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Philippines President: I’m Giving Away 42,000 Guns to Make Our Country Safer
« Reply #13275 on: July 02, 2019, 04:34:23 PM »


President Rodrigo Duterte announced in mid-June that he’s got a plan to reduce gang and drug related crime by arming local community leaders.

These leaders, knowns as “Barangay Captains” have been unwilling to report gang and drug related crime in the past, because they were afraid of violent repercussions from the very gangs and drug dealers they were reporting.

After consulting with Police and his intelligence agencies, Duerte announced that he was considering the bold move of providing community leaders with guns from the state.

There are 42,000 Barangay Captains who would be eligible for the free or private purchase subsidized guns, according to Martin Dino, the Interior Department Secretary who is responsible for the Barangays.

Dino said: “The condition is that the barangay captain should fight drugs and crime. If he is conniving with criminals, he could be the one shot.”

President Duterte said in early June that barangays would be treated like soldiers or police, and “will never go to jail” if they shot suspected criminals while doing their duty.

The plan to arm civilians is supported by the association of barangay officials, according to its president, Edmund Abesamis.

Now as Americans, it’s difficult to imagine a nation where the police can execute you summarily and without charges, but we can sure see the reality that when the bad guys have guns and the good guys don’t, the good guys fall silent.

The solution to this problem is instead of arming community leaders, arm the entire population!

If you look at other nations with a very high rate of armed citizenry, you typically see a very low rate of gang and drug related crime.

That also solves the problem of, “What happens when these Barangay’s go bad, and decide they want to play both sides?”

Now you’ve armed your own enemy and created distrust in the government.

We’re happy to see that President Duterte sees that guns aren’t the problem, but part of the solution.

We only hope that his people enjoy the freedom to own guns, and not just the Barangays.

https://www.secondamendmentdaily.com/2019/07/philippines-president-im-giving-away-42000-guns-to-make-our-country-safer/
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

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'Climate apartheid' between rich and poor looms, UN expert warns
« Reply #13276 on: July 02, 2019, 04:40:06 PM »

A house burns in the upmarket Paradise Pines neighbourhood of California in November

A UN expert has warned of a possible "climate apartheid", where the rich pay to escape from hunger, "while the rest of the world is left to suffer".

Even if current targets are met, "millions will be impoverished", said Philip Alston, the UN's special rapporteur on extreme poverty.

He also criticised steps taken by UN bodies as "patently inadequate".

"Ticking boxes will not save humanity or the planet from impending disaster," Mr Alston warned.

The Australian native is part of the UN's panel of independent experts, and submitted his report – which is based on existing research – to the UN Human Rights Council on Monday.
'Climate apartheid'

A key warning was that the world's poor are likely to be hardest hit by rising temperatures - and the potential food shortages and conflict that could accompany such a change.

Developing nations are expected to suffer at least 75% of the costs of climate change – despite the fact that the poorer half of the world's population generate just 10% of emissions

Those "who have contributed the least to emissions... will be the most harmed," he said, warning that the effects could undo 50 years of progress on poverty reduction.

On the other hand, Mr Alston cites examples of how the wealthy in Western nations already cope with extreme weather events.

When Hurricane Sandy hit New York in 2012, most citizens were left without power, yet "the Goldman Sachs headquarters was protected by tens of thousands of its own sandbags and power from its generator." Similarly, "private white-glove firefighters have been dispatched to save the mansions" of the wealthy.

This "over-reliance" on the private sector would likely lead to what he termed "climate apartheid" – where the rich "escape overheating, hunger, and conflict".

As far back as 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warned that the "poorest of the poor in the world... are going to be the worst hit".

Mr Alston's report heavily criticises the lack of action, despite such warnings, over the past several decades.
'Failure to act'

"Sombre speeches by government officials at regular conferences are not leading to meaningful action," Mr Alston wrote in a scathing put-down of current policy. "Thirty years of conventions appear to have done very little."

Among those coming in for criticism are Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro, for opening up the rainforest to mining, and "weakening" environmental protections.

US President Donald Trump also comes under fire – for placing "former lobbyists in oversight roles", "actively silencing and obfuscating climate science", and also rolling back environmental protections.

Yet Mr Alston's scorn is not only for politicians, but also for the UN Human Rights Council to which he submitted the report.

"The Human Rights Council can no longer afford to rely only on the time-honoured techniques of organizing expert panels, calling for reports that lead nowhere, urging others to do more but doing little itself, and adopting wide-ranging but inconclusive and highly aspirational resolutions," he wrote.

Instead, it must commission an urgent expert study on the possible options available to avert disaster, and "propose and monitor specific actions", Mr Alston said.
Threats to democracy

There may also be wider societal implications.

The International Organisation for Migration warned in a 2014 report that estimates for migration as a result of climate change vary wildly – from about 25 million to one billion people by 2050.

Mr Alston's report contains one estimate of 140 million displaced people in Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and Latin America alone.

Democracy, he warned, could also be at risk as governments struggle to make major changes to cope.

"The human rights community, with a few notable exceptions, has been every bit as complacent as most governments in the face of the ultimate challenge to mankind represented by climate change," the report said.

He said that the entire human rights community had failed "to face up to the fact that human rights might not survive the coming upheaval".

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-48755154
« Last Edit: July 02, 2019, 04:43:14 PM by knarf »
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

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Dalai Lama 'deeply sorry' for remarks about women
« Reply #13277 on: July 02, 2019, 04:48:16 PM »
The Dalai Lama has apologised for controversial comments about the possibility of a woman succeeding him.

Speaking to the BBC last month, the Tibetan spiritual leader said that any future female Dalai Lama should be "attractive".

But a statement from his office apologised for his words, suggesting he had been joking.

"He is deeply sorry that people have been hurt by what he said and offers his sincere apologies," it said.

In the interview, the spiritual leader, who is 84 this week, touched on topics including US President Donald Trump, his dreams of returning to Tibet, and refugees.

However, it was his comments on the prospect of a female Dalai Lama that raised eyebrows.

"If a female Dalai Lama comes, she should be more attractive," he said in English, while laughing.

The statement apologised for any offence caused and put it down to a misunderstood joke.

The Dalai Lama "has a keen sense of the contradictions between the materialistic, globalized world he encounters on his travels and the complex, more esoteric ideas about reincarnation that are at the heart of Tibetan Buddhist tradition", the statement said.

"However, it sometimes happens that off the cuff remarks, which might be amusing in one cultural context, lose their humour in translation when brought into another. He regrets any offence that may have been given."

Throughout his life, the Dalai Lama has opposed the objectification of women and supported gender equality, it added.

The statement also said comments in which he said refugees in the European Union should ultimately return home "may have been misinterpreted."

"He certainly appreciates that many of those who leave their countries may not wish or be able to return," it said,

However, there was no apology for his comments on Mr Trump who, he said, had a "lack of moral principle."

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-48844825
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

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Italian judge says German captain acted to protect human life
« Reply #13278 on: July 02, 2019, 04:53:38 PM »
AGRIGENTO, Italy (Reuters) - An Italian judge ruled on Tuesday that the German captain of a rescue charity ship had not broken the law when she forced a naval blockade at the weekend, saying she had been carrying out her duty to protect human life.

Carola Rackete, a 31-year-old German national, disobeyed Italian military orders and entered the port of Lampedusa on Saturday to bring some 41 African migrants to land in the Dutch-flagged Sea-Watch boat.

She was immediately detained and placed under house arrest, but in a blow for Italy’s hardline interior minister, Matteo Salvini, Judge Alessandra Vella ruled that Rackete had been carrying out her duty and had not committed any act of violence.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-europe-migrants-italy-judge/italian-judge-says-german-captain-acted-to-protect-human-life-ruling-idUSKCN1TX2LT?feedType=RSS&feedName=worldNews&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Reuters%2FworldNews+%28Reuters+World+News%29&utm_source=reddit.com
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

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University of Washington researchers created a method for two people help a third person solve a task using only their minds. Heather Wessel, a recent UW graduate with a bachelor’s degree in psychology (left), and Savannah Cassis, a UW undergraduate in psychology (right) sent information about a Tetris-like game from their brains over the internet to UW psychology graduate student Theodros Haile’s brain. Haile could then manipulate the game with his mind.

Telepathic communication might be one step closer to reality thanks to new research from the University of Washington. A team created a method that allows three people to work together to solve a problem using only their minds.

In BrainNet, three people play a Tetris-like game using a brain-to-brain interface. This is the first demonstration of two things: a brain-to-brain network of more than two people, and a person being able to both receive and send information to others using only their brain. The team published its results April 16 in the Nature journal Scientific Reports, though this research previously attracted media attention after the researchers posted it September to the preprint site arXiv.

“Humans are social beings who communicate with each other to cooperate and solve problems that none of us can solve on our own,” said corresponding author Rajesh Rao, the CJ and Elizabeth Hwang professor in the UW’s Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering and a co-director of the Center for Neurotechnology. “We wanted to know if a group of people could collaborate using only their brains. That’s how we came up with the idea of BrainNet: where two people help a third person solve a task.”


An example of the game. A Receiver sees the panels on the left and two Senders see the panels on the right. Top row shows the screens at the beginning of the trial. The Senders (right panels) can see the green line at the bottom, but the Receiver can’t. Middle row is when Senders have a chance to review the Receiver’s decision, and can suggest that the Receiver change their mind. Bottom row: Success! The two screens after the Senders have changed the Receiver’s mind.

As in Tetris, the game shows a block at the top of the screen and a line that needs to be completed at the bottom. Two people, the Senders, can see both the block and the line but can’t control the game. The third person, the Receiver, can see only the block but can tell the game whether to rotate the block to successfully complete the line. Each Sender decides whether the block needs to be rotated and then passes that information from their brain, through the internet and to the brain of the Receiver. Then the Receiver processes that information and sends a command — to rotate or not rotate the block — to the game directly from their brain, hopefully completing and clearing the line.

The team asked five groups of participants to play 16 rounds of the game. For each group, all three participants were in different rooms and couldn’t see, hear or speak to one another.

The Senders each could see the game displayed on a computer screen. The screen also showed the word “Yes” on one side and the word “No” on the other side. Beneath the “Yes” option, an LED flashed 17 times per second. Beneath the “No” option, an LED flashed 15 times a second.

“Once the Sender makes a decision about whether to rotate the block, they send ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ to the Receiver’s brain by concentrating on the corresponding light,” said first author Linxing Preston Jiang, a student in the Allen School’s combined bachelor’s/master’s degree program.

The Senders wore electroencephalography caps that picked up electrical activity in their brains. The lights’ different flashing patterns trigger unique types of activity in the brain, which the caps can pick up. So, as the Senders stared at the light for their corresponding selection, the cap picked up those signals, and the computer provided real-time feedback by displaying a cursor on the screen that moved toward their desired choice. The selections were then translated into a “Yes” or “No” answer that could be sent over the internet to the Receiver.

“To deliver the message to the Receiver, we used a cable that ends with a wand that looks like a tiny racket behind the Receiver’s head. This coil stimulates the part of the brain that translates signals from the eyes,” said co-author Andrea Stocco, a UW assistant professor in the Department of Psychology and the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, or I-LABS. “We essentially ‘trick’ the neurons in the back of the brain to spread around the message that they have received signals from the eyes. Then participants have the sensation that bright arcs or objects suddenly appear in front of their eyes.”

f the answer was, “Yes, rotate the block,” then the Receiver would see the bright flash. If the answer was “No,” then the Receiver wouldn’t see anything. The Receiver received input from both Senders before making a decision about whether to rotate the block. Because the Receiver also wore an electroencephalography cap, they used the same method as the Senders to select yes or no.

The Senders got a chance to review the Receiver’s decision and send corrections if they disagreed. Then, once the Receiver sent a second decision, everyone in the group found out if they cleared the line. On average, each group successfully cleared the line 81% of the time, or for 13 out of 16 trials.

The researchers wanted to know if the Receiver would learn over time to trust one Sender over the other based on their reliability. The team purposely picked one of the Senders to be a “bad Sender” and flipped their responses in 10 out of the 16 trials — so that a “Yes, rotate the block” suggestion would be given to the Receiver as “No, don’t rotate the block,” and vice versa. Over time, the Receiver switched from being relatively neutral about both Senders to strongly preferring the information from the “good Sender.”

The team hopes that these results pave the way for future brain-to-brain interfaces that allow people to collaborate to solve tough problems that one brain alone couldn’t solve. The researchers also believe this is an appropriate time to start to have a larger conversation about the ethics of this kind of brain augmentation research and developing protocols to ensure that people’s privacy is respected as the technology improves. The group is working with the Neuroethics team at the Center for Neurotechnology to address these types of issues.

“But for now, this is just a baby step. Our equipment is still expensive and very bulky and the task is a game,” Rao said. “We’re in the ‘Kitty Hawk’ days of brain interface technologies: We’re just getting off the ground.”

Co-authors include Darby Losey, a graduate student at Carnegie Mellon University who completed this research as a UW undergraduate in computer science and neurobiology; Justin Abernethy, a research assistant at I-LABS; and Chantel Prat, an associate professor in the Department of Psychology and I-LABS. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation, a W.M. Keck Foundation Award and a Levinson Emerging Scholars Award.

https://www.washington.edu/news/2019/07/01/play-a-video-game-using-only-your-mind/?utm_source=UW+News+Subscribers&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=UW_Today&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWXpGbE1XVTNOVEUyWTJReCIsInQiOiJtemFVOUZsa2UyN1JjeVFLZGx6TUxDV3hoQUVSdDl2aE9SWUlqK3JaZzBJUG51aUZcL1MwdThldTJnOFYxczV4b3h5cFFzVXhabHhOeVdwWEp2Z1wvVTFNc1NocVZ3WmZlenVvc2VMbUIzXC9rY3lxaTc5dDdtbUxHcGxBeVRXVHVxbiJ9

NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

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French protesters block Amazon sites over climate, jobs
« Reply #13280 on: July 02, 2019, 05:12:55 PM »


CLICHY, France (AP) — Environmental activists chained themselves to gates and turnstiles Tuesday as they occupied an Amazon building near Paris, accusing the online company of destroying jobs and hurting the planet.

Protesters also disrupted Amazon sites in the southern city of Toulouse and northern city of Lille, hoping to inspire similar action in other countries.

Amazon France said in a statement that “we respect everyone’s right to express opinions,” but defended its climate and employment practices. The company has come under pressure elsewhere over its environmental impact, including from its own employees in the U.S.

Several dozen demonstrators climbed a fence and forced their way into Amazon offices on Paris’ northern edge, staging a day sit-in in the courtyard and entry hall of the premises. Employees were allowed to leave the building, but weren’t allowed back inside.

The activists, mostly student volunteers in their 20s, said they chained themselves to the gates and the turnstiles inside. Outside, some played football, listened to music — and said they were gearing up to spend the night if needed.

Some wore yellow vests. One activist read a magazine titled “Are you radical enough?”

Protest organizers called on the government to block authorization for three new Amazon warehouses slated to open around France. They accuse the company of killing jobs in local businesses, not paying enough taxes and exacerbating climate change because of the emissions used in transporting its huge volume of goods.

“We accuse Amazon of making things worse in terms of over-production and climate change,” notably through massive imports of electronic goods and clothes sold online, whose transport increases carbon emissions, said Alma Dufour of Friends of the Earth.

“I think we’ve reached a point where we could win the cultural fight against Amazon in France and it will be an example for other countries,” she told The Associated Press,

Climate activism is on the rise in France and the French government has led efforts to push Amazon and other online companies to stop using tax havens .

But Amazon is continuing to grow its footprint here, adding three new warehouses to five existing ones.

Amazon France said it is creating 1,800 new jobs this year in France and working for ways to reduce its environmental impact through smaller, more recyclable packaging and investing in solar and wind energy.

https://apnews.com/5b5deea23fc34491ad7a9f80a07a1aff
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

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A Kenya Airways plane

 The body of a suspected stowaway that fell from a jet hit the ground just a metre from a man sunbathing in his back garden in south London, a neighbour has claimed.

Police were called to an address in Offerton Road in Clapham at 3.39pm by shocked residents.

One neighbour described hearing a "whomp" as the body hit the ground.

Police believe the body to be that of a man and he is understood to have fallen from the landing gear of a Kenya Airways flight as it prepared to land at Heathrow Airport.

According to data from flightradar24.com, the Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner was little more than 3,500 feet above the ground as it flew over the street.

    At first I though it was a tramp asleep in the garden. He had all of his clothes on and everything. I had a closer look and saw there was blood all over the walls of the garden.

The individual fell into the garden of a property that changed hands for £2.3m (€2.5m) last year - only a metre from a tenant who had been enjoying the sunshine.

The neighbour said: "I heard a 'whomp' - I went upstairs to look out of a window. At first I though it was a tramp asleep in the garden.

"He had all of his clothes on and everything. I had a closer look and saw there was blood all over the walls of the garden.

"His head was not in a good way. I realised immediately that he had fallen.

    Describing the victim, he said: 'One of the reasons his body was so intact was because his body was an ice block.'

"So I went outside and it was just then the neighbour came out and he was very shaken.

"He had been sunbathing and he landed one metre away from him."

He continued: "The police were here very quickly."

The neighbour, who asked not to be named, said that a plane spotter, who had been following the flight on a plane tracking app from Clapham Common, had seen the body fall.

The plane spotter had arrived almost at the same time as the police and told them the body had fallen from a Kenyan Airways flight.

The neighbour said: "The police had four cars. They were here for about five hours to start the clean-up operation."

He said the body was removed at about 8.30pm and that the clean-up team had returned on Monday morning to continue the job.

He added the neighbour that had been sunbathing had returned briefly yesterday evening before leaving again.

He said: "I spoke to Heathrow Airport this morning to ask if they were aware of this.

"If it had been two seconds later, he would have landed on the common where there were hundreds of people - my kids were in the garden 15 minutes before [he fell]."

Describing the victim, he said: "One of the reasons his body was so intact was because his body was an ice block."

Another neighbour said she had heard a thump, but thought it was falling scaffolding from nearby building works.

Referring to her neighbours, she said: "My heart goes out to them, they're going to have to live with that for the rest of their lives."

The Met Police said a bag, water and some food were discovered in the landing gear compartment of the plane when it arrived at the airport.

A post-mortem will be carried out in due course, the force said, and the age of the individual has yet to be determined.

The death is not being treated as suspicious.

Inquiries are being conducted with the Met's southern central command unit and its aviation policing command.

The Met said it would be liaising with the airline and international authorities.

In 2012, Jose Matada fell to his death from a British Airways flight inbound from Angola.

Mr Matada, originally from Mozambique, was found on the pavement in East Sheen on September 9.

An inquest into his death heard he is believed to have survived freezing temperatures of up to minus 60C for most of the 12-hour flight.

But he was understood to be "dead or nearly dead" by the time he hit the ground.

In 2015, the body of a man landed on a shop in Richmond having clung on in the undercarriage of a plane from Johannesburg in South Africa to Heathrow.

https://www.independent.ie/world-news/europe/britain/stowaway-who-fell-from-jet-over-london-hit-ground-next-to-a-man-sunbathing-in-his-back-garden-38273067.html
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

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Heavy rains in Japan force almost 800,000 residents to evacuate
« Reply #13282 on: July 03, 2019, 05:41:05 AM »
Almost 800,000 people across three Japanese cities have been ordered to evacuate amid warnings of landslides and floods brought by heavy rain.

Kagoshima city, Kirishima and Aira, in Kagoshima prefecture on Kyushu island, urged their residents to move to safety immediately.

One elderly woman in Kagoshima city died after a mudslide hit her home.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has told residents of the cities to "take steps to protect their lives".

Kagoshima prefecture has asked Japan's self-defence forces to help with the relief efforts, Governor Satoshi Mitazono reportedly said.

About 310,000 residents in the neighbouring Miyazaki prefecture have also been advised to evacuate.



Weather officials say 1,000mm (39in) of rain has fallen on Kyushu island since Friday, and Japan's Meteorological Agency forecasts the rains will continue into next week.

A further 350mm of rain is expected in the southern part of the island by midday on Thursday, with some areas predicted to get more than 80mm of rain every hour.

Last July about 200 people died in western Japan in the country's worst flooding disaster in decades. It was the highest death toll caused by rainfall in Japan since 1982.

About two million people were evacuated and more than 70,000 emergency workers were deployed after the heavy rain caused floods and landslides in the region.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-48850111
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

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Consumers can rely on online retail giant Amazon Opens a New Window. to buy everything they need – including a home.

The retailer sells tiny homes that have grown in popularity recently. According to a survey by the National Association of Home Builders Opens a New Window. last year, 53 percent of those polled said they would consider buying a tiny home. Network HGTV also has television programs dedicated on the trend.

Amazon offers its consumers the chance to buy a small log cabin for less than $20,000 and free shipping. The “Lillevilla Allwood Cabin Kit Getaway” Opens a New Window. was described as being “large enough to function as (a) summer house, home office or even a stand-alone retail building.’ The kit comes with directions and is said to take two-to-three days to build.


The "Lillevilla Allwood Cabin Kit Getaway" is being sold for $18,800 on Amazon.

The small homes are apparently popular. The Real Deal Opens a New Window. reported in May that a $7,250 small cabin kit called “Allwood Solvalla” Opens a New Window.  sold out after it went viral. The home appears to be back in stock, according to Realtor.com Opens a New Window. .

“I’m not surprised to see [Amazon selling homes],” Trae Bodge, of TrueTrae.com Opens a New Window. , told MarketWatch Opens a New Window. . “Selling these homes online presents a new level of opportunity for the retailer to reach consumers who are outside of their local area.”

Amazon offers a number of cabin kits for various prices. Like Amazon, Sears -- which was America’s largest retailer once upon a time -- also sold homes via its catalog. The kits gave its customers blueprints and all the material needed to construct the home. The retailer sold an estimated 70,000 to 75,000 homes, according to NPR Opens a New Window.

https://www.foxbusiness.com/retail/amazon-customers-can-buy-a-tiny-home-for-less-than-20000-along-with-free-shipping
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

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Air strike hits Libya migrant detention center
« Reply #13284 on: July 03, 2019, 05:51:35 AM »
Dozens were killed in an air strike on a center housing migrants on the outskirts of Tripoli, with many more wounded. Center officials blamed the attack on forces loyal to Khalifa Haftar, but his militants denied it.



At least 44 people were killed and 130 more were wounded in an attack on a migrant detention center in a suburb of Libyan capital Tripoli late on Tuesday, according to the United Nations mission.

United Nations Libya envoy Ghassan Salame condemned the strike, saying it "clearly amounts to the level of a war crime".

Doctors Without Borders said the detention center in the eastern suburb of Tajoura 
held 126 migrants. 

Pictures from the scene showed many bodies strewn among rubble on the ground and African migrants undergoing emergency surgery after the strike.

"The absurdity of this ongoing war has today reached its most heinous form and tragic outcome with this bloody, unjust slaughter," the UN's Salame said in a statement.

LNA denies responsibility

The Tajoura suburb of Tripoli is also home to several military camps for troops allied with the UN-backed government situated in the capital. The troops are fighting against militants from the Libyan National Army (LNA), which is allied with a rival government in the eastern city of Tobruk. LNA is controlled by warlord Khalifa Haftar, who earlier this year launched an offensive to take the capital.

UNHCR spokesman Charlie Yaxley said it had warned only weeks ago that anyone inside the Tajoura detention center was at risk of being caught in the fighting around Tripoli.

It was not immediately clear who was responsible for the strike, but the Tripoli government and the center officials blamed Haftar's LNA.

Read more: Who is Khalifa Haftar, Libya's military strongman?

On Monday, the LNA said it would start heavy bombing of targets in Tripoli because "traditional means" of war had been exhausted.

However, the LNA denied hitting the migrant detention center on Tuesday evening and accused the militias allied to the Tripoli of shelling it.

Transit country for migrants

Libya is the main starting point for African migrants, fleeing conflict or poverty at home, attempting to sail across the Mediterranean and reach the EU. Libya's coast guard often intercepts boats heading toward Italy and detains the passengers. Thousands of illegal migrants and asylum seekers are housed in detention centers like the one in Tajoura, with many activists reporting that occupants are forced to endure dangerous and inhuman conditions.

https://www.dw.com/en/air-strike-hits-libya-migrant-detention-center/a-49450271
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

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From the Mustang to the minivan, auto legend Lee Iacocca is dead at 94
« Reply #13285 on: July 03, 2019, 05:58:07 AM »

Lee Iacocca, former Chrysler chairman, in 2005.



Lido Anthony Iacocca, the automobile industry legend best known as "Lee," died at the age of 94 on Tuesday morning, his family confirmed.

A child of Italian immigrants who grow up in humble conditions, Iacocca became one of the most powerful — and best known — executives in Detroit.

Iacocca rose to become president of Ford Motor in December 1970.

After being fired in a dispute with company heir Henry Ford II, Iacocca joined the then-struggling Chrysler. Using both his business skills and ability to turn a phrase, he won federal loan guarantees that helped the automaker avoid a potential 1980 bankruptcy.



During his career, Iacocca become closely associated with at least three iconic vehicles. He has been widely credited as the father of the Ford Mustang, as well as the K-Car that helped Chrysler pull out of its financial slump. Working with former Ford colleague Hal Sperlich who joined him at Chrysler, Iacocca also gave the go-ahead to the minivans that for a number of years were the most profitable products offered by the third-largest of the Detroit automakers.

"Lee was one of few truly great leaders," said Bob Lutz, a longtime executive at Ford and Chrysler who worked closely with Iacocca. "He was my mentor, my teacher and role model. When he was on, he was fabulous. I will miss him."

"I owe the second half of my career to Lee Iacocca," Lutz said. "All in all, we had a relationship like a father and son."
Charitable work

In his latter years with Chrysler, Iacocca spent an increasing share of his time doing charitable work, among other things spearheading efforts to restore both the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, the immigration port in New York Harbor where his own parents came into the United States.

Iacocca became famous not only as Chrysler's chairman and CEO but its TV pitchman, where he made famous the tag line, "If you can find a better car, buy it."

But after being nudged out by the Chrysler board, Iacocca unexpectedly teamed with billionaire Kirk Kerkorian in a failed 1995 hostile takeover attempt.

The company and its former chairman patched things up a decade later, with Iacocca again serving as a Chrysler pitchman, in one TV commercial appearing with rapper Snoop Dogg.

Iacocca attempted to form an electric vehicle company, EV Global Motors, in 1999, but he largely focused on writing and charitable work over recent years.

Iacocca was married three times. His last marriage, to Darrien Earle, ended in 1994.

Iacocca lived in the Bel Air section of Los Angeles in his final years.

His daughter Lia Iacocca Assad said Lee Iacocca died of natural causes, but that he suffered from complications from Parkinson's Disease. He is survived by two daughters and eight grandchildren.

https://www.cnbc.com/amp/2019/07/03/lee-iacocca-auto-industry-icon-dead-at-94.html
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

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Tanks arrive in DC ahead of July 4 celebration
« Reply #13286 on: July 03, 2019, 06:01:38 AM »
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump’s plans for Washington’s Fourth of July celebration (all times local):

7:15 p.m.

At least two Army tanks have arrived in Washington ahead of a Fourth of July celebration that President Donald Trump says will include military hardware.

An Associated Press photographer says the two M1A1 Abrams tanks are with four other military vehicles on a freight train in a railyard at the southeastern edge of Washington.

The vehicles are being guarded by military police but are visible to passers-by on nearby paths. A military official earlier told the AP that the tanks were transported north from Fort Stewart in Georgia.

Trump told reporters Monday that the tanks will be stationed outside the Fourth of July celebration but has not given details on how they will be used.

__

5:40 p.m.

President Donald Trump says military tanks will be part of Washington’s Fourth of July celebration later this week.

Asked Monday about his plans, Trump said tanks will be stationed outside but provided no other details.

Trump had wanted a parade of military tanks and other equipment in Washington after witnessing a similar parade in Paris in 2017. But that plan eventually was scuttled, partly because of cost.

This year, the president is organizing an event called “Salute to America” that the administration says will honor the U.S. military.

Trump plans to deliver a speech at the Lincoln Memorial on Thursday. The event will include music, military demonstrations and flyovers. The annual fireworks display will go off closer to the Lincoln Memorial than the Washington Monument.

https://www.apnews.com/2e98f1c80ef9449fa1d4a95ff63258c0
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

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When Justin Trudeau said ‘there is no core identity, no mainstream in Canada’, he was articulating a uniquely Canadian philosophy that some find bewildering, even reckless – but could represent a radical new model of nationhood

As 2017 begins, Canada may be the last immigrant nation left standing. Our government believes in the value of immigration, as does the majority of the population. We took in an estimated 300,000 newcomers in 2016, including 48,000 refugees, and we want them to become citizens; around 85% of permanent residents eventually do. Recently there have been concerns about bringing in single Arab men, but otherwise Canada welcomes people from all faiths and corners. The greater Toronto area is now the most diverse city on the planet, with half its residents born outside the country; Vancouver, Calgary, Ottawa and Montreal aren’t far behind. Annual immigration accounts for roughly 1% of the country’s current population of 36 million.

Canada has been over-praised lately for, in effect, going about our business as usual. In 2016 such luminaries as US President Barack Obama and Bono, no less, declared “the world needs more Canada”. In October, the Economist blared “Liberty Moves North: Canada’s Example to the World” on its cover, illustrated by the Statue of Liberty haloed in a maple leaf and wielding a hockey stick. Infamously, on the night of the US election Canada’s official immigration website crashed, apparently due to the volume of traffic.

Of course, 2016 was also the year – really the second running – when many western countries turned angrily against immigration, blaming it for a variety of ills in what journalist Doug Saunders calls the “global reflex appeal to fear”. Alongside the rise of nativism has emerged a new nationalism that can scarcely be bothered to deny its roots in racial identities and exclusionary narratives.

Compared to such hard stances, Canada’s almost cheerful commitment to inclusion might at first appear almost naive. It isn’t. There are practical reasons for keeping the doors open. Starting in the 1990s, low fertility and an aging population began slowing Canada’s natural growth rate. Ten years ago, two-thirds of population increase was courtesy of immigration. By 2030, it is projected to be 100%.

The economic benefits are also self-evident, especially if full citizenship is the agreed goal. All that “settlers” – ie, Canadians who are not indigenous to the land – need do is look in the mirror to recognize the generally happy ending of an immigrant saga. Our government repeats it, our statistics confirm it, our own eyes and ears register it: diversity fuels, not undermines, prosperity.
Telling an Italian or French citizen they lack a “core identity” may not be the best vote-winning strategy

But as well as practical considerations for remaining an immigrant country, Canadians, by and large, are also philosophically predisposed to an openness that others find bewildering, even reckless. The prime minister, Justin Trudeau, articulated this when he told the New York Times Magazine that Canada could be the “first postnational state”. He added: “There is no core identity, no mainstream in Canada.”

The remark, made in October 2015, failed to cause a ripple – but when I mentioned it to Michael Bach, Germany’s minister for European affairs, who was touring Canada to learn more about integration, he was astounded. No European politician could say such a thing, he said. The thought was too radical.

For a European, of course, the nation-state model remains sacrosanct, never mind how ill-suited it may be to an era of dissolving borders and widespread exodus. The modern state – loosely defined by a more or less coherent racial and religious group, ruled by internal laws and guarded by a national army – took shape in Europe. Telling an Italian or French citizen they lack a “core identity” may not be the best vote-winning strategy.

To Canadians, in contrast, the remark was unexceptional. After all, one of the country’s greatest authors, Mavis Gallant, once defined a Canadian as “someone with a logical reason to think he may be one” – not exactly a ringing assertion of a national character type. Trudeau could, in fact, have been voicing a chronic anxiety among Canadians: the absence of a shared identity.

But he wasn’t. He was outlining, however obliquely, a governing principle about Canada in the 21st century. We don’t talk about ourselves in this manner often, and don’t yet have the vocabulary to make our case well enough. Even so, the principle feels right. Odd as it may seem, Canada may finally be owning our postnationalism.

There’s more than one story in all this. First and foremost, postnationalism is a frame to understand our ongoing experiment in filling a vast yet unified geographic space with the diversity of the world. It is also a half-century old intellectual project, born of the country’s awakening from colonial slumber. But postnationalism has also been in intermittent practise for centuries, since long before the nation-state of Canada was formalised in 1867. In some sense, we have always been thinking differently about this continent-wide landmass, using ideas borrowed from Indigenous societies. From the moment Europeans began arriving in North America they were made welcome by the locals, taught how to survive and thrive amid multiple identities and allegiances.

That welcome was often betrayed, in particular during the late 19th and 20th centuries, when settler Canada did profound harm to Indigenous people. But, if the imbalance remains, so too does the influence: the model of another way of belonging.


Mavis Gallant once defined a Canadian as ‘someone with a logical reason to think he may be one’

Can any nation truly behave “postnationally” – ie without falling back on the established mechanisms of state governance and control? The simple answer is no.

Canada has borders, where guards check passports, and an army. It asserts the occasional modest territorial claim. Trudeau is more aware than most of these mechanisms: he oversees them.

It can also be argued that Canada enjoys the luxury of thinking outside the nation-state box courtesy of its behemoth neighbour to the south. The state needn’t defend its borders too forcefully or make that army too large, and Canada’s economic prosperity may be as straightforward as continuing to do 75% of its trade with the US. Being liberated, the thinking goes, from the economic and military stresses that most other countries face gives Canada the breathing room, and the confidence, to experiment with more radical approaches to society. Lucky us.

Nor is there uniform agreement within Canada about being post-anything. When the novelist Yann Martel casually described his homeland as “the greatest hotel on earth,” he meant it as a compliment – but some read it as an endorsement of newcomers deciding to view Canada as a convenient waystation: a security, business or real-estate opportunity, with no lasting responsibilities attached.

Likewise, plenty of Canadians believe we possess a set of normative values, and want newcomers to prove they abide by them. Kellie Leitch, who is running for the leadership of the Conservative party, suggested last autumn that we screen potential immigrants for “anti-Canadian values.” A minister in the previous Conservative government, Chris Alexander, pledged in 2015 to set up a tip-line for citizens to report “barbaric cultural practises”. And in the last election, the outgoing prime minister, Stephen Harper, tried in vain to hamstring Trudeau’s popularity by confecting a debate about the hijab.

To add to the mix, the French-speaking province of Quebec already constitutes one distinctive nation, as do the 50-plus First Nations spread across the country. All have their own perspectives and priorities, and may or may not be interested in a postnational frame. (That said, Trudeau is a bilingual Montrealer, and Quebec a vibrantly diverse society.)
Can any nation truly behave 'postnationally' – ie without state governance and control? The simple answer is no

In short, the nation-state of Canada, while wrapped in less bunting than other global versions, is still recognisable. But postnational thought is less about hand-holding in circles and shredding passports. It’s about the use of a different lens to examine the challenges and precepts of an entire politics, economy and society.

Though sovereign since 1867, Canada lingered in the shadow of the British empire for nearly a century. Not until the 1960s did we fly our own flag and sing our own anthem, and not until 1982 did Trudeau’s father, Pierre, patriate the constitution from the UK, adding a charter of rights. He also introduced multiculturalism as official national policy. The challenge, then, might have seemed to define a national identity to match.

This was never going to be easy, given our colonial hangover and American cultural influence. Marshall McLuhan, one of the last century’s most seismic thinkers, felt we shouldn’t bother. “Canada is the only country in the world that knows how to live without an identity,” he said in 1963.

According to poet and scholar BW Powe, McLuhan saw in Canada the raw materials for a dynamic new conception of nationhood, one unshackled from the state’s “demarcated borderlines and walls, its connection to blood and soil,” its obsession with “cohesion based on a melting pot, on nativist fervor, the idea of the promised land”. Instead, the weakness of the established Canadian identity encouraged a plurality of them – not to mention a healthy flexibility and receptivity to change. Once Canada moved away from privileging denizens of the former empire to practising multiculturalism, it could become a place where “many faiths and histories and visions” would co-exist.

That’s exactly what happened. If McLuhan didn’t see how Chinese, Japanese, Ukrainian and later Italian, Greek and Eastern European arrivals underpinned the growth of Canada in that sleepy first century, he surely registered before his death in 1980 the positive impact of successive waves of South Asians, Vietnamese and Caribbean immigrants. The last several decades have been marked by an increasingly deep diversity, particularly featuring mainland Chinese, Indians and Filipinos.

Others have expanded on McLuhan’s insight. The writer and essayist John Ralston Saul (co-founder of the charity for which I work) calls Canada a “revolutionary reversal of the standard nation-state myth”, and ascribes much of our radical capacity – not a term you often hear applied to Canadians – to our application of the Indigenous concept of welcome. “Space for multiple identities and multiple loyalties,” he says of these philosophies, the roots of which go deep in North American soil, “for an idea of belonging which is comfortable with contradictions.”

How unique is any of this? Ralston Saul argues that Canada’s experiment is “perpetually incomplete”. In other countries, a sovereignty movement like Quebec’s might have led to bloodshed. Instead, aside from a brief period of violent separatist agitation culminating in kidnappings and a murder in 1970, Canada and Quebec have been in constant compromise mode, arguing at the ballot box and finding ways to accommodate. Canada’s incomplete identity is, in this sense, a positive, a spur to move forward without spilling blood, to keep thinking and evolving – perhaps, in the end, simply to respond to newness without fear.

We’re still working on the language. The same Canadian who didn’t appreciate being told he has no identity might rankle at being called a citizen of an “incomplete” nation. The American and European citizen, too, may find all this chatter about inclusion and welcome ethereal, if not from another planet given the events of 2016, in which the US elected an authoritarian whose main policy plank was building a wall, Britain voted to leave the EU in large part to control immigration, and rightwing political parties gleefully hostile to diversity may soon form national governments, including in France.

None of this raw populism is going away in 2017, especially as it gets further irritated by the admittedly formidable global challenge of how to deal with unprecedented numbers of people crossing national borders, with or without visas. But denial, standing your nativist ground, doing little or nothing to evolve your society in response to both a crisis and, less obviously, an opportunity: these are reactions, not actions, and certain to make matters worse.

If the pundits are right that the world needs more Canada, it is only because Canada has had the history, philosophy and possibly the physical space to do some of that necessary thinking about how to build societies differently. Call it postnationalism, or just a new model of belonging: Canada may yet be of help in what is guaranteed to be the difficult year to come.

Charles Foran is a novelist and the CEO of the Institute for Canadian Citizenship

https://amp.theguardian.com/world/2017/jan/04/the-canada-experiment-is-this-the-worlds-first-postnational-country
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

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National Trust to divest £1bn portfolio from fossil fuels
« Reply #13288 on: July 04, 2019, 05:41:02 AM »
Move by heritage body follows revelations last year about oil and gas investments


The National Trust looks after more than 500 historic sites, including Kingston Lacy in Dorset

The National Trust is divesting its £1bn portfolio from fossil fuels in an attempt to help tackle the escalating climate crisis.

The organisation, which looks after 780 miles (1,250km) of coastline, 248,000 hectares (612,000 acres) of land and more than 500 historic houses, castles, monuments and parks, said it would withdraw the vast majority of its investments from fossil fuels within 12 months, and the entirety within three years.

A Guardian investigation last year revealed the trust had invested tens of millions of pounds in oil, gas and mining companies, despite having previously pledged to cut down its own use of fossil fuels and warning about the impact of climate change.

Hilary McGrady, the director general of the trust, said returns from its investments were vital to allow the organisation to “care for special places across the nation”.

But she added in the announcement on Wednesday: “The impacts of climate change pose the biggest long-term threat to the land and properties we care for, and tackling this is a huge challenge for the whole nation.

“We know our members and supporters are eager to see us do everything we can to protect and nurture the natural environment for future generations.”

The trust had announced in 2015 that none of its investments would be made directly in companies that “derive more than 10% of their turnover from the extraction of thermal coal or oil from oil sands”.

The trust said fossil fuel investments made up £45m of its portfolio.

The divestment campaign is gathering momentum around the world. Earlier this year, Norway’s national oil fund began to refocus on renewable energy. About two-thirds of the UK’s university pension funds, as well as other public pension funds, have also either divested or changed their rules, though some have retained their fossil fuel focus despite strong public pressure.

Other funds to have divested include the Irish infrastructure fund, the New York state pension fund, and Waltham Forest and Southwark councils in the UK.

Peter Vermeulen, the trust’s chief financial officer, said many organisations had been working hard to persuade fossil fuel companies to invest in green alternatives, without success.

“These companies have made insufficient progress and now we have decided to divest from fossil fuel companies,” he said.

“Now we will seek to invest in green startup businesses and other suitable portfolios that deliver benefits for the environment, nature and people.”

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/jul/04/national-trust-to-divest-portfolio-from-fossil-fuels
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

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BMW and Daimler team up on automated driving
« Reply #13289 on: July 04, 2019, 05:44:07 AM »
BERLIN (Reuters) - Some 1,200 developers at BMW and Daimler will team up to develop automated driving technology, the companies said on Thursday, the latest carmakers forced to pool their development resources at a time of shrinking margins.

The strategic partnership will focus on developing technologies for assisted driving systems, automated driving on highways and automated parking, BMW and Daimler said in a statement, adding that the two companies will implement the technologies in their cars independently.

The two carmakers first announced their plans to join forces on automated driving technology in February, saying they were discussing the possibility of extending their partnership.

BMW and Daimler on Thursday said they had finalised the agreement and that they expected the technology to be deployed in mass-market vehicles from 2024.

Earlier this year, BMW and Daimler, Germany’s two biggest carmakers after Volkswagen, both issued profit warnings earlier this year.

Facing headwinds from international trade conflicts and narrowing margins due to tougher emissions legislation, carmakers are being driven to team up by the massive development costs of key technologies in which they face competition from internet giants like Alphabet’s Waymo.

Europe’s biggest carmaker Volkswagen and Ford are in the final stage of talks on a strategic alliance to jointly develop self-driving and electric cars. Newspaper Handelsblatt said the deal was set to be approved on July 11.

In May, Renault and Italian-American group Fiat Chrysler Automobiles announced they were in merger talks, but discussions were later called off.

Daimler issued a profit warning in June - its third in 12 months - saying it was setting aside hundreds of millions of euros to cover a regulatory crackdown on diesel emissions.

In May, BMW warned on profits, saying it had had to make larger investments than expected.

The two companies said their cooperation was non-exclusive, with results being made available to other licensed original equipment manufacturers.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-bmw-daimler-cooperation/bmw-and-daimler-team-up-to-develop-automated-driving-technology-idUSKCN1TZ0QH
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)