AuthorTopic: The Official Refugee Thread  (Read 140968 times)

Offline K-Dog

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Re: 🤡 Trump: ‘2 weeks and big Deportation begins!’
« Reply #870 on: June 23, 2019, 05:43:06 PM »
So for Congress to get this sorted out in two weeks ain't gonna happen.

No doubt there, but it's just a ploy to lay off the blame for the problems on the Demodopes.

2 weeks from now, will ICE be in any better position to do mass deportations on the scale Trumpovetsky boast about?  Pigs will Fly first.

RE

They get deported all the time.  They can marry an American and still be deported.  2000 families is not so many.  Not so many to prevent a pissing match.

Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Offline Surly1

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Re: 🤡 Trump: ‘2 weeks and big Deportation begins!’
« Reply #871 on: June 23, 2019, 06:55:26 PM »
"It's all the fault of those pesky Demodopes!"

What a Maroon,   ::)



RE

https://www.politico.com/story/2019/06/23/donald-trump-deport-immigrants-1376728

Trump: ‘2 weeks and big Deportation begins!’

"This political standoff when it comes to immigration and border security has got to end," he said. "Even if we don't agree on everything, there ought to be some steps we can take together where we do agree."

One of my usual tropes citing Gore Vidal referring to this country as "the United States of Amnesia."
Trump counts on this to insure that no one remembers that we would have had legislative solutions before but for the usual intransigence. The Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2007 couldn't 't even get a floor vote. The bill was a compromise based largely on three previous failed immigration reform bills. So for Congress to get this sorted out in two weeks ain't gonna happen.

Ya, know.

Comprehensive immigration reform could lead to unions.

Yep. In the same way Southern Baptists loathe premarital sex because it could lead to dancing.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: 🤡 Trump: ‘2 weeks and big Deportation begins!’
« Reply #872 on: June 23, 2019, 09:02:13 PM »
Yep. In the same way Southern Baptists loathe premarital sex because it could lead to dancing.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ijK0WTB_-RY" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ijK0WTB_-RY</a>

RE
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Offline K-Dog

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Re: The Official Refugee Thread
« Reply #873 on: June 23, 2019, 09:33:48 PM »
I've got to get a hold of some religion.

I am serious about this.  Immigration reform would lead to a guest worker program with defined rights. If aliens have rights the rabble just might decide they want some too.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/z9od1VnhkAM" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/z9od1VnhkAM</a>

This will not make some people happy.
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Offline RE

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Re: The Official Refugee Thread
« Reply #874 on: June 23, 2019, 09:42:02 PM »
If aliens have rights the rabble just might decide they want some too.

Aliens already have rights.  The Geneva Convention, which the FSoA is a signatory of.  Just it is ignored same as the rights under the Constitution are ignored.

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Offline K-Dog

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Re: The Official Refugee Thread
« Reply #875 on: June 23, 2019, 10:29:31 PM »
If aliens have rights the rabble just might decide they want some too.

Aliens already have rights.  The Geneva Convention, which the FSoA is a signatory of.  Just it is ignored same as the rights under the Constitution are ignored.

RE

I think you just made my point.  Cognitive dissonance has to be binary or it gets very confusing.
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Offline RE

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I think you can say this is confirmation the FSSoA is running Concentration Camps.

RE

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/latino/nearly-300-migrant-children-removed-texas-facility-described-appaling-n1021151

Almost 300 migrant children removed from Texas facility described as 'appalling'

“I have never seen conditions as appalling as what we witnessed last week,” one attorney said.


The entrance to a Border Patrol station in Clint, Texas, on June 20, 2019.Cedar Attanasio / AP file

June 24, 2019, 11:36 AM AKDT / Updated June 24, 2019, 1:17 PM AKDT
By Daniella Silva

Almost 300 migrant children have been removed from a border patrol facility in Texas after media reports of lawyers describing “appalling” and potentially dangerous conditions, Department of Homeland Security officials told NBC News.

Lawyers who recently visited two Texas facilities holding migrant children described seeing young children and teenagers not being able to shower for days or even weeks, inadequate food, flu outbreaks and prolonged periods of detention.

The children who were removed were being held at a border station in Clint, Texas. Some were wearing dirty clothes covered in mucus or even urine, said Elora Mukherjee, the director of the Immigrants’ Rights Clinic at Columbia Law School. Teenage mothers wore clothing stained with breast milk. None of the children had access to soap or toothpaste, she said.

“Almost every child I spoke with had not showered or bathed since they crossed the border — some of them more than three weeks ago,” she said. “There is a stench that emanates from some of the children because they haven’t had an opportunity to put on clean clothes and to take a shower.”
Migrant children facing dire conditions in U.S. custody
June 24, 201904:20

The children have been taken to a tent detention camp also in El Paso, Texas, where they will remain under the custody of Border Patrol until they can be placed with the Department of Health and Human Services, the DHS officials said. The Associated Press first reported on the conditions at the facility.

Mukherjee was part of the team of lawyers who visited the facility last week. She said that although the border station has the capacity for slightly more than 100 people, when they arrived Monday morning there were about 350 children there. The group spoke to more than 60.

“I have never seen conditions as appalling as what we witnessed last week,” she said. “The children are hungry, dirty and sick and being detained for very long periods of time.”

“Children who are young themselves are being told by guards they must take care of even younger children,” Mukherjee said, adding that children as young as 7 and 8 were forced to care for 2-year-olds.

She said almost all the children had been separated from the adults they crossed the border with — siblings, aunts or grandparents, or even their parents.

“They don’t know where their loved ones are who they crossed the border with,” she said.

Many also had family members already in the United States waiting to take them in, she said.

Federal law requires unaccompanied or separated migrant children be transferred to HHS custody within 72 hours, but some children at the Clint facility had been in Border Patrol custody for weeks, she said.

Migrant children are increasingly finding themselves stuck on concrete benches or even outside at Border Patrol stations, with HHS close to exceeding its capacity, according to three government officials and documents reviewed by NBC News.
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Meanwhile, a different team of attorneys said they had also encountered children in similar conditions when they visited the Central Processing Center in McAllen, Texas, this month.

“It’s the same conditions,” immigration attorney Hope Frye said.

Frye said she encountered a 17-year-old Guatemalan mother with a premature baby at the crowded facility. The mother was wheelchair-bound after an emergency C-section in Mexico. When Frye met her, she was “caked with dirt” and neither she nor her baby had showered since arriving, she said.
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Frye said she took a tissue to clean the baby and wiped off “black dirt from her neck.”

Frye described the baby as looking weak and said the mother told her she had stopped thriving while at the facility.

Frye said she felt she had no choice but to come forward to tell the young mother’s story. The teen and her baby have since been released from Border Patrol custody.

“She told me she believed if they did not get out, her baby would die,” she said. “There is no question in my mind that it was the extreme love of this 17-year-old mother that kept that baby alive.”

Frye described filthy conditions, adding, “There is no soap and no water, or the water is inadequate or inaccessible unless you’re let out of the cages.”

Frye also said of the children they spoke to, “almost every kid had some sort of illness” or had been sick. She said the team sent a doctor back to the facility after the visit, and six children were ultimately sent to the hospital.

Customs and Border Protection did not immediately respond to request for comment about the conditions at the Clint and McAllen facilities.

A decades-old agreement known as the Flores Settlement sets the guidelines for treatment of migrant children as well as their detention and release, including that facilities be “safe and sanitary.”

Last week, a Department of Justice attorney appeared in court to argue an appeal of a 2017 ruling that the conditions of the settlement were being violated. In a clip that went viral, attorney Sarah Fabian argued that specific amenities such as soap, toothbrushes and even a half a night’s sleep should not be required under the terms of the original settlement. The argument drew criticism from the panel of judges at the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

“To me it’s more like it’s within everybody’s common understanding: If you don’t have a toothbrush, if you don’t have soap, if you don’t have a blanket, it’s not safe and sanitary,” Judge A. Wallace Tashima said. "Wouldn’t everybody agree to that? Would you agree to that?”

Vice President Mike Pence said Sunday he does believe migrant children should have access to soap, toothbrushes and other basic amenities.
Daniella Silva

Daniella Silva is a reporter for NBC News, specializing in immigration and inclusion issues, as well as coverage of Latin America.
Julia Ainsley contributed.
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Offline RE

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😠 Migrant Children Moved Back to Troubled Texas Border Facility
« Reply #877 on: June 25, 2019, 03:02:21 PM »
First they're out, then they're back.  ::)

Notice nobody suggested letting some reporters inside with some cameras.  Plus, they won't even accept donations of diapers!  That's really telling.

RE

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/25/us/john-sanders-cbp.html

Migrant Children Moved Back to Troubled Texas Border Facility


Tents outside the border station in Clint, Tex. More than 100 children were returned to the facility, officials said Tuesday.Credit Ivan Pierre Aguirre for The New York Times

By Arturo Rubio and Caitlin Dickerson

    June 25, 2019

CLINT, Tex. — At the squat, sand-colored concrete border station in Texas that has become the center of debate over President Trump’s immigration policies, a chaotic shuffle of migrant children continued on Tuesday as more than 100 were moved back into a facility that days earlier had been emptied in the midst of criticism that young detainees there were hungry, crying and unwashed.

The station in Clint, Tex., sits in the middle of a farm town of fewer than 1,000 residents, framed by high fencing and a tall communications tower. In recent weeks, it has become a temporary home to hundreds of migrant children as the government has run out of space to place the large numbers of migrants continuing to flow into the country from Central America.

Lawyers who visited the facility said they found it stretched beyond its capacity, with hundreds of minor detainees having gone for weeks without access to showers, clean clothing or sufficient food.

But in a press call on Tuesday, a Customs and Border Protection official said that the agency was able to send about 100 children back to the station because overcrowding there had been alleviated. The official disputed the lawyers’ accounts of conditions at the facility, insisting that migrant detainees housed by the agency were given access to periodic showers and were offered unlimited snacks throughout the day.

Every Friday, get an exclusive look at how one of the week’s biggest news stories on “The Daily” podcast came together.

The continuing movement of children and confusion over the situation at Clint demonstrated the increasingly disorganized situation along the southern border and the government’s struggle to maintain minimal humanitarian standards amid an unprecedented influx of migrant families that only recently has begun to show any signs of slowing.

The agency’s acting commissioner, John Sanders, will step down in early July as the government’s primary border enforcement executive, a federal official said Tuesday, a development that comes as the agency faces continuing public fury over the treatment of detained migrant children.

[Read more: Customs and Border Protection’s acting chief will step down.]

Mr. Sanders announced his resignation in an email to colleagues shortly after it was reported by journalists. He has led the agency since Mr. Trump tapped the former Customs and Border Protection commissioner, Kevin McAleenan, to replace Kirstjen Nielsen as homeland security secretary. Mr. Sanders specialized in developing technology for national security initiatives and previously served as the chief technology officer for the Transportation Security Administration.


John Sanders, the acting commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, left, is expected to step down in the coming weeks.CreditJ. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press

The official who confirmed his resignation, who requested anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the matter, said it was not clear whether the impending resignation was connected to recent criticism over the agency’s management of a large influx of migrant families along the border.

That assertion from Customs and Border Protection that children were being well cared for ran contrary to what the lawyers, from some of the nation’s top law schools, said they were told by children. During a court-ordered visit to the facility earlier this month, some children said they had not been allowed to shower in nearly a month, and were so hungry that it had been hard for them to sleep through the night.

[Read about the conditions migrant children were held in at Clint.

“I personally don’t believe these allegations,” the Customs and Border Protection official, who spoke on the condition he not be identified, told reporters.

The lawyers’ accounts prompted a significant public backlash, after which all but 30 of the roughly 300 children who were being housed in Clint were transferred elsewhere. Some 249 were placed in a shelter network for children run by the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Refugee Resettlement, while others were moved to a tent facility in El Paso run by Customs and Border Protection.

But on Tuesday, the C.B.P. official said that those moves had alleviated overcrowding in Clint, and allowed for the return of more than 100 children there. The spokesman said that no additional resources had been provided to the children who were sent back.

After the lawyers’ accounts about Clint were made public, volunteers from around the country began to mobilize, hoping to deliver supplies such as diapers, soap and food to the facility. But those who arrived there were not allowed in and their donations were not accepted, according to local media reports.

On the call with reporters on Tuesday, the Customs and Border Protection official said that the agency was reviewing its policy for accepting outside donations, but the official also disputed the idea that supplies were running low.

“We are looking at the possibility of using some of those donations going forward but those items, it’s important to note, are available now,” the official said.

Federal officials had previously told the office of Representative Terry Canales, a Democrat from Texas who requested a list of needed supplies, that the agency would not be able to accept outside donations, according to Curtis Smith, Mr. Canales’s chief of staff.

Arturo Rubio reported from Clint, Tex., and Caitlin Dickerson from New York. Zolan Kanno-Youngs contributed reporting from Washington.
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https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/25/politics/elizabeth-warren-visit-homestead-migrant-facility/index.html

Elizabeth Warren announces visit to migrant facility hours ahead of first debate

CNN Digital Expansion 2018 MJ Lee

By Kate Sullivan and MJ Lee, CNN

Updated 11:03 PM ET, Tue June 25, 2019


Washington (CNN)Sen. Elizabeth Warren said she will go on Wednesday to a facility in Homestead, Florida, that's holding unaccompanied migrant children -- a suddenly announced visit amid a fight on Capitol Hill over funding for the program that cares for such children and controversy over conditions at some border facilities.

"I'm going to Homestead tomorrow. Come with me," Warren said Tuesday night at a Miami town hall, after an attendee urged her to visit the facility in order "to bring the press" and "national attention" to the children.

The visit to Homestead -- just hours ahead of the first Democratic debate in Miami -- was previously unscheduled. Warren advisers said she had decided to make the visit after speaking to immigration advocates backstage before her Miami campaign event.

The facility, which is about 45 minutes from Miami, is an influx facility run by the Department of Health and Human Services for unaccompanied children, who remain there until placed with sponsors in the US. There are around 2,300 children currently at Homestead, according to Evelyn Stauffer, spokeswoman for the HHS' Administration for Children and Families.

"It's been a year ago right now, when we were first hearing about children separated from their parents at the border," said Warren, a Massachusetts Democrat and presidential hopeful. "I went down to McAllen, Texas, and visited one of these facilities."

Warren said that during her visit last June to the Texas facility -- run by Customs and Border Protection, part of the Department of Homeland Security -- she had seen "cage after cage after cage" and "people who were frightened, people who didn't understand what had gone wrong."

"This is a bad time in America's history," she said.

Warren's trip comes days after a Trump administration lawyer argued that migrant children in Customs and Border Protection custody didn't need toothbrushes, blankets and medicine in order to be in safe and sanitary conditions.

Congress, meanwhile, is working on passing a border supplemental funding bill that would provide additional funds to HHS, which has been strained by the influx of migrants.
If Congress cannot agree on a bill, a key department within HHS -- the Office of Refugees and Resettlement -- will run out of money at the end of the month. The office is critical because it operates shelters for unaccompanied migrant children. The House passed a measure Tuesday night, but President Donald Trump has threatened to veto it and the Senate's own bill is significantly different, complicating the chances of reaching a deal.

There have also been a stream of reports -- including from CNN -- of subpar conditions for children and families in the care of Customs and Border Protection.
In May, nearly 133,000 migrants were apprehended at the southern border, according to Customs and Border Protection data, including more than 11,000 unaccompanied children.

CNN's Priscilla Alvarez and Lauren Fox contributed to this report.
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Offline RE

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🚢 Rescue Ship Poses New Test for Italy’s Hard-Line Migrant Policies
« Reply #879 on: June 28, 2019, 10:17:27 AM »
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/27/world/europe/italy-migrants-sea-watch.html

Rescue Ship Poses New Test for Italy’s Hard-Line Migrant Policies


The rescue ship Sea Watch 3, left, off the Italian island of Lampedusa on Wednesday.CreditCreditGuglielmo Mangiapane/Reuters

By Elisabetta Povoledo and Gaia Pianigiani

    June 27, 2019

ROME — A rescue ship carrying 42 migrants floated in Italian waters off the Mediterranean island of Lampedusa on Thursday, further inflaming tensions between humanitarian groups and Italy’s populist government, which has adopted hard-line immigration policies.

The ship, the Sea Watch 3, is operated by Sea-Watch, a German nongovernmental organization, and flies a Dutch flag. It has been at sea for two weeks, awaiting instructions for a safe harbor at which to disembark the migrants, which it picked up in international waters off Libya. The vessel entered Italian waters Wednesday evening.

Although new Italian legislation forbids the ship from entering a port without authorization, the Sea Watch 3’s captain decided to move forward, citing an emergency situation. “We are entering Italian territorial waters out of a state of necessity,” Capt. Carola Rackete said in a radio communication with the port authorities in Lampedusa on Wednesday.

“I know what I’m risking, but the 42 survivors I have on board are exhausted. I’m taking them to safety,” Captain Rackete said on Twitter on Wednesday.
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The Italian government has repeatedly declared its waters closed to migrants. The Sea Watch 3 initially rescued 53 people off Libya on June 12, but three days later, Italy allowed 10 of them — including children and two pregnant women — to disembark for medical reasons. Another migrant disembarked a week later on health grounds.

Captain Rackete’s decision unleashed the ire of the Italian interior minister, Matteo Salvini, who has railed against immigration. “I won’t allow foreign NGOs to dictate the law on national borders for a country like Italy,” Mr. Salvini said in a radio interview on Thursday morning.

Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte said, “The behavior of the commander of the Sea Watch is of unheard-of gravity.” He told reporters on the sidelines of the Group of 20 summit meeting in Osaka, Japan, that the case had moved “from the political to the judicial sphere” and should be handled by Italian magistrates.

Mr. Conte added that diplomatic discussions were continuing with the Dutch government.

But even as the stalemate off Lampedusa dominated the front pages of Italian newspapers on Thursday, migrants continued to land on Italian shores. At dawn, 10 people — including a woman and a minor — arrived on Lampedusa, docking near the port authority’s office.
Interior Minister Matteo Salvini, shown on Wednesday, said nongovernmental organizations should not be allowed to dictate Italian policies.CreditRiccardo Antimiani/EPA, via Shutterstock
ImageInterior Minister Matteo Salvini, shown on Wednesday, said nongovernmental organizations should not be allowed to dictate Italian policies.
Interior Minister Matteo Salvini, shown on Wednesday, said nongovernmental organizations should not be allowed to dictate Italian policies.CreditRiccardo Antimiani/EPA, via Shutterstock

More than 300 migrants — traveling mostly on small boats — have landed in southern Italy in the two weeks since the Sea Watch 3 has been in its standoff with the Italian government.

Under new legislation promoted by Mr. Salvini, rescue boats that bring migrants to Italy without permission could be fined up to 50,000 euros, or about $57,000, and the ships can be seized.

Italian officials could also charge the crew of the Sea Watch 3 with aiding and abetting illegal immigration, a crime introduced by a previous center-right government that has not generally been applied to rescue ships.

On Wednesday, Italian financial police officers boarded the Sea Watch 3 and checked the crew’s documents, Captain Rackete said in her Twitter post.

The government’s hard line has spurred some protest. For more than a week, Lampedusa’s parish priest, the Rev. Carmelo La Magra, and some residents, along with occasional tourists, have been sleeping in the churchyard in protest. They have pledged to sleep outdoors until the migrants aboard the ship have been allowed to disembark in a safe port.

This week, the archbishop of Turin, Cesare Nosiglia, told the Italian government that he would take in the 42 migrants at the Roman Catholic Church’s expense, but there was no immediate information about whether he had received an answer.

Haidi Sadik, a cultural mediator on the Sea Watch 3, said in a statement, “We have people onboard that have gone through horrors in Libya, that have been heavily tortured.”

“Any person rescued at sea, by law has to be brought to a place of safety,” she added.

After the Sea Watch 3 picked up the migrants, the Libyan Coast Guard asked the ship to transport them back to Libya, identifying the country’s capital, Tripoli, as a port of safety. But many international commentators and organizations say that conditions of safety do not currently exist in the North African country.

The European Court of Human Rights this week rejected the humanitarian ship’s request to oblige Italy to allow the migrants to disembark.

On Thursday morning, Sea-Watch again urged the European Union to weigh in.

The organization wrote on Twitter: “Yesterday, we drove into territorial waters of #Italy out of necessity. We already had the coast guard and the customs on board. We waited one night. We cannot wait another. Desperation of people in need is nothing to gamble with.”
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Carola can Captain my rescue ship any day!  :icon_sunny:

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https://www.reuters.com/article/us-europe-migrants-italy-captain/german-migrant-rescue-ship-captain-moved-to-secret-location-after-threats-idUSKCN1TY0TA


July 2, 2019 / 11:32 PM / Updated 2 hours ago
German migrant rescue ship captain moved to secret location after threats


BERLIN (Reuters) - The German captain of a rescue charity ship who angered Italy’s interior minister by bringing African migrants to an Italian island has received threats and been moved to a secret location, the charity she works for said.

An Italian judge on Tuesday ordered 31-year-old Carola Rackete released from house arrest where she had been held since Saturday, when she disobeyed Italian military orders and entered the port of Lampedusa.
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    We condemn threats against sea rescuers like Sea-Watch captain, Germany says

Rackete had faced up to 10 years in prison on possible charges of endangering the lives of four policemen for hitting a patrol boat at the quay as she brought around 40 African migrants to land in the Sea-Watch vessel.

“There were some general threats against Carola,” a spokesman for Sea-Watch, a German charity, said on Wednesday. “That’s why we moved her to a secret place. We will not comment on any further travel plans of her,” he added, speaking English.

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In a statement released by the charity, Rackete called the decision by Judge Alessandra Vella “a great victory of solidarity towards all migrants, against the criminalization of those who want to help them.”

Vella ruled that the captain had not broken the law by crashing through a naval blockade, saying that by bringing rescued migrants to port she was carrying out her duty to protect life.

Far-right Interior Minister Matteo Salvini said he was “disgusted” by the ruling. His League party last month introduced rules effectively closing Italy’s ports to rescue ships, threatening transgressors with fines of up to 50,000 euros ($56,500) and the impounding of their vessels.

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The controversy over Rackete’s actions has dented relations between Italy on one side and Germany and France on the other, and highlighted Europe’s continued failure to adopt a coherent strategy on immigration.

Rackete appeared before a court in Agrigento on Monday and apologized for hitting the patrol boat, saying it had been an accident and that her sole concern was the well-being of the migrants who had been at sea for more than two weeks.

The captain, who sports long, distinctive dreadlocks, has become a heroine to human rights campaigners.
FILE PHOTO: Carola Rackete, the 31-year-old Sea-Watch 3 captain, disembarks from a Finance police boat and is escorted to a car, in Porto Empedocle, Italy July 1, 2019. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane/File Photo

An online campaign to help her launched by two German TV stars has so far raised close to 1 million euros, while a separate fundraiser launched on Facebook by an Italian group collected 435,000 euros in seven days.

“I am moved by the solidarity of so many people,” Rackete said in her statement.

Sea-Watch said the money would be used to fund future rescue missions.

Reporting by Paul Carrel and Wladimiro Pantaleone in Agrigento, Italy; editing by John Stonestreet
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https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/07/06/us/migrants-border-patrol-clint.html

U.S. |Hungry, Scared and Sick: Inside the Migrant Detention Center in Clint, Tex.


The new Aushwitz

A little-known Border Patrol station in Clint, Tex., has become the public face of the chaos on America’s southern border, after lawyers reported seeing filthy, overcrowded conditions for migrant children there. Ilana Panich-Linsman for The New York Times
Hungry, Scared and Sick: Inside the
Migrant Detention Center in Clint, Tex.

An out-of-the-way border station in the desert outside of El Paso has become the
epicenter of outrage over the Trump administration’s policies on the southwest border.

By SIMON ROMERO, ZOLAN KANNO-YOUNGS, MANNY FERNANDEZ, DANIEL BORUNDA, AARON MONTES and CAITLIN DICKERSON   JULY 6, 2019
A Migrant Jail

This story was a collaboration between The New York Times and The El Paso Times.

CLINT, Tex. — Since the Border Patrol opened its station in Clint, Tex., in 2013, it was a fixture in this West Texas farm town. Separated from the surrounding cotton fields and cattle pastures by a razor-wire fence, the station stood on the town’s main road, near a feed store, the Good News Apostolic Church and La Indita Tortillería. Most people around Clint had little idea of what went on inside. Agents came and went in pickup trucks; buses pulled into the gates with the occasional load of children apprehended at the border, four miles south.

But inside the secretive site that is now on the front lines of the southwest border crisis, the men and women who work there were grappling with the stuff of nightmares.

Outbreaks of scabies, shingles and chickenpox were spreading among the hundreds of children who were being held in cramped cells, agents said. The stench of the children’s dirty clothing was so strong it spread to the agents’ own clothing — people in town would scrunch their noses when they left work. The children cried constantly. One girl seemed likely enough to try to kill herself that the agents made her sleep on a cot in front of them, so they could watch her as they were processing new arrivals.

“It gets to a point where you start to become a robot,” said a veteran Border Patrol agent who has worked at the Clint station since it was built. He described following orders to take beds away from children to make more space in holding cells, part of a daily routine that he said had become “heartbreaking.”

The little-known Border Patrol facility at Clint has suddenly become the public face of the chaos on America’s southern border, after immigration lawyers began reporting on the children they saw — some of them as young as 5 months old — and the filthy, overcrowded conditions in which they were being held.


By The New York Times | Aerial image by Mario Tama/Getty Images

Border Patrol leaders, including Aaron Hull, the outspoken chief patrol agent of the agency’s El Paso Sector, have disputed descriptions of degrading conditions inside Clint and other migrant detention sites around El Paso, claiming that their facilities were rigorously and humanely managed even after a spate of deaths of migrant children in federal custody.

But a review of the operations of the Clint station, near El Paso’s eastern edge, shows that the agency’s leadership knew for months that some children had no beds to sleep on, no way to clean themselves and sometimes went hungry. Its own agents had raised the alarm, and found themselves having to accommodate even more new arrivals.

The accounts of what happened at Clint and at nearby border facilities are based on dozens of interviews by The New York Times and The El Paso Times of current and former Border Patrol agents and supervisors; lawyers, lawmakers and aides who visited the facility; and an immigrant father whose children were held there. The review also included sworn statements from those who spent time at El Paso border facilities, inspection reports and accounts from neighbors in Clint.

The conditions at Clint represent a conundrum not just for local officials, but for Congress, where lawmakers spent weeks battling over the terms of a $4.6 billion humanitarian aid package for facilities at the border. The lack of federal investment, some argue, is why the sites have been so strained. But the reports of squalor prompted several Democratic lawmakers to vote against the final bill, which did not have oversight and enforcement provisions.

By all accounts, the Border Patrol’s attempt to continue making room for new children at Clint even as it was unable to find space to send them to better-equipped facilities was a source of concern for many people who worked there.
Clint is known for holding what agents call U.A.C.’s, or unaccompanied alien children — children who cross the border alone or with relatives who are not their parents. Ilana Panich-Linsman for The New York Times

“I can’t tell you the number of times I would talk to agents and they would get teary-eyed,” said one agent, a veteran of 13 years with Border Patrol who worked at Clint.

Mary E. González, a Democratic state lawmaker who toured the Clint station last week, said that Border Patrol agents told her they had repeatedly warned their superiors about the overcrowded facility, but that federal officials had taken no action.

“They said, ‘We were ringing the alarms, we were ringing the alarms, and nobody was listening to us’ — agents told me that,” Ms. González said. “I genuinely believe that the higher-ups made the Clint situation happen.”
A Forward Operating Base

Architects designed the Clint station as a type of forward base — replete with fueling stations, garages for all-terrain vehicles and horse stables — from which agents could go on forays along the border.

The station was never intended to hold more than about a hundred adult men, and it was designed with the idea that migrants would be detained for only a few hours of processing before being transferred to other locations.

Officials have allowed reporters and members of Congress on controlled tours of Clint, but prohibited them from bringing phones or cameras inside, and from entering certain areas. But through interviews with dozens of people with knowledge of the station — including lawyers, former detainees and staff members — The Times was able to model the main areas where children were held: the station’s central processing area, with its cinder-block cells; a converted loading area and yard; and a warehouse on the property.

Children and toddlers were held for days in cinder-block cells with a single toilet. Beds were removed to make space, so they slept on the floor. Many fell ill.

Sick children were quarantined and sometimes held in this padded cell with no toilet.


Parts of the site resemble what might be seen at many government buildings. Photographs in the hallway celebrate the work of the Border Patrol, showing agents on horseback and in all-terrain vehicles. A conference room features high-backed chairs upholstered with faux leather.

But the sense of normalcy fades away the deeper one goes into the station. A detachment of Coast Guard personnel, sent to assist overworked agents, stock an ad hoc pantry with items like oatmeal and instant noodles. Monitors in blue shirts roam the station, hired through an outside contractor to supervise the detained children.

Beyond the pantry, a door leads to the site’s processing center, equipped with about 10 cells. One day this month, about 20 girls were crowded into one cell, so packed that some were sprawled on the floor. Toddlers could be seen in some cells, cared for by older children.

One of the cells functioned as a quarantine unit or “flu cell” for children with contagious diseases; employees have at times worn medical masks and gloves to protect themselves.

A part of the processing area was set aside for detained children to make phone calls to family members. Many broke into tears upon hearing the voices of loved ones, episodes so common that some agents merely shrugged in response.

Clint is known for holding what agents call U.A.C.s, or unaccompanied alien children — children who cross the border alone or with relatives who are not their parents.

Three agents who work at Clint said they had seen unaccompanied children as young as 3 enter the facility, and lawyers who recently inspected the site as part of a lawsuit on migrant children’s rights said they saw children as young as 5 months old. An agent who has worked for Border Patrol for 13 years — and who, like others interviewed for this story, spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the situation — confirmed reports by immigration lawyers that agents have asked migrants who are teenagers to help care for the younger children.

“We have nine agents processing, two agents in charge of U.A.C. care and we have little ones that need their diapers changed, and we can’t do that,” the agent said. “We can’t carry them or change diapers. We do ask the older juveniles, the 16-year-olds or 17-year-olds, to help us out with that.”

As immigration flows change, the scene inside Clint has shifted as well. The number of children in the site is thought to have peaked at more than 700 around April and May, and stood at nearly 250 two weeks ago. In an attempt to relieve overcrowding, agents took all the children out of Clint but then moved more than 100 back into the station just days later.

Unaccompanied boys are kept in a converted loading area that holds about 50 people. Until a few weeks ago, older boys were kept in a tent encampment outside.

Families, including adult parents, were also sent to Clint earlier this year, and Representative Will Hurd, a Republican whose Texas district includes Clint, said that 11 adult males “apprehended that morning” were also being held at the site when he visited on June 29.

Before the influx of migrants began to wane in recent weeks, the agents said they had kept the families in a warehouse normally used to house A.T.V.s. It was converted into two holding areas initially intended to house 50 people each.
A Chief Agent Under Fire

At least two Border Patrol agents at Clint said they had expressed concern about the conditions in the station to their superiors months ago. Even before that, senior Homeland Security officials in Washington had significant concerns about the El Paso Sector’s brash chief patrol agent and his oversight of the facility over the past year, when tighter security along other sections of the border prompted a steep rise in migrant crossings along the section that runs from New Mexico through West Texas.

The situation became so severe that in January, officials at Customs and Border Protection, the agency that oversees the Border Patrol, took the unusual move of ordering the sector chief, Mr. Hull, to come to headquarters in Washington for a face-to-face meeting. The officials were concerned that Mr. Hull, an agency veteran who speaks with a pronounced Texas twang, had moved too slowly to put safety measures in place after the deaths of migrant children, according to a Homeland Security official. After the meeting, Mr. Hull moved forward with the new procedures.

But tension has persisted between Mr. Hull and officials in Washington, particularly in recent months, as the number of migrants continued to increase at his facilities. The officials believe that Mr. Hull and Matthew Harris, the chief of the Clint station, have been slow to follow directives and communicate developments at the facilities in their sector, according to two Homeland Security officials.

Mr. Hull is seen as a hard-liner on immigration issues. He has often been heard saying that migrants exaggerate the problems they face in their home countries.

Officials at the border agency declined multiple interview requests.

Last month, the acting head of C.B.P., John Sanders, ordered an internal investigation into the Clint facility. The investigation — which is being conducted by the agency’s Office of Professional Responsibility and the department’s inspector general — has examined allegations of misconduct.

As part of the review, investigators have conducted interviews and watched hours of video footage to see how agents treated detainees. So far, investigators have found little evidence to substantiate allegations of misconduct. But they have found that the facility is several times over capacity and has horrendous conditions.

The uproar over the site is drawing scrutiny on Border Patrol facilities that are some of the least-regulated migrant detention centers in the United States.
Protesters outside the Clint station on July 4. Ilana Panich-Linsman for The New York Times

That is in part because they are intended in most cases to hold migrants for no more than 72 hours, before they are turned over to better-equipped facilities operated by other government agencies with stricter regulations on, say, the number of toilets and showers required. But the 72-hour limit has been frequently breached during the current migrant surge; some children have been housed at Clint for weeks on end.

Lawyers who visited the Clint station described children in filthy clothes, often lacking diapers and with no access to toothbrushes, toothpaste or soap, prompting people around the country to donate supplies that the Border Patrol turned away.

But Mr. Hull painted a far different picture of his need for supplies in April, when the numbers of children held in Clint were soaring. Mr. Hull told commissioners in Doña Ana County in Las Cruces, N.M., in April that his stations had more than enough supplies.

“Twenty years ago, we were lucky if we had juice and crackers for those in custody,” Mr. Hull said, as quoted in The Las Cruces Sun-News. “Now, our stations are looking more like Walmarts — with diapers and baby formula and all kinds of things, like food and snacks, that we aren’t resourced or staffed for and don’t have the space to hold.”
An Inspector Arrives

One day in April, a man from Washington arrived unannounced around midday at the Clint station. He introduced himself as Henry Moak, and told the agents inside that he was there to inspect the site in his role as Customs and Border Protection’s chief accountability officer.

The Clint station was far over capacity on the day of Mr. Moak’s visit, bulging with 291 children. Mr. Moak found evidence of a lice infestation; children also told him about going hungry and being forced to sleep on the floors.

One girl, a 14-year-old from El Salvador, had been in custody for 14 days in Clint, including a nine-day stretch in a nearby hospital during which Border Patrol agents accompanied her and kept her under surveillance. Mr. Moak did not specify in his report why the girl had been rushed to the hospital. When the girl returned to Clint, another child had taken her bed so she had to sleep on the floor.

Two sisters from Honduras, one 11 and the other 7, told Mr. Moak that they had to sleep on benches in the facility’s hold room, getting their own cot only when other children were transferred out. “The sisters told me they had not showered or brushed their teeth since arriving at Clint station,” Mr. Moak said in his report. Showers had been offered twice during the girls’ time in custody, but the girls were asleep each time, his review showed.

Mr. Moak in the end stated that Clint was in compliance with standards.

One of a team of lawyers who inspected the station in June, Warren Binford, director of the clinical law program at Willamette University in Oregon, said that in all her years of visiting detention and shelter facilities, she had never encountered conditions so bad — 351 children crammed into what she described as a prisonlike environment.

She looked at the roster, and was shocked to see more than 100 very young children listed. “My God, these are babies, I realized. They are keeping babies here,” she recalled.

One teenage mother from El Salvador said Border Patrol agents at the border had taken her medicine for her infant son, who had a fever.

“Did they throw away anything else?” Ms. Binford said she had asked her.

“Everything,” she replied. “They threw away my baby’s diapers, formula, bottle, baby food and clothes. They threw away everything.”

Once at Clint, she told Ms. Binford, the baby’s fever came back and she begged the agents for more medicine. “Who told you to come to America with your baby, anyway?” one of the agents told her, according to the young woman’s account to Ms. Binford.

Border Patrol agents have said they have adequate supplies at Clint for most of the migrants’ needs. The facility lacks a kitchen, they said, so the ramen, granola bars, instant oatmeal and burritos that serve as most of the sustenance for migrants has been the best they could do.

Children sometimes could be seen crying, said one Border Patrol agent, who has worked for seven years at the Clint facility, but it most often seemed to be because they missed their parents. “It’s never because they’re mistreated; it’s because they’re homesick,” she said.
A Father Finds His Sons

Not long after Mr. Moak signed off on the conditions inside Clint, a man named Ruben was desperately trying to find his sons, 11-year-old twins who both have epilepsy.

The boys had crossed the border together in early June with their adult sister. They were hoping to reunite with their parents who had come to the United States earlier from El Salvador in order to earn enough money to pay for the boys’ epilepsy medications. They require daily injections and a strict regimen of care to prevent the seizures they began having at age 5.

But the twins were separated at the border from their sister and sent to Clint.

The first time they spoke to Ruben on the phone, the two boys sobbed intensely and asked when they would be able to see their parents again.

“We don’t want to be here,” they told him.

Ruben asked that his last name and the names of his sons be withheld for fear of retaliation by the American government.

Only later did Ruben learn that the boys had been given at least some of their epilepsy medication, and neither one had had a seizure. But one boy reported breaking out in a skin rash, his face and arms turning red and flaky. Both had come down with fevers and said they had been sent temporarily to the “flu cell.”

“There is no one to take care of you there,” one told his father.

It took 13 days after the boys were detained to speak to their father over the phone. A lawyer who had entered the facility, Clara Long of Human Rights Watch, met the boys, tracked down their parents, and helped them make a call. The boys were stoic and quiet, she said, and shook her hand as if “trying to act like little adults” — until they spoke to their father. Then, they could answer only with one- or two-word answers, Ms. Long said, and were wiping tears from their faces.

Much of the overcrowding appears to have been relieved at Clint, and overall arrivals at the border are slowing, as new policies make migrants, mainly from Central America, return to Mexico after they request asylum, as the summer heat deters travelers and as Mexico’s crackdown on its southern border prevents many from entering.

A Border Patrol agent who has long worked in the El Paso area said agents had tried to make things as easy as possible for the children; some bought toys and sports equipment on their own to bring in. “Agents play board games and sports with them,” he said.

But the Border Patrol long “took great pride” in quickly processing migrant families, and making sure children did not remain in their rudimentary stations for longer than 72 hours, the agent said. Clint, he said, “is not a place for kids.”

In the surrounding town, many residents were puzzled and sad at the news of what was happening to children in the station on Alameda Avenue.

“I don’t know what the hell happened, but they’ve diverted from their original mission,” said Julián Molinar, 66, a retired postal deliveryman who lives in a house facing the station. He served in the Army in Europe as the Berlin Wall came down, he said, and was dismayed that there was now talk of building a border wall near his home. As for the Clint facility, he said, “children should not be held here.”

Dora H. Aguirre, Clint’s mayor, expressed sympathy for the agents, who are part of the community in Clint and neighboring El Paso. “They’re just trying to do their job as a federal agency,” she said. “They are trying to do the best they can.”

Simon Romero, Zolan Kanno-Youngs, Manny Fernandez and Caitlin Dickerson reported for The New York Times, and Daniel Borunda and Aaron Montes reported for The El Paso Times. Reporting was contributed for The New York Times by Emily Cochrane from Clint; Christina Goldbaum from New York; Miriam Jordan from Los Angeles; and Michael Schmidt from Washington. Lauren Villagran contributed reporting from El Paso for The El Paso Times.

Graphics were produced by Guilbert Gates, Jason Kao, Juliette Love, Jugal K. Patel and Jeremy White. Additional work by Larry Buchanan.
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🚢 Hypocrisies About Refugees
« Reply #882 on: July 10, 2019, 04:50:14 AM »
http://thesaker.is/hypocrisies-about-refugees/


Hypocrisies About Refugees


Hypocrisies About Refugees

by Eric Zuesse for The Saker Blog

Here are two visuals from the latest annual U.N. report about the world’s refugee situation, “UNHCR Global Trends 2018”, and though these images don’t pack the emotional punch of a child’s corpse that has just been washed upon a beach after drowning when his family had attempted to escape from a country that the U.S. and its allies were ‘trying to make free’ by bombing it to hell, each of these two pictures below contains a much bigger and more important message than does any such tear-jerking image or anecdote, but each of these pictures requires a bit of intelligence in order to understand it:

The first picture shows the result of the U.S. regime’s regime-change wars under Obama and Trump, in Syria and Venezuela especially. (Syria by using Al Qaeda in Syria to lead jihadists to bring down the Government, and Venezuela by strangulating sanctions that have produced an economic blockade which prohibits food and medicine from being able to reach the population). The 9-year earlier “UNHCR Global Trends 2009”, which covered the end of the George W. Bush Presidency, had reported that “There were 43.3 million forcibly displaced people worldwide at the end of 2009,” and that this was up from 42.0 million in 2008. The “UNHCR Global Trends 2007” said only that “available information suggests that a total of 67 million people had been forcibly displaced at the end of 2007”, and so there might have been a reduction during the later years of Bush’s Presidency. In any case, the number of “forcibly displaced people” was stable during the final years of Bush’s second term and the entirety of Barack Obama’s first term, until 2012. 2011 was the first year of the Arab Spring uprisings, which were a CIA production, as was documented by two books from Ahmed Bensada, each of which was well reviewed by Stuart Jeanne Bramhall, in her two articles, one on 18 January 2014, and the other on 25 October 2015. Of course, the impression that the American public was presented about the Arab Spring uprisings is that those were spontaneous. Actually, Obama came into office in 2009 hoping to overthrow Syria’s Government.

So, whereas the numbers had been stable for Obama’s first term of office, all hell broke loose throughout his second term, with his invasions of Libya and Syria, plus his continuation of George W. Bush’s occupations of both Afghanistan and Iraq. And, now, under Trump, the number is back again to GWB’s peak level and rising.

As I noted on June 30th under the headline “U.S. Government Tops All For Creating Refugees”, “the U.S. regime’s regime-change operations produce around half of the entire world’s refugee-problem.” That fact is shown in the second visual here. (Just look at Syria and Venezuela there.) What the first visual shows is that the U.S. regime’s attempts to overthrow the Governments of Syria and of Venezuela caused those global totals to soar. Those two nations alone accounted for nearly half of the global total, and part of the rest was from America’s prior invasions: Afghanistan, Iraq, the U.S.-backed coup in Honduras in 2009, etc. America’s invasions and attempted coups (such as in Venezuela) provided the dynamos that drove those rising numbers of refugees.

Max Blumenthal and Ben Norton at The Gray Zone headlined on June 19th, “This celebrated Western-funded nonprofit collaborated with al-Qaeda to wage lawfare on Syria” and documented how U.S.-and-allied billionaires and the U.S. Government fund “lawfare,” a war in international courts, and not only a huge international propaganda campaign to demonize Bashar al-Assad, in order to overthrow him. I had previously documented that “U.S. Protects Al Qaeda in Syria”. Actually, Obama bombed Syria’s army at the oil center city of Deir Ezzor on 17 September 2016 in order to enable both Al Qaeda and ISIS to take over that city. The U.S. team talk a storm against “terrorism” but quietly (along with the monarchs of Saudi Arabia, UAE, and Qatar) sponsor it as being “boots-on-the-ground” fighters — proxies there, instead of U.S. troops — to bring down leaders such as Muammar Gaddafi and Bashar al-Assad.

So, when the U.S. and its allies complain about the refugee crisis, and pontificate against “dictators,” and assert international law when they are the worst violators of international law, maybe they enjoy fooling their own public, but outside the U.S. alliance, their lying and evil are obvious. It even shows up clearly in the UNHCR’s statistics (such as those visuals). Obviously, China, Russia, Iran, Venezuela, and other nations that the U.S. regime labels as ‘enemies’, are not to blame for those tens of millions of refugees. The U.S. and its allies definitely are to blame for it. This isn’t a situation where the pot is calling the kettle black, but instead it’s one where the pot is calling the fresh-fallen snow black, and in which only propagandistic ’news’ media refuse to reveal this to their audiences. The snow is white, and the U.S. regime and its allies are red, covered with their tens of millions of victims’ blood and flaming misery.

International poll after international poll finds that the country which is considered to be “the greatest threat to peace in the world today” by the most people worldwide is the U.S., but that Americans don’t think it’s true. So: who is right? Americans? Or the rest of the world? Now, why would people outside the U.S. believe that way? Maybe it’s because of “communist propaganda”? The most important thing to recognize is that the U.S. is a dictatorship. That scientifically demonstrated fact explains a lot. None of these sanctions and coups and invasions against countries that had never invaded nor in any way endangered the U.S. could exist otherwise than this, because any dictatorship is based upon lies. Invading Iraq was based upon lies. Invading Afghanistan was based upon lies. Invading Syria was based upon lies. Invading Libya was based upon lies. The economic sanctions against Russia are based upon lies. American foreign policies are based upon lies. It’s no wonder, then, why Americans are so misinformed.

—————

Investigative historian Eric Zuesse is the author, most recently, of  They’re Not Even Close: The Democratic vs. Republican Economic Records, 1910-2010, and of  CHRIST’S VENTRILOQUISTS: The Event that Created Christianity.

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🚢 Immigration crisis by the numbers
« Reply #883 on: July 11, 2019, 01:53:09 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/_gUBQqpqq-E" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/_gUBQqpqq-E</a>
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🚢 Deportation raids to begin Sunday: report
« Reply #884 on: July 11, 2019, 11:59:04 AM »
https://thehill.com/latino/452555-deportation-raids-to-begin-sunday-report

Deportation raids to begin Sunday: report
By Kyle Balluck and Chris Mills Rodrigo - 07/11/19 05:54 AM EDT


Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents will launch massive raids on Sunday targeting undocumented immigrants scheduled for deportation, The New York Times reported early Thursday, in an operation that President Trump delayed weeks ago.

The ICE action had been set to take place in 10 major cities and target up to 2,000 immigrants, according to multiple reports.
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According to the Times, officials will try to hold detained family members at centers in Texas and Pennsylvania, adding that ICE wants to deport families as quickly as possible.

The newspaper added that other undocumented immigrants caught up in the raids could also be detained.

“Due to law-enforcement sensitivities,” a spokesperson for ICE declined to comment on the Times’s report, noting however that anyone in violation of immigration laws may be removed from the U.S. “if found removable by final order.”

Trump said in late June that he was temporarily delaying the raids to give Congress time to pass new restrictions on asylum laws, which Democrats who control the House oppose.

Trump earlier this month said the raids would begin after the July 4 holiday.

The acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Ken Cuccinelli, told reporters on Wednesday that the raids were “going to happen” but did not provide details.

The raids are the latest hard-line approach taken by the administration to deter migrants from making the journey from Central America to the U.S.

Trump in March threatened to close the southern border unless the flow of migrants was stemmed, eventually striking a deal with Mexico that the Department of Homeland Security has touted as lowering crossings.

Apprehensions dropped 28.5 percent between May and June, suggesting the deal had a major effect on Central American immigration.

Critics, however, say the measures have done little to deter migrants and that the fall in apprehensions is mostly due to the rising heat in the summer months, when migrants are historically less likely to cross into the U.S.

In 2018, the overall apprehensions fell by 17 percent in June, a less significant drop. However, this June still had the most apprehensions since 2004.
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