AuthorTopic: Knarf's Knewz Channel  (Read 1839292 times)

Offline K-Dog

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Re: CO2 levels hit record high despite emissions dip from coronavirus
« Reply #16095 on: June 05, 2020, 02:54:10 PM »
Lockdowns and economic slowdowns during the coronavirus pandemic have had no visible impact on the amount of carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere, according to new data which shows levels of the greenhouse gas hit record highs last month.

Atmospheric concentrations of CO2 have been marching upwards for decades due to humanity’s activities. Figures published today by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, California, show a new monthly high of 417 parts per million (ppm) on average in May, up from 414.8 ppm a year before.

Monthly concentrations only breached the symbolic 400 ppm milestone six years ago, and growth has accelerated in the past decade. While the covid-19 crisis is expected to cut global emissions by the biggest amount since the second world war, that fall is likely to have little effect on the atmospheric CO2 that is driving climate change.

Richard Betts at the UK Met Office says: “It’s not surprising. The analogy I use is filling a bath from a tap. The water from the tap is the emissions and the water level in the bath is the concentrations. We’re still putting CO2 into the atmosphere, it’s just building up slightly less fast than before. What we need to do is turn the tap off.”

In a statement, the Scripps team said the fall in emissions from the pandemic wasn’t big enough to stand out against natural variations in atmospheric concentrations of CO2 caused by changes in soil, plants and the weather. Although CO2 emissions dropped by 17 per cent in early April, even bigger drops of 20 to 30 per cent would need to be sustained for a year to slow the growth of atmospheric CO2 concentrations, said the team.

By the end of the year, the Met Office expects concentrations to be up 2.48 ppm on 2019 levels, not that different to the 2.8 ppm expected before the virus outbreak. “It’s certainly not large enough to affect the climate,” says Betts.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2245330-co2-levels-hit-record-high-despite-emissions-dip-from-coronavirus/

Wrong

On the 5th of the month, every month the Mauna Loa CO2 for the previous month is calculated.  I go there and get the data for my web page.  Last month the increase was 0.7 % over the previous year but this month the increase, caculated today is .58%.

More than a 0.1% drop in a month.  CO2 has a seasonal variability but I think the data is pretty clear.

The concentration can't go down.  The article should know that.  Once CO2 is here it is here to stay, for a very long time.  Saying that it is as high as it has ever been?  Do tell how that could be different.

Bad article.

This is total bullshit.  This is playing word games and not in an honest way because it is a lie:
Quote
Although CO2 emissions dropped by 17 per cent in early April, even bigger drops of 20 to 30 per cent would need to be sustained for a year to slow the growth of atmospheric CO2 concentrations, said the team.

Like every bit does not count? A clear political agenda to encourage nihilism and inaction.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2020, 03:16:50 PM by K-Dog »
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Offline knarf

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Spectacularly situated in West Cork - Would suit DIY enthusiast


Glengarriff Castle

It's a bit of a fixer-upper - but at least the views would be lovely as you spend the rest of your life with a hammer in your hand.

Gorgeous Glengarriff Castle, on the shore of one of the most beautiful bays in Ireland, is back on the market and offers a lot of value for the cost-conscious home-hunter.

At the height of the Celtic Tiger, this massive country pile, with over 20 bedrooms, its own harbour and a ballroom for entertaining friends, had been on the market with an asking price of €20m.

In these more straitened times, it has come back to the market with Sherry Fitzgerald Country Homes for a mere €2.7m (you could nearly go to the Credit Union for that).

There's almost 12,000 sq feet of room, mature woodlands and plenty of space for a swimming pool if you don't fancy walking down to your private harbour for a dip.

But there's no getting around the need for a good builder - extensive work has been carried out on renovating the old pile but as an estate agent might put it; "she's a bit of a blank canvas".

The castle dates from the 1790s and was built by Colonel Simon White, brother of the first Earl of Bantry, Richard White. White was created an Earl for his role in leading British forces against the French Invasion force which attempted to land in Bantry Bay in 1797, to support Irish rebels against the crown.

For his services against the 1798 rebellion, he was awarded land and titles across West Cork.



The castle, which had been a hotel in the 1970s, was bought by the late Ted Toye, a British millionaire, in 2015 after he fell for the charms of West Cork.

Mr Toye had planned on a total renovation as he looked to Glengarriff as the perfect retirement place, he invested in local businesses and had made many friends in the area.

Sadly for the Toye family, they have only managed to do some of the work, roofing one wing of the castle and starting work on the interior.

And they are now looking for some other brave soul to take on this historic, spectacularly situated home, overlooking Garnish island in what many consider to be the most beautiful location in West Cork.

https://www.corkbeo.ie/news/local-news/corks-most-beautiful-castle-up-18367381
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

Offline Eddie

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Spectacularly situated in West Cork - Would suit DIY enthusiast


Glengarriff Castle

It's a bit of a fixer-upper - but at least the views would be lovely as you spend the rest of your life with a hammer in your hand.

Gorgeous Glengarriff Castle, on the shore of one of the most beautiful bays in Ireland, is back on the market and offers a lot of value for the cost-conscious home-hunter.

At the height of the Celtic Tiger, this massive country pile, with over 20 bedrooms, its own harbour and a ballroom for entertaining friends, had been on the market with an asking price of €20m.

In these more straitened times, it has come back to the market with Sherry Fitzgerald Country Homes for a mere €2.7m (you could nearly go to the Credit Union for that).

There's almost 12,000 sq feet of room, mature woodlands and plenty of space for a swimming pool if you don't fancy walking down to your private harbour for a dip.

But there's no getting around the need for a good builder - extensive work has been carried out on renovating the old pile but as an estate agent might put it; "she's a bit of a blank canvas".

The castle dates from the 1790s and was built by Colonel Simon White, brother of the first Earl of Bantry, Richard White. White was created an Earl for his role in leading British forces against the French Invasion force which attempted to land in Bantry Bay in 1797, to support Irish rebels against the crown.

For his services against the 1798 rebellion, he was awarded land and titles across West Cork.



The castle, which had been a hotel in the 1970s, was bought by the late Ted Toye, a British millionaire, in 2015 after he fell for the charms of West Cork.

Mr Toye had planned on a total renovation as he looked to Glengarriff as the perfect retirement place, he invested in local businesses and had made many friends in the area.

Sadly for the Toye family, they have only managed to do some of the work, roofing one wing of the castle and starting work on the interior.

And they are now looking for some other brave soul to take on this historic, spectacularly situated home, overlooking Garnish island in what many consider to be the most beautiful location in West Cork.

https://www.corkbeo.ie/news/local-news/corks-most-beautiful-castle-up-18367381

My famous cousin the poet laureate referred to Ireland as that "dreadful countsy", that "horrible island"...... which he wished was" in the middle of the Atlantic, and, if not below the surface of that ocean, at least a thousand miles away from England"

I suspect Mr. Toye probably agrees about now.
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Offline RE

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I suspect Mr. Toye probably agrees about now.

Not a great RE investment here.  lol.

Also not all that gorgeous.  Pretty average as Feudal Era Castles go.

RE
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Offline Eddie

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Re: CO2 levels hit record high despite emissions dip from coronavirus
« Reply #16099 on: June 06, 2020, 09:43:36 AM »
Lockdowns and economic slowdowns during the coronavirus pandemic have had no visible impact on the amount of carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere, according to new data which shows levels of the greenhouse gas hit record highs last month.

Atmospheric concentrations of CO2 have been marching upwards for decades due to humanity’s activities. Figures published today by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, California, show a new monthly high of 417 parts per million (ppm) on average in May, up from 414.8 ppm a year before.

Monthly concentrations only breached the symbolic 400 ppm milestone six years ago, and growth has accelerated in the past decade. While the covid-19 crisis is expected to cut global emissions by the biggest amount since the second world war, that fall is likely to have little effect on the atmospheric CO2 that is driving climate change.

Richard Betts at the UK Met Office says: “It’s not surprising. The analogy I use is filling a bath from a tap. The water from the tap is the emissions and the water level in the bath is the concentrations. We’re still putting CO2 into the atmosphere, it’s just building up slightly less fast than before. What we need to do is turn the tap off.”

In a statement, the Scripps team said the fall in emissions from the pandemic wasn’t big enough to stand out against natural variations in atmospheric concentrations of CO2 caused by changes in soil, plants and the weather. Although CO2 emissions dropped by 17 per cent in early April, even bigger drops of 20 to 30 per cent would need to be sustained for a year to slow the growth of atmospheric CO2 concentrations, said the team.

By the end of the year, the Met Office expects concentrations to be up 2.48 ppm on 2019 levels, not that different to the 2.8 ppm expected before the virus outbreak. “It’s certainly not large enough to affect the climate,” says Betts.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2245330-co2-levels-hit-record-high-despite-emissions-dip-from-coronavirus/

Wrong

On the 5th of the month, every month the Mauna Loa CO2 for the previous month is calculated.  I go there and get the data for my web page.  Last month the increase was 0.7 % over the previous year but this month the increase, caculated today is .58%.

More than a 0.1% drop in a month.  CO2 has a seasonal variability but I think the data is pretty clear.

The concentration can't go down.  The article should know that.  Once CO2 is here it is here to stay, for a very long time.  Saying that it is as high as it has ever been?  Do tell how that could be different.

Bad article.

This is total bullshit.  This is playing word games and not in an honest way because it is a lie:
Quote
Although CO2 emissions dropped by 17 per cent in early April, even bigger drops of 20 to 30 per cent would need to be sustained for a year to slow the growth of atmospheric CO2 concentrations, said the team.

Like every bit does not count? A clear political agenda to encourage nihilism and inaction.


I agree about the last part....but about the other part.......I don't think you can tell anything from the recent small drop. When I look for a trend, I don't see one, at least not yet.

It could simply be "noise" on a chart that has some significant variation over time.

People with agendas always try to read whatever they want to into the minor blips.....most of which really don't mean shit.

Thanks for calling out the author......I didn't read that one.

Here's what I'm looking at and basing my statement on.

Very short term trend is down.



But on the longer term chart you can see that this kind of variation is apt to occur...and still be part of  an up trend.



Thank you K-Dog, for teaching me about the Mauna Loa data, and why it is important.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2020, 09:48:17 AM by Eddie »
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Offline K-Dog

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Re: Knarf's Knewz Channel
« Reply #16100 on: June 06, 2020, 10:41:33 AM »
Quote
I don't think you can tell anything from the recent small drop.
That also means that you should not be saying there has not been a drop if you don't know.

No visible impact on the amount of carbon dioxide would require a duplicate planet without Covid to compare against and that is impossible to have.  You can't say something  is true if you don't know and that is what the article did.  Claiming there has been no drop is knowledge they don't have.

A 0.12 % drop in a month is big and the fair comparison is to figure out what the % change was a year ago to compare apples and apples.  The change over a year has been smaller overall in other months  but saying there has been no observable change is just as dishonest as saying there has been a change if you have not even looked at the only data point that matters in this question.  They did not. 

We have last months data and the data from a year ago.  We need one data point from two years ago for the month of May.  Then we could actually say this number is bigger than that one or not and make a correct assessment.  That is as close as we could get to an legitimate experimental result.  Anything else is just playing games with the data and if you do that enough you can get any answer you want.

Without that single two year old data point the article is bull.

I could find out that number and definitively answer the question but I don't want to.  It is not important enough for me to know.  But as someone who could easily pull from my ass the same crap these scientists did I know bull when I read it so I point it out.


I hope the fact that I am now a full on Bayesian does not make me too insufferable but once you become enlightened in that way you are aware of the excluded middle fallacy everywhere around us and it bothers you.  Doomers are natural Bayesians and are already insufferable so I fear a double dose of arrogance.

« Last Edit: June 06, 2020, 10:50:03 AM by K-Dog »
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Knarf's Knewz Channel
« Reply #16101 on: June 06, 2020, 10:45:54 AM »
Quote
I don't think you can tell anything from the recent small drop.

That also means that you should not be saying there has not been a drop if you don't know.

No visible impact on the amount of carbon dioxide would require a duplicate planet without Covid to compare against and that is impossible to have.  You can't say something  is true if you don't know and that is what the article did.  Claiming there has been no drop is knowledge they don't have.

A 0.12 % drop in a month is big and the fair comparison is to figure out what the % change was a year ago to compare apples and apples.  The change over a year has been smaller overall in other months  but saying there has been no observable change is just as dishonest as saying there has been a change if you have not even looked at the only data point that matters in this question.  They did not. 

We have last months data and the data from a year ago.  We need one data point from two years ago for the month of May.  Then we could actually say this number is bigger than that one or not and make a correct assessment.  That is as close as we could get to an legitimate experimental result.  Anything else is just playing games with the data and if you do that enough you can get any answer you want.

Without that single two year old data point the article is bull.

I could find out that number and definitively answer the question but I don't want to.  It is not important enough for me to know.  But as someone who could easily pull from my ass the same crap these scientists did I know bull when I read it so I point it out.

Agree.
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Offline Eddie

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I suspect Mr. Toye probably agrees about now.

Not a great RE investment here.  lol.

Also not all that gorgeous.  Pretty average as Feudal Era Castles go.

RE

The way the collapse is going, maybe in a year or two I can cash out of here  and buy a nice place on St.John to ride out the end game of Western Civilization....the one I want is down to $625K now......and the hurricane season looks to be shaping up to be bad-ass.
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Offline knarf

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Agency faces criticism over its capacity to de-escalate situations involving racial minorities or those with mental health issues


 Demonstrators take part in a rally in downtown Toronto protesting the death of Regis Korchinski-Paquet on 30 May.

Police in Canada are facing growing scrutiny after two women – both members of ethnic minorities and both suffering mental health problems – died following encounters with officers.

The deaths come as tens of thousands of people have taken to the streets in the US in protest over police violence against racial minorities, prompted by the police killing of George Floyd.

Justin Trudeau said on Thursday that his country was watching events in the US with “horror” but added: “We know we have an awful lot of work to do here in Canada. As a government, we have taken steps towards that, but … there is much more to do.”

The scale of that challenge has been made clear this week by a string of incidents which have raised questions over Canadian’s law enforcement officers’ capacity to de-escalate tense situations – many of which disproportionately involve people who belong to ethnic minorities or suffer mental health issues – or both.

Regis Korchinski-Paquet, 29 an Afro-Indigenous woman living in Toronto, died on 27 May after her mother called the police pleading for her to be taken to a mental health facility after they’d had an argument.

Some time after, five officers arrived at the family’s 24th-floor apartment, Korchinski-Paquet fell to her death from the balcony.

Police have not released details of the incident, pending an oversight investigation, and details of the incident remain murky, but Korchinski-Paquet’s family have said they believe she would still be alive had the police intervened differently.

On Thursday morning, police in Edmundston, New Brunswick responded to a mental health call involving a Chantel Moore, a 26-year old Indigenous woman.

Police said that when an officer arrived, he was attacked by a woman with a knife, and “had no choice but to defend himself” – shooting her repeatedly.


 Protesters show solidarity with the US in demonstrating against George Floyd’s death.

The premature deaths of the two women, both apparently during mental health crises, have focused a spotlight on police training to safely de-escalate tense situations.

“For generations, we’ve basically asked the police to do more and more,” said Akwasi Owusu-Bempah, a sociology professor at the University of Toronto who specializes in policing and social inequality. “We now have the police performing functions that other social institutions or organizations could be handling more effectively. And I think mental health is a key one of those.”

Much of the culture and training for police officers is a source of the problem, say criminologists.

“Police are trained to respond to complex social situations with force,” said Alexander McClelland, an activist and post-graduate researcher at the University of Ottawa. “And the idea of applying violence in a complex social situation and expecting a nonviolent outcome is very confusing. It’s not logical. Policing just adds more to the crisis.”

As well as the two deaths, other recent examples of apparent police abuse have been reported, including an officer with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police who hit an Inuk man with a police vehicle and the case of a Covid-positive homeless woman with mental health issues who was detained in Toronto by six police officers.

Such incidents have fueled growing calls to divert the billions of dollars of police funding to preventive and responsive social programs.

According to estimates, Canadian taxpayers pay C$15.1bn on police services across the country, including C$1bn on police in Toronto.

“I think we could spend that money and much more imaginative ways, including having mental health supports become first responders instead of police,” said McClelland. “Why do you need someone with a gun to respond to a public health crisis unless you’re assuming that person will use the gun at some point?”

Victims of such encounters are overwhelmingly likely to be members of racial minorities. In Toronto, black residents are 20 times more likely to be shot dead by police.

“Far too many Canadians feel fear and anxiety at the sight of a law enforcement officer,” Trudeau said on Friday.

“Discrimination is a lived reality for far too many of our fellow citizens. It is something that needs to end, and it’s something we’re working on,” he said.

Toronto police have pledged to improve training for de-escalation and the use of body cameras and the mayor has admitted there is systematic racism within the city. But experts argue that police officers are often not the appropriate people to deal with such situations.

“The police are here to deal with issues related to crime disorder to promote public order and public safety,” said Owusu-Bempah. “But we really need more robust services to deal with people who are suffering from mental health crises. Prevention would be much better.”

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/jun/05/canada-police-under-scrutiny-after-two-women-die-after-encounters-with-officers?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_rif_is_fun
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

Offline knarf

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Protesters are being held as long as 50 hours with no protective gear or ability to socially distance from other protesters in custody — or cops.



“Do the right thing.”

That’s what 30-year-old musician Nikko Sherard shouted at a New York City police officer before he was arrested at a protest Saturday night in Lower Manhattan.

The cop was arresting another protester, 26-year-old Hudson Sackrider-De Ricco, when Sherard spoke up. Then he was tackled and surrounded by men in uniform.

“They had got me down on the ground — I was screaming, ‘I’m a black man! Please somebody film this,’” Sherard said. “All I remember was getting punched, and just seeing a group of white people with blue eyes and blue uniform just wailing on me.”

As terrifying as that was, what happened next was even scarier. Sherard, Sackrider-De Ricco, and more than a dozen other protesters were thrown in a bus and transported a few blocks away to One Police Plaza, the NYPD’s headquarters, where they were subject to long hours of detention in crowded confines that seemed to inevitably expose detainees to the deadly coronavirus.

“People were screaming, ‘Please give us our masks!’” said Sherard. “They just packed us in there like sardines. There was one person who was turning red and throwing up and sweating. Someone was yelling that he had the coronavirus and they have us in here without masks on.”

Sherard said he had worn a medical mask to the protest, though by the time he was arrested, it was broken. He’d tied a scarf around his nose and mouth instead, but it was ripped off during the skirmish with police. An EMT later gave the scarf back to Sherard, but when he was taken to a holding cell, the police confiscated it, along with his shoelaces.

Arrested demonstrators, lawyers, and the activists who take care of released protesters told VICE News that protesters have been unable to stay six feet apart from one another in cramped holding pens and cells of police facilities, including One Police Plaza. No one reported being given a mask or any personal protective gear while in custody, and many said the police themselves rarely wore masks. Water was scarce.

“I don’t know that the NYPD is purposefully trying to give protesters the coronavirus, but I think it makes it that much more urgent to try to get people through the system,” said Rebecca Heinsen, a staff attorney at the Legal Aid Society who works in Manhattan. “Or, I mean, they should be not making these arrests.”

The Centers for Disease Control guidelines say that the most effective way to protect individuals and rapid spread of the virus is to stay six feet apart, wear a face covering, wash hands with soap and water or, if that’s not available, use hand sanitizer, and disinfect surfaces regularly.
Practices abandoned

“It’s shocking for the city on the one hand to be saying, ‘Engage in all of these practices,’ and then to say, ‘In the hours that you’re in our custody, and you don’t have any control over how far away you are from other people or whether you have masks or whether you can wash your hands, we’re simply not going to let you do those things,’” said Gideon Orion Oliver, a volunteer attorney with the New York City chapter of the National Lawyers Guild.

More than 2,000 people had been arrested at protests across New York City’s five boroughs as of Wednesday night. The city was the epicenter of the U.S. coronavirus pandemic, and to date it has had more than 301,000 confirmed cases and 21,000 deaths.

In New York City, and across the country, the pandemic has disproportionately hurt brown and black communities — black and Latino New Yorkers are more than twice as likely to die from COVID-19 than white residents are. These are the same communities where many people have lost their jobs as a result of the shutdowns. According to a Pew Research survey, at least 61% of Hispanic Americans, and 44 percent of black Americans have lost their jobs as a result of the coronavirus.

Now, as civil unrest over the police killing of George Floyd continues, communities of color are being forced into weighing the possibility of contracting and perhaps spreading the virus, and protesting police violence.

“This is the sheer injustice that black people are having to go out in the street to protest our deaths — and we’re being exposed to this virus,” said Carlos Polanco, a 21-year-old Dartmouth College student. “This works out for the police well: They either get to brutalize us and kill us on the street, or we are close to people and our chances for COVID are high.”
Fear of another spike

Legal advocates fear that the police’s attitude toward public health may cause another spike in cases. That could mean that the death toll will start creeping up again, especially in already devastated communities, just as the city begins its phased reopening plan.

The Legal Aid Society filed an emergency lawsuit against the NYPD on Tuesday, accusing the department of detaining more than 100 protesters for more than 24 hours. That’s illegal under New York law, which stipulates that people must be arraigned less than 24 hours after their arrest.

On Thursday, however, a Manhattan judge denied the group’s request. Judge James Burke ruled that the delayed detention was acceptable. New York City, he said, has found itself in “a civil unrest crisis within the overarching COVID-19 crisis.”

During the hearing, a representative for the NYPD said that the officers acknowledged that social distancing for arrested protesters isn’t necessarily possible.

“These protesters, while they are out on the street, are not social distancing either,” Assistant Deputy Commissioner Janine Gilbert said.

Heinsen handled six arraignments on Tuesday, all for people who had been arrested and charged with low-level felonies in connection to the protests, such as third-degree burglary. Law enforcement has the discretion to release protesters with an order to return to court at a later date, but instead, many protesters have remained locked up. (Gilbert said officers don’t have time to write these types of tickets in the street.)

One of Heinsen’s clients had been in custody for more than 50 hours, while others had been in custody for more than 45. None were able to socially distance. She spoke with a man who had asthma and had kept his mask on; another had gone to a protest wearing a mask but had it confiscated by the cops as part of his “property.”

“Everybody that I represented — I don’t think it was a surprise that they were all black and brown people,” Heinsen said. “The majority of the people I saw had no warrant, no criminal history, and they’re being charged for these felonies for what seems like very flimsy allegations.”

In a statement Thursday, the Legal Aid Society condemned Burke’s decision, saying it went against established precedent.

“The NYPD is fully responsible for the hundreds of New Yorkers who are currently languishing in cages, deprived of their due process rights and at an increased risk of contracting COVID-19,” the group said.

Normally, arraignments will go until 1 a.m. at 100 Centre Street, home of the New York City Criminal Court. On Wednesday night, when approximately 170 more people were arrested across the city, arraignments continued all night. Even people who are not being arraigned but are simply being given a ticket to appear in court months from now may now be held in custody for as long as 10 to 15 hours, according to Elena Cohen, president of the National Lawyers Guild, which is providing legal support to protesters.
‘We were begging them to give us masks’

“The point of police is to help public health and safety, so arresting [protesters] and holding them is obviously not doing that,” Cohen said. Of the arrested protesters she’s interacted with, she said no one was offered hand sanitizer and given a chance to wash their hands. She’s been unable to find a single person who was asked about whether they have the coronavirus. “It feels like the NYPD has completely forgot that coronavirus is happening. There’s no indication that they’re aware of it.”

Julian Shapiro-Barnum, a 20-year-old acting student arrested alongside Sherard on Saturday, waited for about three hours on the bus crowded with other arrestees before being taken to One Police Plaza.

Once they arrived, he was shepherded into a packed room. Shapiro-Barnum as well as two others who were arrested at the same time say that only a minority of people, including arrestees and cops, were wearing masks.

“We were begging for them to give us masks and they were just laughing at us,” recalled Jack B., a 25-year-old freelance filmmaker who asked that his last name not be published.

“Everyone was losing their mind,” Shapiro-Barnum said. “Some people had been there for 12 hours at that point and they hadn’t been seen.”

VICE News provided the NYPD with a detailed list of questions about protesters and lawyers’ allegations.

In an emailed response, spokesperson Sgt. Jessica McRorie replied only, “We are working as fast and safely as we can to process arrests during this unprecedented time.”

Twenty-year-old protester V.M., who asked that VICE News use only her initials, was arrested Saturday night in Manhattan. She ended up at One Police Plaza for 10 to 12 hours, before she was given instructions to appear in court. During that time, she said that she was given just one cup of water to share between two other people.

“These protests have been going on for a week,” said Akin Akinjiola, a Legal Aid Society staff attorney who works in Manhattan. “[Police] have the numbers of how many people they’re going to arrest so they could be prepared: If you have tickets, if you have handcuffs for them, then have a mask, have a glove.”

https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/7kpbdy/nypd-is-taking-protesters-masks-and-putting-them-at-risk-of-coronavirus-in-custody?utm_source=reddit.com
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

Offline knarf

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Israelis protest Netanyahu's annexation plan
« Reply #16105 on: June 06, 2020, 02:05:36 PM »
TEL AVIV, Israel (Reuters) - Several thousand Israelis demonstrated on Saturday against Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s plan to extend sovereignty over parts of the occupied West Bank, de-facto annexation of land that the Palestinians seek for a state.

Demonstrators protest under coronavirus restrictions against Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's plan to annex parts of the Israeli-occupied West Bank, in Tel Aviv, Israel June 6, 2020.

Protesting in face masks and keeping their distance from each other under coronavirus restrictions, they gathered under the banner “No to annexation, no to occupation, yes to peace and democracy”. Some waved Palestinian flags.

The protest was organised by left-wing groups and did not appear to be the start of a popular mass movement. Around half of Israelis support annexation, according to a recent opinion poll.

The organisers screened a video address by U.S. Democratic Senator Bernie Sanders.

“It has never been more important to stand up for justice, and to fight for the future we all deserve,” Sanders said. “It’s up to all of us to stand up to authoritarian leaders and to build a peaceful future for every Palestinian and every Israeli.”

The Palestinians want an independent state in the West Bank, east Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip, territories Israel captured in a 1967 Middle East war.

Netanyahu has set July 1 as the date to begin advancing his plan to annex Israel’s settlements and the Jordan Valley in the West Bank, hoping for a green light from Washington.

U.S. President Donald Trump has unveiled a peace plan that includes Israel keeping its settlements and the Palestinians establishing a state under stringent conditions.

Palestinians have rejected the proposal and voiced outrage against Israel’s proposed annexation.

Warning of possible violence and diplomatic repercussions, some European and Arab states, together with the United Nations, have urged Israel not to annex its settlements, regarded by many countries as illegal.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-israel-palestinians-annexation-protes/israelis-protest-netanyahus-annexation-plan-idUSKBN23D0SM?utm_source=reddit.com
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

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Many of those protesting about George Floyd’s death believe demands for racial justice now have a new and unstoppable urgency


 The Black Lives Matter rally in Parliament Square in London on Saturday

It was always likely that the months of lockdown would demand some kind of emotional catharsis. You imagined it would involve the usual British excesses of lager and sunshine. In fact, in the past week its primary expression has been a coming together of mostly young people in our cities under the banner of Black Lives Matter.

On Saturday, in by far the largest of the week’s demonstrations in London, many thousands crammed shoulder to shoulder in Parliament Square in the blustery rain and edged their way forwards toward St James’s Park. On Friday, police and government ministers had warned that such a crowd was not only unlawful but certainly dangerous with the virus still at large.

In the midst of that crowd – an unnatural human feeling in itself for all those who have been in isolation – it was impossible not to feel that those warnings should have been heeded far more closely. But for the vast majority of those that came, the risk had seemed worth it. Some of the banners in Parliament Square made their argument succinctly: “Racism has always been a pandemic.”

As well as looking like the premature end of a shutdown spring in the capital, the protest also felt very much like the beginning of something; not a one-off outpouring of rage against the brutal killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis 12 days ago, but a sustainable expression of the need for change.

There was an urgency about that demand, as well as a weariness. Innumerable wounds have been opened by the graphic video of Floyd’s death, stretching back in British memories over generations – the protesters’ banners were a roll call of past and current injustice. Actor John Boyega’s heartfelt speech to the demonstrators on Wednesday made those links explicit: “We are a physical representation of our support for George Floyd … We are a physical representation of our support for Stephen Lawrence.” His words were carried on many of the cardboard signs held aloft: “Now is the time. I ain’t waiting.”

That sentiment, which has spread through cities across the world, was never likely to be postponed by demands for social distancing. The loose network of Black Lives Matter activists who have coordinated last week’s protests across the UK did their best to mitigate the risks in the crowd. They came equipped here with stocks of free masks and sanitiser. Imarn Ayton, 29, one of those coordinators, kicked off proceedings through a loudhailer: “We are not here for violence. If you commit violence today you are not for the cause. I don’t want to see no alcohol. I don’t want to see no weed. This is not a carnival. And keep your distance. You don’t need me to say that coronavirus is killing black people.”

For many hours her hopes for a peaceful protest were realised, but in late afternoon there were clashes between protesters and police and one officer appeared to be knocked off their horse, which then bolted – sending crowds of people scattering.

When I spoke to Ayton, 29, she said they had expected 20,000 to come. The eventual number appeared several times greater. What was not in doubt was that last week had marked a new phase of momentum in a long campaign. “I’ve always been involved,” she said of a movement that has its genesis in the protest against the decision not to prosecute the killer of Trayvon Martin in 2013. “To be honest anyone who is black and passionate is involved. But it feels like a different moment. The death of George Floyd and the protest has inspired many more people to speak up, black, white, everyone. The difference we are seeing is people are no longer prepared to be ignorant; they want to educate themselves.”

A lot of the people I spoke to suggested that this was their first march. They acknowledged the risks of the crowd, but felt they had no real choice. A young black woman from north London, who didn’t wish to give her name was holding a sign saying “Your silence is violence” and sitting at the foot of Gandhi’s statue. “The facts haven’t changed,” she said, “but the difference is more people are listening. I see it on social media, everyone that I know has been posting about this. And if you are young and you are not speaking up now, then it definitely says who you are. They don’t have to be here physically because we are in the middle of a pandemic, but if they are not here mentally and in spirit, well fuck ’em.”

Terence Niemi, 28, from Colchester was also a first-time protester. “I felt like I should be here, there was no real choice this time. But it shouldn’t take losing another person’s life for us to form together. Hopefully in future we can make these kind of movements without this situation going down.”

Da Vinci, a DJ from Brixton, said: “Asking people ‘stop oppressing us’ doesn’t really make much sense to me. But when you see people coming out together all around the world hopefully we can unite around that and find something positive out of it.”

Fatima Abdulrahman had been on two previous protests last week. “You only have to look at the images on the internet to know why people are enraged,” she said. “There is a lot of anger; people are not OK with how things are and there is a lot of pain to process.” She suggested the grimness of the last few weeks has also motivated that change; isolation itself has sharpened the issues. “People have been at home, often alone for several months hearing about people dying, and a disproportionate number of them have been black people. And a disproportionate amount of black people have been suffering economically. That is another reason why we are here.”

The summer looks likely to pitch those demands for social justice squarely against public health. The first test of that clash will be on Sunday afternoon when marchers have been invited to reassemble outside the US embassy in Vauxhall.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/jun/06/now-is-the-time-londons-black-lives-matter-rally-looks-like-a-turning-point
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

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Dozens wounded in Lebanon as protesters demand basic rights
« Reply #16107 on: June 06, 2020, 02:21:33 PM »
Demonstrators seek reforms to tackle country’s many problems, with Shia group Hezbollah another flash point


 Lebanese riot police fire teargas during a protest against the government at Martyrs Square, Beirut on Saturday.

Protesters have poured on to the streets of the Lebanese capital to decry the collapse of the economy, as clashes erupted between supporters and opponents of the Iran-backed Shia group Hezbollah.

Hundreds filled the streets in and around the protest hub of Martyrs Square in the centre of Beirut, with skirmishes also between protesters and security forces, who fired tear gas.

Forty-eight were wounded in the violence, 11 of whom were hospitalised, while the rest were treated at the scene, the Lebanese Red Cross said.

Debt-burdened Lebanon is grappling with its worst economic turmoil since the 1975-1990 civil war, now compounded by a lockdown to stop the spread of coronavirus.

“We came on the streets to demand our rights, call for medical care, education, jobs and the basic rights that human beings need to stay alive,” said 21-year-old student Christina.

But Saturday’s protest turned violent as supporters of Hezbollah clashed with some demonstrators who were demanding that the Iran-backed Shia group disarm.


 Lebanese forces line up as thousands of people gather at Martyrs Square on Saturday.

Hezbollah is the only group to have kept its weapons since the end of the Lebanese civil war in 1990 and this has deeply divided Lebanon along political lines.

“No to Hezbollah, no to its weapons,” said a sign held up by Sana, a female protester from Nabatiyeh, a city in southern Lebanese, a Hezbollah stronghold.

“Weapons should be only in the hands of the army,” said the 57-year-old.

Supporters and opponents of Hebzollah threw stones at each other, prompting the army to intervene by forming a human chain to separate them, an AFP photographer said.

Supporters of Hezbollah, which is also represented in the government and parliament, chanted: “Shi’ite, Shi’ite.”

Security forces also fired teargas near a street leading into the parliament building behind Martyrs Square, after some demonstrators pelted them with stones and ransacked shops in the area.

The Lebanese Red Cross said on Twitter 37 people were wounded in Saturday’s violence, most of them treated at the scene.

Lebanon has been rocked by a series of political crises in recent years, before an economic crunch helped trigger unprecedented cross-sectarian mass protests in October.

The protests forced the government to resign and a new one headed by the prime minister, Hassan Diab, was approved by parliament in February, tasked with launching reforms and combating corruption.

But many Lebanese said it has failed to find solutions to the country’s manifold problems.

More than 35% of Lebanese are unemployed, while poverty has soared to engulf more than 45% of the population, according to official estimates.

Lebanon is also one of the world’s most indebted countries with a debt equivalent to more than 170% of its GDP. The country defaulted on its debt for the first time in March.

Diab’s government adopted an economic recovery plan in April and has begun negotiations with the International Monetary Fund in an attempt to unlock billions of dollars in aid.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/jun/06/protesters-flood-on-to-the-streets-of-beirut-demanding-basic-rights#maincontent
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

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More Than 100 Detained At Kazakh Rallies Demanding Democratic Reforms
« Reply #16108 on: June 06, 2020, 02:32:16 PM »


ALMATY -- More than 100 opposition activists have been detained by police in Kazakhstan where two opposition parties had planned to hold rallies on June 6 in several cities to demand democratic reforms in the Central Asian nation.

Reports spoke of dozens being detained in Almaty, the country's commercial capital, as detentions were reported in other cities as well, including the capital, Nur-Sultan.

The detentions come despite a more liberal law on demonstrations coming into force.

Human rights groups have criticized President Qasym-Zhomart Toqaev with failing to improve respect for human rights after replacing Nursultan Nazarbaev, who stepped down in 2019 after 30 years in power. The oil-rich nation has also been hit hard by a drop in energy prices caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

In Almaty, police, including riot units, cordoned off several central squares as well as streets near the area where at least 100 activists had gathered.

An RFE/RL correspondent said about a dozen people were detained near Ghandi Park. They were reported to be supporters of the Koshe party, which is affiliated with the banned Democratic Choice of Kazakhstan (DVK) party.

In several instances, unknown people holding umbrellas tried to stop journalists from filming.

The DVK and the Democratic Party had organized the rallies, which authorities said breached COVID-19 social-distancing rules. They also said a new law not requiring groups to obtain permission for rallies would still need a five-day notice period before being applied in practice. Technically, that law entered into force on June 6.

In Nur-Sultan, the capital, an RFE/RL correspondent later reported at least 10 protesters being arrested, with photos showing police hauling people away.

There were reports of at least 20 activists being detained by police in the cities of Semei, Shymkent, and Qyzylorda. Some arrests were also reported in Aqtobe. Later reports said about 30 people were also held by police in Oral. In Taraz, activists did not gather amid reports of arrest prior to the planned action.

Later reports said some had been freed, including those activists detained in Qyzylorda.

In Almaty, one group of activists carried a banner that read "I Can't Breathe" -- a reference to the death of George Floyd, an unarmed African-American man who died in police custody in Minneapolis, which has sparked sometimes violent protests across the United States.

Others chanted "Old man, go away!" -- a reference to Nazarbaev, who retains power in Kazakhstan as head of the country's Security Council, a post the 79-year-old is entitled to hold for life.

Others demanded the resignation of Toqaev and a fairer distribution of wealth.

The nation of 19 million people has been hit hard by a drop in crude oil prices as well as the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic. More than 4 million people lost their sources of income during a two-month lockdown that ended last month, according to official data.

https://www.rferl.org/a/kazakh-opposition-plans-rallies-for-democratic-reform/30655977.html

Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'

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Aerial view showing the Pavao-Pavaozinho favela surrounded by the neighbourhoods of Copacabana, Ipanema and Lagoa. A judge has banned police raids on favelas during the coronavirus pandemic

A Brazilian Supreme Court justice banned police raids Friday in the slums of Rio de Janeiro during the coronavirus pandemic, amid growing criticism of recent cases of police violence.

Judge Edson Fachin ruled police raids on the city's impoverished "favelas" could only be used in "absolutely exceptional" cases, and only with prior authorization from the state prosecutor's office, for the duration of the health crisis.

"Recent incidents have made the state's armed operations in Rio de Janeiro's communities even more troubling," the court said in a statement.

"The protocols on the use of force (by police) were already precarious. The pandemic, which has caused people to spend most of their time at home, has made the usefulness of those protocols questionable and the risk even greater."

Fachin specifically mentioned the case of a 14-year-old boy, Joao Pedro Mattos Pinto, who was shot dead in his home during a police raid on the Salgueiro favela complex on May 18.

Pinto's family said officers entered the house shooting and throwing grenades, despite the fact that only children were inside.

"Nothing can justify a 14-year-old child being shot more than 70 times," Fachin said.

Despite the pandemic, Pinto's death and other recent incidents of police violence have triggered protests in Rio's slums, echoing the demonstrations against police brutality sweeping the United States.

Rio police have often been accused of using excessive force.

They killed more than 1,800 people statewide last year, up 18 percent from 2018.

Far-right President Jair Bolsonaro, whose political base is in Rio, is a staunch defender of aggressive police tactics and fierce advocate for gun rights.

https://www.france24.com/en/20200606-brazil-court-bans-raids-in-rio-favelas-during-pandemic
Mark Twain — 'There are many humorous things in the world; among them, the white man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages.'