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Offline knarf

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COVID-19 started bringing the music industry to a screeching halt
« Reply #17100 on: September 10, 2020, 10:15:05 AM »
It’s been six months since COVID-19 started bringing the music industry to a screeching halt. Even as the virus continues to alter the day-to-day activities of modern society, artists are adapting to their “new normal” amid the ongoing pandemic.

On Feb. 28, Green Day announced that they were postponing their tour of Asia due to the developing coronavirus outbreak. It was mid-March when major concert promoters - including Live Nation and AEG - began suspending events en masse. Many highly anticipated treks - including those by the Rolling Stones, Kiss, Lynyrd Skynyrd and Ozzy Osbourne - were pushed back. By the end of the month, virtually all of the spring and summer tours had been suspended or canceled.

With the touring industry shut down due to the pandemic, musicians turned to online resources as a means for connecting with fans. Guns N' Roses unveiled a concert-streaming series, while Dave Grohl released a collection of short stories. Other artists noticeably increased their social-media activity, delivering music lessons, performing impromptu covers and even updating fans on the state of their garage.

Fans jonesing for their live music fix were somewhat satiated by the emergence of drive-in concerts. Night Ranger, the Struts and Steel Panther were among the artists to announce drive-in shows, while Metallica scheduled a concert event to be broadcast live to drive-in movie theaters across the country.

The emergence of these alternative styles of concerts was welcomed by struggling music venues, many of which updated their locations to accommodate drive-in performances. Still, the majority of venues lacked the resources needed to host such events, and an alarming amount of facilities have remained on the brink of bankruptcy. A June report indicated that 90 percent of independent music venues in the U.S. could close forever as a result of the pandemic, though the possibility of a government bailout offers a glimmer of hope. Meanwhile, in England a socially distanced concert venue welcomed music fans, utilizing specialized platforms spread throughout an open space to keep attendees safely apart.

Some performances pushed forward in traditional fashion despite warnings regarding social distancing. Great White received backlash after playing a show in North Dakota that skirted COVID-19 precautions such as face masks and social distancing. Meanwhile, neighboring South Dakota hosted the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, featuring performances by more than 30 artists, including Quiet Riot, Molly Hatchet, the Guess Who and 38 Special. Smash Mouth were also on the bill; singer Steve Harwell even declared, “Now, we’re all here together tonight. ... Fuck that COVID shit!” during the band's set.

While most artists put their touring on hold, the coronavirus lockdown gave many bands the chance to work on new material. Sammy Hagar and the Rolling Stones each released COVID-era singles. Metallica are rumored to be working on new material in quarantine, with drummer Lars Ulrich admitting he's "very excited" about the prospect. Journey, Megadeth, Nine Inch Nails, Alice Cooper and Def Leppard are among the other artists using pandemic stay-at-home time to work on new music.

Musicians also continued to find new and distinctive ways to help those whose lives have been devastated by the pandemic. Everything from at-home performances to special merchandise, archival concerts and even charity singles have help raise funds for various coronavirus-related nonprofits.

Even though U.S. festivals have been canceled in 2020, many - including Lollapalooza and Outside Lands - created online streaming events to bring the thrill of major music fests into fans' homes. Meanwhile, after initially pushing the induction ceremony to November, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame decided to replace their 2020 event with a special on HBO.

And as the discourse surrounding face masks has continued to be a hot-button topic, many rockers have used their celebrity to sound off. Twisted Sister frontman Dee Snider pointedly referred to anti-maskers as “fucking assholes” in a July post to social media, while Fleetwood Mac singer Stevie Nicks struck a less aggressive tone, praising those who wear masks as “spiritual warrior.”

Although the immediate future remains murky - with major concerts unlikely in 2020 - there are a few positive signs on the horizon. Efforts to create a COVID-19 vaccine continue to progress, with some predicting an approval by the end of the year. Meanwhile, Live Nation reports that advanced sales for 2021 events have been robust, proving that fans will be ready for live music once again, whenever it's safe to return to concerts.

https://ultimateclassicrock.com/covid-19-music-industry-six-months/

NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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How the coronavirus could change the live music industry for good
« Reply #17101 on: September 10, 2020, 10:18:08 AM »
What’s happening

Though summer and fall are usually filled with festivals like Coachella and Lollapalooza, the coronavirus pandemic has forced artists to trade massive crowds and well-choreographed productions for the intimacy of their bedrooms and the grainy video on Instagram Live.

Amid the crisis, the live music industry is indefinitely on hold. Tightly packed crowds in concert halls break virtually every set of social distancing guidelines, and 90 percent of independent venues are expected to close in the next few months if there’s no additional aid. And it’s local artists, as well as crew members, who have especially suffered during the pandemic.

Many have turned to live streams, which is one of the only ways fans can get any semblance of a “live” show. While imperfect, the streams have helped to buoy artists’ income, as they are losing out on profits from ticket and merchandise sales. In the last quarter, the events giant Live Nation said it had a loss of $588 million, compared to a profit of $176 million in the previous year.

Some venues and artists have found success with outside events, but others have faced local government crackdowns and fans who won’t follow social distancing guidelines. Some companies, such as Spotify, are developing new features aimed at audiences who want live streams.

Why there’s debate

People have always turned to music for entertainment and comfort, but some wonder if the industry will survive the pandemic. Venues nationwide are fighting to stay in business, even though many don’t qualify for PPP loans, as they are currently completely closed and cannot hire back workers. Even when tours do return, they say, it will take months to schedule and plan, and artists are unlikely to go on a tour that cannot span at least a coast, which means most of the U.S. would need to have the virus under control.

Skeptics also argue that musicians now have to compete with internet stars, who are more skilled at sustaining a virtual fanbase. Plus, without the chance to perform small concerts, early-career musicians trying to catch a break will have to find other ways to draw fans, they argue. There’s also the difference in the perceived value of a live stream and a live show. Fans may not want to pay the same price for a link to a Zoom call as for a seat in a stadium, they say.

But optimists say the music industry will find a way, especially as people turn to songs to cope. That said, they also agree that change is needed to keep the industry alive. The profitability structure has been turned upside down. Some believe companies will be forced to consolidate further. Fans might have to pay artists more, or artists will have to perform more frequently, they say. But indie performers could thrive in the digital era, sidestepping labels to sell directly to fans. There’s also the possibility that live-streaming — which allows fans to watch from any place at any time — becomes more popular, even after the pandemic.

https://news.yahoo.com/how-the-coronavirus-could-change-the-live-music-industry-135916292.html

12 Major Artists Who Got Their Start on YouTube
https://www.teenvogue.com/story/best-artists-discovered-on-youtube
« Last Edit: September 10, 2020, 10:26:18 AM by knarf »
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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Humans exploiting and destroying nature on unprecedented scale
« Reply #17102 on: September 10, 2020, 10:38:03 AM »
Animal populations have plunged an average of 68% since 1970, as humanity pushes the planet’s life support systems to the edge

Wildlife populations are in freefall around the world, driven by human overconsumption, population growth and intensive agriculture, according to a major new assessment of the abundance of life on Earth.

On average, global populations of mammals, birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles plunged by 68% between 1970 and 2016, according to the WWF and Zoological Society of London (ZSL)’s biennial Living Planet Report 2020. Two years ago, the figure stood at 60%.

The research is one of the most comprehensive assessments of global biodiversity available and was complied by 134 experts from around the world. It found that from the rainforests of central America to the Pacific Ocean, nature is being exploited and destroyed by humans on a scale never previously recorded.

The analysis tracked global data on 20,811 populations of 4,392 vertebrate species. Those monitored include high-profile threatened animals such as pandas and polar bears as well as lesser known amphibians and fish. The figures, the latest available, showed that in all regions of the world, vertebrate wildlife populations are collapsing, falling on average by more than two-thirds since 1970.

Robin Freeman, who led the research at ZSL, said: “It seems that we’ve spent 10 to 20 years talking about these declines and not really managed to do anything about it. It frustrates me and upsets me. We sit at our desks and compile these statistics but they have real-life implications. It’s really hard to communicate how dramatic some of these declines are.”

Latin America and the Caribbean recorded the most alarming drop, with an average fall of 94% in vertebrate wildlife populations. Reptiles, fish and amphibians in the region were most negatively affected, driven by the overexploitation of ecosystems, habitat fragmentation and disease.

Africa and the Asia Pacific region have also experienced large falls in the abundance of mammals, birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles, dropping 65% and 45% respectively. Europe and central Asia recorded a fall of 24%, while populations dropped 33% on average in North America. To form the Living Planet Index (LPI), akin to a stock market index of wildlife, more biodiverse parts of the world, such as tropical regions, are given more weighting.

Experts said the LPI was further evidence of the sixth mass extinction of life on Earth, with one million species at risk because of human activity, according to the UN’s global assessment report in 2019. Deforestation and the conversion of wild spaces for human food production have largely been blamed for the destruction of Earth’s web of life.

The report highlights that 75% of the Earth’s ice-free land has been significantly altered by human activity, and almost 90% of global wetlands have been lost since 1700.

Mike Barrett, executive director of conservation and science at WWF, said: “Urgent and immediate action is necessary in the food and agriculture sector. All the indicators of biodiversity loss are heading the wrong way rapidly. As a start, there has got to be regulation to get deforestation out of our supply chain straight away. That’s absolutely vital.”


Freshwater areas are among the habitats suffering the greatest damage, according to the report, with one in three species in those areas threatened by extinction and an average population drop of 84%. The species affected include the critically endangered Chinese sturgeon in the Yangtze River, which is down by 97%.

Using satellite analysis, the report also finds that wilderness areas – defined as having no human imprint – only account for 25% of the Earth’s terrestrial area and are largely restricted to Russia, Canada, Brazil and Australia.

Tanya Steele, chief executive at WWF, said: “We are wiping wildlife from the face of the planet, burning our forests, polluting and over-fishing our seas and destroying wild areas. We are wrecking our world – the one place we call home – risking our health, security and survival here on Earth.”

Sir David Attenborough said that humanity has entered a new geological age – the anthropocene – where humans dominate the Earth, but said it could be the moment we learn to become stewards of our planet.

“Doing so will require systemic shifts in how we produce food, create energy, manage our oceans and use materials. But above all it will require a change in perspective,” he wrote in a collection of essays accompanying the report.

“The time for pure national interests has passed, internationalism has to be our approach and in doing so bring about a greater equality between what nations take from the world and what they give back. The wealthier nations have taken a lot and the time has now come to give.”

While the data is dominated by the decline of wildlife populations around the world, the index showed that some species can recover with conservation efforts. The blacktail reef shark in Australia and Nepalese tiger populations have both shown signs of recovery.

ZSL research associate Louise McRae, who has helped compile the LPI for the last 14 years, said: “Whilst we are giving a very depressing statistic, all hope is not lost. We can actually help populations recover.

“I feel frustrated by having to give a stark and desperate message but I think there’s a positive side to it as well.”

A separate study released today by Newcastle University and BirdLife International says that at least 28 bird and mammal extinctions have been prevented by conservation efforts since the UN Convention on Biological Diversity came into force in 1993.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/10/humans-exploiting-and-destroying-nature-on-unprecedented-scale-report-aoe
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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Germans more afraid of Donald Trump than the coronavirus
« Reply #17103 on: September 10, 2020, 10:43:42 AM »
Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, Trump tops the list of things Germans fear the most, a new survey found. But in a twist that surprised researchers, Germans reported feeling less scared overall than they've been in years.
   
People with facemasks in pedestrian shopping street (picture-alliance/dpa/M. Becker)
The results surprised even the researchers.  For the past 28 years, an annual survey into the fears of people living in Germany has been carried out on behalf of R+V, Germany's largest insurance firm. And now somehow in 2020, the year of the coronavirus pandemic, Germans turn out to be less afraid than they've been in decades.

Of course, they are wearing masks in public and are cautious, but only a few are afraid of contracting COVID-19. That's one of the reasons why this year's so-called fear index fell from 39 to 37%, the lowest value since the survey began in 1992.

"Germans are not reacting to the pandemic by any means with panic," Brigitte Römstedt, head of the R+V Infocenter, told DW. "Many of the worries seem to be subsiding."

People have the feeling that "we have everything under control and we can handle this," Römstedt explained. That attitude is different to what it was a few years ago when war, terrorism, immigration, and extremism were among the Germans' biggest fears.

For the study, some 2,400 men and women in Germany aged 14 years and older were surveyed. Between the beginning of June until the end of July this year, researchers asked people about their greatest political, economic, personal, and environmental fears. 

What they found was that Germans are relatively unafraid of the current pandemic. Only 32% (the year before it was 35%) said they were afraid of falling sick with a serious illness, despite this coronavirus-dominated year.

"Similarly, only around one in three of those who were surveyed fear that they or others in their social circle could be infected with the coronavirus," Römstedt said. A similar finding was made at the beginning of this month by the Deutschlandtrend survey. 

Economic impact scarier than virus itself
Despite the rising number of infections and the awareness of the dangers of the coronavirus, people in Germany are staying fairly relaxed. Only 42% of those surveyed fear that globalization could lead to more frequent pandemics in the future.

"Given the rapid spread of the virus worldwide, we had expected higher figures. According to our findings, people are much more afraid that the virus could threaten their economic well-being rather than their health," Römstedt said.

The economic forecasts for 2020 appear to be gloomy. An economic downturn is on the way, with some even talking of a deep recession. According to German government estimates, the country's gross domestic product will shrink by around 6% this year. This will of course have an impact on the overall mood in Germany.

Economic fears and possible job losses are again at the top of this year's fear index. Concerns about the rising cost of living came in at second place with 51%.

The results did not come as a surprise for Professor Manfred G. Schmidt, a political scientist at the Ruprecht-Karls University in Heidelberg. He has been advising the R+V insurance company for years and helping with the evaluation of the annual study.

According to Schmidt, one uncertainty continues to hover in the minds of many in Germany: "The fear that a second coronavirus infection wave could lead to a further and even deeper economic slump contributes to the widespread uncertainty of the future of the economy."

There's also concern about unemployment. Although this fear "only" ranks 13th out of 20 on the list, around 40% of Germans fear unemployment could spike — and increase of 12% from the previous year.

On November 3, US voters will head to the polls to elect a new president or re-elect the old one. For many Germans, a second term for US President Donald Trump would probably be a nightmare.

Trump ranks number one this year on Germans' list of fears at 53%. The US president has topped the R+V fear scale as early as 2018.

Schmidt sees these concerns as "justified," pointing to the trade war with China or verbal attacks on even allied countries like Germany. 

"Trump's foreign policy has repeatedly caused serious international entanglements," the political scientist said, adding that Washington also continues to withdraw from international cooperation.

Political topics, which have caused great anxiety among Germans in the past, are losing importance, according to the survey.

Worries about the topic of immigration have dropped the most, falling by more than 10% to their lowest level in five years. In 2020, 43% of the people surveyed said they worried that a continued influx of foreigners could lead to tensions between Germans and the new arrivals. The year before, that figure was 55%.

The number of people concerned that the German state could be overwhelmed by the number of refugees also dropped from 56% to 43%.

The results also revealed another surprising twist: Germans have more confidence in politics and politicians again. Only around 40% of Germans said they currently worried that politicians are not up to their job — the lowest number recorded in this millennium. 

According to the authors of the study, this has to do with general satisfaction with the German government's crisis management during the coronavirus pandemic. 

Römstedt put it this way: Politicians are "still not star pupils, but they're moving up."

https://www.dw.com/en/germans-more-afraid-of-donald-trump-than-the-coronavirus/a-54882818
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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Eight dead in Colombian protests against police brutality
« Reply #17104 on: September 10, 2020, 10:50:33 AM »
Eight people were killed in Colombian capital Bogota and satellite city Soacha overnight in protests against police brutality, sparked by a widely-shared video of a man being repeatedly shocked with a stun gun by police before later dying.

Nearly 100 police officers and 55 civilians were injured and dozens of stations and public vehicles damaged or set alight, the national government said. There were 70 arrests, mostly in Bogota.

Bogota’s mayor Claudia Lopez asked President Ivan Duque to call a halt to police use of firearms at protests.

“There is solid evidence of indiscriminate use of guns by members of the police,” Lopez told journalists at a local hospital. “We will not tolerate the use of violence to suppress violence.”

Six people were killed during the protests in Bogota, she said, adding that all of them were young people who had gunshot injuries.

The defense minister said earlier on Thursday all the deaths, including that of a 17-year-old boy, were still under investigation.

Lopez urged protesters to refrain from vandalism.

The demonstrators were protesting the death this week of law student and father of two Javier Ordonez, 46.

The video, filmed by Ordonez’s friend, shows him pinned to the ground by police officers and subjected to successive electric shocks as he begs, “please, no more.”

Police say Ordonez was found drinking alcohol in the street with friends, in violation of coronavirus distancing rules. He was taken to a police station in western Bogota where his family allege he suffered further abuse. He died later in hospital.

The two officers involved have been suspended pending an investigation, the government has said.

Ordonez’s family called for justice and peaceful protest.

“He was murdered by the police officers,” his former sister-in-law, Eliana Marcela Garzon, told Reuters. “We don’t want (deaths) in a country already full of conflict, we want justice.”

Police reform is needed, Garzon said, especially for the future of children like her now-fatherless nephews.

“I don’t want them to grow up feeling like there isn’t justice in this country,” she said. “I want them to grow up knowing laws are followed.”

Duque has said abuse of authority should not be tolerated, but the government called for Colombians not to “stigmatize” police officers and appealed for calm.

“What we are facing here is a mass act of vandalism and violence,” defense minister Carlos Holmes Trujillo told journalists. “What we are facing are unacceptable actions.”

Bogota’s police will be reinforced with 1,600 more officers, more than half of whom will come from other regions, and 300 soldiers, the defense ministry said.

An effort by labor unions earlier this week to revive mass protests seen last year against Duque’s economic and social policies garnered a tepid response amid ongoing coronavirus restrictions.

But Ordonez’s death could fuel renewed widespread outrage against the police, who were roundly criticized last year after a teenage protester was fatally injured by a riot squad projectile.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-colombia-police/eight-dead-in-colombian-protests-against-police-brutality-idUSKBN2612AB?il=0&utm_source=reddit.com
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

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Nebraska to end nearly all social distancing restrictions
« Reply #17105 on: September 10, 2020, 05:24:06 PM »

In this Aug. 20, 2020 file photo, Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts addresses Republican supporters during the opening of the Nebraska Trump Victory Office in Omaha, Neb. Ricketts will end nearly all of his state's social-distancing restrictions on Monday, Sept. 14, 2020, even as the number of new coronavirus cases has trended upward over the last few months.

Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts will end nearly all of his state's social-distancing restrictions on Monday even as the number of new coronavirus cases has trended upward over the last few months.

The new rules will still limit the size of large indoor gatherings, such as concerts, meeting halls and theaters, but will drop all other state-imposed mandates in favor of voluntary guidelines, as other conservative states have done.

“We are loosening the restrictions further on Sept. 14,” Ricketts said at a news conference.

State officials said they made the decision based on the availability of hospital beds and ventilators, in keeping with the Republican governor's goal of not overwhelming medical facilities.

“The goal has always been to protect hospital capacity, and capacity remains stable,” said Ricketts spokesman Taylor Gage.

Nebraska's hospitals have 36% of their regular beds, 31% of their intensive care unit beds and 81% of their ventilators available, according to the state's online tracking portal. Those numbers have changed little in the last few months.

The new rules will apply statewide except in Lancaster County, which includes the state capital of of Lincoln, home to the University of Nebraska's flagship campus. They’ve already been in effect in 27 of Nebraska’s 93 counties, but those areas are overwhelmingly rural and have seen few confirmed cases.

Nebraska will also allow smaller indoor facilities, such as bars, restaurants, churches, gyms and hair salons, to operate with no formal restrictions. State guidance still recommends limiting crowd sizes, but those guidelines aren't enforceable.

Under the new rules, larger indoor venues such as concert halls can allow gatherings of up to 75% of their rated capacity, up from 50%. Additionally, Ricketts said people who want a gathering of 500 people or more will have to get approval from their local public health director.

The state's shift won't affect mask requirements in Omaha and Lincoln. Both cities still require people to wear face coverings in most indoor spaces when they aren't able to stay at least 6 feet (2 meters) apart.

Lincoln-Lancaster County Public Health Director Pat Lopez has said her county won't ease its restrictions this month because of a recent increase in cases driven by returning college students and the reopening of Lincoln Public Schools, the state's second-largest school district.

“This is the time not only to stay the course, but also to redouble our efforts in Lancaster County,” Lopez said. “We need to do what is best for our community to overcome the impacts of this virus.”

Nebraska has confirmed 36,917 coronavirus cases and 421 deaths since the pandemic began, according to the state's tracking portal.

Nebraska saw a sharp spike in cases on Tuesday and Wednesday, but that was the result of a glitch that slowed the reporting of test results. For several days before that, the state's public health data system wasn't receiving results even though laboratories were processing tests.

Even so, the number of confirmed cases has trended upward since early July. Nebraska ranks 15th highest in the rate of positive cases as of this week, according to data collected by Johns Hopkins University.

Neighboring Iowa and South Dakota have seen even higher rates. On Sunday, the White House coronavirus task force sent a report saying Iowa had the third-highest rate of new cases in the country over the previous week. A week earlier, Iowa had the nation's steepest rate of new cases.

https://www.columbiamissourian.com/news/covid19/nebraska-to-end-nearly-all-social-distancing-restrictions/article_f9a4e63b-736e-5512-a35d-9c8aa37824d1.html?utm_source=Email%20Newsletters&utm_campaign=Evening%20Update&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=headline
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline K-Dog

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Re: Knarf's Knewz Channel
« Reply #17106 on: September 10, 2020, 08:47:50 PM »
How can you be in Nebraska and not socially distance?  Even the name of the state sounds lonely.  Good their governor is where he is.  Nobody would like him anywhere else.
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Offline Phil Rumpole

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Re: How the coronavirus could change the live music industry for good
« Reply #17107 on: September 12, 2020, 12:12:23 AM »
What’s happening

Though summer and fall are usually filled with festivals like Coachella and Lollapalooza, the coronavirus pandemic has forced artists to trade massive crowds and well-choreographed productions for the intimacy of their bedrooms and the grainy video on Instagram Live.

Amid the crisis, the live music industry is indefinitely on hold. Tightly packed crowds in concert halls break virtually every set of social distancing guidelines, and 90 percent of independent venues are expected to close in the next few months if there’s no additional aid. And it’s local artists, as well as crew members, who have especially suffered during the pandemic.

Many have turned to live streams, which is one of the only ways fans can get any semblance of a “live” show. While imperfect, the streams have helped to buoy artists’ income, as they are losing out on profits from ticket and merchandise sales. In the last quarter, the events giant Live Nation said it had a loss of $588 million, compared to a profit of $176 million in the previous year.

Some venues and artists have found success with outside events, but others have faced local government crackdowns and fans who won’t follow social distancing guidelines. Some companies, such as Spotify, are developing new features aimed at audiences who want live streams.

Why there’s debate

People have always turned to music for entertainment and comfort, but some wonder if the industry will survive the pandemic. Venues nationwide are fighting to stay in business, even though many don’t qualify for PPP loans, as they are currently completely closed and cannot hire back workers. Even when tours do return, they say, it will take months to schedule and plan, and artists are unlikely to go on a tour that cannot span at least a coast, which means most of the U.S. would need to have the virus under control.

Skeptics also argue that musicians now have to compete with internet stars, who are more skilled at sustaining a virtual fanbase. Plus, without the chance to perform small concerts, early-career musicians trying to catch a break will have to find other ways to draw fans, they argue. There’s also the difference in the perceived value of a live stream and a live show. Fans may not want to pay the same price for a link to a Zoom call as for a seat in a stadium, they say.

But optimists say the music industry will find a way, especially as people turn to songs to cope. That said, they also agree that change is needed to keep the industry alive. The profitability structure has been turned upside down. Some believe companies will be forced to consolidate further. Fans might have to pay artists more, or artists will have to perform more frequently, they say. But indie performers could thrive in the digital era, sidestepping labels to sell directly to fans. There’s also the possibility that live-streaming — which allows fans to watch from any place at any time — becomes more popular, even after the pandemic.

https://news.yahoo.com/how-the-coronavirus-could-change-the-live-music-industry-135916292.html

12 Major Artists Who Got Their Start on YouTube
https://www.teenvogue.com/story/best-artists-discovered-on-youtube

I have a friend who is an ok musician, but mainly does guitar stringing and tuning and stage setting up for bands touring or local venues. His only income stream now is making instrument and equipment cases. He also said struggling musicians are screaming and swearing at their tv every time they hear all the talk about when filthy rich football players etc can have crowds present again.
Women are like hurricanes: Wet and wild when they come, take your house when they leave

Offline knarf

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Re: How the coronavirus could change the live music industry for good
« Reply #17108 on: September 12, 2020, 09:29:45 AM »

I have a friend who is an ok musician, but mainly does guitar stringing and tuning and stage setting up for bands touring or local venues. His only income stream now is making instrument and equipment cases. He also said struggling musicians are screaming and swearing at their tv every time they hear all the talk about when filthy rich football players etc can have crowds present again.

I was headed in the professional guitar player direction since high school. Was raised in the 60's in the "To be Silicon Valley" Just 50 miles south of SFran. I turned pro in the early eighties and traveled a lot in the states. I quit the road to be near my two young children (divorced). Played in local bands to supplement home repair bushiness. Watched the mega music industry form overnight through bought radio stations, to owning the artists material. Mega bucks everywhere...musicians making millions and the corps making billions, all the while we are neglecting our environment to the point of a possible "no return" scenario. I saw this coming like a tsunami and got out of the system as much as I could. I entered a monastery and took vows. It happens to buddhist. That was 1986. Last band i played with was 1996 to make some extra $ for the community. Then I just created songs on the desktop in my room....and now , at 68 years old, I am letting that whole piece of karma in my life go. I have always thought everyone is artistic, and I do not judge what is "good" or Bad". Everyone should be appreciated for whatever sense of art/music they have. I hope 5g is stable enough to create a world where everyone can express themselves through video...do their thing....and it become normalized rather than glorified and controlled by the rich/powerful. I loved RE's video's.  cooking! :)

  Speaking of him, while he is in the hospital, i have a strong feeling to not post current news. Let me explain.
I joined the diner 6 years ago. gut mcpherson was the common link for me. The ice caps could melt in the early 2000's, all the feed back loops. Of course politics and a variety of big change happened along the way. Then scientists announced the anthropocene and humans path of extinction, the 6th mass extinction. then extinction rebellion appeared. then trump's win, then economic, racial and sexual justice, then covid-19 and lock-down and open-up wars. That is where we are at. NOW.  A war between chaos and order.
  From now forward is unknown territory for just about everyone on the planet. Now my interest in the world has become more personal. I need to take care of my self during a time of uncertainty. I do not think anyone has an clue to what is happening and how it is affecting each of us anymore. 
  I also am interested in Cam's taking over the dinner. i think it is a great choice for re to do this. he is relatively young/mature and is a very aware human. I know he is doing what he can already to navigate the near future. I will post here when something catches my attention...."god only knows" when/what/who/where/why that will be. :)

I changed my signature...take a look.

NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline K-Dog

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Re: Knarf's Knewz Channel
« Reply #17109 on: September 12, 2020, 05:34:17 PM »
Your news has been very helpful.  Thank you.
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Offline knarf

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HUGE change is upon us all!
« Reply #17110 on: September 22, 2020, 04:28:08 PM »
                                                                                                                                        NECROCAPITALISM

                                                                                             

Necrocapitalism: a form of capitalism where a country's trade and industry are founded on, linked to and dependent directly or indirectly on death and the profits accruing from it. ... Since then, necrocapitalism has evolved to denote wider practices of the current capitalist model.

For the last week I have worked on a new blog site named "NECROCAPITALISM". Most all the extreme collapse in our world is due to this phenomena. On the new blog I have gathered many articles ( not newz ) that are directly related to the Plutocracy that directs the distribution of resources to favor the wealthy at the expense of human well being.

I check the diner everyday ( and will continue to do so ) to get a feel for where it is heading and join in discussions when I can add something to them. @ RE...Hopefully the worst of your treatment has passed. (Colonoscopies SUCK ). I hope it won't be long before you can return home, and continue the life you want.

Please take a look at the new blog at http://openmind693.wordpress.com
Feel free to comment on the posts, and suggest other pertinent information regarding this travesty...especially the last one "SOLUTIONS?"


NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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Hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars Congress intended for pandemic relief were instead diverted for military spending, with bailout cash used to produce products like jet engine parts, body armor, and dress uniforms. For a period of time, the Washington Post reported, the $1 billion fund that Congress gave the Pentagon via the Cares Act to “prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus” was on track to be used for its original purpose, with $750 million for medical resources and $250 million for defense contractors. That was what Ellen Lord, Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, told reporters in April. But at a congressional hearing two months later, she backtracked, telling lawmakers that defense contractors had “critical needs as well.” The ultimate spending plan that the Pentagon put forth to Congress in June, the Post notes, prioritized $688 million for the defense industry.

While some of the DOD awards benefitted smaller, niche firms facing pandemic-related disruption, hundreds of millions went to larger companies, including subsidiaries of General Electric and Rolls-Royce. “This is part and parcel of whether we have budget priorities that actually serve our public safety or whether we have a government that is captured by special interests,” said Mandy Smithberger, a defense analyst at the Project on Government Oversight, a watchdog group. Government data also reportedly shows that at least 10 of the approximately 30 companies that were given Pentagon money also received loans through the Paycheck Protection Program, another bailout program created by the Cares Act.

Lord defended the spending decision in a statement. “We are thankful the Congress provided authorities and resources that enabled the [executive branch] to invest in domestic production of critical medical resources and protect key defense capabilities from the consequences of COVID,” she said. “We need to always remember that economic security and national security are very tightly interrelated and our industrial base is really the nexus of the two.” But as the Democratic-controlled House Committee on Appropriations wrote in its report on the 2021 defense bill: “The Committee’s expectation was that the Department would address the need for PPE industrial capacity rather than execute the funding for the DIB (defense industrial base).” Military spending was already nearing record highs when the Pentagon’s virus fund arrived, according to the Post, which compares the fiscal year 2019 defense budget—$686 billion—“to a typical year during the Cold War or the period shortly after 9/11, although it has declined somewhat as a percentage of the economy.” Meanwhile, U.S. health officials say there are still significant funding gaps in the country’s pandemic response, with CDC director Robert Redfield warning a Senate panel last week that states urgently need about $6 billion for vaccine distribution. There is still a severe shortage of N95 masks at multiple U.S. hospitals.

The report comes as the country’s coronavirus death toll nears 200,000, a looming milestone in the still raging public health crisis that Donald Trump continues to downplay and spread misinformation about. Addressing supporters at a rally in Swanton, Ohio, on Monday, Trump incorrectly claimed that COVID-19 “affects virtually nobody” younger than 18 and framed the virus as a threat only to older people with underlying conditions. “It affects elderly people, elderly people with heart problems and other problems. That’s what it really affects,” the president said. “In some states, thousands of people—nobody young. Below the age of 18, like, nobody. They have a strong immune system, who knows? Take your hat off to the young, because they have a hell of an immune system.”

While infectious disease experts are still racing to fill in gaps about COVID-19’s effect on young people, public health agencies have warned that people under 18 are more susceptible to becoming infected and spreading COVID-19 than originally thought. And last month, the World Health Organization said that young people are becoming the primary spreaders of the coronavirus in many countries. But beyond contradicting the guidance offered by most top health officials, Trump’s rally remarks go against what he himself told journalist Bob Woodward about the virus in March: “Now it’s turning out it’s not just old people, Bob,” Trump said during one of the interviews for Woodward's new book, Rage. “But just today, and yesterday, some startling facts came out. It’s not just old, older.”

https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2020/09/pentagon-reportedly-blew-its-dollar1-billion-coronavirus-budget-on-body-armor-and-planes
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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American Empire Collapse: It's About To Get Much Worse
« Reply #17112 on: September 23, 2020, 06:45:43 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/em2aWT2T4E0&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/em2aWT2T4E0&fs=1</a>
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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Re-thinking the ‘purpose’ of capitalism
« Reply #17113 on: September 23, 2020, 06:57:33 AM »
Capitalism in the United States, as it is right now, is dangerously flawed. Our politicians and policies prioritize corporations, special interests and top income earners over regular American workers and those most impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. This crisis, in particular, has laid bare the vast chasm between socioeconomic classes that have developed over the past decade. It’s exposed the failure of our nation to address our citizens’ most basic needs that numerous countries around the world seem able to do – but it doesn’t have to be this way. We can, and must, redesign capitalism to level the playing field and offer genuine opportunity and support to anyone who works for it. 

In the last few months, most of the life-saving benefits of the CARES Act, Congress’ landmark COVID stimulus package passed in March, have expired. The absence of critical measures like boosted unemployment benefits and eviction moratoriums have left millions without the lifeline they relied on throughout most of the pandemic, along with the worst quarter of GDP growth in decades, and an unemployment rate of 10.2% (30 million Americans). Thanks to the failures of our federal government, many are questioning capitalism’s purpose as more and more Americans are left to fend for themselves during a deadly pandemic.

Given the bleak outlook of our economy at this current state, it’s no shock that younger Americans, in particular, are questioning the system they’re inheriting. In 2019, the medium net worth for Americans under 35 was 40% lower than it was in 2014 and previous years. Over the same period, the net worth of Americans over 65 rose by 9%.That inverse effect shows that our vast levels of inequality have closed off any opportunity for economic advancement for younger Americans. If you’re born in the wrong zip code, to the wrong parents, or in the wrong state, your chances of owning a home or attending college – much less reaching the Forbes 400 – are slim.

The founder of Forbes Magazine once wrote that “the purpose of capitalism is to increase happiness for all.” There’s truth to that, but to say “for all” seems like quite a stretch in such an unequal economy that offers little support to those struggling on the margins. Basic survival today can be extremely painful for many. Clearly, something needs to be fixed if capitalism is going to survive.

If we actually want to fix the flaws and create a more equitable system for all, there’s a couple concrete steps we need to take immediately. First, we need to increase the  minimum wage to $15 an hour so working folks can put food on the table for their kids and make the rent. Second, we need to get rid of the 2017 GOP tax cuts that gave trillions of our country’s wealth to billionaires and massive corporations, who further exploit the system through loopholes and by-the-letter rules to avoid paying their fair share. Finally, we need to go a step further by adding new marginal rates and wealth taxes on high-net worth folks like myself to ensure that we are tackling inequality at the source.

Saving capitalism is actually that simple: tax the rich and give workers a raise. 

This formula has worked wonders in Western Europe, where they’ve created a system of humane capitalism that doesn’t put the bottom line of corporations above all else. And yes, they are capitalist, not socialist, as much as some of my conservative friends would like to paint them as such.. They have free markets and resources are distributed in order to maximize profits, but strong regulations and progressive taxation create a system with a robust safety net and government programs that treats their citizens with dignity. Is that so hard to imagine in the richest country in the history of the world? 

I want to live in a country where people don’t go bankrupt from medical bills, where the wealthy fund robust public programs with their taxes, and where people are able to live comfortably and with dignity while working at the minimum wage. Loud pundits on the right might try to label me anti-American or a socialist for holding these beliefs, but I’m not. I’m a capitalist who knows that the current status quo is not working for most Americans. We can reform capitalism to create an economy for all that lifts every American up, rather than a select few. The American dream shouldn’t depend on the flip of the coin.

https://patrioticmillionaires.org/2020/09/21/re-thinking-the-purpose-of-capitalism/
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)

Offline knarf

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The U.S. is Borrowing Its Way to Fascism
« Reply #17114 on: September 23, 2020, 08:21:35 AM »


Viewing the GOP convention seemed a little like binge-watching the last several years’ parade of none-too-subtle signs of incipient fascism. We saw extreme nationalism, scapegoating immigrants and foreigners in general, white supremacy, “strong (narcissistic)-man” government, aggressive foreign policies, and hysterical red-baiting. Those signs reflect how capitalism’s deepening crisis undermines both the center-left (Democrat) and center-right (GOP) and shifts politics further right and further left. Trump represents the anti-center right, Bernie Sanders the anti-center left. Most capitalists want neither; the center worked very well for them over the last 75 years. As that political center implodes, U.S. capitalists favor the right over the left. They see the difference between fascism and socialism very clearly. They are not fooled by the crumbling old center’s self-serving efforts to equate socialism and fascism.

Fascism can indeed “happen here,” but in unique fashion. Fascism, like all other systems, has varying forms. As 20th-century fascisms took shape in Italy, Germany, Japan, and Spain—to take some major examples—the same basic system interacted differently with each country’s particular history and conditions. The fascism where U.S. capitalism is now headed will display unique features as well.

The fascism taking shape here is not primarily the crude political theater that today’s wannabe fascists offer. The Trump regime’s courting of white supremacists and other extreme nationalists, its virulent scapegoating of immigrants, Latinx, and African Americans, and its encouragement of police repression are too often counterproductive. Those symbols are similar enough to many of 20th-century fascism’s horrors that they are too easily recognized as dangerous. Today, the United States moves more quietly and more effectively toward fascism via its fast-evolving credit system. It’s time to expose borrowing as a path to fascism.

Today’s crisis-ridden capitalist economy is more dependent on credit than at any time in the system’s history. More than ever, credit sustains the purchasing power of consumers and of government programs. Capitalists depend on that purchasing power. Corporations now routinely carry more direct debt than at any time in the nation’s history. Zombie corporations—those whose profits no longer suffice to service their direct debts—now figure sizably in U.S. capitalism.

Once it was mostly private entities—rich families, banks, insurance companies, and pension funds—that were the chief lenders to corporations. They bought and held the corporate bonds and IOUs. Now those private lenders increasingly sell their corporate bonds to the Federal Reserve. That happens when the corporate loans get packaged into asset-backed securities sold to the Federal Reserve. More recently, the Fed has undertaken the market purchase of exchange-traded funds (ETFs) composed of corporate bonds and of corporate bonds direct from their private issuers. It has also made “credit facilities” directly available to corporations, tax-exempt entities, and municipalities. As the lender of last (and fast-growing) resort, the state becomes ever more the social basis of credit. The Federal Reserve is thus gathering the means to directly control the allocation of credit in a credit-dependent capitalism deeply threatened by its inherent cyclical instability, a major viral pandemic, accumulated domestic social problems, and growing international competition and isolation.

Key deals and intimate relationships between major non-financial corporations and their banks once drew the special attention of careerist politicians, students of capitalism, and also capitalism’s critics. “Finance capitalism” became an important new concept. As credit proliferated into all aspects of capitalism and grew ever more central to its functioning, another new term emerged, “financialization.” Once mostly private, that is no longer the case.

Perhaps we should call this latest phase: “state financialization.” The state’s central bank has become ever more important in controlling the conditions and pathways of credit in capitalism. That has been increasingly evident as capitalism lurched from the 2000 dot-com crisis to the 2008 subprime mortgage crisis and since. Credit provision by the Federal Reserve is now crucial to U.S. capitalism’s passage through the COVID-19 megacrisis and beyond. It is crucial to capitalism’s very survival.

The Federal Reserve now dispenses credit in historically unprecedented dimensions. As they keep their system going, capitalists, the Federal Reserve, and the rest of the government are feeling their way to a U.S.-style fascism. Step by step, they recognize their mutual dependency and sense the possibilities of credit as the cement—and perhaps the only cement—to hold an alliance among them together. Yes, they worry about their newly created mountain of money and how it might veer away from inflating the stock market to inflating and disrupting other markets. But that concern has been eclipsed by the urgency of saving a badly stumbling capitalism today. Capitalists who once bemoaned soaring government deficits and exploding national debts are mostly silent. They know that capitalism’s survival requires massive government, corporate, and household debts and their monetization by the Federal Reserve. The system is teaching its elites about the need for transition now from capitalism to fascism. Only for many of those involved, that transition is not yet quite conscious or visible.

Fascism is what happens in capitalism when employers feel that (1) their system’s accumulated problems exceed its capacity to solve them and (2) strong (often dictatorial) state intervention is needed for the capitalist system to survive. Fascism can also be capitalism’s response when the victims of capitalism’s inequalities (economic, political, and cultural) and instabilities (business cycles) will no longer tolerate them. If and when capitalism’s critics—especially socialists—build a sufficient mass consciousness and mobilize mass organizations that threaten capitalism with major reforms or with revolution, capitalists can seek an alliance with a strong political counterforce to construct a fascism. Such a strong counterforce can be a politician or a political party that captures the imaginations of masses of capitalism’s victims but blames not capitalism but rather immigrants or ethnic or religious minorities. If such politicians or parties attack and oppose socialism and offer capitalists a mass base they need but lack, capitalists will support them. Fascism—a merger of private capitalists and a state that reinforces their system—will have arrived once a fascist party acquires state power. Where socialists advocate system change, fascists advocate nationalism understood as a merger of private capitalism and the state apparatus to exalt some national ideal.

In contrast, socialism is what happens to capitalism when employees feel that capitalism’s accumulated problems exceed the employers’ willingness or the system’s capacity to solve them. Socialists are those victims and critics of capitalism who see it as the problem and system change as the only real solution. By system change, socialists have typically meant combinations of socialized (not private) ownership of means of production, centrally planned (nonmarket) distributions of resources and products, and democratic worker-coop-type (non-hierarchical) organizations of enterprises. Socialists have long been interested in acquiring state power as a means to accomplish system change. Exactly how much and how far system change should extend has been fiercely contested among differing kinds of socialists, and those issues are still hotly debated. Socialists from Marx on to the present have likewise often associated with anarchists around a goal many shared: what Lenin called “the withering away of the state.” Socialists have usually advocated internationalism—“workers of the world unite against capitalism”—as against fascist’s nationalism. These are some key differences separating fascism from socialism.

Fascism merges private capitalism and the state. Political power then enforces capitalism’s basic rules: the economic dominance of the major shareholders and their top directors and managers. In fascism, that dominance extends from economic to also political and cultural realms of social life. It goes well beyond the norm in non-fascist societies based on capitalist economies. For example, labor unions are suppressed or converted into state agencies. All independent labor activity is proscribed. For another example, public education is restructured to serve and feed directly into employment. Monetary policies, exchange rates, and trade balances are managed to achieve nationalist objectives. Cultural institutions are reconfigured and reorganized to celebrate fascism. In the early histories of some fascist parties, socialist criticisms of capitalism were borrowed and repeated to attract working-class adherents. Once those parties made their deals and alliances with capitalists, those early socialist criticisms were silenced and their authors expelled or worse.

In fascism, major shareholders and the boards of directors they elect make all the key private enterprise decisions (what to produce, how, and with which technology and how to use net revenues or profits) as in private capitalism. However, top state officials wield major influences on directors’ decisions or may join them to take seats on the boards. The fascist state typically silences capitalism’s opponents usually on the grounds that their activities constitute treasonous disloyalty. It likewise destroys the political parties of socialists, communists, and other critics of capitalism. For their part, the employers in fascism celebrate and fund the fascist party and the state it runs.

U.S. capitalism’s passage from a private to a state system of credit creation is now viewed as necessary by both of its constituent partners. Private capitalists, on the one hand, and the top political circles in both major parties, on the other, are thus merging into a particular kind of fascism. State financialization facilitates that merger. That some of the partners disagree with Trump and his traditional manipulations of fascist symbols does not change the transition to fascism under way and accepted by the consenting partners.

https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/09/11/the-u-s-is-borrowing-its-way-to-fascism/
NECROCAPITALISM at http://openmind693.wordpress.com ‘Rolling thunder. Shock. A noble one in fear and dread sets things in order and is watchful.’ I-Ching (Hex.51)