AuthorTopic: Knarf's Knewz Channel  (Read 1838660 times)

Offline knarf

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Blaming and buying
« Reply #16050 on: May 30, 2020, 12:51:54 PM »
Instead of learning from the damaging history of blame, politicians are engaging in the age-old practice of 'divide and rule'



Nothing in the world is single, as the poet Shelley said, and we have proof of this in the general reaction to COVID-19. Some people have behaved badly and selfishly, but much good is coming out of the situation as well.

Most people, I like to believe, have been forced to pause and think about the future of the planet, and surely we have all been encouraged to value life more, while realising how fragile it is.

There has been much generosity demonstrated, both on an individual and mass scale, while a new spirit of unity seems to be abroad: one has only to think of the online Coronavirus Global Response summit, hosted by the European Union, during which leaders of many countries raised nearly seven and a half billion euros for research purposes.

That spirit, however, seems to have its limitations.

For some politicians are set on dividing people, rather than on uniting them. While China attended the conference, for example, Russia and America did not.

Instead of acknowledging the need for international co-operation, President Trump is using China as a scapegoat, blaming China for the initial coronavirus outbreak and for the way in which it was handled.

There is also a debate about the origins of the virus, despite assurances from experts and US Intelligence that there is no evidence to suggest that it was man-made.

Trump has already blamed the WHO at the worst possible time, and has withdrawn funding from it, alleging that it has not been sufficiently critical of China, which country, he claims, wants him to lose the next election.

PM Morrison wants an inquiry into the working of the WHO, and also one into the origins of the COVID-19 outbreak, stating that such an inquiry is fair and reasonable, and could be helpful in the future.
Adding fuel to this particular fire

But what is the point of investigating the origins of the virus? Especially at this particular time, when the speedy development of a vaccine is the prime requirement? Relations between Washington and Beijing, and also between Canberra and Beijing, have worsened.

The repercussions are very serious: a friend from Sydney, just to give one example, writes of the spread of anti-Chinese feeling in Australia. Politicians, in appearing to blame China, must know that their actions, albeit misinterpreted, will add fuel to this particular fire.

My mother, a wise woman from whom I still seek advice despite her physical absence, once said, 'People are always looking for something or someone to blame, but I think some things just happen.'

Things of a pestilential nature have 'just happened' throughout history.

One of the earliest instances of plague, quite possibly typhus, occurred in the Athens of 430BC, then in the second year of the Peloponnesian War against Sparta. An overcrowded Athens lost between 75 and 100,000 people, including the great statesman Pericles and two of his sons.

The historian Thucydides contracted the disease, but survived to write an account of it, in which he said he believed the disease originated in Ethiopia, and entered Athens through its port of Piraeus.

The Athenians were naturally demoralised, but were not, apparently, inclined to blame anybody in particular, although they tended to worry about the Delphic Oracle being on the side of Sparta, which did indeed win the protracted conflict in 404BC.

The bubonic plague, the Black Death, tore through Europe at regular intervals: in the mid-14th century it is thought to have killed up to 200 million people. It kept recurring in various places, with England's last major outbreak occurring in 1665-6.

During that long time, most people thought that the plague came from God, and that they were being punished for their sins. But Christian Europe also blamed the Jews, a convenient scapegoat, as so often since.

The old proverb has it that he who blames would buy.

Presumably politicians, in their pointing of fingers, are hopeful of buying votes, of investing in political capital; instead of learning from the damaging history of blame, they are engaging in the age-old practice of divide and rule.

They would be better served to spare a thought for the planet, which needs united efforts from its inhabitants now more than ever.

https://international.la-croix.com/news/blaming-and-buying/12466#
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

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US government is funding website spreading Covid-19 disinformation
« Reply #16051 on: May 30, 2020, 01:00:21 PM »
State Department-backed Armenian project to promote democracy instead features false information

The US government is funding a website in Armenia which is spreading disinformation about the coronavirus pandemic, including warnings that Armenians ought to “refuse” future vaccine programmes.

The website, Medmedia.am, was launched with the help of a US State Department grant meant to promote democracy, but instead has been used to promote false information about Covid-19, according to an investigation by the British news website openDemocracy.

Among Medmedia’s most popular articles are pieces that have called Covid-19 a “fake pandemic” and falsely reported that a morgue offered to pay hundreds of dollars to a dead patient’s family if they claimed the death had been caused by the coronavirus.

The grant was awarded by the State Department to a group called the Armenian Association of Young Doctors, which launched the website last year and is led by a controversial doctor called Gevorg Grigoryan.

He has been known for his strong criticism of the government’s health ministry and its vaccine programmes, and has a history of anti-LGBT statements, including remarks posted on Facebook in 2014 in which he called for gay people to be burned.

Grigoryan, who has claimed that he is not opposed to vaccinations, has teamed up with a prominent journalist and lawyer, both with reported ties to a far-right party called Veto, to create what they called a public fact-finding group on the government’s response to the coronavirus outbreak.

This week, the group’s official Facebook page claimed that the government led by prime minister Nikol Pashinyan, who led a nonviolent reform movement before his election, had “completely failed the fight” against coronavirus. Grigoryan said he was not aligned with a specific political party and denied that Medmedia or the fact-finding project were political fronts aimed at opposing the government.

“If we look at everything from a political point of view then we’re not going to go very far,” he said. “But from an expert point of view, the statistics speak for themselves.”

Armenia has reported about 7,100 coronavirus cases and a rising rate of infections. The country has also grappled with a drop in childhood vaccine rates, which the health minister, Arsen Torosyan, has blamed on anti-vaccine propaganda.

The State Department declined to comment on questions about the size of the grant or its review process.

A post on the US embassy’s website in Armenia said grants under the Democracy Commission Small Grants Program – which are worth up to $50,000 – are awarded on a competitive basis to local NGOs and are meant to focus on issues like transparency and accountability in governance, advancing human rights, eliminating corruption, and enhancing economic growth and development.

But the openDemocracy investigation found that, while Medmedia had published some news articles, most of its opinion pieces were republished Facebook posts that spread false information.

Grigoryan told the Guardian that the US embassy in Armenia had contacted him with “concerns” about op-eds and articles on the site. But, he said: “I am sure I was able to answer all those questions and those concerns disappeared. The site is not an anti-vaccine forum.”

He would not say how much money was given to his Armenian Association for Young Doctors by the US embassy, or how much of that was invested in the website. He called it a “small amount” and addressed questions on specifics to the US embassy. The grant period is due to end in several days, he said.

A disclaimer on the Medmedia website said the site was US-funded but that its articles “do not necessarily reflect” the views of the US government.

Grigoryan defended the articles in an interview with the Guardian, saying the website had been “created to make the voice of the public heard”. “If someone says that Armenia should refuse vaccinations and the government refutes this with weighty proof, it’s already served [the public] good,” he said.

Asked specifically about the articles, he said that he didn’t share their opinions but said they would not be taken down. “It’s not fake news,” he said. “It’s the opinion of a specialist, the opinion of a doctor, of the head of an NGO. It’s an opinion. So it’s not fake news.”

He denied that posting the articles could pose a public health risk, saying they would “initiate discussion.”

While he denied being personally opposed to vaccines, he claimed the articles on his site were representative of skepticism about vaccines in Armenian society.

“The problem is that due to the government’s incorrect [information] policy these kinds of articles are becoming widespread,” he said.

Grigoryan said his past anti-LGBT statements, including one that said he would “always fight against gays,” had been misinterpreted and were prompted by specific cases of “anti-social behaviour.” Asked about a Facebook post from 2014 in which he wrote that “gays should be burnt and in a public place”, he said that the post was a reference to the film Pulp Fiction and was meant as a joke.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/28/us-funding-website-spreading-covid-19-disinformation?CMP=fb_gu&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook#Echobox=1590763315
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

Offline knarf

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Angela Merkel rejects Trump's G7 summit invite
« Reply #16052 on: May 30, 2020, 01:06:28 PM »
German Chancellor Angela Merkel has reportedly refused Donald Trump's invite to attend a G7 summit in Washington. The US president is pushing for an in-person event as member countries ease coronavirus restrictions.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel will not travel to Washington at US President Donald Trump's request to attend the Group of Seven (G7) summit in Washington DC, according to a report from Politico on Friday.

"The federal chancellor thanks President Trump for his invitation to the G7 summit at the end of June in Washington," German government spokesman Steffen Seibert told the outlet.

"As of today, considering the overall pandemic situation, she cannot agree to her personal participation, to a journey to Washington," Seibert said.

Read more: Which European countries are open for summer tourism?

Trump has been rallying behind the idea of hosting a G7 summit in person, months after the March event was canceled amid coronavirus fears. He has received support from UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who said that the meeting of world leaders should be held in person "if possible."


    Donald J. Trump
    ✔
    @realDonaldTrump

    Now that our Country is “Transitioning back to Greatness”, I am considering rescheduling the G-7, on the same or similar date, in Washington, D.C., at the legendary Camp David. The other members are also beginning their COMEBACK. It would be a great sign to all - normalization!
    97.4K
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Even as economies start to open across the world, Merkel has warned that June may be too early for large gatherings to take place. Social distancing and strict vigilance have been recommended even as lockdown restrictions are eased in many parts of the world.

"She will of course continue to monitor the development of the pandemic," Seibert said.

The US has recorded close to 1.75 million cases of the virus. Germany's tally stands at approximately 183,000 confirmed cases. The US death toll has crossed 100,000, while Germany has recorded over 8,500 deaths.

https://www.dw.com/en/angela-merkel-rejects-trumps-g7-summit-invite-report/a-53625373
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

Offline knarf

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House panels approve new anti-terrorism bill, alarms netizens - Phillipines
« Reply #16053 on: May 30, 2020, 02:27:34 PM »




    kakie @kakiep83

    even tweeting any thoughts against the government can, and likely will, be considered an ‘act of terrorism’ under this bill. it’s an infringement upon our most basic human rights. #JunkTerrorBill
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Another netizen simply said "Activism is not Terrorism," while another said the same but added: "our heroes spent decades fighting for this country's democracy yet this government is removing the right of freedom of speech. criminalizing criticism. this is not what we need during this pandemic."



    jerico #OUSTDUTERTENOW @pangungulila

    ACTIVISM IS NOT TERRORISM
    ACTIVISM IS NOT TERRORISM
    ACTIVISM IS NOT TERRORISM
    ACTIVISM IS NOT TERRORISM
    ACTIVISM IS NOT TERRORISM
    ACTIVISM IS NOT TERRORISM
    ACTIVISM IS NOT TERRORISM
    ACTIVISM IS NOT TERRORISM
    ACTIVISM IS NOT TERRORISM#JunkTerrorBill #OUSTDUTERTENOW
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ash ⁷ | #BlackLivesMatter. #JunkTerrorBill. @taechubsi

ACTIVISM IS NOT TERRORISM. our heroes spent decades fighting this country's democracy yet this government is removing the right of freedom of speech. criminalizing criticism. this is not what we need during this pandemic. #JunkTerrorBill #OUSTDUTERTENOW




    4,315
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Kabataan party-list Rep. Sarah Elago also took to social media, saying "it has no safeguards for the protection of human rights, redress of grievances. This can be weaponized to silence critics, suppress dissent."


    Sarah Elago @sarahelago

    #JunkTerrorBill This provides a 60 to 90 day-wire tapping period, and warrantless arrest, detention up to 30 days of suspected terrorists. It has no safeguards for the protection of human rights, redress of grievances. This can be weaponized to silence critics, suppress dissent.
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"The House joint committees basically threw out all the position and recommendations of human rights organizations and international experts in the name of fast-tracking the Duterte regime’s desperate bid to crush dissent, civil liberties, and people’s rights," Karapatan Deputy Secretary General Roneo Clamor said.

"The passage of draconian amendments to the Anti-Terrorism law will seal the deal in Duterte’s brutal campaign of State terrorism – the final piece in the regime’s bid to establish a full blown fascist dictatorship and de facto martial law," he added.

Meanwhile, Nagkaisa Labor Coalition pointed to the "extremely broad definitions of terrorism" in the proposed measure, "which would virtually criminalize almost all forms of dissent."

"Another equally appalling provision would be the warrantless arrests and detention of suspects, which basically overturns every Filipino’s right to be presumed innocent until proven otherwise," Nagkaisa Labor Coalition Chairperson Atty. Sonny Matula said in a statement.

"Instead of focusing on how to effectively deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, or to help the 11,000 ABS-CBN employees, as well as the projected 10 million working class Filipinos…our Honorable lawmakers saw it fit to invest their time into crafting more laws that would possibly endanger more the already grim human rights situation in our country today," he added.

https://www.cnnphilippines.com/news/2020/5/30/House-panels-approve-new-anti-terrorism-bill-alarms-netizens.html
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

Offline knarf

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SpaceX founder Elon Musk's idea to bomb Mars to terraform the environment and make it suitable for humans to live on is a ploy to launch nuclear weapons in space, according to Russia's space chief on Wednesday.

The South African-born tech entrepreneur has been interested in hitting Mars with a nuclear weapon since at least 2015, according to Business Insider.

According to his theory, he says the heat generated by the bombs could cause the planet's polar ice caps to melt and release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, triggering a rapid greenhouse effect that raises the planet's temperature and air pressure to the point of supporting human life.

Dmitry Rogozin, the head of the Russian state space agency Roscosmos, said Musk's plan is a cover-up for sending nuclear bombs into space, according to The Moscow Times.

"We understand that one thing is hidden behind this demagogy: This is a cover for the launch of nuclear weapons into space," Rogozin told a pro-Kremlin television pundit Vladimir Solovyov.

Rogozin called Musk's idea "inhumane" and said it would "destroy" the planet.

"We see such attempts, we consider them unacceptable, and we will hinder this to the greatest extent possible," Rogozin said, saying that international regulations prohibit any weapon deployment in space.

Roscosmos Executive Director for Advanced Programs and Science Alexander Bloshenko told the state-run TASS news agency earlier this month that Musk's plan would need 10,000 nuclear warheads, to which Musk replied: "No problem" on Twitter.


    Jeff Foust @jeff_foust
     · May 13, 2020

    Headline of the day: “Elon Musk will need more than 10,000 missiles to nuke Mars — Roscosmos” https://tass.com/science/1155417
    Elon Musk will need more than 10,000 missiles to nuke Mars — Roscosmos

    Earlier, Musk proposed an ambitious idea to terraform Mars by bombarding the planet’s poles with a large number of nuclear weapons
    tass.com

    Elon Musk
    ✔
    @elonmusk

    No problem
    13.1K
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According to The Moscow Times, Rogozin and Musk have butted heads in the past over accusations that SpaceX was trying to push Moscow out of the carrier rockets market by lowering prices for commercial space flights.

Rogozin's remarks come one day after SpaceX scrubbed the launch of its Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station due to unsuitable weather conditions.

The new launch is slated for Saturday afternoon. If it is successful, it will show the U.S. is no longer dependent on Russia's Soyuz rockets for future space flights.

https://thehill.com/policy/transportation/499968-russian-space-chief-elon-musks-plan-to-bomb-mars-is-a-cover-to-put
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

Offline knarf

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German industry demands subsidies for fossil fuel cars
« Reply #16055 on: May 31, 2020, 10:34:00 AM »
Germany's carmakers have demanded a sales rebate on new diesel and petrol cars. The powerful lobby has been backed up in its calls by state premiers and industry groups.



Germany's top industry body on Sunday called for sales subsidies on electric cars to be extended to fossil-fuel-powered vehicles.

Dieter Kempf, president of the Federation of German Industries (BDI), made the demand in the Welt am Sonntag newspaper.

Germany's powerful-but-struggling carmakers have been calling for the expansion of the subsidies on electric cars, in a bid to shore up their positions during the coronavirus-induced economic crisis.

"In view of the crisis, it makes sense to introduce a further purchase bonus for at least 12 months in addition to the environmental premium, provided that this premium is part of a cross-sectoral approach," Kempf said.

Kempf said the promotion is based on investment and climate protection. "It therefore makes perfect sense to also promote vehicles with modern and efficient combustion engines in this context, if this does not dilute existing incentives for electric mobility," he said.

Rebates are currently available for the purchase of purely electric and hybrid cars.

Read more: As Dieselgate scandal widens, will Germany finally tackle transport emissions?

The automakers have been backed up in their demands by the states of Bavaria, Lower Saxony and Baden-Württemberg, where the manufacturers BMW, VW and Daimler are headquartered.

Bavarian State Premier Markus Söder told Welt: "It is unacceptable that France spends €8 billion on automobile promotion and we spend €9 billion on Lufthansa — but nothing for the heart of our economy. That would be an industrial policy mistake."

"It'll help protect the climate and the economy. We are taking old cars off the market and replacing them with the latest generation of clean vehicles," he added.

Germany's carmakers were responsible for the Dieselgate scandal, in which they deliberately colluded to conceal the illegal emissions of new diesel cars.

Economic stimulus meeting

On Tuesday, the leaders of the ruling coalition will discuss an economic stimulus package which is intended to restore the German economy. According to the Bild newspaper, the package is expected to be worth between €75 and €80 billion.

Leaked agendas have revealed no plans for additional subsidies.

Carsten Linnemann, head of the pro-business wing in Angela Merkel's CDU and sister party CSU, said that if the call was successful it would be "a prime example of how a lobby asserts itself in Germany."

Ralph Brinkhaus, parliamentary group leader of the CDU/CSU, said he also opposed it — but that the pressure from companies, unions and state premiers was substantial.

The German Council of Economic Experts, among others, has spoken out against the new subsidies.

https://www.dw.com/en/german-industry-demands-subsidies-for-fossil-fuel-cars/a-53637670
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

Offline knarf

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An economic turning point for Europe?
« Reply #16056 on: May 31, 2020, 10:42:25 AM »
Most of the big eurozone countries were caught badly unawares by the coronavirus pandemic. France, Spain, Italy, and even Germany suffered severe outbreaks, though most are well on the way to being contained now.

Now eurozone countries are beginning to deal with the resulting economic fallout — and there are some surprising glimmerings of hope that they might actually fix the snarled economic institutions and austerity fixation that have throttled the region's economy since 2008. It is far from a sure thing, but it is the best opportunity in years, and a potential major turning point in the trajectory of the European Union.

Let me review some background. For over a decade the eurozone has been in the stranglehold of an austerity cult. After the initial economic crisis of 2008, the currency area fell into a debt crisis caused not by debt itself, but by the political strictures of the eurozone structure. As Steve Randy Waldman explains, a eurozone-wide crisis that clearly called for a region-wide response was instead pinned on a few scapegoats. Countries like Italy and Greece had indeed borrowed heavily during the preceding decade, but were encouraged to do so by banks in Northern Europe, especially France and Germany. Those same banks had also invested heavily in U.S. mortgage securities, which both turned out to be full of toxic waste, and more importantly, denominated in dollars. Where the U.S. could borrow and print dollars to its heart's content to rescue its banks, Western Europe (unlike China or Russia) had no big dollar hoards to defend itself. A severe dollar shortage quickly developed on the continent as banks tried to unwind their positions. By 2009, a euro-dollar currency crisis was looming, and thereafter a chaotic collapse of the European banking system.

Some kind of banking rescue was unavoidable, but simply saving the banks from their own misdeeds with no punishment or reckoning, out in the open, would have been deeply unpopular. So Eurozone elites chose to bail out the banks by routing the money through peripheral nations, especially Greece. That country got a "bailout" in 2010, but almost all the money went directly to French and German banks to get Greek loans off their books. Meanwhile, the Federal Reserve quietly forestalled a currency crisis by granting the European Central Bank (and several other nations) the power to exchange printed euros for dollars. Those two programs, which got little attention, allowed rich eurozone countries to save their banks.

Then, so euro elites could pretend they weren't just rescuing their idiot banker friends, and to maintain the fiction of neoliberal orthodoxy, they forced gallons of austerity poison down Greece's throat. The whole problem was blamed on purported Greek irresponsibility, which must be paid for with eyewatering tax hikes and savage cuts to social programs. This crushed the Greek economy, which shrank by 28 percent by 2015. Unemployment soared to almost 28 percent. That in turn made the debt problem worse, not better, as the Greek economy shrank faster than the debt load. It had still not come even close to recovery when the pandemic struck.

The broader economic consequences have been disastrous — the eurozone as a whole has been in a moderate depression for a decade, with countries like Germany and France doing only somewhat poorly but ones like Greece, Spain, and Italy suffering a 1930s-scale catastrophe. Here I have charted inflation-adjusted eurozone growth (in red) against that of the United States (in blue), showing the change since the second quarter of 2009 (scaled to 100). Up through the last quarter of 2019, the U.S. economy had grown by 27 percent, while the eurozone had grown by just 15 percent — a yearly average of a meager 0.98 percent over the period:



Now, the German Constitutional Court recently challenged a European Court of Justice ruling that the ECB bond-buying program is legal, throwing a possible legal wrench into its support of euro area debt markets. This raises the prospect that German conservatives, who have been the main political force behind austerity, will block coronavirus relief and reform. However, the grounds for the ruling were that the ECB was overstepping its legal authority, which is obviously true and has been for years. According to European treaties, the ECB is not supposed to intervene in politics, but it has been perhaps the most meddlesome political institution on the continent for the last decade — just now doing so in a beneficial way rather than acting as the thuggish leg-breaker for austerity.

A response to the German ruling could be a new treaty or legal settlement subjecting the ECB to democratic oversight. That, plus the creation of EU or eurozone bonds, could be the first step towards true economic democracy on the continent. Central bank "independence" is a ridiculous impossibility — all central banks are inherently political. If it was democratically-elected authorities overseeing the ECB's power, rather than finance-connected elites, the chance of that power being exercised for good, and the European population accepting those decisions as legitimate, would be greatly increased.
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The European project stands at a crossroads. The whole point of the EU and the eurozone was to defuse the nationalist passions that touched off the worst war in history. A more connected Europe, it was argued, would be a less dangerous one. Instead, elite bungling and austerity have rekindled the flames of right-wing nationalism across the continent. Already the EU has lost one member state, and should it continue down the pre-crisis path of economic stagnation and authoritarian austerity, more would likely follow.

The pandemic is a chance to reverse that damage. It turns out Greece, which handled its outbreak far, far better even than Germany, has much to teach its neighbors. European citizens and policymakers may not get another chance to create a European economy that works for all Europeans. I suggest they seize it.

https://theweek.com/articles/916846/economic-turning-point-europe?utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_source=afternoon&utm_medium=05_31_20-article_4-916846
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

Offline knarf

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Trump says he will designate Antifa a terrorist organization...
« Reply #16057 on: May 31, 2020, 10:52:06 AM »
as GOP points fingers at extremists

The move comes after violent protests across the country over the death of George Floyd at the hands of police.

Democratic and Republican officials on Sunday took aim at groups like Antifa and Boogaloo as well as demonstrators from out of town as responsible for violent episodes at protests in major cities across the country.

President Donald Trump tweeted that he was designating Antifa as a terrorist organization.


    Donald J. Trump
    ✔
    @realDonaldTrump

    The United States of America will be designating ANTIFA as a Terrorist Organization.
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That followed Trump and Attorney General William Barr earlier pointing to anti-fascist organizers and anarchists as culprits behind the mayhem following the death of a 46-year-old black man, George Floyd, at the hands of Minneapolis police. Others said right-wing extremists such as Boogaloo followers, who hope to bring about a second Civil War, were pushing for such uprising in the protests.

"This is being driven by Antifa," national security adviser Robert O'Brien told CNN's "State of the Union" on Sunday. "And they did it in Seattle. They have done it in Portland. They have done it in Berkeley. This is a destructive force of radical — I don't even know if we want to call them leftists. Whatever they are, they're — they're militants who are coming in and burning our cities, and we're going to get to the bottom of it."

Antifa, meaning "anti-fascist," is a coalition of protesters, left-wing activists and self-described anarchists who seek to physically confront and bring down what they deem as the far right. Trump and his administration have long targeted the group, which has made its presence felt at protests throughout his presidency.

O'Brien called for the FBI to engage in surveillance of Antifa and to prosecute its members.

"And if they haven't been doing that, we need a plan right away to make sure that happens," O'Brien told reporters after appearing in the Sunday shows. "I think the attorney general has already been in touch with (FBI) Director Wray, and I think the President wants to know what the FBI has been doing, and what their plan is going forward, and if they haven't been doing anything about Antifa."

O'Brien said that while he condemns "all extremists," he pinned the violence on left-wing radicals.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., tweeted the "big story" being missed is that in "city after city we have a rogues gallery of terrorists from Antifa to 'Boogaloo' groups encouraging & committing violence."

"They may not be ideologically compatible but share a hatred of govt & police & are taking advantage of the protests," Rubio, acting chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, added, saying the demonstrators "don't fit a simple left vs. right identity."

These individuals want to "tear the whole system down even if it requires a new civil war, Rubio said.


    Marco Rubio
    ✔
    @marcorubio

    3 groups of people at protests:

    1. Peaceful protestors angry at the murder of Mr. Floyd but who have even protected police officers at protests

    2. Locals who see the opportunity for wilding

    3. Domestic extremists taking advantage of lawful protests to advance their own agenda
    3,925
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The protests began last week after a video showed Minneapolis police officers pinning Floyd to the ground as he exclaimed that he could not breathe. One officer, Derek Chauvin, was seen holding his knee against Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes as he begged for mercy — with Chauvin continuing to pin Floyd down even after he became unresponsive.

Chauvin was arrested and charged Friday with third-degree murder and manslaughter. Three other officers were also involved in Floyd's detainment. They have not been charged with any crimes stemming from the incident.

The protests ratcheted up over the weekend after demonstrations became violent in Minnesota. Peaceful protests across the country became increasingly tense as night fell upon cities this weekend, with fires breaking out in many of them. Meanwhile, police at the protests have been recorded using harsh force against demonstrators and journalists.

Melvin Carter, the mayor of St. Paul, Minnesota, told "State of the Union" that some of the protesters are driven "by a passion for our community, by a love for our community, and by a deep desire to never see a loss of life like the killing on the video, the killing of George Floyd we all saw this week."

"Then there's folks in the street who are there to burn down our black-owned barbershops, to burn down our family-owned businesses, to burn down our immigrant-owned restaurants and it is very clear to me those people are not driven by a love for our community," Carter said. "And there is no way you can argue those actions are designed to produce a better future for our community, quite the opposite."

Carter had apologized Saturday after saying that "every person" arrested in the protests were from out of state, saying he was given inaccurate information during a police briefing. Local media examined local jail data that found nearly all of the people arrested at the protests live in Minneapolis or the surrounding metropolitan area.

Other top officials in Minnesota, like Gov. Tim Walz, a Democrat, had said out-of-staters were responsible for some of the looting and arson.

Speaking with NBC's "Meet the Press," Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, a Democrat, said he's become aware of "very suspicious" people taking part in the demonstrations through video recordings made at the protests.

"The truth is, nobody really knows," he said of who is responsible for the more violent activity. "I talked to people who were demonstrating, they say they think some of those folks are from Minnesota. And they also say some people have come from out of town. What the exact political motivation is unclear at this point. We need to investigate it."

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., pointed to Walz's comments on out-of-towners in an interview with "This Week."

"Let’s have a look at what really is happening, who is making what, taking what actions," Pelosi said. "But we should not ignore the fact that there is a room for peaceful protests in all of this."

Also on "This Week," Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., said the large Floyd protests are happening because people "want bold and systematic change to take place, so that they can feel like their voices are heard."

"This is what happens when people are tired, just marching every single day, just to have their humanity be recognized," she said. "In Minneapolis, we have marched. We have protested. We have organized. And when we see people setting our buildings and our businesses ablaze, we know those are not people who are interested in protecting black lives."

https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/politics-news/trump-says-he-will-designate-antifa-terrorist-organization-gop-points-n1220321
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

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Iran suggests up to 225 killed in November protests
« Reply #16058 on: May 31, 2020, 11:10:33 AM »


The protests erupted on November 15 in Tehran and rapidly spread to at least 40 cities and towns, with petrol pumps torched, police stations attacked and shops looted

Iran's interior minister has suggested that up to 225 people were killed in November protests sparked by a petrol price hike, ISNA news agency reported on Sunday.

Officials in Iran have yet to issue an overall death toll for the unrest, while London-based human rights group Amnesty International has put the number at more than 300.

The protests erupted on November 15 in Tehran and rapidly spread to at least 40 cities and towns, with petrol pumps torched, police stations attacked and shops looted, before being put down by security forces amid a near-total internet blackout.

Officials had repeatedly denied death tolls given by foreign media and human rights groups as "lies", and passed responsibility of reporting on it between different state bodies.

"Sad things happened. About 40 or 45 people, meaning around 20 percent of those killed, were shot with non-standard issue weapons and martyred," said Interior Minister Abdolreza Rahmani Fazli.

"No armed confrontation with the people happened... but when they attack a police station, they have to be confronted," ISNA quoted him as saying.

His breakdown indicated that, according to the government, between 200 and 225 people were killed in the violence.

According to Amnesty, at least 304 men, women and children were killed during the unrest.

Iran has blamed the violence that broke out during the protests on "thugs" backed by its foes the United States, Israel and Saudi Arabia.

It has singled out exiled royalists and the People's Mujahedeen of Iran (MEK), an exiled former rebel group which it considers a "terrorist" cult.

The minister said the petrol price hike had been "just an excuse" for creating chaos as foes had wanted a "civil war" in Iran.

He also defended the internet blackout, saying that the MEK, monarchists, and the Islamic State group were "giving military training through the internet".

https://www.france24.com/en/20200531-iran-suggests-up-to-225-killed-in-november-protests
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

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Trump delays 'outdated' G7 leaders' summit
« Reply #16059 on: May 31, 2020, 11:16:42 AM »

Mr Trump made the comments on board Air Force One while returning to Washington from Cape Canaveral, Florida

US President Donald Trump has said he will postpone this year's G7 summit and invite leaders of other countries to participate in the talks.

"I don't feel that... it properly represents what's going on in the world. It's a very outdated group of countries," Mr Trump said on Saturday.

The G7 group, which the US hosts this year, includes Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the UK.

The president said Russia, South Korea, Australia and India should be invited.

Speaking to reporters on board the presidential plane Air Force One, Mr Trump said that he was delaying the summit - which was scheduled to take place later in June - until September.

    What is the G7 summit and what does it do?

Last week, Mr Trump said it might be possible to hold a gathering at the White House and potentially parts of Camp David, the US presidential country retreat, despite concerns over the coronavirus pandemic.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel later rejected the president's invitation to attend a summit in person because of the outbreak.

Her spokesman thanked Mr Trump, but said the German leader "cannot agree to her personal participation, to a journey to Washington".

On Friday, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson "agreed on the importance of convening the G7 in person in the near future" following a conversation with the US president, the White House said in a statement.

The G7 - or Group of Seven - leaders were scheduled to meet by videoconference in June in response to Covid-19.

The group is made up of the seven of the world's largest economies.

It regards itself as "a community of values", with freedom and human rights, democracy and the rule of law, and prosperity and sustainable development as its key principles.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-52865201
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

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Wildfires rage across the UK as country continues to bake
« Reply #16060 on: May 31, 2020, 11:32:54 AM »
Wildfires raged around beauty spots across the country yesterday as temperatures continued to soar. Firefighters in Scotland, Surrey and Lancashire were tackling ‘significant’ blazes yesterday after warning that scarce rainfall and dry vegetation would provide ‘all of the ingredients’ for wildfires to spread. It comes as one of the country’s driest ever May’s came to an end, in one of the sunniest springs on record. Temperatures reached highs of 28C yesterday – far higher than the average for the time of year, the Met Office said. Surrey Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS) began tackling a 20-hectare blaze yesterday evening at Thursley Common, which sits on a nature reserve between Thursley and Elstead, near Goldalming. It was believed to have been started after a BBQ got out of control. It came despite warnings for fire chiefs earlier this week for the public to be cautious about BBQs amid an easing of the coronavirus lockdown – and stark images from reservoirs highlighting how dry the ground is. People on the common and residents from 14 nearby homes were evacuated by Surrey Police, who closed off a four mile stretch around Thursley Road for public safety. Surrey Police said smoke was visible for a ‘number of miles’ and asked residents to keep their doors and windows closed to ‘prevent breathing difficulties.’ SFRS added on Twitter: ‘Members of the public at Thursley Common are to evacuate and follow instruction from police officers on scene.


Fire fighters in Thursley Common, Elstead, yesterday


Dry, hot weather helped the Surrey fire get out of control

‘If you have left your vehicle in the car parks please ring 101 to inform police that you are safe and provide them with your car registration number.’ Onlooker Sophie Garrett said she was ‘worried’ when she noticed the blaze from 11 miles away while at Pewley Down park in Guildford. Elsewhere, Scottish Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS) crews have also been tackling a wildfire on the Isle of Skye. SFRS were alerted to the blaze at Kyleakin Woods just before 1pm. On Friday, Area Commander Bruce Farquharson had warned: ‘We have had very little rain over the past two months, and a large volume of dead, bone-dry vegetation remains left over from last year – which essentially acts as a fuel for fire.


The moor fire at Darwen, Lancashire, yesterday


One onlooker saw smoke from Thursley Common from 11 miles away yesterday

‘As a result, there are currently vast areas of countryside all over the country that is tinder dry and vulnerable, and has all of the ingredients for fire to take hold and spread.’ Meanwhile, crews from Lancashire Fire and Rescue Service and Manchester Fire Service have been using eight fire engines to tackle a huge blaze on moorland nearby Bolton Road in Darwen. Lancashire fire crews said: ‘The fire front is covering an area approximately 300 yards by 200 yards.

https://metro.co.uk/2020/05/31/wildfires-rage-across-uk-country-continues-bake-12782509/
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

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Kanye West just bought a $14 million Wyoming ranch. Take a look at the massive property that comes with a saloon, an events venue, and a shooting range.

Sep 12, 2019  https://www.businessinsider.com/kanye-west-wyoming-ranch-photos-2019-9

The Bigger Story

Billionaires Cowboy Up and Turn Wyoming Into a Gated Community

When the super-rich descended upon Teton County, they gushed about its natural beauty. They had less to say about the locals who got pushed out of paradise.

1.3% Blacks 2019 Census Data http://www.census.gov/quickfacts/WY



Of the 3,144 counties in the United States, the one with the highest per capita income is Teton County, Wyoming. It’s also the most unequal: Ninety percent of all income is made by 8 percent of households. Its average per capita income is $194,485, and the average income for the top 1 percent in the county is an astonishing $28.2 million.

Justin Farrell, an associate professor of sociology at Yale and a Wyoming native, spent six years interviewing the ultra-wealthy as well as the working poor in Teton County and studying the effects of wealth on this community. The result of his research is an illuminating and provocative new book, Billionaire Wilderness: The Ultra-Wealthy and the Remaking of the American West. He spoke to reporter Nick Romeo.
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Most people do not associate wealth inequality and environmentalism. What’s the connection you found?

The ultrarich use nature to solve dilemmas they face. The first dilemma is economic. So you made all this money: How much should you share it, how should you enjoy it, and how should you protect and multiply it? Conservation has all sorts of benefits economically. People say that they move to Teton County for the beautiful ecosystem, the wildlife and all that, but the other major reason, the primary reason really, is it’s a tax haven. I try to show that not all tax havens are off in these faraway islands, some of them are right here in the pristine mountains of the American West: Wyoming does not have corporate tax or income tax and often sits atop Bloomberg’s wealth-friendly states rankings. So you see dollars flooding in, which impacts the fabric of the community itself. In Teton County in 1980, only 30 percent of income came from financial investments, but by 2015, $8 out of every $10 in this community was made from financial investments.

I’m a big proponent of conservation, but I don’t think we look enough at who benefits from conservation, not only in terms of tax breaks but in terms of how it affects property values and low-income people who can no longer live anywhere near where they work. Some people have to drive over an 8,000-foot mountain pass every day to get to work in the dead of a Wyoming winter. So the area is transformed into an ultra-exclusive enclave, where you need the money to buy entry. It’s basically become a gated community to the extreme.

What are the other dilemmas that the rich use nature to solve?

The second dilemma is social: How do they wrestle with the stigma of being ultra-wealthy? They are burdened by a social stigma that they are greedy, and they often feel like they’ve sacrificed something along the way to wealth. So they use nature combined with a romantic view of rural people as a way to transform themselves. I found this pattern where they create versions of themselves that they view as more authentic, more virtuous, more small-town and community-minded.

The interesting thing is that they model their personal transformation on this notion of the working poor in the rural West, especially in outdoors-oriented places. They tend to romanticize them. The image is of someone with a low-status career who doesn’t have a lot of material goods but is living close to the earth, in nature, and maybe they’re going skiing or hiking, or maybe they live in a camper van, and they are free from the traps of wealth and power that the rich have had to navigate their whole careers. The rich imagine that the working poor live more of an outdoor life of contentment, are more authentic, simpler, and that they enjoy a special kinship with nature and integration into the small-town community. All that becomes central to how the ultra-wealthy transform themselves—it’s a yearning among the ultra-wealthy for this love of a bygone small-town character kind of mixed with the cowboy ethos.

You talk in the book about how the ultrarich basically play dress-up—they wear Wranglers and plaid shirts. They pull on leather cowboy boots and drive rugged trucks.

Yeah, the dress was very surprising to me. I did not go into this project focused on how those folks dressed, but it turned out to be such a communicator of something deeper and more important. Dress was an outward performance of their conversion to this way of life, of what they view as this way of life. The image is built on half-truths and a really romanticized view of the working poor, especially in this community, where the reality of the working poor tends to be two immigrant families living in a single trailer, with the adults working two or three jobs. But that’s not how the wealthy see it. This performance also includes making friends with people who are just scraping by and going out into nature with these people, whether it’s their ski guides or fishing guide.

Right. It seemed like there was this really intense pride in having the token working-class friend. They all want to have one. But someone you interview points out that friends do not let friends suffer horribly, sleeping in shifts in the single bed of a trailer, particularly when those supposed friends have a 10,000-square-foot mansion that sits unused for most of the year.

I was surprised by how much they talk about their working-class friends. I have so many quotes in the book where they’re like: We’re friends because it’s not about money here. We’re all just in love with Wyoming, we’re all just in love with nature. We’ve all been converted by nature and maybe these friends have helped me along to see that maybe money isn’t everything.

And yeah, money isn’t everything, but it means a lot to those who don’t have it.

Some people are starting to question what is a true friendship and what is a true community. They may be nice, for example, to this wealthy person they are working for, and maybe that person also treats them with respect, but they’re missing this component of what makes a good friendship and relationship, there’s this gaping hole there. Being friendly with a person who has all this money does not help them put food on the table and does not help them be able to live within a reasonable distance and come work for the rich in a restaurant they like or caretake in their homes or take their kids to school or mow their lawn. It’s just this tragic irony that structures a lot of the social relationships in that community.

It was striking how oblivious they were to the fact that these “friendships” were one-sided and based on an economic relationship.

I should stress that a lot of ultra-wealthy folks I talked to were very kind people. But there was a willful ignorance among that group of just how bad things have gotten for some people in this community and just how exclusive a place it’s become. I just wanted to draw attention to that in a way that is based on solid evidence, on six years of research, and that is not unfairly pointing fingers at certain people. But I do point out these inconsistencies between what the wealthy think of themselves and what other people actually think of them and what other people wish the community was really like. That’s what I strove for in the book—something that could be trusted, that wasn’t just this polemical exposé based on sloppy analysis.

And you do point out that in some ways it’s a very generous group of people there. There are a huge number of nonprofits per capita, but when you actually look at where the money is going, it’s almost entirely to arts organizations and environmental organizations that are often very narrowly focused on one charismatic animal, like the moose, not something more systemic like climate change. Meanwhile, funding for human services that help the poor is minimal.

There is a narrative within the community—which has some truth—that it’s an extremely generous place with all these nonprofits. People love to talk about that. So I dug into the numbers, and they do have a huge number of nonprofits: per capita, it’s off the charts. I looked at where the money is going and asked what that says about the community. Often the money is going to arts organizations, for example maybe to fund a symphony in the summer. They bring in these world-class musicians who may stay in some of the wealthy homes. Meanwhile, there is a housing crisis, and there are children in the schools who are homeless. There are homeless children in the richest county in the richest country in the world.

So this is a philanthropic community, but virtually no money is going to organizations working in the social-services sector compared with the millions that are pouring into support the arts or a land trust or environmental nonprofit.

For example, people are really concerned about dwindling moose populations, as am I, but it’s just one animal, and that issue for them is more prominent than poverty. It’s also more prominent than environmental issues like climate change, and climate change is going to affect everything, it’s going to affect the moose. There’s also a social element—is it prestigious to sit on the board of the Latino Resource Center versus sitting on the board of a land trust or an arts organization? I did a social-network analysis of the social capital of these groups as well, and the disparity was just as wide.

The fundamental issue is that a lot of these folks go to this area to escape the homelessness and poverty that they might see somewhere else. They moved there expecting not to see it and when they do, it’s kind of a buzz kill. So they’re like, “I didn’t come to paradise to give money to a homeless person; I thought I got away from that.”

Especially people from the Eastern Seaboard still romanticize the West as being empty of people and just full of nature. But there is a real community of folks there trying to make it and often the wealthy just don’t see them, either because they don’t want to or they’re just not aware because these people are not integrated into their community, so they don’t let it spoil their version of paradise. And so that all creates a veneer both environmental and social that all is well in paradise. It covers over the policy solutions that are really needed to turn this into more of a functioning community where all sorts of people will want to live and can.

What are the effects of the wealthy on land conservation in the West?

There’s this myth that environmentalism and conservationism mean just saving a big piece of land from development. It’s seen as inherently apolitical if you buy a big piece of land and you put easements on it to protect its ecological integrity. That’s the model that people live by as the pinnacle of conservation. That’s very different from how environmentalism or conservation should work in practice. It’s an inherently political activity. They tend to have a very limited view of science—they think, you know, we just need to keep everything in balance. So if we build a house over there, maybe we should save some of the land on the other side of the stream. But they don’t want to get too involved in confrontational issues. Climate change has become a confrontational issue because of the impact of climate skeptics over the last 30 years. So that’s a hot-button issue that most of them stay away from. But when we are talking about conservation or environmentalism, the topic should be climate change. The people didn’t come out there to get politically involved, but that’s what’s required to really tackle those issues.

You use the term “connoisseur conservation” to describe the way some of the wealthy see nature almost as a luxury good, like a fine wine or fancy meal. Can you say more about what this term means?

Folks who are ultra-wealthy will say things like “This is the best that nature has to offer.” And it’s hard to disagree if you look at the mountains and lakes and pristine water and air. So they view the environment as the best of the best, in the same way you would a wine or a yacht. But because it is such a wonderful place ecologically, they are enjoying those benefits more and more, which makes it harder for other Americans to do the same.

They view nature as this medicinal and therapeutic storehouse where they can go recharge their batteries and, in a deeper sense, become whole. Some of them even use religious language. And you know, I enjoy the same benefits when I go on a hike too, so it is not unique to them. But it is unique when they are potentially colonizing that area for themselves and making it impossible for other folks who have lived there for a long time to remain there. I’m not saying other Americans can’t go visit Yellowstone and Grand Teton, but they are turning that area into a wealthy island of certain people and not others.

The quasi-religious view of nature also creates what you describe as a kind of moral exemption on spending money that promotes communion with nature. So what might be seen as extravagant if spent for some other purpose becomes completely fine when it is spent to enhance that bond with nature.

It’s kind of similar to folks who have the money to buy a Tesla and then feel good about saving the environment. Here there’s a similar phenomenon but ratcheted up like everything else. So you might build this enormous nature sanctuary from materials gathered from nearby and this might involve the burning of fossil fuels so that you can keep it heated year-round even though you’re not there, and it might prevent certain wildlife from migrating to certain areas. So there are all kinds of effects and externalities that are not considered because you’re building it with the intent of enjoying nature, which is seen as a moral good.

Tell me about the Yellowstone Club and your experience of going skiing there.

That is basically everything in the book taken to an extreme. They have a private mountain, very steep entry fees, and a quasi-militarized perimeter. I will say that it is odd to get on a ski lift, not see anyone until you get to the top, except for the person who helps you off, ski down, not see another person, and get back up and go again and not see another person. They call one of the runs “private powder,” and that’s indeed true.

They also accuse you of stealing their guest list even though you had gotten the names of residents from tax records. More broadly, it must’ve been difficult to get access to these rich people. Can you talk a little about your methods?

The short answer is that it was really hard, and that is why there isn’t a lot of research at present on the ultra-wealthy. I had this unique identity that set me up to make inroads. So first the Yale name has this elite gravitas in these circles that will initially get you a foot in the door. But I also have this identity as someone who was born in Wyoming and has what I call the Western gravitas, which can be very attractive to people who are moving to these places to pursue that kind of authenticity they view as a romantic ideal. I was able to kind of leverage those two important components.

So, when I wrote an initial letter to invite them to have a conversation, I wasn’t pitching a study on wealth inequality. I knew that was present in the community, so I invited them to participate in a study on how this area is changing, what they like about it, what they don’t like about it. Just very general terms. And we did talk a lot about wild places and all of that, but I also had questions about the income gap here and the fact that this place doesn’t have income taxes. The conversations would just unfold in a natural way.

I also promised anonymity to everybody, and I made sure they knew I was not out to get them. I was not interested in singling out individuals; I was interested in general patterns and telling stories about those patterns through individual lives. I was committed to being accurate and impartial: I made clear that it was not going to be this sloppy attack. I think part of it is that as an academic I do the kind of work that is independent and can be trusted because it’s rooted in reliable methods of sampling and interviewing and participant observation and all of that.

Have you had any responses to the book from the ultrarich yet?

I had some positive reactions where folks were like, “yeah, that’s why I moved here. I like the Wyoming culture and I like wearing jeans and that’s true.” There are others who have pushed back a little bit on my characterization of their philanthropy, saying they are doing it out of the goodness of their heart and they care about the issues, which may be true, but when you look at the numbers, it tells a different story. So, it’s been a little mixed, but I haven’t received any major blowback. Honestly, I think it’s because I built some pretty good relationships with many of these folks, and I do see them as people. People with immense power and immense wealth that have disproportionate impact and who may not understand the reality of life in the rural West or the reality of environmental conservation and the problem of climate change.

There are these stunning examples of cognitive dissonance that you depict where someone flies into Wyoming on a private Learjet but thinks of himself as an environmentalist. Or someone who made their money in oil and gas but supports some moose charity, so they think of themselves as an environmentalist. Given their extraordinary inability to perceive their own hypocrisy, what do you think can be done?

Yeah, I would think more about the policy side than necessarily changing the minds of the rich. Many of the problems that we see in a place like Teton County have been created by the massive concentration of wealth. So I think there’s a myth that needs to be overcome that we need to rely on the ultrarich to solve the problem. They have all these fundraisers and events and there’s so much optimism about the potential to transform these communities because they have so much wealth and human/social capital, but it’s not happening. So, first and foremost I think the state of Wyoming could look at their tax structure for that county.

I do think that there is an opportunity to draw upon the romantic ideals that people have of the West and nature and to harness that for good. It’s important to educate the ultra-wealthy about what’s really going on, there are opportunities for that and that can really make an impact locally. But I think in the long-term, structurally more deeper changes need to happen so that we’re not relying on the whims of those folks. There are some well-meaning ultra-wealthy people who have done a lot of good in the community in terms of giving money to schools and education, but that can fluctuate. If someone decides to go back to Connecticut because they had their fun, you lose a source of income that maybe the community depends on.

Is this community a microcosm for the general challenges America is facing with wealth inequality, NIMBYism, hypocrisy, and the tokenization of the working class?

For sure. That’s one of the reasons I undertook the project. I’m hesitant to generalize very far in the book, that’s just an academic thing—being careful not to assert things beyond your data. But you look at other locales, even places like San Francisco or Seattle where there is growing wealth disparity, you see the same problems with affordable housing, eviction, new immigrant communities coming in, and recreation growing quickly on or adjacent to public lands that provide natural resources. A lot of these patterns are playing out across America and in beautiful natural settings throughout the American West.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/billionaires-cowboy-up-and-turn-wyoming-into-a-gated-community

Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

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Kanye West just bought a $14 million Wyoming ranch. Take a look at the massive property that comes with a saloon, an events venue, and a shooting range.

Sep 12, 2019  https://www.businessinsider.com/kanye-west-wyoming-ranch-photos-2019-9

https://www.thedailybeast.com/billionaires-cowboy-up-and-turn-wyoming-into-a-gated-community

Wonder if Kanye's new neighbors will make him feel as welcome as Gary Clark's did down there in Texas.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/9KgNaRQ_J-c" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/9KgNaRQ_J-c</a>

Paranoid and pissed off
Now that I got the money
Fifty acres and a model A
Right in the middle of Trump country
I told you, "there goes a neighborhood"
Now mister Williams ain't so funny
I see you looking out your window
Can't wait to call the police on me
When I know you think I'm up to something
I'm just eating, now we're still hungry
And this is mine now, legit
I ain't leaving here you can't take it from me
I remember when you used to tell me
Nigga run, nigga run
Go back where you come from
Nigga run, nigga run
Go back where you come from
We don't want, we don't want your kind
We think you's a dog born
Fuck you, I'm America's son
This is where I come from
This land is mine
This land is mine
This land is mine
This land is mine
Up 'til the sun comes up
No I can't stop grinding
And I can't let 'em break me
No I can't let 'em find me
You can meet my friend the governor
Only if you wanna try me
Or you can meet my other friend the judge
Just in case you think I'm lying
When I know you think I'm up to something
I'm just eating, now we're still hungry
And this is mine now, legit
I ain't leaving here you can't take it from me
I remember when you used to tell me
Nigga run, nigga run
Go back where you come from
Nigga run, nigga run
Go back where you come from
We don't want, we don't want your kind
We think you's a dog born
Fuck you, I'm America's son
This is where I come from
This land is mine
This land is mine
This land is mine
(This land is mine)
This land is mine (this land is)
This land is mine (this land is)
This land is mine (this land is)
This land is mine (this land is)

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Gary Lee Jr. Clark / Woody Guthrie
"Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world's grief. Do justly now, love mercy now, walk humbly now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it."

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The Partnership for America’s Health Care Future — partially funded by the AHA — has spent millions on lobbying and ads against universal health care

WASHINGTON - Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP), a nonprofit organization of 23,000 doctors who support Medicare for All reform, has called on the American Hospital Association (AHA) to divest its membership in the Partnership for America's Health Care Future (PFAHCF), a dark-money lobbying group that spends millions fighting against reforms that would lead to universal health coverage.

"The COVID-19 pandemic has stretched hospitals' resources to the limit, and the AHA should not waste precious member hospitals' funds lobbying against universal health coverage," said PNHP President Dr. Adam Gaffney, who is also a pulmonary and critical care physician.

The PFAHCF is a dark-money group founded by health insurance and pharmaceutical companies, two industries whose profits are most threatened by a single-payer Medicare for All system. The PFAHCF spends millions of dollars each year running ads against Medicare for All and other reforms such as a public option. Last summer, the group bought half of all political advertising in Iowa, and spent a total of $1.2 million on anti-reform ads ahead of the Iowa caucuses.

Several medical associations were also early members of the PFAHCF, including the AHA and the American Medical Association (AMA), the largest physician membership organization in the U.S. In August 2019, the AMA left the PFAHCF after pressure from physicians and other health advocates who protested at the AMA's annual meeting in Chicago. Other medical professional groups, including the American College of Radiology, have recently quit their membership in the PFAHCF under pressure from health professionals. Remaining provider groups include the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and the The Virginia Orthopaedic Society.

PNHP had planned a protest outside the AHA's annual meeting in Washington, D.C. in late April. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the doctors' group has taken its campaign online, with tactics such as a petition and letter-writing campaign directed at AHA officials.

The letter-writing campaign caught the attention of Rev. Richard Ellerbrake, who is President Emeritus of Deaconess Health System in St. Louis, Mo. When he learned that the AHA was a member of PFAHCF, Rev. Ellerbrake wrote to AHA board members that, "During my 30 years as COO/CEO of Deaconess Health System, it often seemed to me that the AHA was ahead of the American Medical Association (AMA) on many important issues of the day. Today I would hope the AHA would follow the example of the AMA and discontinue supporting the PFAHCF," a reference to the decision by the AMA to leave the PFAHCF in August of 2019.

PNHP President Dr. Adam Gaffney said that as millions of Americans lose both their jobs and their health coverage during the COVID-19 pandemic, the need for Medicare for All is more urgent than ever before. "As physicians, we can no longer tolerate a health system that puts profits ahead of patients and public health. It's time for health professionals to hold accountable the organizations that claim to represent us."

Dr. Gaffney added that a Medicare for All program such as H.R. 1384, the Medicare for All Act of 2019, would provide a lifeline to struggling hospitals in rural and other underserved areas that serve an increasing number of uninsured patients. He notes that a single-payer system would fund hospitals through annual global budgets that are based on community health needs, not corporate profits.

"The AHA cannot claim to represent hospitals while also opposing a single-payer system that would keep struggling hospitals open," said Dr. Gaffney. "The AHA should immediately leave the PFAHCF, and redirect that money to supporting patients and frontline health care workers."

https://www.commondreams.org/newswire/2020/05/21/doctors-group-demands-american-hospital-association-leave-anti-single-payer-dark
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

Offline knarf

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How do we continue the fight for Medicare for All?
« Reply #16064 on: June 01, 2020, 06:26:53 PM »
East Bay DSA
Rose
@DSAEastBay
Why are single-payer health systems better at responding to the pandemic? How do we continue the fight for Medicare for All? Discuss these Qs and more at our Socialist Night School on Tuesday, w/ SNHP leader Rachel Madley + Natalie Shure (@nataliesurely
)

https://facebook.com/events/6349910...



12:03 PM · May 31, 2020·Buffer
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Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'