AuthorTopic: Knarf's Knewz Channel  (Read 1436065 times)

Offline knarf

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11631
    • View Profile
Police sued over bulldozer death of pot suspect
« Reply #12180 on: March 21, 2019, 11:51:26 AM »
Pennsylvania State Police acted recklessly when troopers used a bulldozer to pursue a Grateful Dead fan caught growing marijuana on public land, killing him when he wound up under the machine’s treads, according to a civil rights lawsuit filed Monday.

Greg Longenecker’s family said state police had no business chasing him with a dangerous piece of machinery — especially over a few pot plants the 51-year-old was cultivating for personal use. His death last July, in a rural area about 75 miles (121 kilometers) outside of Philadelphia, also provoked outrage from a marijuana advocacy group.

“They killed a beautiful human being, a caring, loving man,” Longenecker’s uncle, Mike Carpenter, who’s named as a plaintiff in the federal suit, said in an interview with The Associated Press. “He’ll never be able to share his life with us, or us with him, again. For no reason. He wasn’t hurting anyone.”

State police declined comment. A prosecutor who investigated Longenecker’s death concluded that troopers acted reasonably.

The chase developed as Longenecker — a short-order cook and avid vegetable gardener with a passion for the Dead — and his friend, David B. Light, tended 10 marijuana plants in a small clearing on state game lands near Reading, Pennsylvania. A Pennsylvania Game Commission worker, operating a bulldozer in the area, spotted their car parked in a field where vehicles weren’t allowed and called police.

Light surrendered, but Longenecker fled, disappearing into the thick vegetation.

State police began a lengthy search. A state police helicopter spotted Longenecker in the underbrush, and the game commission worker, with a trooper aboard, used the bulldozer to blaze a trail in pursuit. The bulldozer was traveling no more than 1 (1.6 kph) or 2 mph (3 kph), according to an official account.

How Longenecker got caught in the machine’s treads is hotly disputed. Authorities concluded he was high on methamphetamine, crawled under the back of the bulldozer in an attempt to elude capture, and was crushed to death when it made a left turn.

Longenecker’s friends and family call that explanation ludicrous.

“That morning, Gregory was not high or under the influence. He was normal,” Light wrote in an affidavit obtained by the AP. “There is no way Gregory crawled underneath the back of the bulldozer. It is unthinkable and ridiculous that anyone would say he crawled underneath.”

Light, 55, pleaded guilty to misdemeanor drug charges and was accepted into a program for first-time offenders. He declined comment to the AP.

Longenecker’s family questioned why state police didn’t simply get a warrant for Longenecker and arrest him later, given they knew his identity and that his crime was relatively minor.

An expert in police procedure agreed the state police overreacted.

“It’s outlandish. This is the craziest thing I’ve heard in years,” said Walter Signorelli, a lawyer and retired New York Police Department commander who has overseen investigations into police pursuits. “It seems like they were more concerned with the chase than the danger to themselves and the public and the guy they’re chasing.”

Berks County District Attorney John Adams — the prosecutor who determined that state police acted appropriately — pushed back against the criticism, saying Longenecker put himself in jeopardy by fleeing from the authorities.

“His behavior was despicable,” Adams said. “They yelled to him, they asked him to surrender. He did not surrender.”

Longenecker likely would have faced probation over his marijuana plants, Adams said.

He said Longenecker’s family would have been just as angry had troopers abandoned the search, and it turned out that Longenecker was injured and in need of medical attention.

“He’s in a pile of brush that is completely uninhabitable. Something could have happened to him. And if the state police would have picked up and left, then they would be pissed off: ‘Why didn’t the state police try to find him?’ So they were damned if they did or damned if they didn’t,” he said.

But at least one state police official has evidently acknowledged the situation could have been handled differently.

Carpenter, Longenecker’s uncle, said he met with Sgt. William Slaton from state police headquarters about a month after Longenecker’s death. He said Slaton apologized, telling him that “for 10 plants, he would’ve sent everybody home because they already knew who he was, where he lived, where he worked. He would’ve sent everybody home and maybe picked him up a couple days later.”

A state police spokesman would not confirm or deny Carpenter’s account.

The suit, which was filed in Philadelphia, seeks damages against state police, the game commission and the individuals involved in the pursuit. A game commission spokesman declined comment.

“State police ran Gregory Longenecker over with a government-operated bulldozer and essentially turned him into human roadkill,” said the family’s lawyer, Jordan Strokovsky. “There will be a thorough investigation and a lot of questions will be answered, and ultimately, those who need to be held accountable will be held accountable.”

https://apnews.com/b25c857bbb104bd1ab1aad272e342c07
« Last Edit: March 21, 2019, 11:55:59 AM by knarf »
HUMANS ARE STILL EVOLVING! Our communities blog is at https://openmind693.wordpress.com

Offline knarf

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11631
    • View Profile
Re: Knarf's Knewz Channel
« Reply #12181 on: March 21, 2019, 12:08:15 PM »


I'm with Bill. Not a job worth having,

LOL.....how the hell does anyone end up in that position?

HUMANS ARE STILL EVOLVING! Our communities blog is at https://openmind693.wordpress.com

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37718
    • View Profile
Re: Knarf's Knewz Channel
« Reply #12182 on: March 21, 2019, 12:35:07 PM »


I'm with Bill. Not a job worth having,

LOL.....how the hell does anyone end up in that position?

Standing up on Restaurant Furniture and Waving your arms around a lot?

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline Eddie

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 17439
    • View Profile
Re: Knarf's Knewz Channel
« Reply #12183 on: March 21, 2019, 12:35:51 PM »
Sherman was very popular. In reality he was a war criminal who needlessly invoked a lot of suffering on my own ancestors and many others like them. Their story is forgotten.

I've been trying to make a list of all the things the new Dem candidates have come up with...ending the electoral college, reparations, guaranteed income for all, it's a long list.

We won't get good healthcare, because the insurance and pharma money will make sure its a conduit scheme, whatever they call it. Medicare for all won't be so great if it isn't single payer. Only single payer will ever work.

Free college would be great but that interferes with the current banking conduit scheme, so that won't fly.

I doubt the Democrats can win.....not just because of the reasons I stated, but also because the deck is very stacked against them in other ways, like the gerrymandering that the conservative courts have now upheld...... American politics is a shit sandwich.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline knarf

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11631
    • View Profile
Re: Knarf's Knewz Channel
« Reply #12184 on: March 21, 2019, 03:54:31 PM »
Sherman was very popular. In reality he was a war criminal who needlessly invoked a lot of suffering on my own ancestors and many others like them. Their story is forgotten.

I've been trying to make a list of all the things the new Dem candidates have come up with...ending the electoral college, reparations, guaranteed income for all, it's a long list.

We won't get good healthcare, because the insurance and pharma money will make sure its a conduit scheme, whatever they call it. Medicare for all won't be so great if it isn't single payer. Only single payer will ever work.

Free college would be great but that interferes with the current banking conduit scheme, so that won't fly.

I doubt the Democrats can win.....not just because of the reasons I stated, but also because the deck is very stacked against them in other ways, like the gerrymandering that the conservative courts have now upheld...... American politics is a shit sandwich.


  Have you accounted for the unpredictable outcome of this Extinction Rebellion starting in April? Also the climate anomalies/catastrophes before September, 2020?  That would change the direction of many of the candidates promises.
HUMANS ARE STILL EVOLVING! Our communities blog is at https://openmind693.wordpress.com

Offline knarf

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11631
    • View Profile


How we can curb the devastating effects of climate change is still hotly debated among politicians and scientists alike.

Climate change is one of the greatest challenges mankind has faced up until now.

How we'll be able to curtail global warming and its devastating consequences is still very much a hot potato among politicians and scientists alike — and so far, the outcome of all these debates hasn't been particularly fruitful.

However, researchers at Harvard may have come up with a solution that sounds just a little too good to be true.

In conjunction with researchers from MIT and Princeton, the group has suggested slowing down global warming by diminishing the amount of sunlight that reaches Earth's surface.

Yes, you read that right. The technology is called solar geoengineering or solar geotechnics.

According to a study published in Nature Climate Change, the researchers are considering what might happen if they were to introduce sunlight-reflecting particles into Earth's atmosphere.

 The most important thing to note is that the researchers aren't suggesting the method is a solution to rising global warming trends; it isn't designed to bring temperatures back to pre-industrial levels nor does it address the real crux of the problem — the amount of carbon dioxide we're producing.

In fact, too high a dose of "dimming" could even worsen the situation.

Postdoctoral research fellow at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Peter Irvine, was the lead author of the study.

 "The analogy is not perfect," he explained, "but solar geoengineering is a little like a drug which treats high blood pressure. An overdose would be harmful, but a well-chosen dose could reduce your risks. Of course, it's better to not have high blood pressure in the first place but once you have it, along with making healthier lifestyle choices, it's worth considering treatments that could lower your risks."

The study suggests that this technology could the rate at which temperatures are increasing in half, which could offer global benefits without exacerbating problems in other parts of the world.

Alongside this measure, however, carbon dioxide emissions would still need to be reduced across the globe.

More water and fewer hurricanes

n order to better understand which regions might end up worse off if this geoengineering technology were combined with emission reductions, the researchers used a state-of-the-art, high-resolution model to simulate extreme rainfall and tropical hurricanes.

This is the first time a model of this sort has been used to look into the possible effects of solar geotechnics.

The researchers studied temperature and precipitation extremes, water availability, and also measured the intensity of tropical storms.

 They found that halving global warming via geoengineering would not only cool the planet but also moderate changes in water availability and extreme precipitation in many places.

While the science surrounding geoengineering technology is over half a century old, it's only recently — since our attention has been drawn Earth's climate change — that scientists have intensified their researched the field.

Researchers at Harvard University have stressed, however, that our main response to climate change should be to curb carbon dioxide emissions; geoengineering alone simply wouldn't be capable of fully remedying the root of the environmental problems.

https://www.businessinsider.com/harvard-scientists-want-to-dim-the-sun-to-curb-global-warming-2019-3
« Last Edit: March 22, 2019, 04:42:12 AM by knarf »
HUMANS ARE STILL EVOLVING! Our communities blog is at https://openmind693.wordpress.com

Offline knarf

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11631
    • View Profile
Oceans Are 'Spiking a Fever' With Record Heat Waves
« Reply #12186 on: March 22, 2019, 04:53:19 AM »
The number of heat waves affecting the planet’s oceans has increased sharply, scientists have revealed, killing swathes of sea life like “wildfires that take out huge areas of forest.” The damage caused in these hot spots is also harmful for humanity, which relies on the oceans for oxygen, food, storm protection, and the removal of climate-warming carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, they say.

Global warming is gradually increasing the average temperature of the oceans, but the new research is the first systematic global analysis of ocean heat waves, when temperatures reach extremes for five days or more.

The research found heat waves are becoming more frequent, more prolonged, and more severe, with the number of heat wave days tripling in the past couple of years studied. In the longer term, the number of heat wave days jumped by more than 50 percent in the 30 years to 2016, compared with the period of 1925 to 1954.

As heat waves have increased, kelp forests, seagrass meadows, and coral reefs have been lost. These foundation species are critical to life in the ocean. They provide shelter and food to many others but have been hit on coasts from California to Australia to Spain.

“You have heat-wave-induced wildfires that take out huge areas of forest, but this is happening underwater as well,” said Dan Smale of the Marine Biological Association in Plymouth, UK, who led the research published in Nature Climate Change. “You see the kelp and seagrasses dying in front of you. Within weeks or months they are just gone, along hundreds of kilometers of coastline.”

As well as quantifying the increase in heat waves, the team analyzed 116 research papers on eight well-studied marine heat waves, such as the record-breaking Ningaloo Niño that hit Australia in 2011 and the hot “blob” that persisted in the northeast Pacific from 2013 to 2016. “They have adverse impacts on a wide range of organisms, from plankton to invertebrates to fish, mammals, and seabirds,” Smale said.

The scientists compared the areas where heat waves have increased most with those areas harboring rich biodiversity or species already near their temperature limit and those where additional stresses, such as pollution or overfishing, already occur. This revealed hot spots of harm from the northeast Atlantic to the Caribbean to the western Pacific. “A lot of ocean systems are being battered by multiple stresses,” Smale said.

The natural ocean cycle of El Niño is a key factor in pushing up temperatures in some parts of the ocean, and the effect of global warming on the phenomenon remains uncertain, but the gradual overall heating of the oceans means heat waves are worse when they strike.

“The starting temperature is much higher, so the absolute temperatures [in a heat wave] are that much higher and more stressful,” Smale said. Some marine wildlife is mobile and could in theory swim to cooler waters, but ocean heat waves often strike large areas more rapidly than fish move, he said.

The researchers said ocean heat waves can have “major socioeconomic and political ramifications," such as in the northwest Atlantic in 2012, when lobster stocks were dramatically affected, creating tensions across the US–Canada border.

“This [research] makes clear that heat waves are hitting the ocean all over the world … The ocean, in effect, is spiking a fever,” said Malin Pinsky, a Rutgers University professor and not part of the team. “These events are likely to become more extreme and more common in the future unless we can reduce greenhouse gas emissions.”

Éva Plagányi at Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) also likened ocean heat waves to wildfires. “Frequent big hits can have long-lasting effects,” she said. “This study shows that record-breaking events are becoming the new normal.”

The damage global warming is causing to the oceans has also been shown in a series of other scientific papers published in the last week. Ocean warming has cut sustainable fish catches by 15 percent to 35 percent in five regions, including the North Sea and the East China Sea, and 4 percent globally, according to work published by Pinsky and colleagues.

“We were stunned to find that fisheries around the world have already responded to ocean warming,” he said. Another study showed that achieving the 2°C climate change target set out in the Paris agreement would protect almost 10 metric tons of fish catches each year, worth tens of billions of dollars.

Separate work by Plagányi’s team showed that climate change will reverse the recovery of whales in the Southern Ocean by damaging the krill on which they feed. “Models predict concerning declines, and even local extinctions by 2100, for Pacific populations of blue and fin whales and Atlantic and Indian Ocean fin and humpback whales,” the team reported.

“In the space of one week," Plagányi said, "scientific publications have underscored that unless we take evasive action, our future oceans will have fewer fish, fewer whales, and frequent dramatic shifts in ecological structure will occur, with concerning implications for humans who depend on the ocean.”

https://www.wired.com/story/oceans-are-spiking-a-fever-with-record-heat-waves/?CNDID=52137492&CNDID=52137492&bxid=MjM5NjgxOTA5MjE0S0&hasha=29686b8ec3069969a1a6049a6427dd6c&hashb=6af73501da1698eb318be85b2ffb6ddb847768e3&mbid=nl_03072019_daily_opt-down_list1_p2&utm_brand=wired&utm_mailing=WIRED+NL+030719+Opt+Down+%281%29
HUMANS ARE STILL EVOLVING! Our communities blog is at https://openmind693.wordpress.com

Offline knarf

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11631
    • View Profile
At least nine killed in explosion amid protest in Colombia
« Reply #12187 on: March 22, 2019, 05:05:09 AM »
BOGOTA (Reuters) - At least nine people were killed and four injured in an unexplained explosion on Thursday in an indigenous area in Colombia’s mountainous southwest, local authorities said.

The incident came on the 10th day of a blockade of the area’s major highway. Hundreds of members of indigenous groups have halted traffic on the roadway, demanding land titles and funding for social programs.

One policeman has been killed during the protest, which has caused shortages of gasoline and foodstuffs in some cities. Several vehicles have also been burned.

The explosion on Thursday took place in a house in Dagua municipality, an area largely inhabited by indigenous groups, the provincial government and disaster agency of Valle del Cauca province said.

Colombia, which has more than 45 million inhabitants, has more than 85 ethnic groups. About a million Colombians are members of indigenous groups.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-colombia-violence/at-least-nine-killed-in-explosion-amid-protest-in-colombia-idUSKCN1R3054?feedType=RSS&feedName=worldNews&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Reuters%2FworldNews+%28Reuters+World+News%29&utm_source=reddit.com
HUMANS ARE STILL EVOLVING! Our communities blog is at https://openmind693.wordpress.com

Offline knarf

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11631
    • View Profile
Cradling children, migrant families cross border in waves
« Reply #12188 on: March 22, 2019, 05:15:18 AM »
MCALLEN, Texas (AP) — A mother cradled a crying toddler as she waited in line with 20 other women to shower. Dozens of fathers quietly held their children’s hands in an enclosure made of chain-link fencing.

While these families were held at an overcrowded Border Patrol processing center, a fresh wave of migrants crossed the nearby river separating the U.S. and Mexico and waited for border agents to bring them to the same facility. One Honduran woman carried a feverish 7-month-old baby.

The cycle is repeated multiple times a day. Waves of desperate families are trying to cross the border almost hourly and entering an overtaxed government detention system.

The Border Patrol has become so overwhelmed in feeding and caring for the migrants that it announced plans this week to start releasing some families onto the street in the Rio Grande Valley to ease overcrowding in the processing center, providing the immigrants with a notice to appear at an upcoming court date.

“We have an unprecedented crisis upon us,” Robert Perez, deputy commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the Border Patrol’s parent agency, said in an interview.

The Border Patrol says it made about 66,000 apprehensions of people crossing the border illegally in February, including 36,000 parents and children, an all-time monthly high. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, meanwhile, said since Dec. 21 it has released 107,000 family members while they await court dates.



Immigration authorities expect the number of parents and children to surpass 50,000 in March during the traditional spring spike in migration and potentially reach 180,000 in May, according to two U.S. officials who were not authorized to speak publicly about internal documents.

The Border Patrol ordered expanded medical screenings after the December deaths of two children in its custody. The agency received $30 million to upgrade its South Texas processing center and additional funding to build a similar facility in El Paso.

The autopsy results for Jakelin Caal and Felipe Gomez Alonzo have not yet been released, but Customs and Border Protection has said both children were hospitalized after developing high fevers and nausea.

Children with fevers, colds and the flu arrive daily at the border with their parents and sometimes wait for hours for the Border Patrol to pick them up.

On a recent Thursday, Carmen Mejia’s 7-month-old, Lian, was feverish, one of four sick children in her group of 20. His mother had heard about Jakelin and Felipe before leaving her rural town in northern Honduras.

“It made me sad,” she said. “But imagine. I’m here, also looking for a future for my son.”

Mejia said she hoped to find work to support Lian and two older children she had left behind with her mother.

While she spoke, two more waves of people arrived. The group grew to around 50 before the Border Patrol could load everyone into vans and take them into detention.



Some migrants blamed extortion for forcing them to close small businesses. Others said gangs had killed close relatives and threatened to kill them.

President Donald Trump’s administration says most adult border crossers are economic migrants who count on being released if they bring a child and seek asylum. Immigration agency officials have called for Congress to change laws that would allow them to detain more adults and children and deport people from Central America quicker.

Trump’s signature solution — and the reason for his declaration of a national emergency — is a border wall, especially in South Texas, where there are comparatively few barriers. But a border wall would not stop families who aren’t trying to evade immigration authorities. Those families typically stop after crossing the Rio Grande and wait to be caught.



The Associated Press visited the South Texas processing center where many migrants end up. It’s an old warehouse, with overhead lighting that stays on around the clock and chain-link fencing that forms large cages.

Detainees are issued mats and foil blankets to sleep on the concrete floor. Each detainee receives a medical screening.

Dozens of children waited on their own. Many were 10 years of age or older and kept separately from their parents, who are in another wing of the facility at the same time.

Some of the children waiting on their own talked among themselves. Others tried to sleep on mats under the glare of the lights, their foil blankets crinkling.

The facility received worldwide attention last June, during the Trump administration’s enforcement of a zero-tolerance policy that led to thousands of family separations. Around 1,100 people were detained at the facility then, many of them children who had been separated from their parents.

The facility opened in 2014 during the Obama administration to address another surge of thousands of unaccompanied teenagers arriving from Central America.

Now the processing center and other facilities in the sector deal with parents bringing young children and pregnant women who sometimes go into labor in detention.

“It isn’t meant for families,” said Carmen Qualia, an assistant chief patrol agent for the sector. “We’re set up for individuals.”

Agency guidelines require that parents are detained for no longer than 72 hours before being released or transferred to long-term detention centers with beds and more facilities. The average detention time for families late last week was about 60 hours.

Most families are eventually bused to a Catholic Charities facility in McAllen, where volunteers provide food and medical checkups before taking them to the bus station or airport.



The future of that facility is in jeopardy after McAllen city commissioners last month ordered Catholic Charities to vacate it by May, after complaints from neighbors.

But the Border Patrol is relying on the facility more than ever. While a few hundred people are sent there daily, immigration authorities dropped 800 migrants at Catholic Charities in just one day this week, leading to volunteers posting pleas on social media for donations and help.

Inside a small clinic behind the main building, Dr. Martin Garza listened to the heartbeat and lungs of 1-month-old Cesar Manuel Romero, cradled by his mother, 21-year-old Lily Romero of Honduras. Romero said she gave birth to Cesar on a bus as it passed through Monterrey, Mexico.



After crossing the border, Romero said they were taken to a smaller Border Patrol station — what she and other Spanish-speaking migrants often refer to as “la hielera,” or the icebox. She said another woman in custody loaned her a sweater so she could keep Cesar warm because agents had taken many of her belongings.

She said they were given water that was “nearly frozen.” Afterward, they were taken to the processing center and eventually released to Catholic Charities.

The Border Patrol says its facilities follow agency detention guidelines and that it investigates any complaints of mistreatment.

Garza said agents and medical professionals inside detention almost always diagnose major illnesses or injuries. But colds and fevers persist, along with conditions that aren’t obvious, he said.

“Infants are wheezing. Infants are having trouble breathing, and some of those things may not get picked up,” he said.

https://www.apnews.com/d07198cd6898470ea9137ad800b5bd8a
HUMANS ARE STILL EVOLVING! Our communities blog is at https://openmind693.wordpress.com

Offline Eddie

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 17439
    • View Profile
Re: Cradling children, migrant families cross border in waves
« Reply #12189 on: March 22, 2019, 05:30:36 AM »
MCALLEN, Texas (AP) — A mother cradled a crying toddler as she waited in line with 20 other women to shower. Dozens of fathers quietly held their children’s hands in an enclosure made of chain-link fencing.

While these families were held at an overcrowded Border Patrol processing center, a fresh wave of migrants crossed the nearby river separating the U.S. and Mexico and waited for border agents to bring them to the same facility. One Honduran woman carried a feverish 7-month-old baby.

The cycle is repeated multiple times a day. Waves of desperate families are trying to cross the border almost hourly and entering an overtaxed government detention system.

The Border Patrol has become so overwhelmed in feeding and caring for the migrants that it announced plans this week to start releasing some families onto the street in the Rio Grande Valley to ease overcrowding in the processing center, providing the immigrants with a notice to appear at an upcoming court date.

“We have an unprecedented crisis upon us,” Robert Perez, deputy commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the Border Patrol’s parent agency, said in an interview.

The Border Patrol says it made about 66,000 apprehensions of people crossing the border illegally in February, including 36,000 parents and children, an all-time monthly high. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, meanwhile, said since Dec. 21 it has released 107,000 family members while they await court dates.



Immigration authorities expect the number of parents and children to surpass 50,000 in March during the traditional spring spike in migration and potentially reach 180,000 in May, according to two U.S. officials who were not authorized to speak publicly about internal documents.

The Border Patrol ordered expanded medical screenings after the December deaths of two children in its custody. The agency received $30 million to upgrade its South Texas processing center and additional funding to build a similar facility in El Paso.

The autopsy results for Jakelin Caal and Felipe Gomez Alonzo have not yet been released, but Customs and Border Protection has said both children were hospitalized after developing high fevers and nausea.

Children with fevers, colds and the flu arrive daily at the border with their parents and sometimes wait for hours for the Border Patrol to pick them up.

On a recent Thursday, Carmen Mejia’s 7-month-old, Lian, was feverish, one of four sick children in her group of 20. His mother had heard about Jakelin and Felipe before leaving her rural town in northern Honduras.

“It made me sad,” she said. “But imagine. I’m here, also looking for a future for my son.”

Mejia said she hoped to find work to support Lian and two older children she had left behind with her mother.

While she spoke, two more waves of people arrived. The group grew to around 50 before the Border Patrol could load everyone into vans and take them into detention.



Some migrants blamed extortion for forcing them to close small businesses. Others said gangs had killed close relatives and threatened to kill them.

President Donald Trump’s administration says most adult border crossers are economic migrants who count on being released if they bring a child and seek asylum. Immigration agency officials have called for Congress to change laws that would allow them to detain more adults and children and deport people from Central America quicker.

Trump’s signature solution — and the reason for his declaration of a national emergency — is a border wall, especially in South Texas, where there are comparatively few barriers. But a border wall would not stop families who aren’t trying to evade immigration authorities. Those families typically stop after crossing the Rio Grande and wait to be caught.



The Associated Press visited the South Texas processing center where many migrants end up. It’s an old warehouse, with overhead lighting that stays on around the clock and chain-link fencing that forms large cages.

Detainees are issued mats and foil blankets to sleep on the concrete floor. Each detainee receives a medical screening.

Dozens of children waited on their own. Many were 10 years of age or older and kept separately from their parents, who are in another wing of the facility at the same time.

Some of the children waiting on their own talked among themselves. Others tried to sleep on mats under the glare of the lights, their foil blankets crinkling.

The facility received worldwide attention last June, during the Trump administration’s enforcement of a zero-tolerance policy that led to thousands of family separations. Around 1,100 people were detained at the facility then, many of them children who had been separated from their parents.

The facility opened in 2014 during the Obama administration to address another surge of thousands of unaccompanied teenagers arriving from Central America.

Now the processing center and other facilities in the sector deal with parents bringing young children and pregnant women who sometimes go into labor in detention.

“It isn’t meant for families,” said Carmen Qualia, an assistant chief patrol agent for the sector. “We’re set up for individuals.”

Agency guidelines require that parents are detained for no longer than 72 hours before being released or transferred to long-term detention centers with beds and more facilities. The average detention time for families late last week was about 60 hours.

Most families are eventually bused to a Catholic Charities facility in McAllen, where volunteers provide food and medical checkups before taking them to the bus station or airport.



The future of that facility is in jeopardy after McAllen city commissioners last month ordered Catholic Charities to vacate it by May, after complaints from neighbors.

But the Border Patrol is relying on the facility more than ever. While a few hundred people are sent there daily, immigration authorities dropped 800 migrants at Catholic Charities in just one day this week, leading to volunteers posting pleas on social media for donations and help.

Inside a small clinic behind the main building, Dr. Martin Garza listened to the heartbeat and lungs of 1-month-old Cesar Manuel Romero, cradled by his mother, 21-year-old Lily Romero of Honduras. Romero said she gave birth to Cesar on a bus as it passed through Monterrey, Mexico.



After crossing the border, Romero said they were taken to a smaller Border Patrol station — what she and other Spanish-speaking migrants often refer to as “la hielera,” or the icebox. She said another woman in custody loaned her a sweater so she could keep Cesar warm because agents had taken many of her belongings.

She said they were given water that was “nearly frozen.” Afterward, they were taken to the processing center and eventually released to Catholic Charities.

The Border Patrol says its facilities follow agency detention guidelines and that it investigates any complaints of mistreatment.

Garza said agents and medical professionals inside detention almost always diagnose major illnesses or injuries. But colds and fevers persist, along with conditions that aren’t obvious, he said.

“Infants are wheezing. Infants are having trouble breathing, and some of those things may not get picked up,” he said.

https://www.apnews.com/d07198cd6898470ea9137ad800b5bd8a

No real reason to think it won't get worse. I don't think its an emergency that needs military intervention. Its a legal problem that needs legislative change. Too bad, because we aren't good at that.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline knarf

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11631
    • View Profile
Re: Cradling children, migrant families cross border in waves
« Reply #12190 on: March 22, 2019, 07:37:14 AM »
Here is a plan to assist the millions of migrants on the move and arriving. Each country agree to get a large bulletin board made of cork and every time a billionaire invests in a private company that really does help the migrants, $3,000,000, a gold star is pinned on their countries billionaires bulletin board ( by name ) for all to see. Maybe that could work with Global Warming. It might be quicker than an prolonged civil revolution.
HUMANS ARE STILL EVOLVING! Our communities blog is at https://openmind693.wordpress.com

Offline Eddie

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 17439
    • View Profile
Re: Cradling children, migrant families cross border in waves
« Reply #12191 on: March 22, 2019, 07:54:25 AM »
Here is a plan to assist the millions of migrants on the move and arriving. Each country agree to get a large bulletin board made of cork and every time a billionaire invests in a private company that really does help the migrants, $3,000,000, a gold star is pinned on their countries billionaires bulletin board ( by name ) for all to see. Maybe that could work with Global Warming. It might be quicker than an prolonged civil revolution.

I just hope the shooter types don't start shooting Mayans instead of (or in addition to) Muslims. I don't see this going well, or going away.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline knarf

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11631
    • View Profile
Judge says New York’s stun gun ban is unconstitutional
« Reply #12192 on: March 22, 2019, 03:23:30 PM »
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York state’s ban on personal ownership of stun guns is unconstitutional, a federal judge ruled Friday in the latest in a series of court decisions that have led to the loosening of restrictions on the weapons in several states.

The decision came in a lawsuit filed by Matthew Avitabile, of Schoharie County, New York, who said he wanted to buy a stun gun for self-defense in his rural upstate home.

His lawyers argued that New York’s longstanding ban on civilian ownership of stun guns violated the Second Amendment right to bear arms. U.S. District Judge David Hurd agreed.

“New York’s sweeping prohibition on the possession and use of tasers and stun guns by all citizens for all purposes, even for self-defense in one’s own home, must be declared unconstitutional,” Hurd wrote in his decision.

The lawsuit named the superintendent of the state police, the agency that enforces New York’s weapons laws. New York attorney general’s office, which defends the state in lawsuits, referred questions to state police or Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office. Neither responded to requests for comment Friday.

Illinois’ Supreme Court made a similar stun gun ruling Thursday, deciding in favor of two men charged with carrying the weapons.

In New Jersey, a resident and the New Jersey Second Amendment Society sued the state in 2016 after Taser International declined his order for a Taser Pulse model because the state bans the sale of such merchandise. The following year the state’s attorney general conceded the state’s ban on electronic arms is unconstitutional.

A Massachusetts court struck down that state’s stun gun ban last year, also ruling that banning civilian possession of the weapons violates the U.S. Constitution’s right to bear arms.

“After that, the domino fell in the right way, and the rest of these cases became much more likely” to end with state bans overturned, said Alan Beck, of San Diego, one of two attorneys who filed Avitabile’s lawsuit.

The other, Stephen Stamboulieh, of Madison, Mississippi, said in all the cases the judges ruled that stun guns are “bearable arms” and therefore covered under protections guaranteed by the Second Amendment.

“A right’s a right,” he said. “If it’s a Taser, a billy club, a handgun, it’s all protected by the Second Amendment.”

Stamboulieh said he and Beck have also filed lawsuits aiming to overturn stun gun bans in Hawaii and Rhode Island.

https://www.apnews.com/fa6a99f8896d46c6a64d6414492b4c3a
HUMANS ARE STILL EVOLVING! Our communities blog is at https://openmind693.wordpress.com

Offline knarf

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11631
    • View Profile
The man pulled a gun out before beating the woman

A Dallas bartender was charged with misdemeanor assault after cell phone video showed him punching a woman in the head five times in a parking-related dispute, according to The Dallas Morning News.

The bartender, Austin Shuffield, is a 30-year-old white man. The victim, 24-year-old L'Daijohnique Lee, was a black woman. The racial aspect of the crime has civil rights activists threatening protests if Shuffield doesn't face more severe punishment.

"To those in Deep Ellum, if you don't do right by us, I say shut Deep Ellum (the neighborhood where the assault occurred) down," Said Olinka Green of the Next Generation Action Network. "Don't give them our money. Don't give them our green money if you can't protect our black and brown bodies."

What happened: Lee told police she had been driving the wrong way down the street, so she stopped. She said Shuffield got out of his truck to tell her to move, because she had stopped in front of his parking lot exit.

Lee moved her vehicle into the parking lot, where Shuffield allegedly got out of his car to try to take pictures of her license plates. That sparked an argument.

Recorded video of the incident picks up here, where Lee is seen on her phone, apparently about to call the police. Shuffield pulls out a handgun and holds it behind his back. Then Shuffield slaps the phone out of her hands, and then Lee hits Shuffield in the face.

Shuffield then punches Lee with his right hand to the left side of her face. She bends over, no longer fighting back, and Shuffield continues with four more punches to her head. He then kicks her phone, which had fallen on the ground.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/7AwM8rpMEjw&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/7AwM8rpMEjw&fs=1</a>

Shuffield claims he hit Lee in self defense, claiming she threatened to pepper spray him and broke his back windshield. He was arrested Thursday morning and released after he posted $2,000 bond. He was also fired from his job as a result of this incident.

Hate crime? Some Dallas activists and Lee's attorney believe the charges against Shuffield are not severe enough, believing he should be facing felony charges for committing a hate crime and for pulling the gun on Lee.

"Our office is speaking with the Dallas Police Department and the Dallas County District Attorney's office to ensure all appropriate charges are pursued including felony assault, firearm and hate-crime related charges," Lee's attorney Lee Merritt said in a statement.

https://www.theblaze.com/news/white-bartender-repeatedly-punches-black-woman-in-parking-dispute-and-civil-rights-activists-want-stronger-charges
HUMANS ARE STILL EVOLVING! Our communities blog is at https://openmind693.wordpress.com

Offline knarf

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11631
    • View Profile
The billionaire family behind OxyContin is having its moment of reckoning
« Reply #12194 on: March 23, 2019, 04:35:02 AM »
More than 500 cities, counties, and Native American tribes just slapped the Sackler family with another lawsuit.

More than 500 cities, counties, and Native American tribes across the country filed a class action lawsuit Monday that argues the billionaire family behind Purdue Pharma “initiated and perpetuated” an entire generation of opioid users for their own financial gain by marketing their drug, OxyContin, as safe to prescribe.
Advertisement

The nearly 200-page lawsuit — which devotes 11 pages to listing the places suing — names eight people in the Sackler family, including Richard Sackler, the scion who’s come under increased scrutiny for the marketing methods he pushed while president of Purdue. The family made billions off OxyContin, first introduced to the market in 1996.

Thousands of lawsuits against Purdue Pharma already allege the company played an outsized role in stoking the opioid epidemic. But the Sacklers — rarely named in the early lawsuits — have increasingly become a target for ire. With their communities steeped in an overdose crisis that’s cost the nation hundreds of thousands of lives over the past several years, cities and other players want someone to pay.

As the Sacklers become more and more tied to litigation about the opioid crisis, their non-drug-related pursuits have come under fire too.

In the lawsuit filed Monday, the 500 plaintiffs argue the Sacklers should’ve done more to stop their company from continuing its allegedly deceptive marketing and that Purdue had an “obligation to report suspicious prescribing ran head-on into the Sackler Defendants’ marketing strategy.”

“Purdue and the Sackler defendants manipulated and misrepresented medical science to serve their own agenda at great human cost,” the lawsuit alleges.
Advertisement

Massachusetts’ attorney general has also sued the Sacklers and argues the family led doctors to believe, incorrectly, that OxyContin was a weaker, safer drug than morphine. And New York City added the Sackler family to its existing lawsuit against Purdue Pharma in January. On Thursday, Democratic Rep. Elijah Cummings, chairman of the House Oversight Committee, along with Republican Rep. Mark DeSaulnier, requested documents from Purdue relating to the Sacklers’ level of involvement in ratcheting up sales.

The allegations in the lawsuits largely relate to the Sacklers’ involvement in Purdue’s marketing of the high-dose drug. Purdue settled with the Justice Department in 2007 over allegations relating to its marketing practices and agreed to pay more than $600 million in fines. As part of the settlement, three of the company’s executives pleaded guilty to misleading the public about OxyContin’s potential for addiction, which physicians sold as a less-addictive alternative to other painkillers.

Significant portions of the lawsuit relating to Purdue’s alleged misconduct post-2007, however, are redacted.

The name of the family, made up of prominent philanthropists, also graces museum halls, university buildings, and hospital wings. Now, some recipients of Sackler money have considered cutting ties. The Tate institution, of the Tate Britain and Tate Modern galleries, said this week that it’s not accepting any further donations from the Sacklers. And London’s National Portrait Gallery, under pressure from activists, dropped talks with the Sackler Trust for a $1.3 million donation.

Last month, during a busy Saturday night at New York City’s Guggenheim museum, protesters dropped thousands of fake prescriptions into the institution’s famous atrium to protest its Sackler ties.
Advertisement

Purdue and the Sacklers have repeatedly denied the claims against them, and Purdue has specifically argued that it’s being blamed for an addiction problem too complex to pin to one actor. Drug overdoses have risen exponentially in the U.S. for decades, even as prescriptions for opioids like OxyContin have dropped off. Pain patients, meanwhile, have also argued their drugs are being unfairly demonized.

Synthetic opioids like fentanyl are now considered to be the primary culprit behind overdose deaths, but those deaths often involve more than one substance.

https://news.vice.com/amp/en_us/article/evewqk/the-billionaire-family-behind-oxycontin-is-finally-having-its-moment-of-reckoning
HUMANS ARE STILL EVOLVING! Our communities blog is at https://openmind693.wordpress.com