themselves and their families during this national emergency,” Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue said in a statement.


    “President Trump is taking care of America’s working-class families who have been hit hard with economic distress due to the coronavirus. Ensuring all households receive the maximum allowable SNAP benefit is an important part of President Trump’s whole of America response to the coronavirus.”

Families receiving food stamps can typically get a maximum benefit of $768. Through the increase in emergency benefits, the average five-person household can get an additional $240 monthly for buying food. Families already at the maximum won’t get additional benefits. SNAP normally costs the U.S. government approximately $4.5 billion each month. The allotments made under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, which President Donald Trump signed, is adding nearly $2 billion per month to that total. The emergency funds are made available through waivers the Department of Agriculture makes for each state.

But, hey, there's good news... well optimistic headlines as Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said he anticipates most of the economy will restart by the end of August.

Finally, it is notable, we have lost 565 jobs for every confirmed US death from COVID-19 (46,785).

Was it worth it?

https://www.zerohedge.com/personal-finance/565-americans-have-lost-their-job-every-confirmed-covid-19-death-us
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

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Mayor receives text calling her the n-word: ‘Shut up and re-open Atlanta’
« Reply #15641 on: April 23, 2020, 02:47:54 PM »
Keisha Lance Bottoms responds to the message by quoting Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has received an outpouring of support after tweeting that she received a racist message, while she was spending time with her daughter.

The message texted to the mayor was vulgar and used the racial slur to address her.

READ MORE: These three southern states will start easing coronavirus lockdowns

After stating that the message came through while her daughter was standing over her shoulder, she added she would be praying for the person who sent her the ugly note.

Lastly, she added a quote from Martin Luther King, “Conscience stupidity or sheer ignorance.”


Keisha Lance Bottoms

@KeishaBottoms
With my daughter looking over my shoulder, I received this message on my phone. I pray for you.
“Conscientious stupidity or sincere ignorance.”
~Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Celebrities like Holly Robinson Peete tweeted their support of the mayor adding that her “leadership is vital right now.”


Keisha Lance Bottoms

@KeishaBottoms
 · 19h
With my daughter looking over my shoulder, I received this message on my phone. I pray for you.
“Conscientious stupidity or sincere ignorance.”
~Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Holly Robinson Peete

@hollyrpeete
I’m sorry she had to see that.😡
Stay strong and focused 💪🏽
Your leadership is vital right now🙏🏽🙏🏽🙏🏽

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4:27 AM - Apr 23, 2020
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Bottoms has openly disagreed with Georgia governor Brian Kemp’s decision to reopen many businesses in the state including hair and nail salons and bowling alleys.

“I feel that we are still empowered to use our voices and to use our common sense, and that’s what I will continue to do as mayor,” she said to Atlanta’s 11Alive.

“And I have a good working relationship with the governor and I know that that will continue, but on this we disagree,” The mayor shared. “And his authority as governor is what it is, and it certainly supersedes my authority as mayor on paper — but it doesn’t supersede my voice, and I will continue to use my voice to urge our communities, our business owners and our residents to stay in.”

READ MORE: Trump says he ‘strongly’ disagrees with Georgia governor’s reopening plan

She is not the only one does not agree with Kemp’s decision.

President Donald Trump has also publicly stated that he “strongly” disagrees that Georgia is ready to lift its state-wide quarantine. In response, Kemp stated, “We’ve had conversations with the White House about our data, what we’re doing, they’re doing the same with a lot of governors around the country.”

Bottoms was elected mayor of Atlanta in 2017 in a runoff election. “Mayor Keisha,” as she is affectionately known has rallied the support of the city’s numerous entertainment stars. Rapper Killer Mike expressed yesterday that he will not be reopening his barbershop, The SWAG Shop, despite the governor’s edict to reopen the state.

https://thegrio.com/2020/04/23/mayor-text-calling-n-word-shut-up/
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

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Dr. Bandy X. Lee says Trump is "practicing 'total authority' and putting his armed troops in the streets"

A Yale psychiatrist has warned that pro-Trump lockdown protesters, who exhibit similar psychology as "child soldiers," could quickly turn into "armed troops in the streets" if the president loses his re-election bid.

Dr. Bandy X. Lee, a forensic psychiatrist at the Yale School of Medicine who has mostly taught at Yale Law School, said the armed protests were a natural evolution of the loyalty President Trump demands from his supporters. Many of these protests have evidently been organized by deep-pocketed groups allied with the president.

Lee, the author of the textbook "Violence," has been sounding the alarm about the danger posed by the president for years. She edited "The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump" after his election, with a group of fellow mental health professionals. The book's authors recently started a chat series entitled "Is America in an Abusive Relationship With Its President?"

Lee has also served as a project group leader for the World Health Organization Violence Prevention Alliance. She told Salon that Trump's recent call to "liberate" Democratic-led states was a dog whistle to his core supporters.

"Subconsciously, it is a loyalty test for the people," Lee said. "In Africa, where I did some ethnographic work, child soldiers would be recruited and made to kill a family member to demonstrate their allegiance to the government and not to the family. Similarly, in urban gangs in America, one may be challenged to kill a police officer to prove one's willingness to uphold gang rules over societal rules.

"When Donald Trump suggests that the virus be taken as a 'hoax', that people gather in churches or that people protest for their own sacrifice, he is actually testing people's loyalty to the 'laws' of his mind over the laws of nature, or even impulse for survival. The more he abuses them, the greater their devotion grows, since the psychological cost of admitting their mistake is ever higher — and so it becomes easier to dig a well of unreality than to see the obvious truth.

"We are now entering my specialty: public health approaches to violence prevention, and how to stop epidemics of violence before they happen," Lee added. "Individual violence is hardly predictable, since even the most violent individuals are not violent most of the time, but societal violence is entirely predictable. Prevention is still hard to talk about, since we must act before we see things unfold, but it is highly effective. It is true of pandemics, and it is true of mental health. We can enlighten ourselves through science and prevent catastrophes before they occur."

Lee spoke with Salon about the president's response to the coronavirus and his embrace of protesters calling for an end to social distancing restrictions. Her views represent only those of the World Mental Health Coalition, of which she is president.

Trump has tried to play it both ways, arguing that his lockdown guidelines saved millions of lives while calling for an end to the lockdowns. How does this cognitive dissonance affect the public during a confusing and scary crisis?

Having no core but wishing to avoid accountability, he often tries to cover all grounds. But the psychological effect on the public will eventually be the most harmful — not the devastating pandemic, the economic hardship or even the incompetence itself, but how he hypnotized and misled the public to cover up his ineptitude. To lose our collective mind, because an untreated disturbed person in an influential position has infected a third of the population with his distorted worldview, all to buttress his fragile sense of self, will be a great trauma for the nation to emerge from. His supporters will be the most severely traumatized, if they are able to wake up at all.

How will we cope with the fact that a mentally compromised president caused a devastating pandemic by eliminating a global response system only two years earlier, removed CDC experts in China just months earlier, caused an overwhelming majority of deaths by refusing to respond sooner, and worsened suffering and deaths by continuing to push wrong information? How do we recover from the oppression that states and health care workers had to suffer because the leader who was supposed to protect them obstinately withheld lifesaving supplies, watched with glee as those who did not praise him sufficiently suffered most, and created conditions where they had to compete with one another for equipment, when we were all supposed to be in this together? This is without counting the enormous mental health effects from enduring the extreme shelter-in-place measures that became necessary because of his mismanagement, when we are social animals. And this will only have been the medical side.

How will we cope with his economic destruction, which seems to have set in motion something far worse than the Great Depression, because he depleted all economic infrastructure while trying to balloon numbers for his re-election, even before the pandemic? How will we live with ourselves as we increasingly learn of a future that has been destroyed because he chose to bail out big businesses, including his own, while throwing pennies to working people as he asked them to worship him, which is what his name on the checks is about? Most developed nations are supporting worker salaries, to fuel economy and business as well as to help ordinary people — whose entrusted money the government is using. Human-caused injury is ultimately the most traumatizing.

People whom sociopaths have deceived and exploited often come away with a feeling that their soul has been hollowed out. They have witnessed the extremes of which humanity is capable.

What is your reaction to the growing number of protests against public health measures around the country?

You may have noticed that the more the president abuses his "base," the more they idolize him and obey what he says. He frames risking lives in service of him, so as to prop up his ruined economy and increase his re-election prospects, as "liberation" — and they come out in defiance of their own protection, demanding "choice." He is practicing his "total authority" and putting his armed troops in the streets. We would be mistaken to believe he will leave, or even let a losing election happen in the first place. Abuse of the mind is the worst kind, for you make people do what you wish against their own interests, and even extreme physical abuse becomes possible. He is not only getting away with shooting someone on Fifth Avenue, but a whole massacre.

Why do you think otherwise intelligent people are sometimes drawn to rhetoric suggesting the threat of a highly infectious and deadly virus is overhyped or even a "hoax"?

Mental symptoms do not discriminate between levels of intelligence. What we are seeing is what mental health experts warned would happen if we left a severely impaired person in an influential position without treatment, and what others have described as a cult. All the structures are in place for a personality cult, certainly, including the Fox News propaganda system, the pressure to conform from ever-growing cult members, and the insulation from facts that the president himself encourages by calling real news "the enemy."

But what I find most insidious is the contagion of symptoms: prolonged exposure to the president alone causes you to "catch" his worldview, and even the healthiest, soundest people turn "crazy," as if afflicted with the same condition as the president. This is a known phenomenon I have encountered a great deal from working in underserved settings. It is interchangeably called "shared psychosis," "folie à plusieurs" or "induced delusional disorder." The cure is removal. Then, quite dramatically, an entire afflicted family, street gan or prison cell-block that seemed almost "possessed" returns to normal. Politicians seem to keep waiting for the public to propel his removal, but in reality removal will justify removal: Remove the president first, and the people will follow.

What should the general public's response be when we see relatively small groups like these protesters spread misinformation that can have potentially deadly consequences?

Like cigarette smoking, shooting rampages and reckless driving, "freedoms" that endanger lives and curtail others' freedoms are not legitimate freedoms but a public health concern. People should fight for their legal rights. They should demand access to information as well as to expertise, and correct intervention. When experts call out abnormal signs, it is not a diagnosis but important information. When Dr. Li Wenliang of China detected a SARS-like virus, his observations were important and should have been heeded, not silenced. It is not up to mental health experts to say how it is to be done, but it is our responsibility to say what must be done, based on our best assessment. Our prescription is removal. Since issuing this prescription a month ago, I have repeatedly written about it and am waiting for the authorities to respond. And as with a viral pandemic, time translates to lives.

https://www.salon.com/2020/04/23/yale-psychiatrist-bandy-lee-lockdown-protesters-resemble-child-soldiers-and-urban-gangs/
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

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COVID-19 shows tech companies can curb toxic information. They should do more.
« Reply #15643 on: April 23, 2020, 03:18:18 PM »
By Robert Mahoney, Deputy Executive Director, Committee to Protect Journalists

Big tech helped create the fever swamp of lies and rumors we have to wade through every day to get our news. The coronavirus pandemic is a chance for them to start draining it.
Facebook, Google and Twitter among others grasped early on, in what the World Health Organization has dubbed the ‘infodemic’ of misinformation accompanying COVID-19, that they needed to be seen as actively promoting accurate science and public health information about the disease.
Their stock with the public and lawmakers in the United States and Europe was already low after a series of scandals including Cambridge Analytica and reported Russian interference in elections.
They acted quickly, creating coronavirus information pages, taking down false information about the pandemic such as conspiracy theories, quack remedies and other content that could endanger people’s health. They refused ads by sellers profiteering from shortages.
In a rare move, Facebook, Twitter, Google/YouTube, Microsoft/LinkedIn and Reddit issued a joint statement saying: “We’re helping millions of people stay connected while also jointly combating fraud and misinformation about the virus, elevating authoritative content on our platforms, and sharing critical updates in coordination with government healthcare agencies around the world.”
Whether out of enlightened self-interest or civic duty, the companies stepped up ‘content moderation’ — the enforcement of rules, or what Facebook calls ‘community standards,’ about who can post what information. But their actions undercut two of the arguments that social media companies have long used to justify their failure to take full responsibility for regulating content on their platforms — that it was technically difficult and that it was incompatible with their commitments to free speech.
Twitter made clear that when the free speech of a sitting president collides with the threat of misinformation the company is quite capable of taking appropriate action. On March 29 it deleted two tweets by Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro. The tweets linked to a video that broke the company’s rules on publishing content that “goes directly against guidance from authoritative sources of global and local public health information.” Twitter had earlier taken down a tweet by Venezuelan leader Nicolas Maduro touting some bogus coronavirus ‘antidote.’
Facebook too pulled the video of Bolsonaro, which endorsed the antimalarial drug hydroxychloroquine as a coronavirus treatment.
“We remove misinformation that could lead to physical imminent harm regardless of who posts it,” a Facebook spokesperson told me.
So, I asked all the platforms whether in theory they would remove a post by President Donald Trump that touted, for example, an unproven remedy for the virus that could lead to harm. I received no answer.
Why do public figures matter? They may not be responsible for most of the pollution of our information environment. But research by the Reuters Institute for the study of Journalism at Oxford University shows people pay attention to posts by politicians and celebrities.
The institute analyzed 225 pieces of misinformation about COVID-19 published in English between January and March and concluded: “…misinformation from politicians, celebrities, and other prominent public figures made up just 20% of the claims in our sample but accounted for 69% of total social media engagement.”
This influence is the key to addressing the technical difficulty of monitoring content.
It’s true that human content moderation at scale and in time to mitigate harm is impossible. Billions of pieces of content are uploaded globally each day. Already, the companies use tens of thousands of contracted fact-checkers to take down illegal posts such as terrorist propaganda, child pornography and copyright infringements. And still, they can’t keep up: Each mass shooting or live streamed terrorist attack brings calls from governments for even more and faster content takedowns and account blocking. The investigative site Bellingcat has shown how would-be poisoners of our information well can skirt company moderation and bans.
Journalists are left trying to counter the lies, half-truths and smears that the platforms enable by holding the most egregious up to the light. Initiatives like the International Fact-checking Network have sprung up. News organizations have partnered with platforms to check posts and verify sources.
But if the tech companies focused on the accuracy of the most influential accounts on their platforms, the challenge of policing the rest of the noise would be less significant.
The question is one of motivation. Engagement is core to the social media business model that grabs our personal data and attention to sell advertising.
Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg has said he will not ‘police’ political speech although he does allow paid political advertising. Twitter too has a special policy for world leaders but does not run political ads.
Big tech has given politicians a huge megaphone. Ripping it from their hands is not the solution. Content takedowns and account blocking are blunt instruments. Lots of reporters and documenters of human rights abuses have seen their work disappear that way.
But companies need to hold elected public officials to a high standard and be transparent about it. The public, from whom these quasi-monopolies make their huge profits, need to see that platforms are consistently implementing moderation policies grounded in human rights.
Instead, our information and online behavior are fed into constantly evolving algorithms which prioritize what we see and how we see it. And moderation by artificial intelligence is fraught with its own problems, as companies have acknowledged during this crisis. As they replaced fact-checkers sent home or out sick due to the pandemic with machine moderation, companies warned users to be prepared for ‘mistakes.’
All these problems existed before COVID-19. It’s just that the greatest public health crisis in a century meeting the most powerful, largely unregulated communication platforms in human history have put them at the center of our lives. Locked down in our homes, watching friends and family fall sick and even die, we are ever more reliant on big tech for communication, information and entertainment.
Algorithms are a black box. If tech platforms say they are adjusting them to promote accurate information and clean up the pollution they’ve caused we need to see it. We can’t take it on trust. Our health depends on it.

https://medium.com/@pressfreedom/covid-19-shows-tech-companies-can-curb-toxic-information-they-should-do-more-d950539ab6ca
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

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Gov. Wolf: Coronavirus data not only factor for reopening Pennsylvania
« Reply #15644 on: April 23, 2020, 04:33:35 PM »
 
For all the criteria and data-driven guidelines Gov. Tom Wolf has laid out for reopening a locked-down Pennsylvania, the decision-making process will not be guided entirely by the data, the governor said Thursday.

The objective criteria are “not a hard and fast rule,” Wolf said during a call with reporters.

“We’re going to have to make subjective decisions as objectively as possible,” he said.

Wolf on Wednesday announced a color-coded system for a phased reopening of the state by region. The entire state remains in the red zone, meaning all of the restrictions in place since early March remain.

The yellow phase will loosen some restrictions but many will still be in place. A county must report 50 or fewer new cases per 100,000 residents over a 14-day span in order to even be considered for the yellow phase.

Two regions in the state are scheduled to partially reopen May 8, a date that state officials say could change.

Using the data

Department of Health officials explained the formula like this: Officials will look at the cumulative number of new confirmed cases in a county over 14 days, then determine what that translates to per 100,000 residents. If the number is lower than 50, they’ll zoom out and look at that county in relation to the rest of the counties in that region.

A graphic on the governor’s webpage describing his reopening plans groups Allegheny with 10 other counties to make up the Southwest region. That region is made up of: Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Butler, Cambria, Fayette, Greene, Indiana, Somerset, Washington and Westmoreland counties.

“What I’m trying to do is create a reasonable and logical and informed reopening strategy,” Wolf said. “But it has to be one that is sensitive to the possibility that we (might) move too quickly.”

Wolf said testing capacity will be taken into consideration in the phased reopening but did not spell out what, exactly, would be considered. He reiterated that the criteria are not hard and fast rules.

“What’s good for Philadelphia will not be good for Cameron County,” he said. “We need to recognize that moving forward.”

Health Secretary Dr. Rachel Levine said there is no specific percentage of the population that should be tested for it to be considered safe to open that region. The state’s priority will continue to lie with testing symptomatic individuals.

She said they have, however, loosened the restrictions that had been placed on testing done by the state Health Department. Previously, the focus was on testing symptomatic health care workers and those most vulnerable to the virus.

Now, however, the state will widen that to anyone with symptoms.

Those restrictions were only on tests done by the state labs; hospitals and health care providers were and continue to be free to test anyone they think should be tested.

What reopening looks like

Levine said Thursday the state will reopen by region, and a region can’t move into the yellow phase until all of its counties meet the yellow phase criteria.

“It’s going to be region by region, looking at the case rates from each county (in the region),” she said.

Levine said that when a region goes from red to yellow, the mitigation efforts will morph into aggressive containment efforts.

That will include testing people who are symptomatic, isolating those who are positive, and then doing extensive contact-tracing to find and quarantine people who had close contact with the positive individual.

Levine stressed that the 50-per-100,000 metric is important, but it’s not the only thing that will be taken into account.

“It’s something we can measure and put down on paper, but it’s not the only measure that we’re going to be looking at,” she said. She noted that a model created in conjunction with Carnegie Mellon University will also be used as guidance in the decision-making.

The CMU data dashboard will compile myriad data from different state agencies with the goal of offering reopening guidance that balances the economy and public health.

It will also analyze “what-if” scenarios, and Wolf has said his plan allows for restrictions to be put back into place if there are flare-ups or outbreaks after a region moves to the next phase.

https://triblive.com/news/pennsylvania/gov-wolf-data-on-coronavirus-cases-will-guide-not-make-decision-on-reopening-pennsylvania/
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'