AuthorTopic: Street Artist Murals, Sculpture & Performance Art  (Read 16859 times)

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Re: Street Artist Murals, Sculpture & Performance Art
« Reply #105 on: June 10, 2018, 06:53:13 AM »

       

                University students place flowers on the 'Pillar of Shame' statue, a memorial for those injured and killed in the Tiananmen crackdown, at the University of Hong Kong, on June 4. Tens of thousands of people are expected to attend an annual candlelight vigil for victims of the Chinese government's military crackdown nearly three decades ago on protesters in Beijing's Tiananmen Square. Kin Cheung/AP

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Performance Art - By The People Festival Seeks To Bring People Together
« Reply #106 on: June 12, 2018, 03:50:41 AM »

By The People festival seeks to bring people together
   :icon_sunny:
The Christian Science Monitor

                         

Halcyon, a nonprofit that supports socially engaged artists and social entrepreneurs seeking to address some of the world’s greatest challenges, is looking to blanket Washington with art during its inaugural By The People festival this month.

“Austin has South by Southwest and Aspen has its Ideas Festival,” says Kate Goodall, co-founder and chief executive officer of Halcyon, in a statement. “We believe it’s time for Washington, D.C., to have its own destination festival – one that is open to all, that reinforces this country’s founding principles and builds on its longstanding commitment to civil discourse.”

Running June 21-24, the international festival will be headquartered in the Smithsonian’s Arts and Industries Building on the National Mall, with official activities taking place throughout the city. Sites include the Washington National Cathedral, Union Market, THEARC West, and The Parks at Walter Reed.

The nonprofit is partnering with dozens of Washington-based arts organizations, local businesses, and government agencies for the arts takeover of the city, which will include everything from visual arts installations, an augmented reality art hunt, and high-profile speakers to a range of musical performances, with most events being free.

The festival seeks to unite people around the themes of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness while also bringing together people of varied backgrounds and perspectives. “I can’t think of a better way to bring people from different backgrounds together than through art and dialogue,” says Ms. Goodall in an email interview. “The goal is to engender dialogue by uniting individuals from all walks of life – especially those on opposite sides of an issue.”

Beyond the various art installations and performances, the festival will include curated discussions with experts representing opposing views on high-profile issues.

“By combining those far-reaching dialogues with art installations and performances,” Goodall says, “By The People invites visitors to open their minds and engage with one another on a deeper level.”

It is the hope of organizers that such engagement will remind visitors of what they have in common. “In the current political climate, it’s sometimes hard to remember that we’re more alike than different, stronger together than apart,” she says. “No matter someone’s political disposition, geographic location, age, race or gender, we generally agree that the founding principles of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are critical not only to the foundation of this country, but to its future.”

Goodall explains that the festival has been designed to allow for connection and inclusion and that organizers decided that the events would be free, save for entrance fees for a few performances.

The festival touches neighborhoods throughout the city in an attempt to foster even greater inclusion and participation. “It’s expansive and ambitious,” Goodall says. “It also was important to us to bring the festival to all four quadrants of the city.”

In all, programming will include more than 100 events, and the various installations will feature art that is almost entirely being created for the festival itself. Installations include Jenny Sabin’s “LUX,” a knitted canopy of light representing the theme of “Life”; Dan Steinhilber’s “Untitled Interface Site,” a colorful forest of interconnected inflated bubbles made of plastic wrap to inspire discussion around the theme of “Liberty”; and Maya Freelon’s “Reciprocity Respite & Repass,” a lighthearted sculpture made of colored tissue paper referring to the theme of “Happiness.”

Halcyon’s programs outside the festival include an arts lab as well as an incubator for social entrepreneurs.

“The word ‘Halcyon’ refers to a time of peace and tranquility,” says Goodall. “Our hope is that the By The People Festival will provide four days of calm and joy in which we can all examine our founding principles together.”

https://www.csmonitor.com/The-Culture/Arts/2018/0612/By-The-People-festival-seeks-to-bring-people-together   :icon_study: :emthup:

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Re: Street Artist Murals, Sculpture & Performance Art
« Reply #107 on: July 01, 2018, 05:43:07 AM »
The famed Bansky strikes again.

     

     

A woman walks past artwork attributed to the street artist Banksy, in Paris, on June 25, 2018. Banksy is believed to have taken his message on migration to Paris. Seven works attributed to the graffiti artist have been discovered in recent days, including one near a former center for migrants at the city's northern edge, according to the art website Artistikrezo.
Thibault Camus / AP

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Re: Street Artist Murals, Sculpture & Performance Art
« Reply #108 on: August 12, 2018, 04:23:52 AM »
What a day that was.  :( :-\

     

Mumbai, India
A girl with painted hands and face participates in a peace rally to commemorate the 73rd anniversary of the atomic bombing of the Japanese city of Hiroshima.

Photograph: Francis Mascarenhas/Reuters

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🖼️ The San Francisco Murals and the “Suicide of the Left”
« Reply #109 on: July 01, 2019, 01:23:35 AM »
https://www.globalresearch.ca/san-francisco-murals-suicide-left/5682193

The San Francisco Murals and the “Suicide of the Left”
By Diana Johnstone
Global Research, June 30, 2019
Region: USA
Theme: History, Police State & Civil Rights


The decision of the San Francisco school board to obliterate the historic murals in George Washington High School is not just another instance of Identity Politics foolishness. It is also a terrifying illustration of the drastic mental decline of what is called “the Left”.

Back in the 1930s there was a Left that had brains.  You could agree or disagree with it, you could love it or hate it, but it had ideas, purpose, talent, and a sense of common humanity.  It was working for a just society that would end exploitation and benefit humanity as a whole.

As an example, there were the artistic projects of the Works Progress Administration (WPA), the principal New Deal program to combat the Depression, which extended from creation of the Tennessee Valley Authority to artistic enhancement of public buildings. A beneficiary of this enhancement was George Washington High School in San Francisco, which was blessed with a striking set of murals by a leading artist, Victor Arnautoff, a Russian immigrant who had worked with the Mexican master of socially conscience mural art, Diego Rivera.   One would expect that the presence of these powerful murals would be a lasting cause of pride in their school for staff and students.






Two-step Solution for the American Government Shutdown

The WPA, not least in its art projects, was animated by leftists, and even downright Communists, like Arnautoff, who chose to depart from the sterilized “I cannot tell a lie” cherry tree myth and the crossing of the Delaware glorification of George Washington to introduce reminders of the forgotten victims of the foundation of the United States – the exploitation of African slaves and the violent expropriation of Native American lands.  The murals were clearly part of the leftwing WPA intellectuals’ endeavor to raise social consciousness, a step toward the Civil Rights movement of the 1950s.

In the age of the House Un-American Activities Committee and Joe McCarthy’s drunken rampage, such red-tinged WPA projects exposing the less glorious side of the birth of the republic aroused hostile suspicion.  And yet, the Arnautoff murals survived Nixon, HUAC and McCarthy witch hunts.  It took Identity Politics to call for their destruction.

What is most shocking is that the African-American president of the San Francisco Board of Education, Stevon Cook, supports this destruction of the murals on grounds that they include “violent images that are offensive to certain communities.”  Joely Proudfit, director of the California Indian Culture and Sovereignty Center in San Marcos, said it was not worth saving the art if one native student “is triggered by that”.

Everything is wrong with such a position.  Education should include teaching people to analyze what they see rather than simply “be triggered”.  The contemporary world is crammed with images that are deeply offensive.  When a student can have an historic mural torn down because she or he is “triggered” by it, what sort of preparation is this for the future? School should not be a “safe place” for emotions but a preparation for using reason to master those emotions as one goes through life.  The protesters have chosen the worst possible way of interpreting the murals instead of using their reason to understand them and place them in their context. Yes, slavery happened and yes, American Indians were slaughtered, and their descendants can think of the strength they needed to resist and survive, and draw from their tragic history a sense of compassion for all who suffer from comparable injustice today. The attack on the mural is a gesture of impotent spite.

What are the hurt feelings of a San Francisco high school student compared to the pain and hunger of a Yemeni child living under U.S.-supported bombing?  George Washington is dead, but in the city named after him, American leaders are sponsoring the massacre of innocent civilians all around the world.  Why don’t these super-sensitive American students use their sensitivity to oppose such ongoing crimes and develop their intelligence to figure out how to join with others in fighting to end the Permanent War State in Washington?

But the snowflake trend has no use for real strength, the strength of courage to overcome obstacles, and draws an artificial moral strength from perpetual emotional weakness. Instead of gaining strength from increased knowledge, a certain tendency of young persons who have NOT suffered as their forebears did cling to their victimhood as the key to their own privileges.  This may bring a few momentary advantages but is disastrous in the long run.

A healthy society is based on a balance between respect for the individual, regardless of identity or origins, and awareness of belonging to humanity as a whole, with all its sufferings, joys, tragedies and aspirations. Closing oneself into a limited identity group denies both respect for individuals and awareness of universal humanity.  It can only be a basis for endless conflict, “my people are better than your people”, “no, my people are better than your people”.  Those who “win” a momentary victory by imposing on others a destructive act of iconoclasm are only confirming their identification as “losers” as their sole key to success.

With such divisions, the American people will be absorbed in tribal skirmishes, while their criminal rulers continue to spread devastation around the world.

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Diana Johnstone is the author of Fools’ Crusade: Yugoslavia, NATO, and Western Delusions. Her new book is Queen of Chaos: the Misadventures of Hillary Clinton. The memoirs of Diana Johnstone’s father Paul H. Johnstone, From MAD to Madness, was published by Clarity Press, with her commentary. She can be reached at diana.johnstone@wanadoo.fr.  Diana Johnstone is a Research Associate of the Centre for Research on Globalization  (CRG).
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