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Offline knarf

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Heatwave cooks mussels in their shells on California shore
« Reply #13230 on: June 29, 2019, 05:13:51 AM »
Temperatures lead to what appears to be largest local die-off in 15 years, raising fears for broader ecosystem


Scores of dead mussels were on the rocks at Bodega Bay, California.

In all her years working at Bodega Bay, the marine reserve research coordinator Jackie Sones had never seen anything like it: scores of dead mussels on the rocks, their shells gaping and scorched, their meats thoroughly cooked.

A record-breaking June heatwave apparently caused the largest die-off of mussels in at least 15 years at Bodega Head, a small headland on the northern California bay. And Sones received reports from other researchers of similar mass mussel deaths at various beaches across roughly 140 miles of coastline.

While the people who flocked to the Pacific to enjoy a rare 80F beach day soaked up the sun, so did the mussel beds – where the rock-bound mollusks could have been experiencing temperatures above 100F at low tide, literally roasting in their shells.

Sones expects the die-off to affect the rest of the seashore ecosystem. “Mussels are known as a foundation species. The equivalent are the trees in a forest – they provide shelter and habitat for a lot of animals, so when you impact that core habitat it ripples throughout the rest of the system,” said Sones.

“I would expect that this actually impacted the entire region, it’s just that you would have to have people out there to document it to know,” said Sones.

Years of research into ocean health has focused on rising water temperatures and the effects of acidification on marine life. Kelp and coral are suffering in warmer waters, starfish are melting, and shellfish are breaking down.

But there is less data on the impacts of these kinds of one-off extreme weather events in the open coastal air. The Northeastern University marine ecologist Brian Helmuth designed a robot mussel that can measure and log temperatures as the animal would experience them.

“We no longer think of climate change in the future when we do this kind of forecasting work,” Helmuth told BayNature. “It’s how do you prepare for it now.”

The University of British Columbia biologist Christopher Harley documented a mussel cook-off at Bodega Head in 2004, but he and Sones believe this one was probably bigger.

“These events are definitely becoming more frequent, and more severe,” said Harley, citing diminishing mussel beds along the west coast, up to British Columbia. “Mussels are one of the canaries in the coal mine for climate change, only this canary provides food and habitat for hundreds of other species.”

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/jun/28/california-mussels-cooked-heat
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At least 57 e-scooters and bikes found at the bottom of Portland river
« Reply #13231 on: June 29, 2019, 05:21:13 AM »
Some were still in working order



E-scooter rollout is going just swimmingly in Portland. In addition to pedestrian concerns about the scooters cluttering cities and a substantial number of scooter-related injuries, it seems companies such as Lime, Bird, and Razor have another problem. Their scooters are ending up at the bottom of Portland's Willamette River.

According to a report from The Oregonian newspaper, at least 57 e-scooters and bicycles were recently discovered and removed from the Willamette, which runs through the heart of Portland. Officials have no clues as to why the scooters were scuttled, but it's likely an act of protest against the increasingly popular-yet-annoying method of transportation. Scooters have been thrown in the Pacific Ocean or set on fire in Southern California, and a hacker in Australia loaded the scooters' voice boxes to deliver lewd and racist comments.

"We advise those people not to park scooters in the river," Sgt. Brandon White from the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office joked.

he scooters were discovered by accident during a training session for the Multnomah County Sheriff's River Patrol and Dive Team. They showed various levels of decay — some were rusting, while others still had functioning lights. Ironically, had these not been found, the batteries could have been harmful to the river's ecosystem, which runs counter to the green ideology behind the scooters.
The e-scooters are currently in the midst of their second trail run in Portland. The first was a four-month stint in 2018, and the second recently started in April 2019 for a longer one-year trial. According to The Seattle Times, Portland currently has about 1,975 scooters, short of the 2,500 scooters allowed, available for public use.

https://www.autoblog.com/2019/06/28/e-scooters-bikes-thrown-in-portland-river/
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The Dalai Lama insists his female successor should have an "attractive face"
« Reply #13232 on: June 29, 2019, 05:25:46 AM »

The Dalai Lama insists his female successor should have an "attractive face"

By Sophie Lewis

June 28, 2019 / 7:12 PM / CBS News

Ahead of his 84th birthday, the Dalai Lama is once again insisting that, if his successor is a woman, she must be physically attractive. The Nobel Peace Prize winner doubled down on the idea during an interview with BBC News Thursday.

"If a female Dalai Lama comes, she should be more attractive," the 14th Dalai Lama told reporter Rajini Vaidyanathan. If not, "people, I think prefer, not see her, that face."

Vaidyanathan tried to give him the benefit of the doubt. "It's about who you are inside, isn't it?"

"Yes, I think both," he said. "Real beauty is inner beauty, that's true. But we're human beings. I think the appearance is also important."

This isn't the first time the Tibetan religious leader has brought up the physical beauty of a potential successor. In a 2015 BBC interview, he made similar comments, noting that a female Dalai Lama should be attractive, otherwise she would be of "not much use."

His comments immediately sparked outrage online.

The Dalai Lama also discussed his views on President Donald Trump during the interview. The two have never met, despite his close relationships with some former presidents. He specifically criticized Mr. Trump for what he believes is his "lack of moral principle."

"When I saw pictures of some of those young children, I was sad," he also said of the situation at the border. "America should take a global responsibility."

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/dalai-lama-insists-his-female-successor-should-have-an-attractive-face/
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Boeing's 737 MAX software outsourced to $12.80-an-hour engineers
« Reply #13233 on: June 29, 2019, 05:30:57 AM »
It remains the mystery at the heart of Boeing's 737 MAX crisis: how did a company renowned for meticulous design make seemingly basic software mistakes leading to a pair of deadly crashes?

Longtime Boeing engineers say the effort was complicated by a push to outsource work to lower-paid contractors.

The MAX software -- plagued by issues that could keep the planes grounded months longer after US regulators this week revealed a new flaw -- was developed at a time Boeing was laying off experienced engineers and pressing suppliers to cut costs.

Increasingly, the iconic American planemaker and its subcontractors have relied on temporary workers making as little as $US9 ($12.80) an hour to develop and test software, often from countries lacking a deep background in aerospace -- notably India.

In offices across from Seattle's Boeing Field, recent college graduates employed by the Indian software developer HCL Technologies occupied several rows of desks, said Mark Rabin, a former Boeing software engineer who worked in a flight-test group that supported the MAX.

The coders from HCL were typically designing to specifications set by Boeing. Still, "it was controversial because it was far less efficient than Boeing engineers just writing the code," Rabin said. Frequently, he recalled, "it took many rounds going back and forth because the code was not done correctly."

Boeing's cultivation of Indian companies appeared to pay other dividends. In recent years, it has won several orders for Indian military and commercial aircraft, such as a $US22 billion one in January 2017 to supply SpiceJet.

That order included 100 737-MAX 8 jets and represented Boeing's largest order ever from an Indian airline, a coup in a country dominated by Airbus.

Based on resumes posted on social media, HCL engineers helped develop and test the MAX's flight-display software, while employees from another Indian company, Cyient, handled software for flight-test equipment.
Costly delay

In one post, an HCL employee summarised his duties with a reference to the now-infamous model, which started flight tests in January 2016: "Provided quick workaround to resolve production issue which resulted in not delaying flight test of 737-MAX (delay in each flight test will cost very big amount for Boeing)."

Boeing said the company did not rely on engineers from HCL and Cyient for the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, which has been linked to the Lion Air crash last October and the Ethiopian Airlines disaster in March.

The Chicago-based planemaker also said it didn't rely on either firm for another software issue disclosed after the crashes: a cockpit warning light that wasn't working for most buyers.

"Boeing has many decades of experience working with supplier/partners around the world," a company spokesman said. "Our primary focus is on always ensuring that our products and services are safe, of the highest quality and comply with all applicable regulations."

In a statement, HCL said it "has a strong and long-standing business relationship with The Boeing Company, and we take pride in the work we do for all our customers. However, HCL does not comment on specific work we do for our customers. HCL is not associated with any ongoing issues with 737 MAX."

Recent simulator tests by the Federal Aviation Administration suggest the software issues on Boeing's best-selling model run deeper. The company's shares fell this week after the regulator found a further problem with a computer chip that experienced a lag in emergency response when it was overwhelmed with data.

Engineers who worked on the MAX, which Boeing began developing eight years ago to match a rival Airbus plane, have complained of pressure from managers to limit changes that might introduce extra time or cost.

"Boeing was doing all kinds of things, everything you can imagine, to reduce cost, including moving work from Puget Sound, because we'd become very expensive here," said Rick Ludtke, a former Boeing flight controls engineer laid off in 2017. "All that's very understandable if you think of it from a business perspective. Slowly over time it appears that's eroded the ability for Puget Sound designers to design."

Rabin, the former software engineer, recalled one manager saying at an all-hands meeting that Boeing didn't need senior engineers because its products were mature. "I was shocked that in a room full of a couple hundred mostly senior engineers we were being told that we weren't needed," said Rabin, who was laid off in 2015.
'Nonsense'

The typical jetliner has millions of parts -- and millions of lines of code -- and Boeing has long turned over large portions of the work to suppliers who follow its detailed design blueprints.

Starting with the 787 Dreamliner, launched in 2004, it sought to increase profits by instead providing high-level specifications and then asking suppliers to design more parts themselves.

The thinking was "they're the experts, you see, and they will take care of all of this stuff for us," said Frank McCormick, a former Boeing flight-controls software engineer who later worked as a consultant to regulators and manufacturers. "This was just nonsense."

Sales are another reason to send the work overseas. In exchange for an $US11 billion order in 2005 from Air India, Boeing promised to invest $US1.7 billion in Indian companies. That was a boon for HCL and other software developers from India, such as Cyient, whose engineers were widely used in computer-services industries but not yet prominent in aerospace.

Rockwell Collins, which makes cockpit electronics, had been among the first aerospace companies to source significant work in India in 2000, when HCL began testing software there for the Iowa-based company. By 2010, HCL employed more than 400 people at design, development and verification centers for Rockwell Collins in Chennai and Bangalore.

That same year, Boeing opened what it called a "center of excellence" with HCL in Chennai, saying the companies would partner "to create software critical for flight test." In 2011, Boeing named Cyient, then known as Infotech, to a list of its "suppliers of the year" for design, stress analysis and software engineering on the 787 and the 747-8 at another centre in Hyderabad.

The Boeing rival also relies in part on offshore engineers. In addition to supporting sales, the planemakers say global design teams add efficiency as they work around the clock.

But outsourcing has long been a sore point for some Boeing engineers, who, in addition to fearing job losses say it has led to communications issues and mistakes.
Moscow mistakes

Boeing has also expanded a design centre in Moscow. At a meeting with a chief 787 engineer in 2008, one staffer complained about sending drawings back to a team in Russia 18 times before they understood that the smoke detectors needed to be connected to the electrical system, said Cynthia Cole, a former Boeing engineer who headed the engineers' union from 2006 to 2010.

"Engineering started becoming a commodity," said Vance Hilderman, who co-founded a company called TekSci that supplied aerospace contract engineers and began losing work to overseas competitors in the early 2000s.

US-based avionics companies in particular moved aggressively, shifting more than 30 per cent of their software engineering offshore versus 10 per cent for European-based firms in recent years, said Hilderman, an avionics safety consultant with three decades of experience whose recent clients include most of the major Boeing suppliers.

With a strong US dollar, a big part of the attraction was price. Engineers in India made around $US5 an hour; it's now $US9 or $US10, compared with $US35 to $US40 for those in the US on an H1B visa, he said. But he'd tell clients the cheaper hourly wage equated to more like $US80 because of the need for supervision, and he said his firm won back some business to fix mistakes.

HCL, once known as Hindustan Computers, was founded in 1976 by billionaire Shiv Nadar and now has more than $US8.6 billion in annual sales. With 18,000 employees in the US and 15,000 in Europe, HCL is a global company and has deep expertise in computing, said Sukamal Banerjee, a vice president.

It has won business from Boeing on that basis, not on price, he said: "We came from a strong R&D background."

Still, for the 787, HCL gave Boeing a remarkable price – free, according to Sam Swaro, an associate vice president who pitched HCL's services at a San Diego conference sponsored by Avionics International magazine in June.

He said the company took no up-front payments on the 787 and only started collecting payments based on sales years later, an "innovative business model" he offered to extend to others in the industry.

The 787 entered service three years late and billions of dollars over budget in 2011, in part because of confusion introduced by the outsourcing strategy.

Under Dennis Muilenburg, a longtime Boeing engineer who became chief executive in 2015, the company has said that it planned to bring more work back in-house for its newest planes.
Engineer backwater

The MAX became Boeing's top seller soon after it was offered in 2011. But for ambitious engineers, it was something of a "backwater," said Peter Lemme, who designed the 767's automated flight controls and is now a consultant.

The MAX was an update of a 50-year-old design, and the changes needed to be limited enough that Boeing could produce the new planes like cookie cutters, with few changes for either the assembly line or airlines. "As an engineer that's not the greatest job," he said.

Rockwell Collins, now a unit of United Technologies, won the Max contract for cockpit displays, and it has relied in part on HCL engineers in India, Iowa and the Seattle area. A United Technologies spokeswoman didn't respond to a request for comment.

Contract engineers from Cyient helped test flight test equipment. Charles LoveJoy, a former flight-test instrumentation design engineer at the company, said engineers in the US would review drawings done overnight in India every morning at 7:30 am.

"We did have our challenges with the India team," he said. "They met the requirements, per se, but you could do it better."

Multiple investigations – including a US Justice Department criminal probe – are trying to unravel how and when critical decisions were made about the MAX's software. During the crashes of Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines planes that killed 346 people, investigators suspect, the MCAS system pushed the planes into uncontrollable dives because of bad data from a single sensor.

That design violated basic principles of redundancy for generations of Boeing engineers, and the company apparently never tested to see how the software would respond, Lemme said.
'Stunning fail'

"It was a stunning fail," he said. "A lot of people should have thought of this problem – not one person – and asked about it."

Boeing also has disclosed that it learned soon after MAX deliveries began in 2017 that a warning light that might have alerted crews to the issue with the sensor wasn't installed correctly in the flight-display software.

A Boeing statement in May, explaining why the company didn't inform regulators at the time, said engineers had determined it wasn't a safety issue.

"Senior company leadership," the statement added, "was not involved in the review."

https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/boeing-s-737-max-software-outsourced-to-12-80-an-hour-engineers-20190629-p522h4.html?
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Offline knarf

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The liberal ideology that has underpinned Western democracy for decades is “obsolete,” Russian President Vladimir Putin said in an interview with the Financial Times published Friday.

Speaking to the FT on the eve of the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan, during which world leaders will discuss trade, security and other matters, Putin said “the liberal idea” had “outlived its purpose” and “come into conflict with the interests of the overwhelming majority of the population.”

Putin, 66, has been Russia’s de facto leader for almost 20 years and has trumpeted the rise of nationalist populism. He has been accused of using financial aid and social media to support populist movements abroad, including during the 2016 U.S. Presidential elections and the recent European Parliament elections, which Putin has vehemently denied.
Putin on U.S. foreign relations

On the topic of tensions between the U.S. and Iran, Putin said the situation has become “explosive.” He attributed the problem to American unilateralism and the lack of rules underpinning world order.

Tensions between the U.S. and Iran escalated after Iranian forces shot down a U.S. drone on June 20. Relations between the countries have been deteriorating since Trump decided to withdraw from an international accord that curbed Tehran’s nuclear program.

Turning to Russia’s direct relations with the U.S., Putin said he was concerned about the threat of a renewed nuclear arms race. “The cold war was a bad thing … but there were at least some rules that all participants in international communication more or less adhered to or tried to follow,” Putin said. “Now, it seems that there are no rules at all.”
Putin on the global refugee crisis

Putin took aim at Chancellor Angela Merkel‘s 2015 policy to admit more than one million refugees to Germany, mainly from war-torn Syria, describing it as a “cardinal mistake.” Meanwhile he praised U.S. President Donald Trump for trying to stop migration and drug trafficking from Mexico.

Merkel’s decision “presupposes that nothing needs to be done. That migrants can kill, plunder and rape with impunity because their rights as migrants have to be protected,” said Putin. “Every crime must have its punishment. The liberal idea has become obsolete,” he added.

Others say Putin’s words are dangerous. Brian Dooley, Senior Advisor at Human Rights First, a Washington, D.C.-based human rights organization, says that “Putin and Trump are in lockstep in their demonization of migrants, scapegoating refugees with lies. These smears are bad enough but they’ll also encourage others and make this sort of hateful speech seem mainstream.”

Mohammed Ateek, a Syrian academic researcher, who moved to London from Syria in 2013, says Putin is trying to “normalize the narrative of closed borders.” He tells TIME that “calling for homogenous communities and refusing multiculturalism is in the heart of [Putin’s] dangerous policies.” Ateek also argues that it Putin’s actions in Syria have contributed to Europe’s refugee crisis — Moscow has been militarily involved in Syria war since September 2015, and in 2017 said would permanently station troops there. “Russia’s actions have led hundreds of thousands of Syrians dead and millions fleeing the country. Now, he’s calling these displaced people ‘rapists and murderers’ and encouraging countries to shut their borders in front of them,” says Ateek.
Putin on LGBTQ rights

Putin told the Financial Times that liberal governments have “pursued a mindless multiculturalism” by embracing sexual diversity, among other things. Echoing views expressed by other right-wing populists, such as Poland’s Law and Justice leader Jaroslaw Kaczynski and Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban, Putin said “[LGBTQ persons] must not be allowed to overshadow the culture, traditions and traditional family values of millions of people making up the core population.”

With regards to Russia’s own LGBTQ rights record, Putin told the newspaper that “we have no problem with LGBTQ persons. God forbid, let them live as they wish … But some things do appear excessive to us. They claim now that children can play five or six gender roles.”

But given how LGBTQ people are treated in Russia, such claims “come across as hypocritical,” Tanya Lokshina, Europe and Central Asia associate director at Human Rights Watch, tells TIME. In Russia, LGBTQ people cannot “live as they wish,” she says. “They have long faced threats, bullying, abuse inside their families, and discrimination.”

In 2013, Russia introduced a controversial “anti-gay propaganda law” that bans the “promotion of nontraditional sexual relations to minors.” Lokshina says the law, which is officially titled the law “aimed at protecting children from information promoting the denial of traditional family values,” has a “stifling effect on access to affirming education and support services, with harmful consequences for LGBT youth.”

Donald Tusk, the European Council president, lashed out at Putin’s comments as well. “What I find really obsolete is authoritarianism, personality cults and the rule of oligarchs,” he told reporters on Friday. Tusk added that whoever claims that liberal democracy is obsolete also claims that “freedoms are obsolete, that the rule of law is obsolete and that human rights are obsolete.”

https://time.com/5616982/putin-liberalism-g20/
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Offline Eddie

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Re: Boeing's 737 MAX software outsourced to $12.80-an-hour engineers
« Reply #13235 on: June 29, 2019, 09:43:55 AM »
It remains the mystery at the heart of Boeing's 737 MAX crisis: how did a company renowned for meticulous design make seemingly basic software mistakes leading to a pair of deadly crashes?

Longtime Boeing engineers say the effort was complicated by a push to outsource work to lower-paid contractors.

The MAX software -- plagued by issues that could keep the planes grounded months longer after US regulators this week revealed a new flaw -- was developed at a time Boeing was laying off experienced engineers and pressing suppliers to cut costs.

Increasingly, the iconic American planemaker and its subcontractors have relied on temporary workers making as little as $US9 ($12.80) an hour to develop and test software, often from countries lacking a deep background in aerospace -- notably India.

In offices across from Seattle's Boeing Field, recent college graduates employed by the Indian software developer HCL Technologies occupied several rows of desks, said Mark Rabin, a former Boeing software engineer who worked in a flight-test group that supported the MAX.

The coders from HCL were typically designing to specifications set by Boeing. Still, "it was controversial because it was far less efficient than Boeing engineers just writing the code," Rabin said. Frequently, he recalled, "it took many rounds going back and forth because the code was not done correctly."

Boeing's cultivation of Indian companies appeared to pay other dividends. In recent years, it has won several orders for Indian military and commercial aircraft, such as a $US22 billion one in January 2017 to supply SpiceJet.

That order included 100 737-MAX 8 jets and represented Boeing's largest order ever from an Indian airline, a coup in a country dominated by Airbus.

Based on resumes posted on social media, HCL engineers helped develop and test the MAX's flight-display software, while employees from another Indian company, Cyient, handled software for flight-test equipment.
Costly delay

In one post, an HCL employee summarised his duties with a reference to the now-infamous model, which started flight tests in January 2016: "Provided quick workaround to resolve production issue which resulted in not delaying flight test of 737-MAX (delay in each flight test will cost very big amount for Boeing)."

Boeing said the company did not rely on engineers from HCL and Cyient for the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, which has been linked to the Lion Air crash last October and the Ethiopian Airlines disaster in March.

The Chicago-based planemaker also said it didn't rely on either firm for another software issue disclosed after the crashes: a cockpit warning light that wasn't working for most buyers.

"Boeing has many decades of experience working with supplier/partners around the world," a company spokesman said. "Our primary focus is on always ensuring that our products and services are safe, of the highest quality and comply with all applicable regulations."

In a statement, HCL said it "has a strong and long-standing business relationship with The Boeing Company, and we take pride in the work we do for all our customers. However, HCL does not comment on specific work we do for our customers. HCL is not associated with any ongoing issues with 737 MAX."

Recent simulator tests by the Federal Aviation Administration suggest the software issues on Boeing's best-selling model run deeper. The company's shares fell this week after the regulator found a further problem with a computer chip that experienced a lag in emergency response when it was overwhelmed with data.

Engineers who worked on the MAX, which Boeing began developing eight years ago to match a rival Airbus plane, have complained of pressure from managers to limit changes that might introduce extra time or cost.

"Boeing was doing all kinds of things, everything you can imagine, to reduce cost, including moving work from Puget Sound, because we'd become very expensive here," said Rick Ludtke, a former Boeing flight controls engineer laid off in 2017. "All that's very understandable if you think of it from a business perspective. Slowly over time it appears that's eroded the ability for Puget Sound designers to design."

Rabin, the former software engineer, recalled one manager saying at an all-hands meeting that Boeing didn't need senior engineers because its products were mature. "I was shocked that in a room full of a couple hundred mostly senior engineers we were being told that we weren't needed," said Rabin, who was laid off in 2015.
'Nonsense'

The typical jetliner has millions of parts -- and millions of lines of code -- and Boeing has long turned over large portions of the work to suppliers who follow its detailed design blueprints.

Starting with the 787 Dreamliner, launched in 2004, it sought to increase profits by instead providing high-level specifications and then asking suppliers to design more parts themselves.

The thinking was "they're the experts, you see, and they will take care of all of this stuff for us," said Frank McCormick, a former Boeing flight-controls software engineer who later worked as a consultant to regulators and manufacturers. "This was just nonsense."

Sales are another reason to send the work overseas. In exchange for an $US11 billion order in 2005 from Air India, Boeing promised to invest $US1.7 billion in Indian companies. That was a boon for HCL and other software developers from India, such as Cyient, whose engineers were widely used in computer-services industries but not yet prominent in aerospace.

Rockwell Collins, which makes cockpit electronics, had been among the first aerospace companies to source significant work in India in 2000, when HCL began testing software there for the Iowa-based company. By 2010, HCL employed more than 400 people at design, development and verification centers for Rockwell Collins in Chennai and Bangalore.

That same year, Boeing opened what it called a "center of excellence" with HCL in Chennai, saying the companies would partner "to create software critical for flight test." In 2011, Boeing named Cyient, then known as Infotech, to a list of its "suppliers of the year" for design, stress analysis and software engineering on the 787 and the 747-8 at another centre in Hyderabad.

The Boeing rival also relies in part on offshore engineers. In addition to supporting sales, the planemakers say global design teams add efficiency as they work around the clock.

But outsourcing has long been a sore point for some Boeing engineers, who, in addition to fearing job losses say it has led to communications issues and mistakes.
Moscow mistakes

Boeing has also expanded a design centre in Moscow. At a meeting with a chief 787 engineer in 2008, one staffer complained about sending drawings back to a team in Russia 18 times before they understood that the smoke detectors needed to be connected to the electrical system, said Cynthia Cole, a former Boeing engineer who headed the engineers' union from 2006 to 2010.

"Engineering started becoming a commodity," said Vance Hilderman, who co-founded a company called TekSci that supplied aerospace contract engineers and began losing work to overseas competitors in the early 2000s.

US-based avionics companies in particular moved aggressively, shifting more than 30 per cent of their software engineering offshore versus 10 per cent for European-based firms in recent years, said Hilderman, an avionics safety consultant with three decades of experience whose recent clients include most of the major Boeing suppliers.

With a strong US dollar, a big part of the attraction was price. Engineers in India made around $US5 an hour; it's now $US9 or $US10, compared with $US35 to $US40 for those in the US on an H1B visa, he said. But he'd tell clients the cheaper hourly wage equated to more like $US80 because of the need for supervision, and he said his firm won back some business to fix mistakes.

HCL, once known as Hindustan Computers, was founded in 1976 by billionaire Shiv Nadar and now has more than $US8.6 billion in annual sales. With 18,000 employees in the US and 15,000 in Europe, HCL is a global company and has deep expertise in computing, said Sukamal Banerjee, a vice president.

It has won business from Boeing on that basis, not on price, he said: "We came from a strong R&D background."

Still, for the 787, HCL gave Boeing a remarkable price – free, according to Sam Swaro, an associate vice president who pitched HCL's services at a San Diego conference sponsored by Avionics International magazine in June.

He said the company took no up-front payments on the 787 and only started collecting payments based on sales years later, an "innovative business model" he offered to extend to others in the industry.

The 787 entered service three years late and billions of dollars over budget in 2011, in part because of confusion introduced by the outsourcing strategy.

Under Dennis Muilenburg, a longtime Boeing engineer who became chief executive in 2015, the company has said that it planned to bring more work back in-house for its newest planes.
Engineer backwater

The MAX became Boeing's top seller soon after it was offered in 2011. But for ambitious engineers, it was something of a "backwater," said Peter Lemme, who designed the 767's automated flight controls and is now a consultant.

The MAX was an update of a 50-year-old design, and the changes needed to be limited enough that Boeing could produce the new planes like cookie cutters, with few changes for either the assembly line or airlines. "As an engineer that's not the greatest job," he said.

Rockwell Collins, now a unit of United Technologies, won the Max contract for cockpit displays, and it has relied in part on HCL engineers in India, Iowa and the Seattle area. A United Technologies spokeswoman didn't respond to a request for comment.

Contract engineers from Cyient helped test flight test equipment. Charles LoveJoy, a former flight-test instrumentation design engineer at the company, said engineers in the US would review drawings done overnight in India every morning at 7:30 am.

"We did have our challenges with the India team," he said. "They met the requirements, per se, but you could do it better."

Multiple investigations – including a US Justice Department criminal probe – are trying to unravel how and when critical decisions were made about the MAX's software. During the crashes of Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines planes that killed 346 people, investigators suspect, the MCAS system pushed the planes into uncontrollable dives because of bad data from a single sensor.

That design violated basic principles of redundancy for generations of Boeing engineers, and the company apparently never tested to see how the software would respond, Lemme said.
'Stunning fail'

"It was a stunning fail," he said. "A lot of people should have thought of this problem – not one person – and asked about it."

Boeing also has disclosed that it learned soon after MAX deliveries began in 2017 that a warning light that might have alerted crews to the issue with the sensor wasn't installed correctly in the flight-display software.

A Boeing statement in May, explaining why the company didn't inform regulators at the time, said engineers had determined it wasn't a safety issue.

"Senior company leadership," the statement added, "was not involved in the review."

https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/boeing-s-737-max-software-outsourced-to-12-80-an-hour-engineers-20190629-p522h4.html?


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They're probably endless
« Reply #13236 on: June 29, 2019, 04:13:52 PM »
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Male contraceptive gel: UK man among first in world to take part in trials
« Reply #13237 on: June 29, 2019, 04:24:56 PM »
Couples in Manchester and Edinburgh are among up to 450 taking part in the two-year international study.


Men will apply the gel daily to their upper arms and shoulders.

A British man is among the first in the world to trial a male contraceptive gel as part of a two-year international study.

PHD student James Owers, from Edinburgh, told Sky News that his partner saw an advert for the project and asked him if he wanted to get involved.

He said: "I thought it was a good opportunity to really make a difference into the discourse about responsibility in terms of contraception.


James Owers, a PHD student, is among the first in the world to trial the gel

"At the moment, men only really have the vasectomy or the condom - and if you want to have kids in the future, a vasectomy isn't such a great idea and condoms are very, very ineffective.

"The recorded failure rate of condoms is 17%, so I was quite keen from a selfish perspective, to get more options and to help develop those."

He is among 450 couples who will be involved in trialling the gel formulation, called NES/T, which includes the progestin compound segesterone acetate, in combination with testosterone.

It is applied to the back and shoulders and absorbed through the skin.

The progestin blocks natural testosterone production in the testes, reducing sperm production to low or non-existent levels.

The replacement testosterone maintains normal sex drive and other functions that are dependent on adequate blood levels of the hormone.

Mr Owers suggested remembering to apply the gel every day is not an issue and that the process is "absolutely fine".

He described it coming in a "toothpaste dispenser" like tube - adding: "You just dispense some on your hands and you rub it into your shoulders and shoulder blades, it takes about 30 seconds, dries really quickly, doesn't smell or anything and it's really very little effort indeed."

Researchers also claim that so far, the trials have proved very effective.

Mr Owers said: "It's actually quite interesting, it takes six to 12 weeks to get your sperm count all the way down and it takes about six to 12 weeks for it to come back up again.

"So it's quite different to the pill in as much as if you miss the pill on one day or in fact, you miss it by 12 hours, there is some non-zero chance that you will ovulate.

"But if I was to miss taking this for an entire week, I would still be clinically infertile, so the risk here is quite different from the pill."

The study is being led in the UK by Saint Mary's Hospital, part of Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, and the University of Edinburgh.

The project is being funded by the US National Institute of Health and led by the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute and the University of Washington School of Medicine.

Dr Cheryl Fitzgerald is among those behind the study and told Sky News that so far it was going "very well".

She said: "We are going to be looking at these men very closely throughout the duration of the trial to check that their sperm counts stays low.

"Obviously, if that doesn't happen, we will tell couples they need to use other forms of contraceptive, but certainly the evidence we've got so far, is that this is very very effective and it really does, really really suppress sperm counts, so I think it will be highly effective."

Dr Fitzgerald added: "I think women have got quite a few choices and I think men need to have a choice.

"Also, there are lots of women who can't take different forms of contraception, so contraception becomes quite an issue, so I think anything that can be added into that must be good."

https://news.sky.com/story/male-contraceptive-gel-uk-man-among-first-in-world-to-take-part-in-trials-11748858
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Minneapolis pastor and his church expelled for permitting gay marriage
« Reply #13238 on: June 29, 2019, 05:28:46 PM »
Rev Dan Collison had his credentials removed by a 77% vote at the Evangelical Covenant Church’s annual meeting


 First Covenant Church in downtown Minneapolis.

Leaders of the Evangelical Covenant Church have voted to defrock a Minneapolis pastor and expel his church – for permitting gay marriage.

The Rev Dan Collison had his credentials removed by a 77% vote at the Evangelical Covenant Church’s annual meeting in Omaha, Nebraska, on Friday night. Leaders also voted to expel Collison’s First Covenant Church, a founding member of the 134-year-old denomination.

Collison, who became a pastor at First Covenant in downtown Minneapolis in 2009, told the Star Tribune he was “not surprised” but “saddened”.

“I feel grounded in the path we have chosen,” he said. “I feel grateful for the pastors and churches who stood up for us. I feel compassion to those caught in the middle.”

The ECC said First Covenant was free to keep operating and can keep its church building. First Covenant said Collison will continue serving as lead pastor.

In 2014, a First Covenant staff member officiated at an offsite wedding of two women from the church worship band. The church has also put out a “love all” statement that said it welcomes members of the LGBTQ community to participate in the church, including serving in leadership roles, and says it offers pastoral care including weddings “to all in our congregation without regard for ability, race, sex, gender identity or sexual orientation”.

ECC leaders also voted on Friday night to remove another pastor, the Rev Steve Armfield, a retired Michigan minister who officiated his son’s same-sex wedding in Minneapolis in 2017. Armfield also was accused of violating the denomination’s same-sex marriage ban.

Leaders recommended that Collison, Armfield and First Covenant be forced out because they violated policies on human sexuality, specifically “celibacy in singleness and faithfulness in heterosexual marriage”.

“The ECC is mindful of the complexity, the sensitivity and the pain that matters of human sexuality can bring,” said Michelle Sanchez, an ECC executive minister. “We talk about the desire for both freedom and responsibility as a denomination. Those two things were coming into tension in this case.”

First Covenant Church was founded by Swedish migrants in 1874. Today, the denomination has about 875 churches with 280,000 members nationally.

“I hope this historic church someday changes its mind and then returns to our family,” ECC president John Wenrich said in a statement.

Armfield, an ECC pastor for 47 years, served an ECC church in Red Wing, Minnesota, in the 1970s.

“It is so unbelievably upsetting to see my father, Dan, and my fellow members of First Covenant experience the hate, deceit and actions that go against the teachings of love and inclusion that Jesus Christ preached,” said Matthew Armfield, who attends First Covenant.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/jun/29/minneapolis-pastor-and-his-church-expelled-for-permitting-gay-marriage

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In this March 31, 2015, aerial photo, the wake of a supply vessel heading toward a working platform crosses over an oil sheen drifting from the site of the former Taylor Energy oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico, off Louisiana.

For 15 years, oil from one particular spill has been leaking into the Gulf of Mexico.
A new federal study estimates that each day, about 380 to 4,500 gallons of oil are flowing at the site where a company's oil platform was damaged after a hurricane. That's about a hundred to a thousand times worse than the company's initial estimate, which put the amount of oil flowing into the ocean at less than three gallons a day.
The report, released this past week and written by scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and one at Florida State University, also contradicted assertions from the Taylor Energy Company about where the oil was coming from.

The leak started in 2004, when an oil platform belonging to the Taylor Energy Company was damaged by a mudslide after Hurricane Ivan hit the Gulf of Mexico. A bundle of pipes and wells sank to the ocean floor and became partially buried under mud and sediment.

To respond to the leak, Taylor Energy tried to cap nine of the wells and place containment domes over three of the plumes in 2008.
But after local activists observed more oil slicks near the site of the Deepwater Horizon Spill in 2010, the Taylor oil spill started getting national attention. And last May, the US Coast Guard installed a containment system that has been collecting 30 barrels, or about 1,260 gallons, a day to help catch the oil that's continuing to surge in the ocean.


This September 2018 photo provided by NOAA shows a NOAA research vessel at a Taylor Energy production site in the Gulf of Mexico. A federally led study of oil seeping from the damaged platform found releases lower than other recent estimates, but contradicts the well owner's assertions about the amount and source of oil.

Study contradicts rig owner's conclusions

Taylor Energy liquidated its oil and gas assets and ceased production and drilling in 2008, and says on its website that it exists solely to respond to the spill. It maintains that any oil and gas now leaking at the site is coming from oil-soaked sediment and bacterial breakdown of the oil.
The federal government's study suggests otherwise.
"This shows it is in fact coming from the reservoirs, from these oil pipes, and not from the remnant oil at the bottom of the ocean," Andrew Mason, one of the study's authors, told CNN.
To reach that determination, scientists collected samples from under the ocean's surface using two methods. Previous studies had either used samples from oil slicks on the ocean surface or measurements from flying over the site.
Using an acoustic device, scientists estimated that 9 to 47 barrels, or about 380 to 1,900 gallons, of oil are leaking daily. Another device called a bubblometer put that estimate at 19 to 108 barrels, or about 800 to 4,500 gallons, a day.
The report notes that the ranges are estimates and don't necessarily represent a final definitive government estimate of the oil being released at the site.

Efforts to stop the leak

Mason called the US Coast Guard's containment system "a great step forward," but said that it still allows some oil to leak out. He also cautioned that it wasn't a permanent fix, given that the containment system would begin to degrade the longer it's in the ocean, and said that authorities needed to go in and plug the remaining 16 wells.
Taylor Energy has claimed that intervening further could release more oil and negatively affect the environment.
In a statement to CNN, the company said it had not seen the data in the latest government report and could not verify its accuracy. It added that it "continues to advocate for a response that is grounded in science and prioritizes the well-being of the environment."

Mason said that the study helps establish the extent of the problem.
"This has been a good step forward in definitively saying what's going on at this site so we can move on from saying 'There's no problem,' to saying, 'All right, there's a problem and how do we fix it now?'" he said.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/29/us/taylor-oil-spill-trnd/index.html
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Protest in Madrid as conservatives suspend ban on most polluting cars
« Reply #13240 on: June 29, 2019, 05:43:52 PM »
MADRID (Reuters) - Thousands protested in Madrid on Saturday against the suspension of curbs on polluting cars by the new conservative city hall, raising fears that environmental rollbacks seen in the United States may be spreading to Europe.

The first reversal of environmental policies by a major European city comes despite soaring global environmental concerns and is a fresh sign of growing divisions in Spain after a series of inconclusive elections in April and May.

Last November Madrid’s then far-left government banned most petrol and diesel cars from its center to tackle high levels of nitrogen dioxide. The policy was known as “Madrid central” and it was intended to bring Madrid into line with EU clean air rules which it had been violating since 2010.

“Yes we can, I do want Madrid central,” chanted the protesters. Some were holding banners that read “I want to breathe free” and “We aspire to have a Madrid without smoke”.

“We have to save (the planet) starting at the local and small level, the first thing is Madrid’s center,” said Laura Martin, a 39-year-old actress.

She added that she was concerned that the new Madrid government might have some similar ideas to U.S. President Donald Trump’s rollback of environmental policies, such as weakening rules limiting carbon emissions from power plants and standards on harmful gas emissions from cars and trucks.

People of all ages rallied despite a scorching heatwave in Spain and most of Europe, which had already forced the city of Paris to ban more than half of all registered cars from its roads earlier this week because the heat worsens pollution.

Various European cities including Paris, Hamburg, Amsterdam, London and Oslo have started to penalize or ban older polluting cars as they seek to phase out all fossil fuel cars in the coming decade.

Environmental groups including Greenpeace say the “Madrid central” measure slashed air pollution levels from car emissions in the center to record lows.

The new city hall run by the conservative People’s Party suspended fines on cars entering the currently restricted area of around five sq km (two sq miles) from July 1, while it reviews the plan to make it “compatible with citizens’ mobility needs”.

“As far as I know at the European level there’s no precedent in ending a car traffic restriction,” said Lara Lazaro, researcher of the Real Instituto Elcano.

The European Commision has warned Spain that it would face sanctions and a possible lawsuit if it fails to meet air quality standards in its largest cities of Madrid and Barcelona.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-spain-environment-protests/protest-in-madrid-as-conservatives-suspend-ban-on-most-polluting-cars-idUSKCN1TU0VS?feedType=RSS&feedName=topNews&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+reuters%2FtopNews+%28News+%2F+US+%2F+Top+News%29
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American Missiles Found in Libyan Rebel Compound
« Reply #13241 on: June 29, 2019, 05:59:48 PM »
Libyan government fighters discovered a cache of powerful American missiles, usually sold only to close American allies, at a captured rebel base in the mountains south of Tripoli this week.

The four Javelin anti-tank missiles, which cost more than $170,000 each, had ended up bolstering the arsenal of Gen. Khalifa Hifter, whose forces are waging a military campaign to take over Libya and overthrow a government the United States supports.

Markings on the missiles’ shipping containers indicate that they were originally sold to the United Arab Emirates, an important American partner, in 2008.

If the Emirates transferred the weapons to General Hifter, it would likely violate the sales agreement with the United States as well as a United Nations arms embargo.

Officials at the State Department and Defense Department said Friday they had opened investigations into how the weapons ended up on the Libyan battlefield.

“We take all allegations of misuse of U.S. origin defense articles very seriously,” a State Department official said in a statement. “We are aware of these reports and are seeking additional information. We expect all recipients of U.S. origin defense equipment to abide by their end-use obligations.”

The United States supports United Nations-led efforts to broker a peaceful solution to the Libyan crisis, the official added.

A spokeswoman for the Department of Defense declined to comment further on the matter.

The United Arab Emirates ambassador to Washington, Yousef al-Otaiba, declined to answer questions about the provenance of the missiles.
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The missiles were discovered after forces loyal to the United Nations-backed national unity government carried out a successful surprise attack Wednesday on Gheryan, a mountain redoubt 40 miles south of Tripoli. Gheryan was the headquarters for General Hifter’s military campaign to seize control of Tripoli, which his forces have been fighting since April.

After capturing Gheryan, pro-government fighters uncovered Chinese-made attack drones and the stack of four American-made Javelin missiles at an abandoned base. Known in the military as “fire and forget” weapons, the Javelins are guided by infrared technology and are capable of destroying all currently fielded main battle tanks.

Markings on the missile crates identify their joint manufacturer, the arms giants Raytheon and Lockheed Martin, and a contract number that corresponds with a $115 million order for Javelin missiles that was placed by the United Arab Emirates and Oman in 2008.

Oman is not a player in Libya’s wars. But the United Arab Emirates, under its de facto leader Prince Mohammed bin Zayed, is one of General Hifter’s most committed foreign backers.

Emirati warplanes carried out airstrikes in 2017 that helped General Hifter win control of Benghazi, after years of battle against Islamist militias that leveled entire swaths of the eastern city.

When General Hifter started his assault on Tripoli on April 4, in the face of much international opposition, the Emiratis continued to support him. They supplied a Russian-made surface-to-air missile system, Chinese-made Wing Loong combat drones and Emirati drones, said a senior Western official with knowledge of the arms trade.

Jordan, another American ally to side with General Hifter, sent a Jordanian-made anti-tank system known as Nashshab, the official said.

Turkey, a regional rival of the United Arab Emirates, intervened on the other side of the fight, sending combat drones and armored vehicles to help the United Nations-backed government in Tripoli.

The United States supports the Tripoli government, which it helped install. However, President Trump appeared to endorse General Hifter and his military drive after the two men spoke by telephone in April, hailing his “significant role in fighting terrorism.”

Other American officials later rowed back that position by stressing American support for the United Nations-led political process.

The foreign interventions, which flout a United Nations embargo on all arms sales to Libya, highlight how the conflict set off by the ouster of Libya’s longtime dictator, Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, in 2011 has partly devolved into a proxy conflict between rival regional powers.

Until now, though, those foreign sponsors have avoided using restricted American military technology.

“The U.A.E. has been supplying advanced weapons to the Libyan theater for years,” said Oded Berkowitz, an Israeli security analyst who specializes in the Libyan conflict. “But now they seem to be throwing everything at it. And some of these weapons, like the Javelins, are real game changers.”

The controversy over the Javelin missiles suggests that the Emiratis are flexing their military muscle with little regard for rules set by their American allies, said Frederic Wehrey, a scholar at the Carnegie Institute and author of a recent book on Libya.

“This is the new era we’re in,” he said.

The Emiratis have used restricted American weapons in Libya before. In 2014, American officials were alarmed when Emirati warplanes bombed targets in western Libya with American munitions, said Deborah Jones, then the United States ambassador to Libya.

Criticism of the Emirati actions from the Obama administration made Prince Mohammed “furious,” recalled Ms. Jones, who was sent to Abu Dhabi to meet with him.

President Trump, though, has had a much closer relationship with his Emirati and Saudi allies in the Persian Gulf, a closeness that has left some wondering if it has emboldened the Emiratis in Libya.

“When the Emiratis bombed Tripoli in 2014 there was alarm in the Pentagon and an effort to warn them off,” Mr. Wehrey said. “But in the current climate, you have to wonder if they perceive such a cost.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/28/world/africa/libya-american-missiles.html
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US President Donald Trump walking with North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un during a break in talks at the second US-North Korea summit at the Sofitel Legend Metropole hotel in Hanoi on February 28, 2019.

U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un extended warm invitations to one another on Sunday, exchanging lofty visions for the future as they met at the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two Koreas.

The leaders shook hands on the North Korean side of the DMZ, making Trump the first sitting American president to ever set foot in the hermit state, before crossing together to the South Korean side and shaking hands again.

“It’s a great honor to be here,” Trump said, adding, “I feel great.” Upon leaving closed-door talks with Kim, he described the meeting as “very, very good.”

Kim said this was “an expression of his willingness” to work toward a new future.

While the two spoke of reconciliation and diplomatic progress, Trump said that U.S. sanctions on the country over its nuclear weapons and missile development programs would stay for now. The leaders agreed to designate a team to work out the details of future negotiations, Trump said, adding that the U.S. team would be headed by Washington’s nuclear envoy Stephen Biegun and that work would begin “over the next two or three weeks.”

The sticking point between the historical adversaries has long been the issue of denuclearization, a term whose definition the two countries can’t seem to agree on. Washington wants Pyongyang to give up its nuclear weapons, while Kim and his predecessors view the term to mean broader concessions from the U.S., including the removal of its troops from the Korean peninsula.

Trump made the surprise announcement just hours earlier of his intention to meet Kim at the Joint Security Area patrolled by soldiers from both Koreas near the inter-Korean border. Sunday also marks the first meeting between American and North Korean heads of state at the historic border since a cease-fire was signed ending the Korean War in 1953.

The meeting, which comes on the tails of the G-20, is the third between the two leaders in just over a year. The most recent, in Hanoi, Vietnam in February, collapsed due to disagreements over U.S. sanctions on Pyongyang.
An invitation to the White House

The U.S. president said he invited Kim to the White House during their private talks Sunday, while the two agreed to visit one another’s countries “at the right time.”

“I would invite him right now to the White House,” Trump said, to which the North Korean leader responded that it would be a great honor if Trump visited Pyongyang. Kim expressed his desire to “leave behind the past and move toward the future,” according to Reuters.

“It’s a great day for the world,” Trump said, adding that he was proud to step over the border line. “The world is watching. It’s very important to the world,” he said, before stepping into private talks with Kim and South Korean President Moon Jae-in. Moon joined both leaders shortly after he and Trump visited a guard post in the northernmost part of the South Korean side of the DMZ.

Kim lauded the positive relationship between the leaders, saying that Sunday’s meeting would have been “impossible” without “the great relationship between us,” Reuters reported. Moon echoed Kim’s words, attributing what he called a historic meeting to Trump’s “bold move.”

The Trump administration, like several U.S. administrations before it, is endeavoring to put an end to North Korea’s  nuclear program. The reclusive country has carried out several nuclear weapons tests in recent years and developed long-range missiles capable of hitting targets thousands of miles away.

Trump appears to have established a personal camaraderie with the North Korean strongman and has voiced optimism about potential for an agreement, though physical progress on the dismantling of the North’s nuclear facilities has yet to be seen. U.S. intelligence agencies earlier this year reported that North Korea has begun rebuilding key missile testing facilities for its intercontinental ballistic missile program, reversing a prior moratorium on missile development that Trump had hailed as a foreign policy success after his first meeting with Kim in Singapore in June of 2018.

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/06/30/rtrs-190630-trump-kim-quotes-dmz-eu.html
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At G20, U.S. and China reach a ceasefire in trade war
« Reply #13243 on: June 30, 2019, 05:06:10 PM »


The leaders of the two biggest economies in the world met in Osaka, Japan at the G20 summit to discuss the on-going trade war between them. And while no resolution has been reached, the U.S. is holding off on further tariffs on China for now. NPR’s chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley joins to discuss the president’s meeting with Xi and his Twitter invitation to North Korea’s Kim Jong Un.
Read the Full Transcript

    Hari Sreenivasan:

    For more on the G20 and President Trump's wide ranging news conference, Scott Horsley, chief economics correspondent for NPR joins us now from Seoul, South Korea. First off, the big news is the China trade tariffs. Any kind of negotiations that might restart again?

    Scott Horsley:

    China has a kind of a long history of sort of playing rope-a-dope with the United States nodding and saying we're gonna make changes and then maybe not actually changing their behavior. So if the measure is going to be actual verifiable changes in China's behavior this could be a really tough negotiation and certainly that the Trump administration will continue to hold out the threat of even more tariffs if they don't get what they want.

    At the same time you know, don't forget we already have 25% tariffs on some $250 billion where the Chinese imports a lot of those are not things that are quite so visible to consumers but they are having an effect on the U.S. economy.

    Hari Sreenivasan:

    Yeah I was just out in Wisconsin this week a lot of farmers are certainly feeling it. Let's talk a little bit also about what's happening in terms of this possible visit in North Korea to the DMZ. The president seems to suggest an impromptu possibility of chatting with Kim Jong Un?

    Scott Horsley:

    So the president tweeted that he was inviting Kim Jong Un to come and have a handshake with him at the DMZ, the heavily fortified border between North and South Korea. The White House says they've gotten a positive response to this Twitter invitation from the North Koreans. But they they aren't saying definitively that Kim will show up.

    Hari Sreenivasan:

    Scott, you've got one more day left on this trip. What are the expectations? What will happen in Korea?

    Scott Horsley:

    You know this this is going to be certainly a compelling photo-op if in fact Kim Jong Un shows up. Trump was asked if Kim tried to sort of pull him across the border into North Korea if he would go, Trump said certainly he would have no no problems about stepping in North Korea. So I think there's certainly going to be a spectacle but is there going to really be meaningful movement on the effort to end North Korea's outlaw nuclear program? That's another question.

    Remember the last time Kim and Trump met it didn't go so well. President Trump himself was aware of downplaying expectations for a substantive movement here on the denuclearization puzzle. It's probably going to be a couple of minutes at most if he and Kim do meet up.

    Hari Sreenivasan:

    Okay. And also at the press availability of sorts? A press conference, a very wide ranging one. Any new news from that?

    Scott Horsley:

    The president had some really positive news to announce. News that would certainly rally the markets that the economy would feel good about with this trade truce with China. And he kind of buried the lede, he came out and gave a sort of lengthy opening statement and barely spelled out what the trade truce was gonna be. It kind of took reporters pressing him to say, can you explain exactly what's going on Mr. President? But yeah he also touched on that potential meeting with Kim, he touched on the Democratic debate.

    He was joking with reporters saying you know, do you want me to stop? Do you want me to keep going? He says I'm in no hurry that my plane is going to wait for me. Reporters at a commercial plane tickets were sort of nervously looking at their watches and saying we don't want to stop the president answering questions but we but we've got to make our way from Japan to Korea pretty soon.

    Hari Sreenivasan:

    All right. NPR's Scott Horsley joining us from Seoul, South Korea. Thanks so much.

    Scott Horsley:

    All right my pleasure.

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/at-g20-u-s-and-china-reach-a-ceasefire-in-trade-war
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New data shows depth of U.S. mental health crisis
« Reply #13244 on: June 30, 2019, 05:15:24 PM »
U.S. suicide rates are at the highest level since World War II, according to a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report, per Bloomberg's Cynthia Koons.

By the numbers: From 2000 to 2006, the suicide rate in the U.S. increased by an average of about 1% a year. From 2006 through 2016, it increased by 2% a year. There were 1.4 million suicide attempts in 2017 and 47,000 deaths.

Why it matters: Despite an improvement of material well-being, emotional distress in the U.S. has reached "crisis levels," according to the CDC.

    Koons reports that the national mental health epidemic stems from various causes, including "genetic, social, and environmental factors."
    It's reached the scale of "the global financial crisis" — and yet there is no groundwork in policy, manpower or in institutions to address it.

Go Deeper "Generation Z's suicide epidemic"
https://www.axios.com/suicide-generation-z-epidemic-cee7990a-243e-489c-8242-2aefc545bba7.html

https://www.axios.com/mental-health-depression-suicide-epidemic-51ed2696-4153-49a9-8fba-e3f6958259c9.html
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