AuthorTopic: Russian Communications Ministry proposes isolated web for state agencies  (Read 896 times)

Offline Palloy

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That's a very good idea, I'm surprised they haven't done that already.  All governments should do this.

http://rt.com/politics/261825-russia-integrated-networks-bill/
Communications Ministry proposes isolated web for state agencies
May 25, 2015
RIA Novosti / Ramil Sitdikov

Russian communications agency has prepared a bill that orders to create a separate information network for the state administration, security and defense, totally isolated from the internet for the sake of greater protection.

The draft document regulating the project has been posted online for public discussion, the deadline for which is set at July 13.

The bill introduces the term ‘Integrated Communications Networks’ (ICN). It also reads that the state web must have centralized management and have no connection with foreign communication networks or with networks that have public access.

The ministry suggested that the ICN operator be decided by the Russian president upon advice from the Military-Industrial Commission. The prices for its services will be determined by government decrees.

The project is to be financed from the state budget and all technology and hardware used in it must be agreed with the country’s Federal Security Service, the FSB. The same agency must also determine the general requirements for the new network, such as stability and protection from non-sanctioned access.

RIA Novosti quoted communications industry sources as saying that if the bill is passed, the most likely candidate for the contract of setting up the ICN would be the state-owned corporation Rostelecom. A company spokesman said it had extensive experience in executing large-scale government projects and that it was ready to become the ICN operator if such decision were made.

Soon after the Communication Ministry’s bill was posted online for public discussion business daily Kommersant reported the government’s alleged plans to finance the project from a special tax of 0.9 percent of income levied on private operators in the communications sector.

The newspaper referred to an unnamed source described as a participant in the market. This source elaborated that the idea of the new fund and tax belonged to some state agency involved in the future project, but not the Communications Ministry.

Representatives of the Communications Ministry said that their bill did not mention any new funds or reserves as well as new taxes. A source close to the FSB told the newspaper it was unlikely that the security agency was behind the idea.

“For the FSB it makes no sense to create such reserves. The existing laws do not allow the security service to use its means. Besides, the FSB has a lot of tasks that are of greater importance,” Kommersant quoted the security source as saying.

Representatives of major Russian communications operators declined to comment.

Last week Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered to create a protected segment of the internet that could be used only by Russian bodies of state power and ensure the complete protection of data in this segment through encryption. The project must be completed before January 1, 2018. The first users of the ‘Russian segment of the internet’ will be both chambers of the parliament, courts, prosecutors and Audit Chamber.

Putin first urged the creation of additional measures of information protection in October last year at the session of Russia’s Security Council. Communications Minister Sergey Nikiforov said then that the presidential order would be fulfilled, but emphasized that Russian citizens should not fear that their country could be one day separated from global internet.

“Such isolation is not possible under any circumstances,” the minister said.
The State is a body of armed men

Offline Ka

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I wonder how long before some bureaucrats get tired of having to manually type in info they get from the Internet they need for an internal report, so they cobble together a network connection....

Offline Palloy

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They would have to devise a new network protocol that refuses to connect IPv4 and IPv6 addresses to the IPvR system.  And they would have to use a different plug standard for USB sticks - Stuxnet was supposed to be spread that way.
The State is a body of armed men

Offline Palloy

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This is exceptionally ironic, given that the US has not ratified the Law of the Sea and is the major "bad actor" on the internet.

http://rt.com/usa/262493-nsa-rogers-maritime-law/
NSA director wants ‘maritime’ law for internet
May 27, 2015

International partners should embrace a sort of “Law of the Sea” for the internet, the head of the United States National Security Agency now says, in order to keep the web open and safe from bad actors, state-sponsored or otherwise.

Speaking at a cyberwar conference in Estonia on Wednesday, NSA Director Mike Rogers told attendees that continuing management of an "open, reliable and safe" internet may be best achieved if global stakeholders look towards other areas, where widespread cooperation is required to keep operations afloat.

“I hope we do not find a world in which the internet becomes something that fractures and where the ability to move information freely is controlled,” Rogers said at the seventh Conference on Cyber Conflict, an annual event hosted by NATO’s Cooperative Cyber Defense Centre of Excellence.

“The seas around the world are, much like the cyber domain, not governed by one single nation. We have created maritime norms and have to do the same in the cyber space to ensure a flow of information and ideas,” Rogers said, adding, "I'd like to see if we can create something equivalent to the maritime world in the cyber world that enables us to keep moving information, keep moving commerce, keep moving ideas on a global basis.”

"Can we create a 'global commons', so to speak, that enables open, reliable, safe and resilient communications, a flow of information and ideas?" the spy chief added. "(This should be) in a framework that maximizes its use for all of us."

Rogers’ remarks came just shy of the two-year anniversary concerning the publication of the first news articles to make use of leaked NSA documents to expose aspects of the agency’s previously secret surveillance operations. Since June 2013, classified files provided to the media by Edward Snowden, a former US government contractor, have detailed the NSA’s global eavesdropping efforts, including programs that opponents say have compromised core aspects of the internet.

"The issue is not that the NSA is spying on whoever the bad guy is who they want to spy on," acclaimed cryptologist Bruce Schneier said previously of the agency’s effort. "The issue is that they are deliberately weakening the security of everyone else in the world in order to make that spying easier."

Notwithstanding nearly two years of condemnation from international critics, Rogers reportedly urged attendees at this week’s event to work together with the US to adopt a system of governance that would keep the web as open as possible. Given revelations made possible by the Snowden trove, however, Rogers could encounter an uphill battle when trying to get international partners on the same page.

NSA disclosures have already led Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff to call for a country-specific internet to avoid US surveillance, and some of America’s biggest tech companies, including Google and Apple, have announced plans to open new data centers abroad to ease foreign customers, who fear their information is falling into the hands of Uncle Sam.

Commenting to Reuters, Richard Hill, a former staff member of the United Nations' International Telecommunications Union, said the NSA chief’s remarks were "exactly contrary" to current US policy that puts America’s intentions above those of others.

On June 5, 2013, the Washington Post and the Guardian first reported that the NSA collects millions of telephone records in bulk on a regular basis, regardless of whether that data pertains to individuals suspected of any criminal activity. After nearly two years of debate, the Patriot Act provision that supposedly authorized the NSA to collect call records, Section 215, is set to expire at the end of this month.
The State is a body of armed men

 

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