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Do you think Bernie Sanders will be Assassinated before he can be elected.

Yes Bernie will be killed before he can become president.
0 (0%)
No Bernie will be allowed to run against Trump.
1 (100%)

Total Members Voted: 1

Voting closed: February 27, 2020, 09:28:03 PM

AuthorTopic: Election Errata  (Read 141263 times)

Offline K-Dog

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Re: Election Errata
« Reply #1215 on: February 21, 2020, 10:59:03 PM »
How many here have actually worked for a Billionaire or known any personally besides me?  I suggest my perspective has merit.  My perspective leads me to a thesis.  Rich people will destroy the world. 

Me, for one.

In college, Rick MacArthur was one of my best friends.  That is the MacArthur of the Foundation and now the Publisher of Harper's Magazine.  He was Managing Editor of the Columbia Spectator when I was the Photography Editor.

I also met several of the Rockefellers when I was a boy in Brazil and Dad the Pigman was making all the bad loans to South American countries.

RE

Ok and my thesis is ?

I didn't make any comment on your thesis.  I just answered a direct question you asked.

RE

My point is that I have a perspective which drives my opinion.  I was asserting credibility.  With your perspective you are in a position to evaluate it.   :emthup: or  :emthdown:.

Well, 1st off I just did a rant on Bloombug right after the debate.  2nd, by now you should know my opinion of Rich People.  All rich people are Criminals.  The richer they are, the bigger criminal they are.  Billionaires are the biggest criminals of all.  Do you want criminals running Da Goobermint?  ???   :icon_scratch:

So, you generally get a  :emthup: for your thesis, although I don't think it goes far enough.

RE

For you then:

« Last Edit: February 21, 2020, 11:01:55 PM by K-Dog »
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Re: Election Errata
« Reply #1216 on: February 21, 2020, 11:23:11 PM »

For you then:



Coming Soon to the Bastille Near You.   :icon_sunny:

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RE
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Why the Presidency Can’t Just Go Back to ‘Normal’ After Trump.
« Reply #1217 on: February 22, 2020, 03:08:15 PM »

The “norms and traditions” that Trump has incinerated aren’t timeless features of American democracy; they’re actually quite new—and brittle.


resident Donald Trump has spent three years incinerating a group of practices commonly lumped together under the nebulous category of “norms and traditions,” causing the chattering class to worry that he’ll “destroy the presidency,” “undermine American democracy,” “erode” our institutions with each break with precedent or decorum. There are also those, including presidential candidate Joe Biden, who insist that things can go back to normal when Trump is gone. Either in January 2021 or January 2025, these optimists hope, America will experience a restoration of these timeless customs.

Here’s the problem: Many of these “presidential norms and traditions” that Trump has left by the wayside aren’t timeless at all; they’re actually quite new. They grew up alongside and in reaction to the expansion of both the federal state and the presidency—a process that began in the early 20th century but gained steam from the 1930s onward. With the growth of what Arthur Schlesinger Jr. called the “imperial presidency,” each occupant of the Oval Office has left his imprimatur on the development of what we think of as normative presidential conduct.



https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2020/02/15/why-presidency-cant-go-back-normal-trump-115362?utm_source=pocket-newtab
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🗳️ Sanders’ Nevada win makes him clear front-runner
« Reply #1218 on: February 24, 2020, 05:11:35 AM »
Bernie is on a roll.

RE

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Re: 🗳️ Sanders’ Nevada win makes him clear front-runner
« Reply #1219 on: February 24, 2020, 08:53:40 AM »
Bernie is on a roll.

RE

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And the DNC regulars are out in force to find a bigger, bolder and brighter way to ratfuck Bernie in public. On MSDNC, Chris Matthews compared Sanders' victory in Nevada to Nazi tanks rolling into Paris. Trump haters like Bill Palmer re publishing articles like The five step plan for making sure Bernie Sanders isn’t the Democratic nominee, and the DNC's shapeshifting rules changes to help ensure an establishment nominee. (Keep your eye on Superdelegates: The DNC resisted past progressive demands to eliminate superdelegates, but moved them to the second round of voting at the nominating convention. All 30 members of the Rules Committee are establishment loyalists, so the DNC reserves the right to force a second ballot at the convention, defeating the purpose of the rules change. Keep your eye on a forced second ballot.)

Equal opportunity ratfuckers.
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https://www.vox.com/2020/2/28/21157803/trump-fox-news-poll-losing-to-biden-sanders-bloomberg

Trump lashes out at Fox News for new poll showing him losing to all the Democratic candidates

The president didn’t appreciate the reality check.
By Aaron Rupar@atrupar Feb 28, 2020, 2:30pm EST

African American supporters lay their hands on President Trump as they pray for him at the conclusion of a news conference and meeting in the Cabinet Room at the White House on Thursday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Donald Trump lashed out on Friday at the network that normally covers him so favorably over a new national poll that shows him losing hypothetical head-to-head popular vote matchups against all six of the top Democratic presidential candidates.

“Worst Polls, just like in 2016 when they were so far off the mark, are the @FoxNews Polls,” Trump tweeted on Friday morning.

That tweet came 37 minutes after Fox News displayed a graphic on the air highlighting the results of a new network poll that shows Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, and Mike Bloomberg beating him handily, with Elizabeth Warren, Pete Buttigieg, and Amy Klobuchar leading him by spreads that are within the margin of error.
Fox News

As is the case with most everything Fox News broadcasts, Trump was apparently watching. And he apparently didn’t appreciate the reminder about it not in fact being the case that a majority of the country loves him.

His attack on Fox News serves as a reminder that despite a rough-and-tumble and still-uncertain Democratic primary, he’s eminently beatable in November.

While it’s obviously possible for Trump to repeat what he did in 2016 and win the election even if he loses the popular vote, there’s almost no chance of him losing the popular vote by a deficit of this magnitude against Biden, Sanders, or Bloomberg and still prevailing in the Electoral College. (Some other polls have been more favorable to Trump’s odds.)

Related
Trump’s Colorado rally featured an extended meltdown over 30 seconds of critical Fox News coverage

And considering the poll was conducted during the early part of a week that saw a historic stock market slide amid concerns about the coronavirus pandemic and the Trump administration’s capacity for dealing with it, there’s reason to believe the president’s standing isn’t improving anytime soon. Of course, we’re still months from the general election, and it’s worth remembering that Hillary Clinton also had a healthy lead over Trump at this point in the 2016 election cycle.

Still, the poll is mostly bad news for Trump. But instead of doing some self-reflection, he’s doing what he’s in the habit of doing and attacking the messenger.
Despite what Trump would have you believe, Fox News polls are reliable

While Fox News’s on-air programming is known for its occasionally absurd pro-Trump spin, its polling is as reputable as it gets. Trump, however, hasn’t been shy about indicating that he thinks the network should be rigging polls to make him look better.

Trump’s suggestion that Fox News polling shouldn’t be taken seriously because they were off in 2016 is a mistaken one. The network’s final 2016 poll found Hillary Clinton leading Trump by a 4-point spread (48 percent to 44 percent) that was quite close to Clinton’s ultimately margin of victory in the popular vote (48 percent to 46 percent). This election cycle, Fox News has consistently found Trump trailing the top candidates vying for the Democratic nomination.

Who that nominee will be remains an open question. Fox News’s new poll is its first this election cycle that shows Biden slipping out of the national frontrunner spot, with Sanders taking the lead.
Fox News

While the poll shows Trump lagging behind each of the top Democratic candidates, it also shows that voters believe Trump will win a second term. Fifty-six percent of respondents said they think Trump will be reelected — a 12 percent increase from last October.

But what voters think will happen is less important than how they plan to vote. And while Trump may not want to believe it — especially coming as it does from a network from which he expects blind loyalty — the reality is that Fox News finds that a majority of registered voters (52 percent) are already saying they’ve either definitely (45 percent) or probably (7 percent) made up their minds to vote for someone else.

The news moves fast. To stay updated, follow Aaron Rupar on Twitter, and read more of Vox’s policy and politics coverage.
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Offline azozeo

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Election Errata - Last Time There Was a Brokered Convention
« Reply #1221 on: March 01, 2020, 05:01:06 PM »


Estes Kefauver arrived at the 1952 DNC in Chicago with a plurality of delegates. Then, Adlai Stevenson won the nomination.

There’s talk that this summer’s Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee could be a contested convention, meaning no candidate has a majority of the pledged electoral votes. That leaves unpledged delegates free to vote for whomever they like to cast votes on a second ballot.

There’s also talk that if Sen. Bernie Sanders arrives with a plurality of delegates, but not a majority, he could be rejected in favor of a more moderate candidate, like former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg.

It’s happened before. In fact, the last time it happened was here in Chicago, in 1952.

The victim? Sen. Estes Kefauver of Tennessee, who is best remembered for chairing the organized crime hearings that inspired several scenes in The Godfather, Part II.


http://www.chicagomag.com/city-life/March-2020/What-Happens-If-Theres-a-Contested-Convention-Bernie-Sanders-Estes-Kefauver/?utm_source=pocket-newtab
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A Diner Exercises his Voting Franchise
« Reply #1222 on: March 01, 2020, 09:02:06 PM »


youtube-Logo-4gc2reddit-logoOff the keyboard, microphone & camera of RE



Voting by K-Dog



Follow us on Twitter @doomstead666

Friend us on Facebook



 



Published on The Doomstead Diner  March 1, 2020






Discuss this Video and Article at the Election Errata Table inside the Diner



 



Diner Admin and Author of the Chasing the Squirrel Blog K-Dog who lives in thr Super Tuesday staate of Washington cast his Ballot today in one of the Ballot Boxes sprinkled around the city of Renton, which is one of the Seattle Suburbs.  Nowadays there is no more going to the local Elementary School and going inside a Drape Covered Booth and pulling a lever.  First they went to Postal Mail voting, then when that turned out to have a lot of problems (not to mention election fraud), they started dropping down these boxes around town where you go to drop down your vote anytime after you get your Ballot in the mail.  Obviously there still can be Fraud with this system also, but hopefully it is slightly less.



Here on the Diner mosst of us make no secret of who we support in an election, and Diner Support leans heavily toward Bernie Sanders & Liz Warren.  A couple of Bloomberg Supporters sprinkled in also.  About nobody supprts Uncle Joe Biden, and DEFINITELY there are no Diners who support Trumpovetsky.  lol.  Or at least they won't admit it publicly.



Mayor Pete Buttegieg also quit the race today, cutting down the number of so-called "moderate" Democrats (really corporate sellouts), which should help Uncle Joe at the DNC, but a Brokered Convention still looms as a possibility.  In that sort of scenario, the "Super Delegates" become very critical.  A Unified Ticket of Bernie & Liz also is a possibility., with the one with the higher number of delegates taking the POTUS spot, and the other one as Veep.



As for me, although I support both Bernie & Liz, regular Diners know I don't vote.  I never have.  At the age of 11 years sold right after returning from Brazil, Bobby Kennedy was assassinated.  At that moment, I lost hope that the Amerikan political process would ever be fair and I decided not to participate in it that way.  I do however make my voice heard, and have done so since my teenage years as a Pirate Radio Talk Jockey when I excoriated Tricky Dick Nixon on my show every saturday night after midnight, when we fired up the Transmitter.  We only reached Queens and Long Island motly, although we could reach Manhattan if we turned the antenna around.



Today with the internet, the potential is there to reach many more people than that.  Thus I run the Doomstead Diner.



 



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Offline RE

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Re: A Diner Exercises his Voting Franchise
« Reply #1223 on: March 02, 2020, 12:07:19 AM »
Now UP on GEI!  :icon_sunny:

RE

posted on 02 March 2020

A Diner Exercises His Voting Franchise

by Reverse Engineer, Doomstead Diner

John B. Lounsbury Ph.D. CFP

Managing Editor Econintersect.com

Senior Contributor TheStreet.com

Highly ranked author Seeking Alpha

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Offline RE

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🗳️ Klobuchar and Buttigieg endorsing Biden after dropping
« Reply #1224 on: March 03, 2020, 01:18:48 AM »
More Roadkill.

RE

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Offline Surly1

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Bloomberg out, endorses Biden
« Reply #1225 on: March 04, 2020, 07:27:50 AM »
Bloomberg suspends presidential campaign, endorses Biden



Michael Bloomberg, who spent hundreds of millions of dollars to self-fund his 2020 presidential run, announced Wednesday that he is suspending his campaign after a poor performance on Super Tuesday and will endorse Joe Biden.

The state of play: Bloomberg opted to skip campaigning in early states, staking his candidacy on a string of Super Tuesday victories to launch him to frontrunner status, but that plan was ultimately felled by the resurgence of Joe Biden's campaign.

Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar both exited the race between the South Carolina primary and Super Tuesday and chose to back Biden — along with Beto O'Rourke.
On Super Tuesday, Biden scored surprise victories in states like Texas, Massachusetts and Minnesota — and racked up huge wins across the South.
While Bloomberg was viable in multiple states, he didn't win any — and his only victory was in the territory of American Samoa.
What he's saying: "I’ve always believed that defeating Donald Trump starts with uniting behind the candidate with the best shot to do it. After yesterday’s vote, it is clear that candidate is my friend and a great American, Joe Biden," Bloomberg said in a statement.

"I’ve known Joe for a very long time. I know his decency, his honesty, and his commitment to the issues that are so important to our country – including gun safety, health care, climate change, and good jobs."
The big picture: Bloomberg's self-funding drew backlash from an increasingly progressive party that is skeptical of the role of big money in politics. Bloomberg was one of two billionaires in the race, joined by Tom Steyer, who dropped out over the weekend.

Bloomberg's record as mayor of New York City drew controversy, particularly his support of stop-and-frisk. He apologized for the policy in November, acknowledging that it unfairly targeted people of color.
He faced criticism for his use of non-disclosure agreements after being accused of harassment and gender discrimination by former female employees of Bloomberg LP.
He also faced an ethical conflict related to his ownership of Bloomberg News. The eponymous founder refused to allow his company's journalism arm to investigate him as a candidate, forcing it to extend that policy to all 2020 Democrats.
Bloomberg moved to directly take on President Trump from the start of his run. Both campaigns took out 60-second ad slots during the Super Bowl, and Bloomberg became a repeated target of Trump's tweets.

Trump gave Bloomberg a signature nickname — "Mini Mike" — and said he "is going nowhere, just wasting his money."
What's next: Bloomberg has pledged to pay his massive staff to continue to work through November to support whoever becomes the eventual Democratic nominee.

This story is breaking news. Please check back for updates.
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🗳️ Elizabeth Warren, Once a Front-Runner, Drops Out of Presidential Race
« Reply #1226 on: March 06, 2020, 06:10:23 AM »
Well that does it for the Debates.  It's now One-on-One,  Biden v. Bernie.  That will be interesting.

RE

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/05/us/politics/elizabeth-warren-drops-out.html

Elizabeth Warren, Once a Front-Runner, Drops Out of Presidential Race

Ms. Warren, a senator and former law professor, staked her campaign on fighting corruption and changing the rules of the economy.


Video
transcript
0:00/1:11
Warren Calls Campaign ‘The Honor of a Lifetime’
Senator Elizabeth Warren discussed why she decided to exit the race for the Democratic nomination, and said she was not ready to endorse one of her rivals.

    “I will not be running for president in 2020, but I guarantee I will stay in the fight for the hardworking folks across this country who have gotten the short end of the stick over and over. That’s been the fight of my life, and it will continue to be so.” Reporter: “Will you be making an endorsement today? We know that you spoke with both Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders yesterday.” “Not today, not today. I need some space around this, and want to take a little time to think a little more. This has been the honor of a lifetime. Ten years ago, I was teaching a few blocks from here, and talking about what was broken in America and ideas for how to fix it, and pretty much nobody wanted to hear it. And I’ve had a chance to get out there and talk with millions of people. Gender in this race, you know, that is the trap question for every woman. If you say, ‘Yeah, there was sexism in this race,’ everyone says ‘Whiner.’ And if you say, ‘No, there was no sexism,’ about a bazillion women think, ‘What planet do you live on?’”

1:10Warren Calls Campaign ‘The Honor of a Lifetime’
Senator Elizabeth Warren discussed why she decided to exit the race for the Democratic nomination, and said she was not ready to endorse one of her rivals.CreditCredit...Ruth Fremson/The New York Times
Shane GoldmacherAstead W. Herndon

By Shane Goldmacher and Astead W. Herndon

    March 5, 2020

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Senator Elizabeth Warren entered the 2020 race with expansive plans to use the federal government to remake American society, pressing to strip power and wealth from a moneyed class that she saw as fundamentally corrupting the country’s economic and political order.

She exited on Thursday after her avalanche of progressive policy proposals, which briefly elevated her to front-runner status last fall, failed to attract a broader political coalition in a Democratic Party increasingly, if not singularly, focused on defeating President Trump.

Her departure means that a Democratic field that began as the most diverse  in American history — and included six women — is now essentially down to two white men: former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Senator Bernie Sanders.

Ms. Warren said that from the start, she had been told there were only two true lanes in the 2020 contest: a liberal one dominated by Mr. Sanders, 78, and a moderate one led by Mr. Biden, 77.

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“I thought that wasn’t right,” Ms. Warren said in front of her house in Cambridge as she suspended her campaign, “But evidently I was wrong.”

Though her vision energized many liberals — the unlikely chant of “big, structural change” rang out at her rallies — it did not find a wide enough audience among the party’s working-class and diverse base. Now her potential endorsement is highly sought, and both Mr. Sanders and Mr. Biden have spoken with her in the days since Super Tuesday losses sealed her political fate, though she revealed precious little of her intentions on Thursday.

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“I need some space around this,” she said.

Ms. Warren’s impact on the race was far greater than just the outcome for her own candidacy. Her policy plans drove the agenda. She effectively pushed former Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg of New York, a centrist billionaire, out of the race with a dominant debate performance last month.

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And her ability to raise well over $100 million and fully fund a presidential campaign without holding high-dollar fund-raisers demonstrated that other candidates, beyond Mr. Sanders and his intensely loyal small-dollar donors, could do so in the future.
ImageMs. Warren with her husband, Bruce, and their dog, Bailey, at their home in Cambridge, Mass., on Thursday. She announced her exit from the race in a news conference outside.
Ms. Warren with her husband, Bruce, and their dog, Bailey, at their home in Cambridge, Mass., on Thursday. She announced her exit from the race in a news conference outside.Credit...David Degner for The New York Times

Ms. Warren’s political demise was a death by a thousand cuts, not a dramatic implosion but a steady decline. In the fall, most national polls showed that Ms. Warren was the national pacesetter in the Democratic field. By December, she had fallen to the edge of the top tier, wounded by an October debate during which her opponents relentlessly attacked her, particularly on her embrace of “Medicare for all.”

She invested heavily in the early states, with a ground game that was the envy of her rivals. But it did not pay off: In Iowa, where she had bet much of her candidacy — she had to take out a $3 million line of credit before the caucuses to ensure she could pay her bills in late January — she wound up in a disappointing third place.

Ms. Warren slid to fourth in New Hampshire and Nevada, and to fifth in South Carolina. By Super Tuesday, her campaign was effectively over — with the final blow losing her home state, Massachusetts.

The California results strikingly laid bare the demographic cul-de-sac her candidacy had become as Ms. Warren struggled to win over voters beyond college-educated white people, in particular white women. She was poised to win delegates in only a handful of highly educated enclaves: places like San Francisco, Santa Monica and West Hollywood.

Though the campaign failed to generate the widespread backing necessary to win the nomination, Ms. Warren retained a core of fierce loyalists dedicated to her promise of wholesale change.

Her selfie lines were filled with well-wishers — young girls seeking her trademark pinkie promise (“I’m running for president because that’s what girls do”), cutouts of Ms. Warren’s likeness, and tattoos of her adopted slogan: “Nevertheless, she persisted.” When her staff gathered Thursday, many were clad in liberty green, the color her campaign adopted to symbolize its togetherness.

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“One of the hardest parts of this is all those pinkie promises,” a visibly emotional Ms. Warren said, describing the “trap” of gender for female candidates.

“If you say, ‘Yeah, there was sexism in this race,’ everyone says, ‘Whiner!’” Ms. Warren said. “If you say, ‘No, there was no sexism,’ about a bazillion women think, ‘What planet do you live on?’”

Before her exit, Ms. Warren accumulated the second-largest number of Democratic delegates of any woman to run for president in history, behind only Hillary Clinton, the 2016 nominee.

The party’s left lane is now clearer for Mr. Sanders. His supporters and other progressives have spent the last two days gingerly reaching out to Ms. Warren’s orbit and plotting in private conversations about how to keep the two liberal standard-bearers aligned.

In January, Mr. Sanders and Ms. Warren clashed in a deeply personal way after she confirmed a report that in a private meeting before the campaign began, he told her he believed that a woman could not win the White House in 2020. During a debate, Mr. Sanders strongly denied having made the remark, and Ms. Warren confronted him onstage afterward, accusing him of calling her a “liar.” Relations have been chilly since.

In her call with Mr. Biden, Ms. Warren revealed so little of her endorsement plans that a person familiar with the call remarked on her “great poker face.”

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Ms. Warren arrived on the political scene in the aftermath of the 2008 financial collapse and shot to stardom with her indictments of Wall Street and unfettered capitalism.

In 2016, some progressive organizations mounted “Run Warren Run” campaigns and Mr. Sanders floated her as a possible challenger to Mrs. Clinton, but Ms. Warren declined to run.

Joining the 2020 race, she found a changed political terrain. Mr. Sanders’s political stock had soared after his 2016 run, giving him an immediate advantage in fund-raising and name recognition that complicated Ms. Warren’s electoral path.

Mr. Trump’s election seemed to shock the Democratic base into an acute focus on electability. Voters frequently second-guessed their electoral choices as they tried to game out which candidate would be best equipped to beat him.

Mr. Biden, in particular, has capitalized on this anxiety.

Ms. Warren’s allies and supporters said the electability question  — who would be the surest bet to defeat the president — disproportionately hurt female candidates after Mrs. Clinton’s unexpected loss in 2016.

“All they heard all along was what a risk the women were,” said Christina Reynolds, a vice president of Emily’s List, a leading Democratic women’s group that endorsed Ms. Warren this week, only after Senator Amy Klobuchar withdrew.

Ms. Reynolds said that evaluation was as wrong as it was widespread. “The idea that that doesn’t hang around the women’s necks is crazy,” she said.

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Ms. Warren’s campaign was slow to directly address questions of electability, seeming to believe her rise in the polls last year spoke for itself. But as the calendar turned to 2020, it was apparent that the issue was hobbling her candidacy as precinct captains and volunteers warned Ms. Warren that it was what they were hearing about from voters.

Ms. Warren’s decline had begun in earnest at the October debate, when she was pressed on how she would pay for Medicare for all and had no answer. It took weeks to detail her plan, but by then her perceived trustworthiness seemed to have taken a hit: The candidate with a plan for everything did not have one to finance the biggest issue of the campaign.

When she did roll out details, she was criticized by those on the left for compromising too much and by centrists for the sheer size of the plan. The episode captured a fundamental pain point for her candidacy: She was too much of an insider for those demanding revolution, and too much of an outsider for those who wanted to tinker with the system and focus on beating Mr. Trump.

As the race intensified in the fall, Ms. Warren was reluctant to strike back at her opponents, even as they undermined her image. Pete Buttigieg made deep incursions into her support among educated white voters but she did not call him out in earnest until December, even as he flooded the Iowa airwaves with a moderate message undercutting her progressive platform.

While most campaigns used the megaphone of mass television ads to cut through the media filter, Ms. Warren’s braintrust was cool to the power of commercials from the start, preferring on-the-ground and digital organizing.

At times, Ms. Warren’s campaign did not reflect the urgency of a candidacy trying to make history and promote a program of systemic upheaval that included government-run health care, free public college, student debt cancellation, breaking up Big Tech, universal child care, and tax increases on the wealthy.

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But after weak finishes in Iowa and New Hampshire, Ms. Warren charged into the February debate planning to confront Mr. Bloomberg in his first appearance onstage. In Mr. Bloomberg, she found a rare rival she seemed truly comfortable attacking, an embodiment of the influence of money.

She slashed. He stumbled. Mr. Bloomberg would never recover. Ms. Warren’s donations surged, but her vote count did not.

She would bend a principled stand that week as well, declining to disavow a new super PAC that would air nearly $15 million in pro-Warren advertising, saying she did not want to unilaterally disarm. The irony was not lost on her opponents: The anti-big money candidate  wound up with the biggest super PAC in the race to date.

In recent days, Ms. Warren had taken to speaking to voters directly about their electability fears, imploring them to tune out pundits.

“Cast a vote from your heart,” she said Tuesday.

Ms. Warren’s supporters were devoted to making the party more progressive to the end. In Illinois, where Ms. Warren’s campaign was scheduled to hold a post-Super Tuesday phone banking session, staff and supporters refused to cancel. They used their time to support Marie Newman, the local challenger running against an incumbent Democrat opposed to abortion rights.

Astead W. Herndon reported from Cambridge, and Shane Goldmacher from New York. Jonathan Martin contributed reporting from New York.
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Sen. Kamala D. Harris endorses Joe Biden for president
« Reply #1227 on: March 08, 2020, 05:35:03 AM »
Meet your Dem VP nominee.

Sen. Kamala D. Harris endorses Joe Biden for president

Cleve Wootson
JACKSON, Miss. — Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) on Sunday endorsed Joe Biden for president, the latest of his former rivals to give a nod to the former vice president’s candidacy.

In a statement, Harris said she felt that Biden was best prepared to “steer America through these turbulent times.”

“When I started my run for president, I said America needs a president who reflects the decency and dignity of the American people; a president who speaks the truth; and a president who fights for those whose voices are too often overlooked or ignored,” Harris said in a statement released on Sunday morning.

Harris is the fifth former rival to endorse Biden since his commanding victory in the South Carolina primary. Former South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) and former Texas Congressman Beto O’Rourke endorsed Biden in advance of the pivotal slate of Super Tuesday states. Former Massachusetts governor Deval Patrick endorsed Biden on Friday.
"Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world's grief. Do justly now, love mercy now, walk humbly now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it."

 

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