AuthorTopic: More From the Collapse History Channel  (Read 1249 times)

Online Eddie

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More From the Collapse History Channel
« on: June 12, 2015, 10:25:54 AM »
This time, something from the North.

On April 10th, 1865, in celebration of the Union victory, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, citizens decided to celebrate by trying to lynch an anti-Lincoln newspaperman.

It was called the Newspaper Riot, and the publisher (who was apparently a fairly insufferable bigot) barely got out alive. It was captured in an early photograph.



http://www.seacoastnh.com/Places-and-Events/Historic-Portsmouth/Portsmouth-is-Revolting/
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online Eddie

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Re: More From the Collapse History Channel
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2015, 10:34:49 AM »
Race relations in Manhattan, circa 1863:

The New York City draft riots (July 1316, 1863), known at the time as Draft Week,[2] were violent disturbances in New York City that were the culmination of working-class discontent with new laws passed by Congress that year to draft men to fight in the ongoing American Civil War. The riots remain the largest civil and racial insurrection in American history, aside from the Civil War itself.[3]

President Abraham Lincoln diverted several regiments of militia and volunteer troops from following up after the Battle of Gettysburg to control the city. The rioters were overwhelmingly working-class men, primarily ethnic Irish, resenting particularly that wealthier men, who could afford to pay a $300 (equivalent to $5,746 in 2015) commutation fee to hire a substitute, were spared from the draft.[4][5]

Initially intended to express anger at the draft, the protests turned into a race riot, with white rioters, mainly but not exclusively Irish immigrants,[3] attacking blacks wherever they could find them. The official death toll was listed at 119.[6] The conditions in the city were such that Major General John E. Wool, commander of the Department of the East, said on July 16 that "Martial law ought to be proclaimed, but I have not a sufficient force to enforce it."[7] The military did not reach the city until after the first day of rioting, when mobs had already ransacked or destroyed numerous public buildings, two Protestant churches, the homes of various abolitionists or sympathizers, many black homes, and the Colored Orphan Asylum at 44th Street and Fifth Avenue, which was burned to the ground.[8]

The demographics of the city changed as a result of the riot. So many blacks left Manhattan permanently (many moving to Brooklyn), that by 1865 their population fell below 10,000, the number in 1820.
(from Wiki)


See a map of the widespread riots here:
http://www.mrlincolnandnewyork.org/map.html





« Last Edit: June 12, 2015, 10:52:38 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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