AuthorTopic: The Survivor Library  (Read 4392 times)

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15141
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
The Survivor Library
« on: October 29, 2014, 02:48:27 AM »
Came across this the other day and thought I would repost. General doomer/prepper reference.

Why a Survivor Library?
http://blog.survivorlibrary.com/
What is it and why should anyone care?

There are many websites, books, videos and classes that teach “Survival Skills”. How to make water safe to drink. How to build a weather proof shelter from available materials. How to build a fire. How to operate in a tactical combat environment to neutralize raiders seeking your food supplies.

All of them deal primarily with the immediate effects of a disaster and how to survive them. All of these are excellent skills to have. A year’s worth of food is an excellent way to help safeguard yourself and your family in the event of an emergency or a large scale disaster.

Unfortunately many large scale disasters such as Solar or Nuclear EMP events, Pandemic disease or Cyber warfare could result in a collapse of what has become an increasingly fragile technological and industrial infrastructure. The collapse of that infrastructure means the likely death of the majority of the people affected. Some scenarios have expected death rates of as high as 90% within a few months.

The Survival Skills most often taught and disseminated will get you through the immediate danger.

Few if any of these resources focus on what happens afterwards beyond speaking of “planting a garden”.

What happens AFTER the Solar Flare that destroys the electrical grid and all electronics? AFTER the other 90% of the population has died from starvation, dehydration and disease. AFTER the roving gangs and raiders are eliminated and local communities form to provide security and relative peace.

What Then?

The factories are gone. The transportation system has stopped. Now it’s time to start planning for the long term, for your children and grandchildren.

The infrastructure that crashed can’t be “turned back on”. The local power plant can’t be restarted when the coal it uses comes from several states away which was transported by trains which depended on diesel fuel refined in other states and delivered by pipelines which no longer function. The infrastructure is too complex to simply be switched back on.

Tools and equipment and supplies can be salvaged for a while but will inevitably run out. There is only so much fertilizer stored in stores and warehouses. There are only so many batteries and flashlight bulbs in inventory. It will all run out in time and no one will be making replacements.

Which means you will have to build a new infrastructure which can eventually replace what was lost.

But how? No one has those skills or knowledge any longer. The cell phones don’t work and we can’t build digital radios any longer and we don’t know how to build a telegraph system.

The Library contains many books on telegraph systems. It has numerous books on how to build simple radios. It has books on how to build a wire based telephone system from the simplest pieces of equipment up through how to build a telephone exchange and lay wires.

Once the fuel runs out the cars and trucks stop do you know how to build a carriage to put behind a horse? Do you know how to make the tackle with which to attach the carriage TO the horse? There are books on that. There are books on building sailing vessels and steamships. Books on how to build steam engines to put in steamships.

The library contains thousands of  books on technologies that can be produced by most reasonably skilled craftsman using tools not as sophisticated as what can be found in many modern home workshops.

Here is some more in depth discussion of the issues:

Lost Knowledge
Low Probability/High Consequence Events
Industrial Infrastructure
Technological Infrastructure
Insulation from Reality
Industrial Complexity
The Library Level of Technology

The Library is broken in many different categories. Some are very broad. Some are more specialized.

All of the books are scanned copies of the original book stored in PDF format. That makes it possible to both read the book and, if desired, to print it.

As the library has grown over time we’ve tried to cover both the simplest, more basic self sufficiency skills such as growing food and raising livestock through the most advanced and sophisticated technology of the time such as aeroplanes and communications systems like telephone and telegraph.

Where there books on Industrial processes, methods, formulas, techniques we included those as well. Even the more advanced technologies of the periods are within the reach of people starting from scratch. Steam engines may seem primitive to most modern people but they powered the industrial revolution in much of the world well into the 1900s.

Basic knowledge of chemical formulas and processes are recorded in books from these periods ranging from the most basic industrial chemical needs through household materials in common use.

The Library in it’s entirety is a compendium of the Technological and Industrial Knowldge of the 1800 through early 1900s.

It is the knowledge needed to rebuild a technological and industrial infrastructure from scratch when the modern infrastructure ceases to function.

***

Want to download the whole megillah?

Torrent Link

actual link URL is:

https://kickass.to/survival-library-t9707162.html
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 17035
    • View Profile
Re: The Survivor Library
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2014, 08:14:02 AM »
I'm going to try to archive this stuff, at least digitally. Looks like it requires some software downloads though. I'd appreciate any advice for the tech challenged, from anybody who has managed to get this stuff saved.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online jdwheeler42

  • Global Moderator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 3326
    • View Profile
    • Going Upslope
Re: The Survivor Library
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2014, 05:28:34 PM »
I'm going to try to archive this stuff, at least digitally. Looks like it requires some software downloads though. I'd appreciate any advice for the tech challenged, from anybody who has managed to get this stuff saved.
You might want to forgo downloading it as a torrent file... I started that and at 15 minutes in the lowest estimate of how long it will take is 2 years 48 weeks... :o

UPDATE: after an hour I did get a couple brief periods where it said about 7 weeks.  I now have HTTrack Website copier running, and it seems to be doing a fairly consistent 24KB/s.  For 109GB I'm calculating that will take 55 days to complete.  If you seriously want the whole thing, I suggest trying to contact the website owners directly and see if they will burn you DVDs for a nominal fee.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2014, 06:41:51 PM by jdwheeler42 »
Making pigs fly is easy... that is, of course, after you have built the catapult....

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 17035
    • View Profile
Re: The Survivor Library
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2014, 07:38:28 PM »
Thanks, JD.

Fifty-five days sounds like....like I probably would actually never get it done. Maybe they could burn it. It'd be worth paying for, and more than a nominal fee.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 35950
    • View Profile
Re: The Survivor Library
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2014, 09:19:07 PM »
I'm going to try to archive this stuff, at least digitally. Looks like it requires some software downloads though. I'd appreciate any advice for the tech challenged, from anybody who has managed to get this stuff saved.
You might want to forgo downloading it as a torrent file... I started that and at 15 minutes in the lowest estimate of how long it will take is 2 years 48 weeks... :o

UPDATE: after an hour I did get a couple brief periods where it said about 7 weeks.  I now have HTTrack Website copier running, and it seems to be doing a fairly consistent 24KB/s.  For 109GB I'm calculating that will take 55 days to complete.  If you seriously want the whole thing, I suggest trying to contact the website owners directly and see if they will burn you DVDs for a nominal fee.

JD, after you get it downloaded, can you copy it onto an external hard drive and mail it to me?  I'll buy the hard drive and pay the shipping.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online jdwheeler42

  • Global Moderator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 3326
    • View Profile
    • Going Upslope
Re: The Survivor Library
« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2014, 10:00:56 PM »
JD, after you get it downloaded, can you copy it onto an external hard drive and mail it to me?  I'll buy the hard drive and pay the shipping.
Honestly, even if I finish downloading this, based on my track records with back-ups, I'm not sure I can copy it onto an external hard drive.  I would, however, be willing to try burning a few DVDs.

Also, a similar site you might find interesting is http://www.cd3wd.com/mdownloads/index.htm -- they have works which are in the public domain due primarily to being publications of governmental and non-profit agencies.
Making pigs fly is easy... that is, of course, after you have built the catapult....

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 35950
    • View Profile
Re: The Survivor Library
« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2014, 10:10:53 PM »
JD, after you get it downloaded, can you copy it onto an external hard drive and mail it to me?  I'll buy the hard drive and pay the shipping.
Honestly, even if I finish downloading this, based on my track records with back-ups, I'm not sure I can copy it onto an external hard drive.  I would, however, be willing to try burning a few DVDs.

Also, a similar site you might find interesting is http://www.cd3wd.com/mdownloads/index.htm -- they have works which are in the public domain due primarily to being publications of governmental and non-profit agencies.

108 Gigs is a lot of DVDs at 8.5 Gigs each.  Tough to search through.  However, if you think that way works better for you, I will do the transfer onto a hard drive here and then make copies for Diners who want one.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online jdwheeler42

  • Global Moderator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 3326
    • View Profile
    • Going Upslope
Re: The Survivor Library
« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2014, 11:49:31 PM »
Also, a similar site you might find interesting is http://www.cd3wd.com/mdownloads/index.htm -- they have works which are in the public domain due primarily to being publications of governmental and non-profit agencies.

108 Gigs is a lot of DVDs at 8.5 Gigs each.  Tough to search through.  However, if you think that way works better for you, I will do the transfer onto a hard drive here and then make copies for Diners who want one.
Okay, the Free Download Manager http://www.freedownloadmanager.org/ they recommend at cd3wd.com seems to be doing the trick.  When I'm not doing anything else online, I'm getting an estimates of around 50-65 hours to finish, which is actually fairly reasonable for 108 Gigs.

One possibility is rather than make a number of copies of the material to send around, we could round-robin the DVD disks, each person copying the material onto his local hard disks and then sending the originals on to the next person who wants them.  This could be done with several different sites.  In addition to cd3wd and survivorlibrary, there is PSSurvival.com -- a bit wacky in its premise of pole shifts, and nothing new added since July 2013, but the information compiled still is useful; copyrighted but free for personal, noncommercial use.  And there is PracticalAction.org Practical Answers website, which has a Creative Commons CC BY-SA license.  The big advantage of those two is that I have already done a HTTrack copy of their websites so hopefully bringing them up to date would not take very long.
Making pigs fly is easy... that is, of course, after you have built the catapult....

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 35950
    • View Profile
Re: The Survivor Library
« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2014, 02:19:12 AM »
Also, a similar site you might find interesting is http://www.cd3wd.com/mdownloads/index.htm -- they have works which are in the public domain due primarily to being publications of governmental and non-profit agencies.

108 Gigs is a lot of DVDs at 8.5 Gigs each.  Tough to search through.  However, if you think that way works better for you, I will do the transfer onto a hard drive here and then make copies for Diners who want one.
Okay, the Free Download Manager http://www.freedownloadmanager.org/ they recommend at cd3wd.com seems to be doing the trick.  When I'm not doing anything else online, I'm getting an estimates of around 50-65 hours to finish, which is actually fairly reasonable for 108 Gigs.

One possibility is rather than make a number of copies of the material to send around, we could round-robin the DVD disks, each person copying the material onto his local hard disks and then sending the originals on to the next person who wants them.  This could be done with several different sites.  In addition to cd3wd and survivorlibrary, there is PSSurvival.com -- a bit wacky in its premise of pole shifts, and nothing new added since July 2013, but the information compiled still is useful; copyrighted but free for personal, noncommercial use.  And there is PracticalAction.org Practical Answers website, which has a Creative Commons CC BY-SA license.  The big advantage of those two is that I have already done a HTTrack copy of their websites so hopefully bringing them up to date would not take very long.

This methodology makes sense.

The reason I am not downloading the material myself is that my new package is NOT unlimited, I have 60 Gigs a month.  Downloading this would consume all my bandwidth for 2 months, leaving nothing for the Vidcasts, Podcasts and just general Diner work.

I will also add to the collection my collection of Books I downloaded from Books Great Choice a while back.  Lots of good stuff in there, not sure how many Gigs total, I think around 20.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online jdwheeler42

  • Global Moderator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 3326
    • View Profile
    • Going Upslope
Re: The Survivor Library
« Reply #9 on: October 30, 2014, 07:27:44 AM »
The reason I am not downloading the material myself is that my new package is NOT unlimited, I have 60 Gigs a month.  Downloading this would consume all my bandwidth for 2 months, leaving nothing for the Vidcasts, Podcasts and just general Diner work.
Yeah, it's nice having fiber optic cable coming to the pole outside my house  :icon_mrgreen: -- they don't have any set bandwidth limits, just the throughput limits.  An update on the progress, after one overnight, I am 2% finished, so it looks like it may take a couple weeks to finish.  I did however update the Pole Survival, so I could burn that and get that sent out over the weekend if people are interested, it's a little under 11 GB.  I did mirror the Practical Action website too, but when it came up to be only 400 MB I got suspicious, sure enough the PDFs are on another site which I did not capture.
Making pigs fly is easy... that is, of course, after you have built the catapult....

Online jdwheeler42

  • Global Moderator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 3326
    • View Profile
    • Going Upslope
Re: The Survivor Library
« Reply #10 on: November 07, 2014, 07:56:10 AM »
An update on the progress, after one overnight, I am 2% finished, so it looks like it may take a couple weeks to finish.
A milestone, I just hit 50% finished.  The real problem is that it keeps stopping after about 20-30 minutes and I have to keep manually resuming the download.  At peak throughput, I am getting estimates of around being finished in 12 hours.  It's all the 0B/s that are killing me.
Making pigs fly is easy... that is, of course, after you have built the catapult....

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15141
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: The Survivor Library
« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2014, 05:55:55 AM »
    A notable omission here is Khan Academy (https://www.khanacademy.org/) but it's a decent list to start with.
    100 Amazing How-To Sites to Teach Yourself Anything






    Learning new skills and expanding your knowledge doesn’t have to cost you an arm and a leg. There are loads of free resources on the Web that can help you find instructional videos, tutorials and classes to learn a wide variety of skills from fixing basic car problems to speaking another language. With 100 sites to choose from, you’re bound to find something here that will help you learn just about anything you could want.


    General Tutorials

    These sites offer a wide range of tutorials and videos.

       Expert Village: [/b]One of the biggest how-to sites on the Web, this site is home to hundreds of thousands of videos on an infinitely broad spectrum of topics.
       LearnThat.com: [/b]With categories like business, finance, home repair, and computers and tech, this site has plenty of classes for avid learners.
       Koonji: [/b]With tutorials that are extremely easy to follow, this site will make it simple to learn just about anything.
       SuTree: [/b]Whether you want to learn new skills or share some of your own, you can do both on this video how-to site.
       VideoJug: [/b]With great videos on topics as diverse as doing well on the SAT and knitting a scarf, you’ll be able to find just what you’re looking for here.
       FindTutorials.com: [/b]This huge collection of tutorials contains listings for education, hobbies and DIY projects around the house.
       TrickLife: [/b]Want to make your life better? This site is home to numerous tutorials to help improve your home, your body and your personal well-being.
       Instructables: [/b]This site offers a wide range of video tutorials where users can showcase all their valuable skills.
       MyTutorials: [/b]Search through the tutorials on this site to find just what you’re looking to learn.
       Tutorial Ninjas: [/b]From investing to getting healthy, you’ll find loads of tutorials here.
       Hodder Education: [/b]Check out this site for a range of self-learning opportunities in sports, music, health and more.
       Sofia: [/b]Promoting free sharing of intellectual assets, this site offers several free courses[/url] in programming, typography and geography.
       I Can Learn Anything: [/b]Pay this site a visit to get access to a wide range of social learning resources.
       Wikiversity: [/b]With over 10,000 free learning resources, you’ll find tons of great instructional materials here.


    Around the House


    Want to know how to fix that broken cabinet or hang up some great wallpaper? These sites are all about helping you learn how to fix things around the house, on your car or even learn a new hobby.

       Make Magazine: [/b]If you’re looking to turn your old laptop into something cool, or find new and inventive ways to spruce up your home, you’ll find loads of ideas on this site.
       What the Craft: [/b]With a little instruction from this site you can create hand-tailored clothes or great new pillows for your couch.
       Skillvids: [/b]Save money on costly home repairs by learning how to do them yourself on this site.
       Jonko Online Auto Repair: [/b]Here, you’ll find some instructional help on fixing all the little things that can go wrong with your car.
       DoItYourself.com: [/b]Whether you’re trying to sell your home or manage your finances, you’ll find some helpful guidance here.
       Fix Expert: [/b]Learn some of the basics of car maintenance and repair from this site.
       Easy2DIY: [/b]Want to know how to lay carpet? Fix your leaky dishwasher? You’ll find that and more here.
       Free DIY Tutorials: [/b]Visit this site to learn how to construct a range of sewing and crafting projects.
       The Bicycle Tutor: [/b]Why pay someone to fix your bike when you can do it yourself? This site can teach you how.
       Grovetech PC Repair and Maintenance: [/b]Check out this site to learn how to do some basic PC repairs like adding additional RAM and cleaning off all those nasty viruses.
       ReadyMade: [/b]This site can help you learn to build things you never knew you could do on your own.
       Hack a Day: [/b]Embrace your creative side with these hacks that help you learn to reuse the junk around your house in cool new ways.
       Howtopedia: [/b]With loads of tips on how to make your DIY projects greener, this site will help you make your home and the earth a little better at the same time.
    [/list]


    Business and Management


    If you feel like you’re seriously lacking on business and management skills at work, no need to worry. These sites can help you learn the basics and get your career on track.

       KnowThis?: [/b]Boost your marketing skills by taking one of the tutorials offered through this site.
       Leadership Training Tutorials: [/b]Like the name suggests, these free tutorials are all about helping you bring out your leadership skills.
       Laynetworks: [/b]Those who want to learn more about great management skills can find tutorials galore here.
       Website 101: [/b]If you’re an entrepreneur who doesn’t know much about running a business online, this site is home to loads of tutorials that can help you understand what it takes to establish a great web presence.
       Business Tutorials: [/b]Whether you want to start your own business or need a little guidance once you have, this site will provide all kinds of helpful tutorials.
       Passion for Business Learning: [/b]Learn more about business skills from management to finance on this site.
       Business Balls: [/b]While the name might be silly, the site offers some serious advice and information on improving management and business skills.
       ComputerWeekly: [/b]Those in the IT field should take advantage of this site’s free weekly webinars to stay up-to-date on the latest information and developments.
       TechOnline: [/b]Designed with electronics professionals in mind, this site has dozens of great tech-focused tutorials.
       Change Management: [/b]Here you’ll find instructional materials to improve your skills in leadership and management.


    Language and Writing


    Those who want to learn a new language, improve their writing skills or just learn more about literature will be well-served by these instructional sites.

       BBC Languages: [/b]With numerous languages to choose from, this site offers visitors some really valuable free language learning materials.
       Project Gutenberg: [/b]Catch up on reading the classics with the free e-books offered here.
       Teach Yourself Japanese: [/b]Whether you’re learning for business or pleasure, this site offers all kinds of resources for Japanese language learners.
       Literature.org: [/b]The extensive library of free material on this site makes it cheap and easy to read up on just about any subject.
       Bibliomania: [/b]With free books and study guides to go along with them, you’ll not only be able to read the classics but get help understanding them as well.
       LookLex: [/b]Here you’ll be able to learn the basics of the Arabic language with free audio tutorials.
       American Sign Language Browser: [/b]If you’ve ever wanted to learn ASL you’ll find a number of resources here that can get you started.
       Learn Spanish: [/b]As one of the most widely-spoken languages in the world, there’s no better time than now to start learning Spanish.
       Writer’s Resource Center: [/b]This site is home to loads of support and information on writing better fiction.
       Paradigm Online Writing Assistant: [/b]Need some help writing? You’ll find instructional articles here.


    Technology


    These tech-focused sites offer help to both technophiles and beginners alike.


       actDEN: [/b]Never learned how to use Microsoft Excel? Now you can with free tutorials on this site, offering education on a number of computer programs.
       How-to Geek: [/b]From setting up to fixing problems, this site will help you learn to get your gadgets up and running.
       W3Schools: [/b]Learn just about anything you could want to know about Web design and development from the large number of tutorials on this site.
       KillerSites: [/b]Here you’ll find loads of free info on web design and hosting.
       Productivity Portfolio: [/b]Are you really not good with technology? Here you’ll find tutorials designed just for you, with simple 5-minute lessons on the basics of programs like Outlook and Firefox.
       Tweako: [/b]This site is home to numerous tutorials focused on technology, programming and the net.
       Vista4Beginners: [/b]Many people find Vista hard to navigate, and if you’re one of them you can find help on this site, filled with great tutorials.
       Digital Arts: [/b]From tips on using Photoshop to what it takes to make great web designs, this site will help you embrace the creative side of technology.
       InPictures: [/b]With tutorials that come complete with visual representations of how to do everything, this site is perfect for the visual learner.
       N Design Studio: [/b]This site is focused on Dreamweaver and Illustrator, providing a wide range of tutorials.
       NetTuts: [/b]Check out this site if you’re in need of a little help with a web development project or want to learn more about programming on the internet.
       Geekpedia: [/b]Here you’ll find tutorials on just about every programming language you could want to learn.
       MuppetLabs: [/b]Programmers and aspiring geeks alike can find numerous tutorials here on languages like C++ and Perl.


    Math


    Many people struggle to understand mathematical concepts. These sites offer help and instruction no matter what level you’re on.

       S.O.S. Mathematics: [/b]Check out this site to find tutorials and worksheets to help you learn more about math and get a little practice applying it.
       MathVids: [/b]If you’d rather learn from videos, the instructional ones provided here will be helpful to you, offering explanation of a wide variety of math issues.
       Math Cracker: [/b]Get a little help on math subjects from the basics of algebra to the intricacies of calculus with a variety of helpful tutorials.
       Real World Math: [/b]Think your math teacher was full of it when he said you’d actually use the math you’re learning? This site applies all kinds of math to real situations, making it easier for many to see how it might be valuable.
       Math for Morons Like Us: [/b]Even the smartest people can sometimes forget their multiplication tables, but if you feel especially weak in math you may want to check out this site. It breaks down even complicated ideas into easy to understand lessons.
       Math.com: [/b]With some great tools and a variety of tutorials on algebra, geometry, trigonometry and more, this site has loads to offer learners.
       MathTools: [/b]If you’re using MATLAB you can get some information on how to better use the program and understand what’s going on with these free tutorials.
       Paul’s Online Math Notes: [/b]This professor wants to help you learn math, and offers notes, lessons and more.
       Visual Calculus: [/b]The modules on this site are designed to help you see visually how calculus works, an easier way to learn for many who struggle to understand abstract concepts without illustration.
       PurpleMath: [/b]Visit this site to find notes, tutorials and lessons on a variety of math subjects.



    Science


    Learn more about the amazing world around you from its chemical makeup to the processes going on in your own body with these helpful sites.


       The Chem Team: [/b]Learn the basics of chemistry with the tutorials and lessons provided by this site.
       Get Body Smart: [/b]With interactive animations and activities, this site makes it fun to learn about how the body works inside and out.
       The Physics Zone: [/b]You can get a better grasp on concepts like magnetism and motion with this site that offers instruction on the theoretical and mathematical aspects of physics.
       The Life Wire: [/b]Here you’ll find a number of animations and tutorials that are designed to help you learn more about biology, even the stuff that may have confused you before.
       Geology Rocks: [/b]The earth may seem like a stable, static entity but it’s always changing and moving. Check out this site to learn more about these processes and the ground under your feet.
       NASA: [/b]If Earth isn’t your thing, take to the heavens with videos, photos, articles and podcasts all about the stars, planets and what lies beyond.
       Inner Body: [/b]Check out this site to learn a bit about the circulatory system and find out just how that cheeseburger is clogging your arteries.
       Exploratorium: [/b]Also called the Museum of Science, Art and Human Perception, you’ll find lessons here on everything from how music works to the effects of global warming.
       Science A-Go-Go: [/b]This site is a great place to learn about the latest and greatest scientific discoveries. You can take to the discussion forums as well if you’d like to debate any topic.
       The Why Files: [/b]If you’ve ever wondered why or how a news story about science is true or want to learn more about everyday science, check out this site.


    Creativity


    These lesson-filled sites offer a chance to learn more about art, music and digital creativity.

       Berklee Shares: [/b]Here you’ll get access to loads of free Strobist: Check out this blog and its tutorials to learn the basics of lighting in photography.
       Teoria: [/b]On this site you’ll find a number of music-related tutorials and lessons to help you better understand music theory.
       Digital Arts: [/b]Need a little creative inspiration? This site can help you out and help you better learn to use your digital art tools.
       PSDTUTS: [/b]Whether you use PhotoShop to touch up your drawings or to make completely digital works of art, you’ll find helpful tutorials here.
       Photography Mentor: [/b]Join this site to get educational videos for your computer or iPhone to learn more about digital photography.
       E-Chords: [/b]The video tutorials on this site can help you learn to totally shred on the guitar or bass.
       DrumBum: [/b]If drums are more your style, these tutorials and lessons will help you master a variety of types of music.
       Music Theory: [/b]Ricci Adams teaches the basics of music theory and notation with lessons and tutorials on this site.
       Computer Music Products: [/b]Want to make and distribute music right from your computer? This site can teach you how.
       Duey’s Drawings: [/b]If you’ve always been envious of those who can draw and paint, give this instructional site a visit for lessons on how you can improve your skills.
       Video-Tutes: [/b]Learn a number of useful things about shooting and editing videos from the instructional tutorials on this site.



    History


    Expand your knowledge of the past with these history sites that contain info, photos and lessons on numerous topics.


       Archive.org: [/b]With links to information on the history of music, documents and even the Internet, this site is a one-stop-shop for learning.
       Library of Congress: [/b]With numerous digitally archived photos, documents and manuscripts, as well as a few wholly online exhibits, you’ll find a wealth of great information on this site to help you learn about American history.
       The Rosetta Project: [/b]No matter what language you want to learn about, still spoken or long dead, you’ll find its history and loads of information about it here.
       Digital History: [/b]This online project offers users a wide range of digitized historical information to make learning easy and fun.
       U.S. Census Bureau: [/b]Get the stats on just about everything you could want to know about Americans on this site.
       Biography: [/b]Learn a little more about the people who have shaped the world we live in today with the information from Biography.
       Artcyclopedia: [/b]Wanna know a little more about the history of art? You’ll find information, photos and resources galore here.
       History Channel: [/b]Even if you don’t have cable you can watch videos, engage in interactive programs and read all about world history on this site.
    "It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

     

    Related Topics

      Subject / Started by Replies Last post
    Diner Library

    Started by RE « 1 2 ... 9 10 » The Kitchen Sink

    140 Replies
    39721 Views
    Last post May 19, 2018, 05:41:46 PM
    by BC2K
    0 Replies
    567 Views
    Last post March 30, 2017, 02:47:21 PM
    by azozeo
    0 Replies
    150 Views
    Last post July 25, 2018, 11:05:31 AM
    by azozeo