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🚢 Why the U.S. Is Stuck With a Fight Over Immigration: A Debate
« Reply #795 on: July 26, 2018, 04:24:54 AM »
https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2018-07-25/why-the-u-s-is-stuck-with-a-fight-over-immigration

Politics & Policy
Why the U.S. Is Stuck With a Fight Over Immigration: A Debate


The U.S. needs more foreign residents, but public sentiment makes that unlikely.
By Tyler Cowen
and Noah Smith
July 25, 2018, 8:00 AM AKDT

Part of what made America great. Source: Bettmann/Getty Images
Tyler Cowen is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is a professor of economics at George Mason University and writes for the blog Marginal Revolution. His books include “The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream.”
Read more opinion
Follow @tylercowen on Twitter
Noah Smith is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He was an assistant professor of finance at Stony Brook University, and he blogs at Noahpinion.
Read more opinion
Follow @Noahpinion on Twitter
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No issue these days draws as much attention, and heated rhetoric, in the U.S. as immigration. Indeed, immigration has jumped to the top of polls as the most important problem facing the nation, ahead of dissatisfaction with America’s political leadership. Bloomberg Opinion columnists Tyler Cowen and Noah Smith recently met online to debate the role immigration plays in the nation’s economic and political life.

Noah Smith: Tyler, in a recent article, you predicted that President Donald Trump might shift the U.S. toward a more closed immigration policy in the long term. Though polls show increasing support for immigrants and immigration, you noted a paper showing that thinking about immigrants makes Americans tend to support redistribution less. Your conclusion was that although most Americans might have warm feelings toward immigrants in the abstract, the minority who are intensely anti-immigrant will prevail.

I think there are reasons to doubt this conclusion. The first reason is that illegal immigration and low-skilled immigration — the types that people tend to feel most negatively about — are both way down from a decade ago. Because these unpopular inflows are simply less of an issue, the pressure for restriction might abate quickly. Meanwhile, with U.S. fertility rates low, the U.S. needs skilled immigrants to come in and pay taxes to support the comfortable retirements of the elderly native-born. We might be seeing a situation similar to the mid-1800s, in which the needs of the U.S. economy override a brief bout of nativism.

Tyler Cowen: I still don’t see a renewed dose of immigration increases in America’s immediate or even midterm future. Immigration has become a major issue all around Europe, and pretty uniformly it is helping right-wing parties, not the left. Democrats fear this scenario for the U.S., even if immigration is polling pretty well at the moment. And so Democrats will keep some distance from the issue, more than one might have thought a few years ago.

Democrats also have begun to rethink the demographic-dividend strategy, based on the premise that immigrants will continue to vote for the Democrats in disproportionate numbers. According to one estimate, in 2016 perhaps as many as 28 percent of Latinos voted Republican, more than many observers had been expecting. The very successes of assimilation mean that many immigrants will end up voting Republican. Furthermore, a lot of recent legal arrivals are among the strongest opponents of illegal immigration into this country. I increasingly doubt that Democrats will be willing to bet the farm on a political strategy to boost immigration.

NS: I agree with you that the idea of importing Democratic voters is both a bad idea and a wrong idea. Texas, where Republican candidates often win more than 40 percent of the Latino vote, seems like the most plausible future.

I also think that the age of mass Latino immigration is now over. It was mostly over even before Trump, and a combination of Trump’s harsh treatment of migrants and improving conditions in Central America seem likely to halt even the trickle that remains.

But that doesn’t mean America’s need for immigrants will go away. With an aging population and falling fertility, the country needs the tax dollars that skilled immigrants provide, in order to support pensions and local government budgets. U.S. companies also need skilled immigrants in order to maintain technological dominance. And shrinking, declining cities need immigrants to keep them from becoming ghost towns. Those needs aren’t going to go away any time soon. So I think that there will be demand for continued inflows of immigrants, unlike during the mid-20th-century baby boom when fertility was high.

TC: I fully agree that we should increase immigration into the U.S. I just don’t think we will. And surely you would admit we follow all kinds of other policies that don’t make sense in economic terms. Right now people just feel too nervous and too polarized about the cultural issues, and I think that will prevent further progress on immigration.

We agree that Latino immigration has peaked. Where then should the next wave of immigrants come from? Perhaps South Asia and Africa are the logical choices, but I don’t think those are the easiest regions to sell to the voters, including Democrats. That both regions have significant Muslim populations doesn’t make this any easier, even though Muslim immigration to the U.S. has in general gone quite well.

Are so many Europeans keen to come here? I don’t quite see it. Eastern Europeans would be a logical choice, but it’s also well understood that Polish and Romanian immigration turned out to be one motivating factor behind Brexit. These days, I just see too much political risk aversion.

NS: The next wave of immigration would — and probably should — come from China and India, and to some extent the Philippines. Those have been among the largest source countries in recent years, and immigration tends to follow on itself. Both countries have environmental and political downsides that make the U.S. an attractive option for skilled workers, and I think this will continue to be true. Politically, Asian immigrants are viewed as positively as European immigrants. Even Republicans might view Chinese immigration favorably, given the existence of a strong conservative current within the Chinese-American community.

As for the political sensitivity of immigration, I wonder if the issue isn’t simply a stalking horse for divisions between groups of native-born Americans — religious versus nonreligious, black versus white, urban versus rural, etc. The parallel I’m thinking of is the period before the Civil War, when the anti-immigration Know-Nothing movement suddenly flared up in the North. After the war, anti-immigrant sentiment essentially vanished.

I now see the U.S. as being in a cold civil war. We may not fight with guns — in fact, I’ll be surprised if we do — but one way or another, the contest between two competing visions of America is now going to the finish line. Afterward, perhaps in a decade or so, I wouldn’t be surprised if the winning side starts bringing in immigrants again, for economic reasons.

TC: If we really are in a cold civil war, as you suggest, that does not bode well for more immigration. As for Chinese migrants, I think, like Australia and New Zealand, we are due for some scandals concerning how well Chinese immigrant-spies have penetrated core American institutions. That won’t help the cause of Chinese immigration.

You yourself note that last time, in the 19th century, it took a massive Civil War to shift the coalitions back toward favoring more immigration. These days, our ideological conflicts don’t seem to have finish lines, and the American system of government is strongly set up to favor blocks and veto powers. On immigration, I think we’ll be lucky to maintain the status quo.
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Re: 🚢 Why the U.S. Is Stuck With a Fight Over Immigration: A Debate
« Reply #796 on: July 26, 2018, 05:17:15 AM »
https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2018-07-25/why-the-u-s-is-stuck-with-a-fight-over-immigration

Politics & Policy
Why the U.S. Is Stuck With a Fight Over Immigration: A Debate


The U.S. needs more foreign residents, but public sentiment makes that unlikely.
By Tyler Cowen
and Noah Smith
July 25, 2018, 8:00 AM AKDT

Part of what made America great. Source: Bettmann/Getty Images
Tyler Cowen is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is a professor of economics at George Mason University and writes for the blog Marginal Revolution. His books include “The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream.”
Read more opinion
Follow @tylercowen on Twitter
Noah Smith is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He was an assistant professor of finance at Stony Brook University, and he blogs at Noahpinion.
Read more opinion
Follow @Noahpinion on Twitter
COMMENTS
13
LISTEN TO ARTICLE
6:22
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No issue these days draws as much attention, and heated rhetoric, in the U.S. as immigration. Indeed, immigration has jumped to the top of polls as the most important problem facing the nation, ahead of dissatisfaction with America’s political leadership. Bloomberg Opinion columnists Tyler Cowen and Noah Smith recently met online to debate the role immigration plays in the nation’s economic and political life.

Noah Smith: Tyler, in a recent article, you predicted that President Donald Trump might shift the U.S. toward a more closed immigration policy in the long term. Though polls show increasing support for immigrants and immigration, you noted a paper showing that thinking about immigrants makes Americans tend to support redistribution less. Your conclusion was that although most Americans might have warm feelings toward immigrants in the abstract, the minority who are intensely anti-immigrant will prevail.

I think there are reasons to doubt this conclusion. The first reason is that illegal immigration and low-skilled immigration — the types that people tend to feel most negatively about — are both way down from a decade ago. Because these unpopular inflows are simply less of an issue, the pressure for restriction might abate quickly. Meanwhile, with U.S. fertility rates low, the U.S. needs skilled immigrants to come in and pay taxes to support the comfortable retirements of the elderly native-born. We might be seeing a situation similar to the mid-1800s, in which the needs of the U.S. economy override a brief bout of nativism.

Tyler Cowen: I still don’t see a renewed dose of immigration increases in America’s immediate or even midterm future. Immigration has become a major issue all around Europe, and pretty uniformly it is helping right-wing parties, not the left. Democrats fear this scenario for the U.S., even if immigration is polling pretty well at the moment. And so Democrats will keep some distance from the issue, more than one might have thought a few years ago.

Democrats also have begun to rethink the demographic-dividend strategy, based on the premise that immigrants will continue to vote for the Democrats in disproportionate numbers. According to one estimate, in 2016 perhaps as many as 28 percent of Latinos voted Republican, more than many observers had been expecting. The very successes of assimilation mean that many immigrants will end up voting Republican. Furthermore, a lot of recent legal arrivals are among the strongest opponents of illegal immigration into this country. I increasingly doubt that Democrats will be willing to bet the farm on a political strategy to boost immigration.

NS: I agree with you that the idea of importing Democratic voters is both a bad idea and a wrong idea. Texas, where Republican candidates often win more than 40 percent of the Latino vote, seems like the most plausible future.

I also think that the age of mass Latino immigration is now over. It was mostly over even before Trump, and a combination of Trump’s harsh treatment of migrants and improving conditions in Central America seem likely to halt even the trickle that remains.

But that doesn’t mean America’s need for immigrants will go away. With an aging population and falling fertility, the country needs the tax dollars that skilled immigrants provide, in order to support pensions and local government budgets. U.S. companies also need skilled immigrants in order to maintain technological dominance. And shrinking, declining cities need immigrants to keep them from becoming ghost towns. Those needs aren’t going to go away any time soon. So I think that there will be demand for continued inflows of immigrants, unlike during the mid-20th-century baby boom when fertility was high.

TC: I fully agree that we should increase immigration into the U.S. I just don’t think we will. And surely you would admit we follow all kinds of other policies that don’t make sense in economic terms. Right now people just feel too nervous and too polarized about the cultural issues, and I think that will prevent further progress on immigration.

We agree that Latino immigration has peaked. Where then should the next wave of immigrants come from? Perhaps South Asia and Africa are the logical choices, but I don’t think those are the easiest regions to sell to the voters, including Democrats. That both regions have significant Muslim populations doesn’t make this any easier, even though Muslim immigration to the U.S. has in general gone quite well.

Are so many Europeans keen to come here? I don’t quite see it. Eastern Europeans would be a logical choice, but it’s also well understood that Polish and Romanian immigration turned out to be one motivating factor behind Brexit. These days, I just see too much political risk aversion.

NS: The next wave of immigration would — and probably should — come from China and India, and to some extent the Philippines. Those have been among the largest source countries in recent years, and immigration tends to follow on itself. Both countries have environmental and political downsides that make the U.S. an attractive option for skilled workers, and I think this will continue to be true. Politically, Asian immigrants are viewed as positively as European immigrants. Even Republicans might view Chinese immigration favorably, given the existence of a strong conservative current within the Chinese-American community.

As for the political sensitivity of immigration, I wonder if the issue isn’t simply a stalking horse for divisions between groups of native-born Americans — religious versus nonreligious, black versus white, urban versus rural, etc. The parallel I’m thinking of is the period before the Civil War, when the anti-immigration Know-Nothing movement suddenly flared up in the North. After the war, anti-immigrant sentiment essentially vanished.

I now see the U.S. as being in a cold civil war. We may not fight with guns — in fact, I’ll be surprised if we do — but one way or another, the contest between two competing visions of America is now going to the finish line. Afterward, perhaps in a decade or so, I wouldn’t be surprised if the winning side starts bringing in immigrants again, for economic reasons.

TC: If we really are in a cold civil war, as you suggest, that does not bode well for more immigration. As for Chinese migrants, I think, like Australia and New Zealand, we are due for some scandals concerning how well Chinese immigrant-spies have penetrated core American institutions. That won’t help the cause of Chinese immigration.

You yourself note that last time, in the 19th century, it took a massive Civil War to shift the coalitions back toward favoring more immigration. These days, our ideological conflicts don’t seem to have finish lines, and the American system of government is strongly set up to favor blocks and veto powers. On immigration, I think we’ll be lucky to maintain the status quo.


Democrats also have begun to rethink the demographic-dividend strategy, based on the premise that immigrants will continue to vote for the Democrats in disproportionate numbers. According to one estimate, in 2016 perhaps as many as 28 percent of Latinos voted Republican, more than many observers had been expecting. The very successes of assimilation mean that many immigrants will end up voting Republican. Furthermore, a lot of recent legal arrivals are among the strongest opponents of illegal immigration into this country. I increasingly doubt that Democrats will be willing to bet the farm on a political strategy to boost immigration.


They better rethink it. But I don't see much sign of that, myself. I see a very stubborn attachment to a whole laundry basket full of very questionable assumptions, and a party that sold out its base of poor white people and won't ever get them back.
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🚢 Trump threatens shutdown over wall, immigration
« Reply #797 on: July 30, 2018, 01:10:04 AM »
MOAR Goobermint Shutdown threats!  ::)

RE

https://www.cnn.com/2018/07/29/politics/donald-trump-shutdown-wall/index.html

Trump threatens shutdown over wall, immigration

By Eli Watkins, CNN

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/glAcWe1NNq4" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/glAcWe1NNq4</a>

Updated 10:58 AM ET, Sun July 29, 2018
Trump close country wall immigration sot_00000000

Current Time 1:31
/
Duration Time 1:32
 
Rep. Marsha Blackburn newday
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What it would take to build Trump's border wall
Mexican Secretary of Finance and Public Credit Luis Videgaray walks to the IMFC Plenary Session during the IMF and World Bank Group 2016 Spring Meetings on April 16, 2016 in Washington, DC. / AFP / MOLLY RILEY (Photo credit should read MOLLY RILEY/AFP/Getty Images)
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US President Donald Trump (C) is shown border wall prototypes in San Diego, California on March 13, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
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Washington (CNN)President Donald Trump threatened to push the government into shutdown ahead of the coming appropriations deadline in September if Congress does not fund his border wall and change the nation's immigration laws.

"I would be willing to 'shut down' government if the Democrats do not give us the votes for Border Security, which includes the Wall! Must get rid of Lottery, Catch & Release etc. and finally go to system of Immigration based on MERIT! We need great people coming into our Country!" Trump tweeted Sunday.
Trump has previously floated the possibility of a government shutdown over border security and immigration, and on Sunday he made his threat explicit, saying he would do so unless Congress funds his proposed wall, which he promised Mexico would pay for, and puts in place his preferred immigration policies.
In May, Trump suggested "closing up the country for a while" if he did not get his wall.

"They don't want the wall," Trump said. "But we're going to get the wall, even if we have to think about closing up the country for a while."
Sunday's shutdown threat from Trump also echoed a remark he made in February when he said "I'd love to see a shutdown" if the government did not agree to address immigration.
Congress ultimately passed a spending bill in March that funded the government through September. Trump threatened at the time to veto the spending agreement, but eventually signed the bill while expressing his displeasure with Congress.

"I said to Congress, I will never sign another bill like this again," Trump said in March.

A shutdown over Trump's wall at the September deadline would mark the third lapse in appropriations this year, following a shutdown in January as Democrats battled with the Trump administration and congressional Republicans on protections for "Dreamers" as well as a brief shutdown when Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky blocked a spending vote.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced in June that he was canceling much of the Senate's August recess, saying the chamber needed the additional time to make progress on Trump's nominees and pass appropriations bills. And with the House out on August recess, there's not much time left before the deadline that both chambers will be in session.
Both Speaker of the House Paul Ryan and McConnell met with Trump last week to discuss funding the government.
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Re: The Official Refugee Thread
« Reply #798 on: July 30, 2018, 08:31:46 AM »
There is only one party immigrants can be counted on voting for.  The party of doom.



326,955,688 is our current number.  Climate is going to smash food production and we are fucked.  The population has more than doubled since WWII and we still let people who can't do math make decisions.

THIS MUST STOP
« Last Edit: July 30, 2018, 08:35:30 AM by K-Dog »
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Re: 🚢 Trump threatens shutdown over wall, immigration
« Reply #799 on: July 30, 2018, 04:32:05 PM »
MOAR Goobermint Shutdown threats!  ::)

RE

https://www.cnn.com/2018/07/29/politics/donald-trump-shutdown-wall/index.html

Trump threatens shutdown over wall, immigration

Oh please, Jesus, please. Shut the government down, you vile orange fuck. Pretty fucking please.
And try to pin it on the Ds.
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Re: The Official Refugee Thread
« Reply #800 on: July 30, 2018, 10:28:58 PM »
who patrols the border during the shutdown? Another own goal.
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🚢 Judge Orders Trump Administration To Fully Restore DACA
« Reply #801 on: August 04, 2018, 05:23:39 AM »



Law
Judge Orders Trump Administration To Fully Restore DACA

August 3, 201810:52 PM ET

Vanessa Romo


President Trump in January 2018. On Friday, a federal judge ruled the administration has not provided adequate justification for ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.
Evan Vucci/AP

A Washington, D.C.-based federal judge ruled on Friday that the Trump administration must fully restore the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, saying the government's rationale for dropping it is inadequate.

The order by U.S. District Judge John Bates barring the administration from ending DACA is the third such mandate by a district court, and the latest blow to the administration's efforts to eliminate DACA.

President Trump announced plans to shutter the program, which protects young immigrants who came to the U.S. as children from deportation, in September 2017. Since then the Department of Homeland Security has stopped accepting new applications and processing renewals.

In the 25-page opinion, Bates also denied a motion by the Department of Homeland Security to vacate a previous decision in which he determined the administration's explanations for phasing out the Obama-era program were "arbitrary and capricious."
Federal Judge Upholds DACA, Calling White House Decision To Rescind It 'Capricious'
The Two-Way
Federal Judge Upholds DACA, Calling White House Decision To Rescind It 'Capricious'

Bates had stayed his April ruling to restart DACA within 90 days, giving Homeland Security attorneys an opportunity "to better explain its view that DACA is unlawful." But on Friday, he concluded the government's legal judgments remained "inadequately explained."

The judge's conclusion says:

    "The Court has already once given DHS the opportunity to remedy these deficiencies—either by providing a coherent explanation of its legal opinion or by reissuing its decision for bona fide policy reasons that would preclude judicial review—so it will not do so again."

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2nd Federal Court Blocks Trump From Rescinding DACA
The Two-Way
2nd Federal Court Blocks Trump From Rescinding DACA

California and New York district court judges have also ruled against the Trump administration, finding that the manner in which it concluded DACA was unlawful and violated the Administrative Procedures Act. DHS is appealing those judgments.

Bates did grant Homeland Security's request for time to consider an appeal. The government has 20 days to submit its petition. If that effort is unsuccessful, DACA will have to be fully implemented on Aug. 23.

In closing, Bates wrote that Friday's ruling does not imply that the government cannot revoke DACA but that it simply has not provided a sound legal justification for doing so.

"A conclusory assertion that a prior policy is illegal, accompanied by a hodgepodge of illogical or post hoc policy assertions, simply will not do," Bates wrote.
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🚢 Judge tells Trump administration to clean up the immigration mess it made
« Reply #802 on: August 05, 2018, 04:01:39 AM »
https://thinkprogress.org/judge-slams-trump-administrations-unacceptable-efforts-to-reunite-immigrant-families-dad6d184e1e7/

Judge tells Trump administration to clean up the immigration mess it made
The government is told it can't expect the ACLU to clean up the mess it's made of immigration policy.
Stephanie Griffith
Aug 4, 2018, 8:29 am   


EL PASO, TX - JULY 26: A woman, identified only as Heydi and her daughter Mishel,6, look at a map of the United States as they figure out where their sponsor lives after being reunited in El Paso, Texas last month after being separated for about two months. CREDIT: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A federal judge slammed the Trump administration’s foot-dragging in reuniting parents and young children separated under the government’s harsh immigration policies, calling the slow progress in reunifying families “unacceptable.”

Judge Dana Sabraw rejected the administration’s efforts to pass the task of reuniting immigrant parents and children to the American Civil Liberties Union, saying in a hearing conducted by telephone late Friday that the government is “100 percent” responsible for bringing back together the families that it ripped apart with its “zero tolerance” policy.

Sabraw ordered the administration to name a dedicated official who would be responsible for overseeing the effort going forward. The judge rejected the Trump administration’s efforts to pass responsibility to the ACLU for tracking down some 500 parents removed from the country without their children, CNN reported.

Sabraw said that if the government doesn’t track down the parents, the children risk being “permanently orphaned.” The judge called the government’s foot-dragging “unacceptable.”
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“Many of these parents were removed from the country without their child, all of this is the result of the government’s separation and then inability and failure to track and reunite,” Sabraw said.

“In reviewing the status report it appears that only 12 or 13 of close to 500 parents have been located, which is just unacceptable at this point,” Sabraw said.
U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen speaks during the Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity Summit on July 31, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Kevin Hagen/Getty Images)
Trump administration says it isn’t responsible for reuniting deported parents and children

CNN reported that Sabraw has order the administration to name one or two officials who will be the point persons leading the effort to reunite families, and to provide a detailed action plan for reuniting children with their parents, who in many cases have already been deported.

As ThinkProgress reported on Thursday, the government wants the ACLU, which has filed a lawsuit on behalf of the separated families, to take the lead in fixing a mess that the Trump administration created with its zero tolerance policy that forced families to be torn asunder.
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The U.S. Department of Justice suggested that the ACLU could use its “network of law firms, volunteers and others” to help reunite the families.

Speaking to MSNBC Friday night, Lee Gelernt, deputy director of the ACLU’s immigrants’ rights project, said the government bears the responsibility for reuniting families, although the organization is doing what it can to help. He accused the Trump administration, however, of withholding vital information that the organization needs to help reunite families.

“The government is sitting on information that could help us, and they haven’t given it to us,” Gelernt told the All In with Chris Hayes program.

“They have phone numbers of parents, they haven’t given it to us. We got addresses from them — sometimes it’s just a city with 700,000 people. That was the address they gave us. They’re telling us to get us the phone numbers, they need eight more days. I mean, that’s terrible,” Gelernt said.

He added that the situation for these young children is getting more dire as weeks drag on since being wrested away from their parents.
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“I think without this judge’s ruling, we may have been looking at 5,000 kids separated by now. Now we’re down to 500, but those 500, as the judge said, are critical. We’re talking about them being orphaned if we don’t find these parents.”

Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-OR), who has been one of the most proactive U.S. lawmakers on the family separation issue, told CNN’s Anderson Cooper 360 late Friday that a big part of the problem was that officials did a sloppy, incomplete job of gathering data that could later be used to reunite families.

“The situation is, that the government has so botched the connection between the parents and the children that they’d like to shed that responsibility and put it off onto someone else,” he said.

“In terms of street addresses, many of their files just say things like ‘sin calle’ which means ‘without a street,’ or maybe lists a city and no other details and they’re finding it difficult to find the parents since they didn’t track the information. They’d like to say, well, we messed it up, but let’s make sure someone else has to clean this up.”
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Re: The Official Refugee Thread
« Reply #803 on: August 05, 2018, 01:08:42 PM »
Quote
The government is told it can't expect the ACLU to clean up the mess it's made of immigration policy.

The Judge should put the Trump lawyer in the kink for contempt of court for for even suggesting the ACLU should clean up the mess.

Then when the lawyer gets out he can die from a poisoned doorknob for revealing the ACLU is actually now an NGO.  I was pretty sure of it since the Seattle offices are in the same damn building Homeland Security hides out in.  Nine floors above the ACLU the elevators won't even stop for without a badge.  Everyone going in and out is recorded.  Not that it is really a big deal, considering all of 4th avenue for blocks around is now being videoed.

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🚢 Judge halts deportation, threatens to hold Sessions in contempt
« Reply #804 on: August 10, 2018, 12:56:23 AM »
https://www.nola.com/national_politics/2018/08/judge_halts_mother-daughter_de.html

    National Politics & Government

Judge halts mother-daughter deportation, threatens to hold AG Sessions in contempt
Updated 4:41 PM; Posted 4:33 PM

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is pictured delivering remarks on efforts to combat violent crime in America during an appearance at the United States Attorney's Office for the Middle District of Georgia on Thursday August 9, 2018, in Macon, Ga. (AP Photo/John Amis)


By The Washington Post

WASHINGTON - A federal judge in Washington halted a deportation in progress Thursday and threatened to hold Attorney General Jeff Sessions in contempt after learning that the Trump administration started to remove a woman and her daughter while a court hearing appealing their deportations was underway.

"This is pretty outrageous," U.S. District Court Judge Emmet Sullivan said after being told about the removal. "That someone seeking justice in U.S. court is spirited away while her attorneys are arguing for justice for her?"

"I'm not happy about this at all," the judge continued. "This is not acceptable."

The woman, known in court papers as Carmen, is a plaintiff in a lawsuit filed this week by the American Civil Liberties Union. It challenges a recent policy change by the Department of Justice that aims to expedite the removal of asylum seekers who fail to prove their cases and excludes domestic and gang violence as justifications for granting asylum in the United States.

Attorneys for the civil rights organization and the Department of Justice had agreed to delay removal proceedings for Carmen and her child until 11:59 p.m. Thursday so they could argue the matter in court.

But lead ACLU attorney Jennifer Chang Newell, who was participating in the court hearing via phone from her office in California, received an email during the hearing that said the mother and daughter were being deported.

Trump playing the blame game on immigration

Trump playing the blame game on immigration

Blaming the migrants for their plight – demonizing them – serves only to normalize the xenophobia the president is fomenting.

During a brief recess, she told her colleagues the pair had been taken from a family detention center in Dilley, Texas, and were headed to the airport in San Antonio for an 8:15 a.m. flight.

After granting the ACLU's request to delay deportations for Carmen and the other plaintiffs until the lawsuit is decided, Sullivan ordered the government to "turn the plane around."

Justice Department attorney Erez Reuveni said he had not been told the deportation was happening that morning, and could not confirm the whereabouts of Carmen and her daughter.

The ACLU said later that government attorneys informed them after the hearing that the pair was on a flight to El Salvador. The Justice Department said they would be flown back to Texas and returned to the detention center after landing, the ACLU said.

"It must have been absolutely terrifying for them to think they would be returning to a country where they raised very credible claims of persecution and death," said Eunice Lee, who is co-counsel in the case and is co-legal director at the University of California-Hastings Center for Gender and Refugee Studies. "It's outrageous to me that while we were working around-the-clock filing briefings for this case's early morning hearing that people in the government were actively arranging for Carmen's deportation."

The Justice Department declined a request for comment.

To qualify for asylum, migrants must show that they have a fear of persecution in their native country based on their race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership in a "particular social group," a category that in the past has included victims of domestic violence and other abuse.

Carmen fled El Salvador with her daughter in June, according to court records, fearing they would be killed by gang members who had demanded she pay them money each month or suffer consequences. Several coworkers at the factory where Carmen worked had been murdered, and her husband is also abusive, the records state.

Miller pushing hardline legal immigrant policy

Miller pushing hardline legal immigrant policy

Miller is backing a policy that would make it harder for legal immigrants to be granted citizenship if they receive certain forms of government assistance.

Under the fast-track removal system, created in 1996, asylum seekers are interviewed to determine whether they have a "credible fear" of returning home. Those who pass get a full hearing in immigration court.

In June, Sessions vacated a 2016 Board of Immigration Appeals court case that granted asylum to an abused woman from El Salvador. As part of that decision, Sessions said gang and domestic violence in most cases would no longer be grounds for receiving asylum.

"The mere fact that a country may have problems effectively policing certain crimes - such as domestic violence or gang violence - or that certain populations are more likely to be victims of crime, cannot itself establish an asylum claim," Sessions wrote at the time.

The ACLU lawsuit was filed on behalf of 12 migrants from Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala - three of them children - all of whom failed their initial "credible fear" interviews.

Two of the children and their mothers were deported before the suit was filed. None of the adults had been separated from their children as part of President Trump's "zero-tolerance" policy.

The lawsuit says Sessions's ruling, and updated guidelines for asylum officers that the Department of Homeland Security issued a month later, subject migrants in expedited removal proceedings to an "unlawful screening standard" that deprives them of their rights under federal law.

Asylum seekers previously had to show that the government in their native country was "unable or unwilling" to protect them. But now they have to show that the government "condones" the violence or "is completely helpless" to protect them, the lawsuit says.

(c) 2018, The Washington Post. Written by Arelis R. Hernandez.
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🚢 Showdown — and potential shutdown — loom over border funding
« Reply #805 on: September 01, 2018, 05:44:38 AM »
Another Goobermint shutdown threat!  ::)

RE

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/08/31/showdown--and-potential-shutdown--loom-over-border-funding.html

Showdown — and potential shutdown — loom over border funding 

    The White House has floated a potential strategy to partially shutdown specific government agencies if Congress does not pass spending legislation that includes funding for a border wall, according to sources.
    Lawmakers have 11 work days to fund government after returning from recess.
    A senior administration official said the current preference is not a shutdown but a Homeland Security bill that includes $5 billion in funding set aside for a wall along the southern border.

Kayla Tausche   | @kaylatausche
Published 17 Hours Ago Updated 17 Hours Ago CNBC.com
      
   
President Donald Trump
Cheriss May | NurPhoto | Getty Images


When Congress returns from recess after Labor Day weekend, lawmakers will have just 11 legislative days before an Oct. 1 deadline to pass new spending legislation or a stopgap funding bill to keep the government open, or risk the third government shutdown in 2018.

But the White House is considering at least one alternative option, according to three people who have discussed the idea with West Wing officials: A "partial shutdown," in which President Donald Trump would sign stand-alone bills to fund the majority of the government, while reserving the right to veto others if they don't include funding for the border wall.

"It hasn't been ruled out," said a senior administration official, who said there are multiple scenarios being discussed with GOP leaders. "But it hasn't been ruled in, either."
Sen. Shelley More Capito: I think Brett Kavanaugh will be confirmed
Sen. Shelley More Capito: I think Brett Kavanaugh will be confirmed 
8:59 AM ET Thu, 16 Aug 2018 | 01:46

The strategy, said to be supported internally by senior policy advisor Stephen Miller and, to a lesser extent, budget director Mick Mulvaney, would eliminate traditional shutdown vignettes of withheld paychecks and closed national parks and veterans affairs facilities. It would allow the White House to exact leverage over a specific campaign issue before a potential party reorg in Congress — and prevent a forced signature on a wide-ranging and opaque spending bill that excludes his top priority.

"The president won't sign another bill like the omnibus," said one person who's discussed the strategy with the White House, referring to the February $1.3 trillion bipartisan spending package on which Trump threatened a last-minute veto.

A second senior administration official said the current preference is not a shutdown but a Homeland Security bill that includes $5 billion in funding set aside for a wall along the southern border, a dollar amount Trump has signaled publicly he'd support.

Marc Short, former White House director of legislative affairs, said the president encouraged Republican leadership to stay in town in August to finish the piecemeal government funding bills.

"That [progress] benefits the president to isolate a national security or border security issue in any funding battle," Short tells CNBC.

A senior GOP aide said Republican leaders in both chambers of Congress are aligned in wanting to make as much progress as possible on the 12 appropriations bills required to fund the government. So far, roughly three-quarters of the spending has been bundled into three "minibus" packages being negotiated — or set for future negotiation — between the House and Senate.

But it's up to the White House, according to the aide, to decide how far it will push to fund the Department of Homeland Security and, within that, the border wall, which are not in the packages being considered. Neither is funding for the departments of Justice or Transportation, which also could become lightning rods in the debate because of money set aside for the Russia investigation or the Gateway tunnel between New York and New Jersey.

In late July, Trump tweeted he'd be willing to "shut down" the government if Democrats didn't vote for his border package — despite the fact that he agreed privately with House Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell weeks earlier not to shut down the government ahead of midterms.

"The president wants to get border security done – whether it's this month, next month, or December," the first senior administration official said.

Spokespersons for both Ryan and McConnell told CNBC that they plan to address any government funding gaps through a continuing resolution, a short-term measure that would likely fund the government until late November.

"Congress doesn't want a shutdown or an individual agency shutdown," said Stan Collender, professor of public policy at Georgetown University. "They want to go home; they want to fundraise; they want to campaign."
WATCH: Trump says border security a national security problem
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🛳️ Child concentration camps in America
« Reply #806 on: October 04, 2018, 01:16:07 AM »
https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2018/10/02/pers-o02.html

Child concentration camps in America
2 October 2018


Across the United States, under cover of darkness, the government is rounding up immigrant children and sending them to a desert concentration camp in Tornillo, Texas, near the US-Mexico border. In recent weeks, hundreds have been transferred from foster shelters to Tornillo, where they live in tents, 20 to a room.

The New York Times spoke with employees at shelters who described scenes that recall the most shameful episodes in American history, including the capture of fugitive slaves, the forced removal of Native Americans from their land, and the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War Two.

According to the Times, “In order to avoid escape attempts, the moves are carried out late at night because children will be less likely to try to run away. For the same reason, children are generally given little advance warning that they will be moved.”

With the children in a panic, some shelter employees reportedly cry when officials descend upon their facilities. Others protest and raise concerns about the safety of the children at the desert concentration camp, to no avail. Children beg to know whether they will be taken care of at their new location. Phone numbers for their emergency contacts are written on belts tied around the children’s waists.

Roughly 13,000 children are currently detained in shelters and immigration detention facilities nationwide, a record high. Conditions in immigration detention centers and shelters are deplorable, with children reporting cases of rape, sexual abuse and physical violence.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is expanding the size of the Tornillo tent city, which currently houses 1,600 immigrant youth, to 4,000. Starting in November and extending through March, the average daily low temperature will be below 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

The Trump administration will soon begin detaining children indefinitely, having pulled out of the Flores settlement, a court agreement that barred the government from detaining immigrant children for more than 20 days. The administration has also been arresting, detaining and deporting relatives of detained children who submitted official applications to sponsor the children.

The midnight Gestapo-style roundup of children has been treated as a non-event by the two big business parties and the corporate media. Instead, the entire political and media establishment is focused exclusively on the allegation that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted Christine Blasey Ford at a party in 1982, when they were both teenagers.

The Democratic Party’s focus on Kavanaugh’s alleged sexual assault is a deliberate effort to distract from his record as a defender of indefinite detention and torture under the Bush administration. Democrats have covered up the fact that in 2017 Kavanaugh ruled to deny a detained 17-year-old immigrant the right to abort a pregnancy on the grounds that immigrants are not entitled to basic rights.

Speaking Saturday in Austin, Texas, Democratic House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi made revealing comments about the Democratic Party’s midterm election strategy. She advised candidates not to focus on Trump’s attacks on immigrants, explaining that calling for “shutting down ICE [Immigration and Customs Enforcement]” merely “serves the president’s purpose.” According to the Texas Tribune, Pelosi said she has told Democratic candidates that focusing on the issue would “waste energy.”

Despite its claims to be an “anti-racist” party, the Democratic Party is orienting itself toward Trump’s anti-immigrant chauvinism. On September 26, nearly 70 percent of Democrats in the House of Representatives voted either “yes” or “present” on a resolution “recognizing that allowing illegal immigrants the right to vote devalues the franchise and diminishes the voting power of the United States citizens.” Keith Ellison, a leader of the “progressive” wing of the Democratic Party, was among those who voted in favor of the anti-immigrant resolution.

The same day as the congressional vote, Democratic California Governor Jerry Brown vetoed a state bill that would have barred immigration officials from arresting immigrants at courthouses. Brown also extended the deployment of the state’s National Guard on the Mexican border.

Following the Democrats’ lead, many political groups that call themselves “socialist” but in reality function as factions of the Democratic Party, have dropped the defense of immigrants.

The International Socialist Organization has not published an article on the US government’s attacks on immigrants since September 10. Socialist Alternative and Jacobin magazine, which is linked to the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), have not published articles on the US immigration situation since August 24 and August 22, respectively. The fall issue of the DSA’s magazine Democratic Left does not include a single reference to the attacks on immigrants.

The Socialist Equality Party views the defense of immigrants as an urgent question not only for immigrants themselves, but for the defense of the democratic rights of the working class as a whole.

The attack on immigrants is an attack on the working class. There are 20 million undocumented immigrants in the US, comprising a significant section of the working population. While the ruling class seeks to divide different sections of workers against one another, the fight against corporate power and social inequality is impossible without the unity of immigrant and non-immigrant workers.

Moreover, the police state methods currently employed against immigrants will be used against all workers and political opponents of the government. The federal government is building a network of concentration camps and empowering state agencies to break down doors, set up checkpoints, conduct military-style workplace raids and haul people off without due process. This is a powerful mechanism of state repression that the ruling class will use against striking workers and demonstrators.

The defense of immigrant workers is necessary to establish the unity of the working class internationally. In almost every country, immigrants comprise a significant section of the working class, and everywhere their rights are under attack. In Germany, Poland, Hungary, Austria and across Europe, governments are adopting the anti-immigrant policies of neo-Nazi parties in an effort to pit workers against each other and block the growth of the class struggle.

Nationalists like Bernie Sanders claim that immigrants weaken the position of the working class. To the contrary, the presence of large international populations within each country testifies to the global character of production and the global character of the working class. It reflects the objective identity of interests of workers of all countries and all national origins, who face the same conditions of exploitation at the hands of the same transnational corporations. Workers today have an unprecedented opportunity to open lines of communication between one another across national boundaries and strengthen their position against their common corporate enemies.

The fight to secure the basic democratic and social rights of the working class requires a resolute defense of the rights of immigrants and unqualified opposition to all forms of racism and national chauvinism. The Socialist Equality Party demands:

• The immediate release all detained immigrants and the dismantling of immigrant concentration camps and prisons

• The abolition of ICE, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and all immigration-related enforcement agencies internationally

• The prosecution of all government officials responsible for jailing immigrants and immigrant children

• Immediate citizenship for all undocumented people wherever they reside

• The de-militarization of borders and dismantling of border checkpoints to allow free and safe passage

• The guaranteed right of workers to travel and move about the world as they please.

Workers must revive the time-honored slogan “An injury to one is an injury to all!” This is a necessary prerequisite for the development of an international revolutionary socialist movement.

Eric London
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🚢 'March of the Migrants' draws over 1,000 Hondurans to US border
« Reply #807 on: October 16, 2018, 12:08:48 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/V0dIQKrJVrQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/V0dIQKrJVrQ</a>
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🚢 Pressure Turns to Mexico as Migrant Caravan Heads for Border
« Reply #808 on: October 19, 2018, 02:00:12 AM »
https://www.truthdig.com/articles/pressure-turns-to-mexico-as-migrant-caravan-heads-for-border/

Oct 18, 2018
Pressure Turns to Mexico as Migrant Caravan Heads for Border


GUATEMALA CITY — As some 3,000 Hondurans made their way through Guatemala, attention turned to Mexico, after U.S. President Donald Trump threatened Thursday to close the U.S.-Mexico border if authorities there fail to stop them — a nearly unthinkable move that would disrupt hundreds of thousands of legal freight, vehicle and pedestrian crossings each day.

With less than three weeks before the Nov. 6 midterm elections, Trump seized on the migrant caravan to make border security a political issue and energize his Republican base.

“I must, in the strongest of terms, ask Mexico to stop this onslaught — and if unable to do so I will call up the U.S. Military and CLOSE OUR SOUTHERN BORDER!” Trump tweeted, adding that he blamed Democrats for what he called “weak laws!”

The threat followed another one earlier this week to cut off aid to Central American countries if the migrants weren’t stopped. Trump made a similar vow over another large migrant caravan in April, but didn’t follow through and it largely petered out in Mexico.

On Thursday, Mexico dispatched additional police to its southern border after the Casa del Migrante shelter on the Guatemalan side of the border reported that hundreds of Hondurans had already arrived there.

Mexican officials said the Hondurans would not be allowed to enter as a group and would either have to show a passport and visa — something few have — or apply individually for refugee status, a process that can mean waiting for up to 90 days for approval. They also said migrants caught without papers would be deported.

Marcelo Ebrard, who is set to become foreign relations secretary when President-elect Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador takes office Dec. 1, said Trump’s tweets need to be understood in the context of the upcoming U.S. midterm elections.

“The electoral process is very near, so he is making a political calculation,” Ebrard said in an interview with Radio Centro.

Trump’s stance, he said, was “what he has always presented,” adding he saw “nothing surprising in it.”

Still, the idea that Mexico could close its porous southern border — or that the United States would choke off the lucrative trade and other traffic between the two nations — strained the imagination.

“There would be huge economic impacts for both the United States and Mexico … but limited effect on illegal immigration,” said Andrew Selee, president of the Migration Policy Institute.

“The president certainly can slow down crossing at legal border crossings where about a million people cross each day. That would really hurt legal transit between the two countries and manufacturing and trade, which would affect American workers,” Selee said. “But it would have much less impact on illegal border crossings between ports of entry.”

Stephanie Leutert, director of the Mexico Security Initiative at the University of Texas at Austin, said she interpreted the tweet to mean Trump could send troops not to ports of entry but elsewhere where the illegal crossings take place.

“If that’s the case, I don’t think Mexico should be too worried because in a sense … it’s the same kind of thing U.S. administrations have been doing for a long time,” Leutert said.

Like Guatemala and Honduras, Mexico is a country of many migrants, raising the question of whether the political will exists for a confrontation.

Lopez Obrador wants to avoid repression against migrants and also to avoid angering the United States. He said this week that Mexico would offer jobs to Central Americans. “Anyone who wants to work in our country … will have a work visa,” he said.

By Thursday, the caravan had dispersed a bit, with the youngest and strongest of the migrants walking ahead together, some boarding buses or trying to hitch rides. On a bridge leading out of the Guatemalan capital, Hondurans marched single-file behind a woman holding a baby in her arms as a school bus rumbled past.

Juan Escobar, 24, said he had heard about Trump’s comments but said they would not dissuade the migrants from continuing their journey.

“Only God on high can stop us,” Escobar said.

Carlos Lopez, 27, said he was concerned by Trump’s threats, but “you have to keep fighting.”

Trump also warned that he prioritizes border security over even the recently struck trade deal to replace NAFTA, the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, or USMCA.

“The assault on our country at our Southern Border, including the Criminal elements and DRUGS pouring in, is far more important to me, as President, than Trade or the USMCA. Hopefully Mexico will stop this onslaught at their Northern Border,” Trump tweeted.

Analysts didn’t see the pact as being in imminent danger, though trade attorney Daniel Ujczo of Dickinson Wright PLLC said there is “a significant concern” Trump could hold the agreement hostage over future issues.

“Leaders around the world are skeptical that any deal with this U.S. administration is actually final,” Ujczo said, “particularly one such as the USMCA where the ink has not been put to the signature line.”

U.S.-bound migrant caravans have been going on for years — with traveling in numbers seen as offering protection from assaults, robberies, even shakedowns by police. They’re also a cheaper alternative to the $7,000 to $10,000 that smugglers, charge for passage to the border, Leutert noted.

Still, it wasn’t until this year that the caravans received widespread attention.

“There have been these caravans through the years, but they become prominent because the president tweets about them,” Selee said.

He predicted that, like the caravan in April, Mexico will respond with measures like granting asylum to some migrants who qualify while deporting others who don’t, perhaps not eliminating the caravan entirely but significantly reducing its size before it reaches the U.S. border.

But the direct, public pressure from Trump puts Mexico, already an uneasy ally the last two years, in an uncomfortable spotlight.

“Ironically, the way President Trump responds to these caravans makes it harder for the Mexican government to cooperate with the U.S. on immigration enforcement,” Selee said. “There is a lot of disposition in both the current and the incoming Mexican government to cooperate with the U.S. on some aspects of immigration control. But it becomes much harder when President Trump makes this a political issue in which he bashes Mexico.”

___

Orsi and Stevenson reported from Mexico City. Associated Press writer Paul Wiseman in Washington contributed to this report.
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https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2018/10/18/u-s-supports-mexico-un-plan-caravan-honduran-migrants/1690833002/

Trump administration supports Mexico, UN plan to deal with caravan of migrants
Sergio Bustos, USA TODAY Published 11:12 p.m. ET Oct. 18, 2018 | Updated 1:45 a.m. ET Oct. 19, 2018


The president has vowed "very severe" consequences if the Saudi government is found responsible for the murder of Jamal Khashoggi. He was last seen entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.USA TODAY
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(Photo: John Moore, Getty Images)
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The Trump administration on Thursday night welcomed a Mexican government plan to work with the United Nations refugee agency to deal with a controversial caravan of mostly Honduran migrants — fleeing poverty and violence — before they can make their way to the U.S.-Mexico border.

The caravan of migrants, who number anywhere between 1,500 to 4,000 people, has angered President Donald Trump. This week, he threatened the governments in Central America and Mexico if they failed to deal with the situation.

A top Mexican official said Thursday night that his government will ask the UN High Commissioner for Refugees to help identify “legitimate” asylum claims from the migrants who are part of the caravan making its way through his country’s southern border en route to the U.S.

Under the Mexican government’s plan, those migrants whose asylum claims get rejected would be immediately repatriated to Honduras and other countries, Gerónimo Gutiérrez, the Mexican Ambassador to the U.S., told Fox News’ “Special Report” in an interview.
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“We want to make sure that those claims are legitimate,” he said, noting a handful of migrants had already applied for asylum in Mexico.

“We obviously are sensitive to the humanitarian situation that we encounter,” said Gutiérrez. “But we have also made very clear that there is no legal ground on which Mexico can issue a permit by which people can just go through Mexico towards the United States.”

“Mexico is in favor of legal, safe and orderly migration,” he added. “And the step we took today, it’s extremely important.” 

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who is visiting Mexico on Friday, applauded the move by Mexican government officials.

“We welcome the Government of Mexico’s statement that they will seek cooperation with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees to address immigration issues in the region, including the influx of people arriving in Mexico,” he said in a statement. “The United States stands ready to assist the Government of Mexico and UNHCR in this effort.”

Mexico’s decision to seek UN assistance came following a barrage of tweets from Trump over the past two days in which he railed against Democrats in Congress and the governments of Mexico, Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala, threatening to cut off U.S. aid to the Central American countries and close the southern border.

“The assault on our country at our Southern Border, including the Criminal elements and DRUGS pouring in, is far more important to me, as President, than Trade or the USMCA. Hopefully Mexico will stop this onslaught at their Northern Border. All Democrats fault for weak laws!” he wrote in one of his tweets.

 

In a separate tweet, Trump later thanked Mexico for sending law enforcement officers to its southern border to intercept the migrant caravan, linking to a short video clip of dozens of Mexican federal police disembarking from a plane.

Trump tweeted his praise shortly before Thursday night’s campaign rally in Montana, where he blasted Democrats before next month’s midterm elections.

“They wanted that caravan,” Trump said of Democrats. “It’s going to be an election of the caravan.”

Trump is ramping up his rhetoric on immigration as he begins a three-day campaign swing of western states where border security has become a top issue in the upcoming election.

In his interview with Fox News, Mexico’s Gutiérrez criticized organizers of the migrant caravan.

“It’s not in the interest of anybody to have those people make that trip,” he said. “They’re frequently tricked by human smuggling organizations.”

He also said the Mexican government had “evidence that this caravan is also very much politically motivated,” but he did not elaborate.

More: Trump claims Democrats wanted caravan, ups immigration rhetoric ahead of western swing

Also: Trump: Aid will end to Central American countries allowing migrant caravan to head to US

He acknowledged, however, the need for Mexico and the U.S. to continue aiding Central American countries, while enforcing its own immigration laws.

“We need to work in development and help those countries, and we’re doing [it].  And we also need to make sure that laws are enforced, and that’s also what we’re doing.”

The Honduran migrant group started last Friday with about 160 people who banded together in the hopes that their numbers would protect them from robbers and other dangers facing them on their journey, according to The Associated Press. Organizers said they were fleeing north from a corrupt Honduran government, along with rampant poverty and violence.

According to the World Bank, 66 percent of Hondurans live in poverty and about one out of five Hondurans in rural areas live on less than $1.90 a day.

Rep. Jan Schakowsky, an Illinois Democrat, slammed the Trump administration for backing Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez’s “corrupt government” and “painting a picture of this migrant caravan as a threat to our national security instead of the desperate group of refugees that they are.”

“The migrant caravan struggling toward our border is a direct result of Juan Orlando Hernandez’s anti-democratic regime,” she said in a statement on Thursday night. “We must support these refugees and stop turning a blind eye to Hernandez’s repression and violence.”

Also: Trump threatens to seal U.S.-Mexico border over migrant caravan. Can he do it?
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