AuthorTopic: Do it for Denmark  (Read 2834 times)

Offline RE

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Do it for Denmark
« on: March 11, 2015, 01:02:20 AM »

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…In the last rant, I went ballistic on the Economista Clowns & Jokers who must be Smoking Crack to come up with the numbskull ideas of impoverishing people to stimulate growth and lending more money to already bankrupt borrowers as a solution for economic collapse. This was inspired by the FACT that one of the World Class Economistas currently making policy on the global level, one Douglas McWilliams of CEBR was documented on camera really smoking crack in a London Crack house, wasted to beat the band.


http://profile-pics-cdn.xvideos.com/videos/profiles/profthumb/79/ed/11/beezbone--ym/profile_1_big.jpgFor today, the latest in hilarity is the Danish Ad Campaign, “Do it for Denmark”, designed to encourage Danish girls to start getting PREGNANT! They are supposed to go out on Vacation and find willing foreigners to inseminate them and then return to Denmark to bring new Great Danes into the world, so that they can pay taxes to support the current crop of aging Great Danes! LoL.


Charitable folks that Diners are, several have already stepped up to the Plate as Volunteers here to keep Danish social security programs solvent. Given our aging demographic, we also will purchase our own Viagra to make this possible! It’s a gift to the Danish People, and hopefully the cost of the Viagra can be deducted from the income tax as a Charitable Contribution to needy Danish Girls. LoL…


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Here’s the last rant on Crack Smoking Economistas, in case you missed it…



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Offline Randy C

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Re: Do it for Denmark
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2015, 02:30:34 PM »
In addition to climate change, fresh water depletion and energy depletion, one often not talked about factor in our system coming apart is soil depletion.  All you need to do is go visit the Mississippi gulf coast when the tide is out to see the dunes of top soil sitting on the bottom of the gulf to know that the soil has been blowing out of the Midwest and Great Plains and going down the Mississippi River for about 120 years now and about half of that was done with draft horses.

Back when I was a kid, my cousins, who owned a farm in northeastern Iowa, told me there was about seven feet of top soil there.  That was a long time ago when the road network was laid out the fields were at the same level as the roads and the ditches were classic Iowa 7 foot deep ditches.  Ask anyone who has ever slid into one of those ditches what that is like!  Now, the fields are level with the bottom of the ditches.  It is a bit shocking to look back at old photos and see just how much lower the fields are today than they were 50 years ago.

It takes at least six inches of top soil to grow food, about nine remains on average in the breadbasket of the US.  Once that next four inches is gone, large scale mechanized farming will be coming to an end, regardless of how much oil is in the ground.  It takes a lot of capital to grow crops every year, and that capital comes from banks and those banks require crop insurance and it won't take very many failed seasons to not only break the bank as it were, but to starve the population as well as there is only about seven or eight months of food on hand in the US if the next harvest fails.

This is one of the reasons why I am such a believer and practitioner of small scale farming because not only do I like to eat good quality non-GMO food but I also like to be able to afford food.  With meat and dairy going through the roof, keeping a cow and some calves that grow into steers around is not only a good idea it is becoming a necessity.  And the reality is that most parts of the eastern US don't have enough wild food to begin to support the population as it stands now.  There probably isn't enough domestic food as well and as California and the High Plains dry out and blow away we will really get to see some serious shit!   :icon_mrgreen:

Offline RE

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Re: Do it for Denmark
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2015, 04:02:56 PM »
In addition to climate change, fresh water depletion and energy depletion, one often not talked about factor in our system coming apart is soil depletion.  All you need to do is go visit the Mississippi gulf coast when the tide is out to see the dunes of top soil sitting on the bottom of the gulf to know that the soil has been blowing out of the Midwest and Great Plains and going down the Mississippi River for about 120 years now and about half of that was done with draft horses.

Back when I was a kid, my cousins, who owned a farm in northeastern Iowa, told me there was about seven feet of top soil there.  That was a long time ago when the road network was laid out the fields were at the same level as the roads and the ditches were classic Iowa 7 foot deep ditches.  Ask anyone who has ever slid into one of those ditches what that is like!  Now, the fields are level with the bottom of the ditches.  It is a bit shocking to look back at old photos and see just how much lower the fields are today than they were 50 years ago.

It takes at least six inches of top soil to grow food, about nine remains on average in the breadbasket of the US.  Once that next four inches is gone, large scale mechanized farming will be coming to an end, regardless of how much oil is in the ground.  It takes a lot of capital to grow crops every year, and that capital comes from banks and those banks require crop insurance and it won't take very many failed seasons to not only break the bank as it were, but to starve the population as well as there is only about seven or eight months of food on hand in the US if the next harvest fails.

This is one of the reasons why I am such a believer and practitioner of small scale farming because not only do I like to eat good quality non-GMO food but I also like to be able to afford food.  With meat and dairy going through the roof, keeping a cow and some calves that grow into steers around is not only a good idea it is becoming a necessity.  And the reality is that most parts of the eastern US don't have enough wild food to begin to support the population as it stands now.  There probably isn't enough domestic food as well and as California and the High Plains dry out and blow away we will really get to see some serious shit!   :icon_mrgreen:

Unless there is scale up water conservative food production techniques like Hydroponics and Aquaculture, a large scale die off from Famine is assured now between the water depletion and soil depletion issues.  Since such a large scale shift is unlikely to occur rapidly enough, the only question is exactly how long before we get the kind of massive failure in the Industrial Agriculture system we currently are seeing go down in the Fracker Industry?  Is there 5 years of topsoil left in Iowa?  Maybe, maybe not.

Unfortunately of course, small scale farmers in highly populated neighborhoods won't do much better than the general population, since they will quickly be dispatched along with their calves and milk cows to feed hungry locals, further consuming the capital, as it were.

It's definitely not a good time to stop sniffing glue.



RE
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Offline Randy C

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Re: Do it for Denmark
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2015, 05:35:59 PM »
The population density around here is 42 per sq mile or 640 acres.  In my neighborhood, there are about that many people.  Most of them are over 60 and are not very mobile without their cars/trucks so I don't expect too much trouble early on from the locals.  It will take a bit longer for those who are more than a mile away to start filtering in having consumed the larger beef, sheep and dairy herds in the county.  In fact, there are several people within a mile that also have milk cows and calves/steers on hands as well as chickens and pigs, so I am not the only target.

Though, RE, your points are not lost on me. Two and 1/2 years ago when we made the decision to sell one of the many reasons was that we were known locally and as far away as Blacksburg, VA (40 miles) as a local food producer.  It is hard to have a business and produce an income while hiding from your buyers, unless all you do is farmers market and you never tell any of your buyers where you are.  That is okay with most people, but some, like me, want to see where things are produced and refusing to show your place off can have some repercussions as word gets around the market that you won't show off your farm.  Eventually, even the market manager is going to demand a visit just to make sure you really are producing the food and not just reselling, a big no no at the Blacksburg, VA farmers market.

Anyone with an improved road and incoming power lines will likely have uninvited visitors once food supplies come under threat and that certainly does include me and mine.  Again, one of the many reasons I decided that this paradigm just would not stand the test of time and began looking at other options including a mix of primitive living as well as pre-draft horse farming.  Tales From The Green Valley (BBC production) is a good example of 1600 farmings in England.

Another showing this weekend.  I insisted that the realtor make sure that these people are per-approved and can actually make the purchase.  They raise sheep and liked our four foot woven wire fencing.  Makes me glad I spent the money to have it put in my a professional fence builder.

Offline RE

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Re: Do it for Denmark
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2015, 05:52:12 PM »
The population density around here is 42 per sq mile or 640 acres.  In my neighborhood, there are about that many people.  Most of them are over 60 and are not very mobile without their cars/trucks so I don't expect too much trouble early on from the locals.  It will take a bit longer for those who are more than a mile away to start filtering in having consumed the larger beef, sheep and dairy herds in the county.  In fact, there are several people within a mile that also have milk cows and calves/steers on hands as well as chickens and pigs, so I am not the only target.

Though, RE, your points are not lost on me. Two and 1/2 years ago when we made the decision to sell one of the many reasons was that we were known locally and as far away as Blacksburg, VA (40 miles) as a local food producer.  It is hard to have a business and produce an income while hiding from your buyers, unless all you do is farmers market and you never tell any of your buyers where you are.  That is okay with most people, but some, like me, want to see where things are produced and refusing to show your place off can have some repercussions as word gets around the market that you won't show off your farm.  Eventually, even the market manager is going to demand a visit just to make sure you really are producing the food and not just reselling, a big no no at the Blacksburg, VA farmers market.

Anyone with an improved road and incoming power lines will likely have uninvited visitors once food supplies come under threat and that certainly does include me and mine.  Again, one of the many reasons I decided that this paradigm just would not stand the test of time and began looking at other options including a mix of primitive living as well as pre-draft horse farming.  Tales From The Green Valley (BBC production) is a good example of 1600 farmings in England.

Another showing this weekend.  I insisted that the realtor make sure that these people are per-approved and can actually make the purchase.  They raise sheep and liked our four foot woven wire fencing.  Makes me glad I spent the money to have it put in my a professional fence builder.

Lack of Gasoline is not a big deterent for a large population to filter out a few hundred miles.  You can easily make 50-100 miles a day outward on a Bicycle.  Even on foot you can cover 20-30 miles a day.  Plenty of Food available on the outbound trip in the form of fat assed suburban McMansion dwellers.

Hoping you are successful in selling off the VA Doomstead.  :icon_sunny:  I am going Full Time now into the Doom Field and looking at AK properties to start a SUN  :icon_sunny: Community.  your expertiese would be very valuable.

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Offline Randy C

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Re: Do it for Denmark
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2015, 04:18:22 AM »
Two thirds of the American population is obese and won't be going anywhere without fuel.  As to how far people get once the fun starts, that depends on how fast things unfold and the time of year.  As you know, it doesn't take much to plug up the road system, a little snow and lots of panic shut down I-95 south bound back in Feb 2001 with a 131 vehicle pile up.  (I missed out on sitting in that one all night by not leaving work until 3 pm and then going south on US 301 through Maryland across the Nice Bridge into VA, then west to Fredericksburg)  As to walking, most people can't cover 20-30 miles per day unless they are runners or hikers.  I could do about half that and I walk a lot.  Topography is also a factor, US 221, coming up Bent Mountain west of Roanoke, is a series of long and sometimes steep switchbacks.  All the roads out here are mountain roads, slow going and with the constant risk of attack from the locals, that will slow people down.

I'm not trying to argue that no one will make it out here, on the contrary, the meanest, nastiest SOBs will be the ones who do make it out here, and given that the average person can't really carry a lot (80 lbs max) that means they will need to find food almost every day and a lot of the weight these people will be carrying will be in weapons and ammo (rifle or shotgun and hand gun).  Throw in a tent, sleeping bag, cook kit, extra clothing, socks, some basic tools, (saw, axe, multi-tool) water, rain suit and some food, they will be moving a bit slower than if they were just out on a day hike, not to mention that movement will be slowed by the locals trying to repulse the invaders.  Yes, it will be a mess when the food system collapses.

Yes, once this place sells we will be coming west looking at other living arrangements and AK is still on my list.  Best to try to get ahead of the crowd.  Once they figure out the abrupt climate change is here to stay the migrations will start, assuming there is fuel for their vehicle....  :o

Offline RE

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Re: Do it for Denmark
« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2015, 04:30:42 AM »
Two thirds of the American population is obese and won't be going anywhere without fuel.  As to how far people get once the fun starts, that depends on how fast things unfold and the time of year.  As you know, it doesn't take much to plug up the road system, a little snow and lots of panic shut down I-95 south bound back in Feb 2001 with a 131 vehicle pile up.  (I missed out on sitting in that one all night by not leaving work until 3 pm and then going south on US 301 through Maryland across the Nice Bridge into VA, then west to Fredericksburg)  As to walking, most people can't cover 20-30 miles per day unless they are runners or hikers.  I could do about half that and I walk a lot.  Topography is also a factor, US 221, coming up Bent Mountain west of Roanoke, is a series of long and sometimes steep switchbacks.  All the roads out here are mountain roads, slow going and with the constant risk of attack from the locals, that will slow people down.

I'm not trying to argue that no one will make it out here, on the contrary, the meanest, nastiest SOBs will be the ones who do make it out here, and given that the average person can't really carry a lot (80 lbs max) that means they will need to find food almost every day and a lot of the weight these people will be carrying will be in weapons and ammo (rifle or shotgun and hand gun).  Throw in a tent, sleeping bag, cook kit, extra clothing, socks, some basic tools, (saw, axe, multi-tool) water, rain suit and some food, they will be moving a bit slower than if they were just out on a day hike, not to mention that movement will be slowed by the locals trying to repulse the invaders.  Yes, it will be a mess when the food system collapses.

Yes, once this place sells we will be coming west looking at other living arrangements and AK is still on my list.  Best to try to get ahead of the crowd.  Once they figure out the abrupt climate change is here to stay the migrations will start, assuming there is fuel for their vehicle....  :o

Well, clearly it is important precisely WHEN the ATMs shut down.  If it happens during the Winter, Cyclist Zombies will have a lot more trouble making good mileage than in the Summer.  Same with Walker Zombies.

However, barring a SUPER fast collapse, the process of Outward Migration does not occur instantaneously, but over several years.  They don't depopulate Rome in a Day, so to speak.  So you have this ongoing issue of people outward migrating as the Big Shities become unlivable.

RE
« Last Edit: March 13, 2015, 04:32:48 AM by RE »
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Offline Petty Tyrant

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Re: Do it for Denmark
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2015, 03:37:24 PM »
 theres a big difference between a fit cyclist or hiker with a hat and water and packd lunch covering x miles a day and a hungry thirsty one. the sao paolo situation is intructive if it is rpresentative, ive seen viral vids of irls scooping a cup of water from the toilet and drinking it. people wandring out from the city if they dont have transport re likely to also drink straight from dms nd rivr full of farm runoff and e coli. i imagine hitching with trukers and couriers to become common for people who lost the use of their car from repo or too expensive fuel.

we so far have seen only the unprepared stories in sao paulo but people have had a long time to get rainwater tanks if they have a detached house. theres so many wys to use very little water. disconect plumbing undr sinks and collect graywater to flush toilets. use a coin laundry. filter and boil other outside water etc, yet we see people filling soda bottles instead.

i believe with a continuing slow collapse we will continue seeing rising prices of food sold on global markets so just because theres still decent production in your county or country does not mean you get to eat it. it gets exprted to saudi arabia or somewhere , and that may happen with armed escorts as itwas in the 1930’s. there could also be closed roads and checkpoints prventing people moving freely thouh these are a barier to vehicles not people walking who can find al ternate routes around. a  ssudden event and all bets on these are off of course.
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Offline RE

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Re: Do it for Denmark
« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2015, 07:30:35 PM »
theres a big difference between a fit cyclist or hiker with a hat and water and packd lunch covering x miles a day and a hungry thirsty one. the sao paolo situation is intructive if it is rpresentative, ive seen viral vids of irls scooping a cup of water from the toilet and drinking it. people wandring out from the city if they dont have transport re likely to also drink straight from dms nd rivr full of farm runoff and e coli. i imagine hitching with trukers and couriers to become common for people who lost the use of their car from repo or too expensive fuel.

we so far have seen only the unprepared stories in sao paulo but people have had a long time to get rainwater tanks if they have a detached house. theres so many wys to use very little water. disconect plumbing undr sinks and collect graywater to flush toilets. use a coin laundry. filter and boil other outside water etc, yet we see people filling soda bottles instead.

i believe with a continuing slow collapse we will continue seeing rising prices of food sold on global markets so just because theres still decent production in your county or country does not mean you get to eat it. it gets exprted to saudi arabia or somewhere , and that may happen with armed escorts as itwas in the 1930’s. there could also be closed roads and checkpoints prventing people moving freely thouh these are a barier to vehicles not people walking who can find al ternate routes around. a  ssudden event and all bets on these are off of course.

If there is NO WATER around, cyclists won't be going very far for sure, however I would figure outward migration begins before water completely disappears from taps, particularly in the richer suburbs.

So when the water rationing starts in the inner city, your zombies fill up their canteens and start peddling outward to where the water is still turned on and there are nice juicy suburbanites to BBQ.

If they need to fill up at a lake or river, you can still boil the water and not die immediately from fertilizer runoff.  Even drinking toilet water is not going to kill you usually, my cat drank out of the toilet all the time.

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Offline Randy C

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Re: Do it for Denmark
« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2015, 07:06:28 PM »
Meow!!!!

Animals have a much better blood gut barrier than humans do and that is why they can eat/drink all kinds of crap (water out of the floor drain in the milking parlor by way of example) without dying.  Humans on the other hand, not so much.  Strain the water through a cloth filter and then boil it and let it cool off will make it safe to drink.  I would still boil my stream water though I do drink the spring water without treating it because it is from a closed spring box.  Also, being a farmer, I've been exposed to a lot more bacteria than most city people.  The milk inspector called it farmers gut.  That's why I can't use myself as an example for why my milk is safe.  I can drink it raw but others may not be able to.  Now that said, I have been taking donations for raw milk since the summer of 2010 and have not had any complaints about people getting sick, though there was a case of some people getting sick in Northern VA due to raw milk, but there could have been other problems as well meaning it was not the milk or the milk was contaminated with e-coli or something along those lines.

Offline RE

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Re: Do it for Denmark
« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2015, 08:57:42 PM »
Meow!!!!

Animals have a much better blood gut barrier than humans do and that is why they can eat/drink all kinds of crap (water out of the floor drain in the milking parlor by way of example) without dying.  Humans on the other hand, not so much.  Strain the water through a cloth filter and then boil it and let it cool off will make it safe to drink.  I would still boil my stream water though I do drink the spring water without treating it because it is from a closed spring box.  Also, being a farmer, I've been exposed to a lot more bacteria than most city people.  The milk inspector called it farmers gut.  That's why I can't use myself as an example for why my milk is safe.  I can drink it raw but others may not be able to.  Now that said, I have been taking donations for raw milk since the summer of 2010 and have not had any complaints about people getting sick, though there was a case of some people getting sick in Northern VA due to raw milk, but there could have been other problems as well meaning it was not the milk or the milk was contaminated with e-coli or something along those lines.

Well instead of drinking out of the toilet bowl, you could get the water from the tank instead.  That should be fine.

Having eaten in so many truck stops I developed a pretty strong stomach from that.

Definitely though, it's going to be quite a mess when people's taps start running dry in the cities and suburbs.  Sao Paolo is the Canary in the Coal mine for that one.

RE
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