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Offline Surly1

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MOAR heat.

A giant heat dome over Alaska is set to threaten all-time temperature records

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Upper-level high pressure is maxed out and anchored over southern Alaska Friday evening per model simulations. (TropicalTidbits.com)

All-time heat records are at risk in Alaska in coming days as a massive and abnormally intense area of high pressure locks in and strengthens over the region.

This heat dome is expected to produce temperatures near and above the highest values ever recorded for multiple days, particularly in southern parts of the state. It’s the latest in a slew of record-shattering heat events in Alaska.

Anchorage is predicted to test or best its highest-temperature ever recorded of 85 degrees (set in 1969) on five straight days between July 4 and 8. It could even flirt with 90 degrees.

The National Weather Service in Anchorage wrote that most of southern Alaska will be “downright hot with many locations in the 80s and even low 90s.”

Anchorage’s nighttime lows may settle only in the mid-60s during this hot stretch, which is close to its average high at this time of year.

“This 7-day forecast contains the warmest 1-day, warmest 2-day, warmest 3-day, warmest 4-day, warmest 5-day, warmest 6-day, and warmest 7-day period on record for Anchorage,” tweeted Alaska climatologistBrian Brettschneider.

This heat wave is the latest in a nonstop barrage of warm weather for the northernmost state. It comes right on the heels of a June that was well above average and filled with wildfires that are persisting and/or growing into July. Spring was disturbingly warm before that, and so was winter.

It also follows a historic heat wave in Europe, which shattered records.


Late-day temperatures compared to normal over the next week in Alaska per the American GFS model. (TropicalTidbits.com)

Alaska’s temperatures have shifted abruptly higher in the past few years, and it’s a similar story across the Arctic more broadly because of climate change.

[In Alaska, climate change is showing increasing signs of disrupting everyday life]

Sea ice surrounding the state is at record-low levels. The open water and lack of ice has elevated ocean temperatures more than 4.5 degrees (2.5 Celsius) above normal.

The combination of the unusually warm coastal waters, the intense dome of high pressure over land, and near peak energy from the sun (just 10 days removed from the summer solstice) will act to maximize the potential for historically high temperatures.


Forecasts for upper-level high pressure over Alaska are at maximum for climatology later in the week. (Tomer Burg)

Even before the development of this latest heat dome, strong high pressure has frequently sprawled over Alaska in recent weeks, leading to unusually high temperatures.

Alaska climatologist Rick Thoman tweeted that Anchorage, Kotzebue, Talkeetna and Yakutat all posted their warmest June on record, while Nome, King Salmon and McGrath logged their second-warmest June.

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Record-breaking temperatures to close June helped the monthly averages soar this high. As one example, it hit 92 in Northway, near the eastern border with Canada on June’s final day.

In southeast Alaska, where moderate to extreme drought has persisted for about a year, Juneau tied its third warmest day on record on June 28. The city also just completed its warmest five-day stretch on record (since 1936), according to Brettschneider.

While this blast of heat will eventually ease next week, the forecast calls for more warmer-than-normal conditions later into July and August.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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🌧️ Rain showers help alleviate drought concerns
« Reply #856 on: July 24, 2019, 09:08:46 AM »
Rain at last!

We're getting lots of it.  I left the Sahara, I have returned to the Rainforest.  :icon_sunny:

RE

https://www.ktva.com/story/40828130/rain-showers-help-alleviate-drought-concerns

Rain showers help alleviate drought concerns
Tuesday, July 23rd 2019, 8:37 PM AKDT
By: Aaron Morrison


Since June 1, Anchorage has only recorded 0.13" of rain, which was enough to make this the driest June-July on record. That was until today when much needed rain began to fall across Southcentral. While many areas started off the day on the dry side, a storm tracking in from the east effectively ended the dry summer that we have been seeing. The good news is not only has the rain been falling slowly, but it's a sign of an active weather pattern that is setting up across the state.

Rain showers will continue into the night for a large portion of Southcentral, with the heaviest rain shifting west of the Inlet by morning. Many locations will see anywhere from .25 to .50 inches of rain, which is more rain than we've seen dating back to May. Not only will this rain help alleviate drought concerns across the region, but many burn bans that are still in place likely will be lifted. This comes amidst the slow and steady rain that we continue to see, which allows the ground to fully absorb most of the moisture.

If you're a fan of cooler weather, we'll also see the coolest stretch of weather in some time. Thanks to cloudy skies, an active weather pattern, and rain in the forecast, many days will see afternoon highs only climb into the low to mid 60s. A welcoming sight, from the warm, dry, and smoky conditions we have been seeing.

Enjoy the rain!

-Meteorologist Aaron Morrison
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🏔️ Leaving Alaska: Thousands migrate for a strong Lower 48 economy
« Reply #857 on: August 15, 2019, 03:58:31 PM »
Good Newz!  The less people the better!  More Salmon for ME!

Dimwits going in the WRONG direction!  :icon_sunny:

North to Alaska!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/JSt0NEESrUA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/JSt0NEESrUA</a>

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https://www.ktuu.com/content/news/Leaving-Alaska-Thousands-emigrate-for-a-strong-Lower-48-economy-543466731.html

Leaving Alaska: Thousands migrate for a strong Lower 48 economy
By Sean Maguire |
Posted: Wed 9:00 PM, Aug 14, 2019


ANCHORAGE (KTUU) According to a study from the Alaska Department of Labor, when the economy is strong in the Lower 48 and unemployment is low, more people leave Alaska in search of opportunity.

“What we found over the last five years was a trend where every year without fail, we’re seeing 16,000 people move from the Lower 48 to Anchorage and about 20,000 people a year moving to the Lower 48,” said Bill Popp, president and CEO of the Anchorage Development Corp. “So that’s a net loss of about 20,000 from Anchorage to the Lower 48 over the past five years.”

The high out-migration for Anchorage is mirrored in figures for the rest of the state. The past five years have seen increasing numbers of Alaska residents leave the state as the national unemployment rate dropped.

“Alaska’s continuous net migration loss makes sense given that the nation’s economic expansion has hit a record length and the U.S. unemployment rate has fallen to a near 50-year low,” read a report written by Neal Fried, a State of Alaska economist.

“A smaller population means a smaller marketplace and less spending in our community,” said Popp, who continued to describe that a declining population hurts local businesses and entrepreneurs.

The AEDC is now looking at improving quality of life indicators such as a strong university district, strong arts sector, accessible parks and trails as a way to attract and retain talent.

Paula Bradison, president of Alaska Executive Search, said the recruitment company had seen a rise in job orders but difficulty hiring in some sectors, particularly for accountants, who are said to be in demand.

“Absolutely,” said Bradison to the question of whether a strong economy in the Lower 48 is pulling people away. Ongoing state budget turmoil is also said to be making some small and midsize businesses nervous.

“What I hear from the employers is uncertainty, even from our strongest legacy businesses, this is the first time in my career that I’ve heard this level of uncertainty,” Bradison said. The consequence is that some businesses are nervous about making a hire and talented people are being snapped up out of state.

In late July, the AEDC released a scathing three-year outlook for Anchorage, warning that budget instability and the governor’s vetoes would worsen the recession and spark higher out-migration.

The report suggested that if some of the vetoes are restored that those population losses would be mitigated.

There is however a bright spot for Anchorage. Barbara Ramsey, an associate broker at ReMax Dynamic Properties, said the property market appeared to be relatively balanced. She described falling oil prices, budget uncertainty and high unemployment as “speed bumps” but said that the property market could weather the storm.

The number of homes being built or on the market is a major difference from 1986 when the economy tanked and people left the state en masse. “We had a lot of inventory on the market, that created a nosedive, created a car crash,” Ramsey said.

“While no single landlord’s vacancy is an indicator of the whole market, and we offer a different product than other landlords, we currently are still seeing a healthy demand for our rentals,” read a prepared statement from the Cook Inlet Housing Authority. “However, we are concerned that current budget decisions could begin to negatively affect demand in the not so distant future for our region and across the state."
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Offline AJ

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Re: Frostbite Falls Newz Links
« Reply #858 on: August 16, 2019, 03:08:52 AM »
Yeah, anybody who follows the climate change catastrophe that's approaching (and is young) would be moving to Canada, Alaska, Scandinavia or South New Zealand. Only dimwits would move back to the lower 48.
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Offline RE

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Re: Frostbite Falls Newz Links
« Reply #859 on: August 16, 2019, 03:31:00 AM »
Yeah, anybody who follows the climate change catastrophe that's approaching (and is young) would be moving to Canada, Alaska, Scandinavia or South New Zealand. Only dimwits would move back to the lower 48.
AJ

Don't forget Siberia & Nunavut!

RE
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🐀 State monitoring Wasilla Fred Meyer rodent problem
« Reply #860 on: August 16, 2019, 09:26:22 AM »
The Wasilla Fred Meyer has reopened.  They're still watching for Rats though.

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https://www.ktva.com/story/40924637/state-monitoring-wasilla-fred-meyer-rodent-problem

State monitoring Wasilla Fred Meyer rodent problem
Thursday, August 15th 2019, 2:57 PM AKDT
Updated: Thursday, August 15th 2019, 9:12 PM AKDT
By: Heather Hintze


State health inspectors are monitoring a pest problem at the Wasilla Fred Meyer after complaints of rodents throughout the store.

A video posted to social media alerted staff at the Department of Environmental Conservation’s food safety office to the issue.

Program manager Jeremy Ayers said the department has received about a dozen more complaints since then.

He said a supervisor inspector went to the store on Friday, Aug. 9, a day after the Facebook video went up.

In the report the supervisor wrote he found two small outside openings.

“One door sweep appeared to be chewed through creating an entry point (emergency exit near customer pickup as well as automatic doors leading to home and garden outdoor section). Person in charge agreed to seal off these openings as soon as possible,” Nathan Maxwell wrote.


Maxwell noted he observed “numerous rodent droppings throughout the store” and found sticky traps were catching rodents on a regular basis.

Earlier this week a corporate spokesperson for Fred Meyer said the company is implementing “aggressive” cleaning and working with a third-party pest management company.

Ayers said the state is there to make sure the company follows through.

“We’re there to ensure not only that progress is being made but that there potentially isn’t a significant hazard to the public,” Ayers said. “Obviously when you have rodents in a facility that’s bad and they do pose a potential health risk. So we need to make sure the risk to the public is minimized as much as possible.”

One customer said she first noticed signs of rodents in February. But Ayers said no one made a formal complaint to DEC until after the video was seen on social media.

Ayers encourages people to report any food safety or health issues they find right away.

“We only have about 13 full-time inspectors for the state. So we can’t be in the facilities as much as we’d like to. It’s important if the public sees something, if they alert us to it and we know there’s a problem we can get someone in there sooner to correct the issue,” Ayers said.

DEC has a complaint line set up where people can text information along with pictures or videos. People can also ask to keep their complaint anonymous. That number is 907-764-YUCK.

Copyright 2019 KTVA. All rights reserved.
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Offline RE

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💵 Alaska’s universal basic income problem
« Reply #861 on: September 05, 2019, 11:09:46 AM »
A little Political Bickering is a small price to pay for reducing poverty.

$1600 this year!  Just for being able to fog a mirror!  :icon_sunny:

RE

https://www.vox.com/future-perfect/2019/9/5/20849020/alaska-permanent-fund-universal-basic-income

Alaska’s universal basic income problem

Alaska gives each resident a check every year. It’s cut poverty — and warped the state’s politics.

By Robyn Sundlee Sep 5, 2019, 8:00am EDT


Oil wells and truck charging station at dawn in Deadhorse, Alaska. Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

This story is part of a group of stories called
Future Perfect

Finding the best ways to do good. Made possible by The Rockefeller Foundation.

What if we just give people money?

This is the question propelling several new books and that’s been taken up by more than one presidential candidate — foremost Andrew Yang, who has made universal basic income (UBI) the centerpiece of his campaign. An automated future looms on the horizon, and tech magnates and policy wonks are turning to UBI as a neat solution to the messy problem of technology-induced unemployment.

Yet when one considers the political ramifications of the largest and longest-running UBI experiment in America — Alaska’s Permanent Fund Dividend (PFD) — giving out cash appears to create unforeseen problems, and advocates for basic income would do well to incorporate Alaska’s latest experience into their conceptions of the policy.

Since 1982, Alaska has been giving every woman, man, and child an annual chunk of its nest egg: the $66.3 billion Permanent Fund. Alaska deposits at least 25 percent of mineral royalties — revenue the state generates from its mines, oil, and gas reserves — into the fund annually. The money is in turn invested by the Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation in domestic and global stock, bonds, private equity, and more, and interest earnings are then distributed to Alaska residents every September.

Former Gov. Jay Hammond, the mastermind behind the fund, created the dividend system as a way to ensure Alaska’s nonrenewable resources could provide an everlasting return to the state. In his words, he “wanted to transform oil wells pumping oil for a finite period into money wells pumping money for infinity.” Paying out $1,000 to $2,000 per person per year — every Alaskan gets the same amount — was Hammond’s plan to protect the fund. If every Alaskan were a stakeholder in the Permanent Fund’s future, surely no politician could dismantle it without paying an electoral price.

For decades, Hammond’s system was an unprecedented success. But in 2015, plunging oil prices created major shortfalls in the state’s budget. In response, then-Gov. Bill Walker deviated from the traditional PFD formula and reduced the value of the check for 2016. Doing so allowed the government to continue funding state services and ensured the sustainability of the fund. Instead of a check for $2,052, as they would have received with the traditional formula, Alaskans that year got a comparatively paltry $1,022.

In 2018, Republican state Sen. Mike Dunleavy saw an opportunity. Despite traditional Republican aversions to handouts, Dunleavy ran for governor on the campaign platform of increasing the PFD. He promised every resident up to $6,700, to make up for Walker’s cuts in 2016 and 2017 — though he was foggy on how the state could pay.

The result? Dunleavy won by a landslide.

The problem is that he now finds himself unable to fulfill his campaign promise without major cuts elsewhere. He’s now seeking to jettison other state commitments to health care, education, infrastructure, and other vital areas. After initially vetoing $444 million from the state budget, Dunleavy responded to the threat of a recall vote and walked back some of his more extreme line-item cuts. Still, the state will see no funding for public broadcasting, a 31 percent cut to its critical ferry system, $130 million from Medicaid, and $70 million from the University of Alaska system.

The PFD allowed Dunleavy to turn the governor’s race into a single-issue vote: Do you want a bigger check or not? The events in Alaska show that a UBI policy can have a dramatic effect on an economy — but it can also overwhelm all other governmental concerns and dominate politics.
The complicated politics of the Alaska Permanent Fund

To supporters of a UBI, the Alaska PFD offers a tantalizing glimpse of what a universal basic income can do. Thanks to the PFD, crippling poverty is scant in Alaska. A 2016 study by the University of Alaska found it reduced poverty up to 20 percent.

However, Alaskans’ finances are insecure in other ways. High unemployment (the highest in the country) and the astronomical cost of rural living meant that even voters who were concerned about the feasibility of Dunleavy’s $6,700 pledge voted for him anyway.

A couple thousand bucks might not sound like basic income, but for many rural Alaskans, a big PFD can mean the difference between a year of hunger and a year of plenty. In the end, Dunleavy’s $6,700 was an offer too high to refuse.

But on top of all the cuts he’s pushed, Dunleavy agreed on August 20 to the $1,600 PFD that was passed by the legislature — meaning Alaskans still won’t get the check they thought they were voting for, because contrary to Dunleavy’s campaign messaging, the governor does not actually hold the power to set the value of the dividend. (Only the legislature does.)

The upheavals in Alaska illustrate how the PFD has come to warp the state’s politics. It has allowed a feckless politician to capitalize on residents’ economic insecurities and reach the state’s highest office. Alaska is one of the closest test cases we have for UBI, and interested parties should note the political and social costs that Alaska’s PFD is accruing. Once a government adopts such a policy, it may well become the preeminent issue in future campaigns. As Anchorage Daily News commentator Charles Wohlforth wrote, “It took only a year or two before the fund became politically sacrosanct.”

Alaska is not a perfect analog to the United States as a whole. The state has no income or sales tax and is loath to implement either. Andrew Yang’s Freedom Dividend plan relies on dedicated tax revenue, which would be subject to fewer vicissitudes than oil markets. It is also improbable the US would find itself in a similar budgetary bind that would pit funding for public services against a UBI. The US can borrow in huge numbers and perform financial wizardry that a lone state cannot.

However, Alaska’s political composition means it is a better test case for UBI than any small-scale randomized controlled trial, since it allows observers to study not only the economic and social ramifications of UBI but also its effects in the political arena. Republicans control the government of Alaska — just as they now control the US federal government — and Republicans tend to defund public services and thwart attempts to raise taxes on the wealthy. Any viable American UBI policy would have to grapple with the same temptations on the part of conservative politicians to use UBI to get elected and then as an excuse to strip public funding from programs they don’t like.

The situation unfolding in Alaska demonstrates how economic precarity, paired with an entrenched reliance on an annual check, can result in deep political dysfunction. How might the government salvage this vital yet troublesome program? Alaskan lawmakers have proposed codifying the formula for the dividend check amount in the state constitution as a way of settling its perennial political battles.

In theory, this would isolate the PFD from opportunistic politicians, but the reality would be more complicated. How exactly to calculate the amount alone is a vexing and deeply political question. Introducing more rigidity to the process might make the state even less adaptable to oil market fluctuations.

None of this is to say Alaska should do away with the PFD, or that UBI activists should abandon their cause. Aspects of the PFD show tremendous promise for a similar nationwide program — it signals the US would see reduced poverty, a buoyed economy, a greater sense of ownership over the country. But these UBI enthusiasts should pay attention to the curdling effects the PFD has had on Alaska’s politics, and how it has left elections vulnerable to candidates willing to make unkeepable promises.

Cash is a uniquely motivating incentive. The Alaska governor’s race indicates UBI would be a mobilizer of votes beyond what other proposals might achieve. And because UBI does not have the same tinge of big government as other entitlements, conservative political movements can readily claim UBI for their own and use it as a cudgel to dismantle public programs. Alaska demonstrates that when you start giving people money, the act may very well eclipse every other political concern and blot out all other missions of government.

Robyn Sundlee is a research fellow at the USC Annenberg Center on Communication Leadership and Policy. She was the campaign manager for Alaska State Rep. Jonathan Kreiss-Tomkins (D) in 2018.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2019, 11:11:41 AM by RE »
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Offline RE

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🏔️ Life in Alaska During the Round-the-Clock Darkness of Polar Night
« Reply #862 on: September 30, 2019, 12:01:59 PM »
Go to the link for more pics.

RE

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/photo-booth/life-in-alaska-during-the-round-the-clock-darkness-of-polar-night

Life in Alaska During the Round-the-Clock Darkness of Polar Night

By Coralie Kraft

September 29, 2019
Photographs by Mark Mahaney


Utqiagvik, Alaska, is the northernmost city in the United States. Situated more than three hundred miles north of the Arctic Circle, with a population between four and five thousand, it sits on a promontory that juts into the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, with no roads or railways connecting it to the rest of the state. With the exception of a seasonal summer barge that carries heavy provisions and equipment, all supplies and visitors must arrive via modified passenger planes, which make stops to pick up new passengers and provisions, not unlike large, airborne buses. As the Northern Hemisphere tilts away from the sun in the winter months, communities close to the North Pole experience a phenomenon known as polar night: a period of uninterrupted darkness. In Utqiagvik, this lasts for approximately two months of the year.

The photographer Mark Mahaney travelled to Utqiagvik this past January, during the final days of the season’s polar night. “Landing, it looked like we were dropping down onto the moon,” he told me recently. As soon as the plane doors opened, frigid air flooded the passenger compartment. Mahaney hurried off and into the airport, where a tiny room a little bigger than a two-car garage serves as the security, check-in, waiting, and baggage-claim areas. Mahaney’s fellow-passengers were members of Utqiagvik’s high-school basketball team: players fly in and out for every game.

The bitter cold—which ranged, last January, from around seventeen degrees Fahrenheit (not so different from winter in New York City) to a brutal negative twenty-eight—initially hampered Mahaney’s ability to meet locals around town. During the “day,” he would see people making hurried trips to work or to the grocery store; at night, the streets were deserted. Mahaney traipsed around in the dark, photographing buildings and cars caked with layers of snow. In his photographs, which are collected in a new volume from Trespasser, Utqiagvik looks abandoned. Dogs materialize as quiet, watchful shadows, or else with teeth savagely bared. Other living things barely make an appearance, though there are hints of humanity: stale light shining weakly through windows encrusted with ice, or headlights on a road. There is only one portrait in the entire series, of a young man dressed in a wrestling singlet, crouching down as if about to begin a fight. His face comes as something of a shock: after so many photographs of darkness and ice, the warmth of the man’s skin and the interior setting feel disorientingly out of place.

Though Utqiagvik’s residents were welcoming of an outsider, Mahaney said there was one topic that he found many people reluctant to discuss: their changing environment. The Arctic Ocean is heating up twice as fast as the rest of the planet, and the warmer waters are altering life in Utqiagvik in unforeseen, and perilous, ways. Whale hunting, for instance, a tradition in Inupiat culture, is threatened in many areas around Utqiagvik, where, during the spring season, the ice is no longer stable enough to support hunters dragging whale carcasses out of the water. Yet a primary cause of climate change—fossil fuels—is also the main source of livelihood for much of Utqiagvik, which leases its land to the Prudhoe Bay Oil Field, the largest oil field in North America.

The photograph that ends Mahaney’s series was taken after more than sixty days of darkness. Light has just started to suffuse the sky, rosy pink hues bleeding into gray. Two massive whale bones, stuck vertically into the ground, form a gentle curve, like a doorway. A modern boat leans heavily away from the camera; next to it are skeletons of the traditional boats that the Inupiat have used for generations. It’s at once a hopeful image, with the touch of light, and an elegiac one; what other darknesses are in store for this northernmost patch of America in the years to come?

    Coralie Kraft is a photo editor at The New Yorker.Read more »

    More:PhotographyPhotographersAlaskaDarknessWinter
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Offline RE

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🤖 Paralyzed Man Walks With Brain-Controlled Exoskeleton
« Reply #863 on: October 05, 2019, 01:41:08 PM »
I want one of these!  Better than a Cripple Cart!  lol.

Seriously though, he's still being supported from above with cables, he doesn't have to balance.  This invention still needs a lot of work.

Nevertheless, I can dream of being the $6 Million Man/Robot.  Or Tobor the 8 Man.  lol.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/YytEc1MFJiA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/YytEc1MFJiA</a>

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So in place of one BIG JAIL, we get 4 brand spanking new ones!  Great infrastructure project.

Then, Riker's Island is sold to Trump for luxury housing.   ::)

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https://www.npr.org/2019/10/17/771167909/new-york-to-close-citys-notorious-rikers-island-jail-complex

City Council Votes To Close New York's Notorious Rikers Island Jail Complex

October 17, 20198:32 PM ET
Richard Gonzales at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)


The Rikers Island jail complex in New York with the Manhattan skyline in the background. New York City lawmakers voted on Thursday to close the notorious jail complex.
Seth Wenig/AP

The City Council of New York voted 36-13 Thursday to approve a plan to close the city's notorious jail complex on Rikers Island by 2026 in favor of four smaller jails spread out across the city.

Under the $8 billion plan, the four new or expanded jails will be located in the boroughs of Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx and Queens, closer to existing courthouses.

The proposal was born out of the conclusion of Mayor Bill de Blasio and other Democrats that mass incarceration and a massive jail complex are out of step in an era of falling crime rates. About 7,000 inmates are currently housed in Rikers each day, down from a high of almost 22,000 in 1991 during the height of the crack epidemic. The plan calls for a further reduction in the jail population to 3,300 inmates, or more than half, in the next six years.

"What we are doing today will reshape the city for generations to come and impact the lives of every New Yorker," said City Council speaker Corey Johnson on Thursday. "For decades, our city was unfair to those who became involved in the justice system, and the overwhelmingly majority who were caught up were black and brown men."

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The plan is opposed by the Correction Officers' Benevolent Association and some residents of neighborhoods near the local jail sites.

Others say the move is ill-timed and will put public safety at risk.

"There is simply no way to cut the average daily jail population — which the city itself has described as 'more violent and difficult to manage' — that much more without leaving dangerous criminals on the street," wrote Rafael A. Mangual, a fellow at the Manhattan Institute, a conservative think tank, before the vote to close Rikers.

Proponents of closing Rikers say the move is in keeping with a wave of other criminal justice reforms.

Simple marijuana possession cases are rarely prosecuted. A new state law goes into effect in January outlawing cash bail for most misdemeanors and non-violent felonies. That means fewer people are expected to be jailed while awaiting trial.

Rikers, a complex of 10 jails set on an island between Queens and the Bronx, mainly housed inmates waiting for trial. It is notorious for violence, inhumane conditions and neglect.
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🍗 Popeyes customers brawl and STAFF turn on each other amid long lines
« Reply #865 on: November 06, 2019, 09:06:22 AM »
If only J6P could get this worked up over possible Extinction, Thermonuclear War or Impeachment!  ::)

RE

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7648175/Popeyes-customers-brawl-STAFF-turn-amid-long-lines-restocked-chicken-sandwich.html

Tuesday, Nov 5th 2019 3PM 33°F 6PM 34°F 5-Day Forecast

Popeyes customers brawl and STAFF turn on each other amid long lines nationwide for the restocked chicken sandwich - as one determined man even resorts to pushing broken down car through a drive-thru to get one

    Two men at an Ellenton, Florida Popeyes drive-thru are seen fighting in the road
    Video from Edgewood, Maryland Sunday shows a fight between several people
    One man at a crowded Harlem, New York location screamed at staff because he felt they were taking to long for his order of 10 chicken sandwiches
    Staff in Tallahassee turned against each other and spilled out the door fighting 
    Videos from a Popeyes at Union Park, Florida, show a pair pushing their car through the drive-thru in a bid to get their hands on the viral $3.99 sandwich
    The fast food chain brought it back on National Sandwich day which happened to fall on a Sunday, when competitor Chick-fil-A is closed
    The sandwich debuted for the first time in August and sold out in two weeks 
    Social media users shared photos and videos of long lines stretching around the block and blocking a lane in California for a taste of the infamous sandwich
    Popeyes rep told DailyMail.com Monday that the response has been 'truly extraordinary and unprecedented' but declined to share specific sales info

By Leah Simpson For Dailymail.com and Marlene Lenthang For Dailymail.com

Published: 12:42 EST, 4 November 2019 | Updated: 17:59 EST, 4 November 2019


Fast food fans have been seen desperately trying to get their hands on Popeyes' hugely popular chicken sandwich after it returned to restaurants across the country on Sunday.

Videos show a man being leaping out of his vehicle to punch another, staff spilling out of a branch as they fight, and even altercations once customers made it inside the restaurants.

A clip captioned, 'welcome to Ellenton Popeyes' shows the moment a customer waiting to make their order walks up to a man at the service window and pounds impatiently on his vehicle.

The driver then leaps from the SUV and the pair roll around fighting before others stop them and one yells 'f**k you a**hole!'.

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Brawl breaks out at a Popeyes in Edgewood
Video from Edgewood, Maryland also shows a fight between several people
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Two men at an Ellenton, Florida Popeyes drive-thru are seen fighting in the road
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Video from Edgewood, Maryland also shows a fight between several people (left). Two men at an Ellenton, Florida Popeyes drive-thru are seen fighting in the road (right)
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Popeyes customer hits old man over chicken sandwich in Ellenton, FL

One man at a crowded Harlem, New York location screamed at staff because he felt they were taking to long for his order of 10 sandwiches.

But a video from Edgewood, Maryland also shows a physical altercation between several hangry people inside that location, including one seemingly armed with long stick.

While some were willing to wait patiently, it seemed staff at a Tallahassee, Florida branch couldn't hold it together and turned against each other as they dealt with the demand.

'Lord what in the sandwich is going on y’all,' one Twitter user posted a clip of six people in orange t-shirts spilling out the location. 'Got the workers turning against each other now.'

It appeared customers helped try to break up the fight.
Staff in Tallahassee, Florida turned against each other and spilled out of the door fighting
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Staff in Tallahassee, Florida turned against each other and spilled out of the door fighting
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Tempers fray between Popeyes staff in Tallahassee, Florida
A line on La Brea in Los Angeles, California is pictured. A Popeyes rep told DailyMail.com Monday that the response has been 'truly extraordinary and unprecedented'
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A line on La Brea in Los Angeles, California is pictured. A Popeyes rep told DailyMail.com Monday that the response has been 'truly extraordinary and unprecedented'
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Dedicated diner pushes car in line for Popeyes' chicken sandwich
Wild photos and videos from a Popeyes at Union Park, Florida, show desperate customers pushing their car through the drive-thru in a bid to get their hands on the viral sandwich
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Wild photos and videos from a Popeyes at Union Park, Florida, show desperate customers pushing their car through the drive-thru in a bid to get their hands on the viral sandwich

'The safety and health of our employees and patrons is always our priority,' Popeyes told DailyMail.com in a statement Monday. 'Restaurant managers have specific protocols they follow to ensure the health and safety of each employee and guest. Most Popeyes restaurants are franchised, and employment matters are handled by the franchisees.'

In another example of determination, a customer whose car had broken down in Union Park, Florida was not dissuaded from getting in on the chicken sandwich action. He was seen pushing the motor through a drive-thru route.

After being out of stock in recent months, the item returned to menus on National Sandwich Day, sparking chaos as desperate customers battled to get hold of the savory treat.

The $3.99 meal, which comes in classic and spicy, debuted for the first time in August and was met with a frantic craze that led to long lines and fist fights at several restaurants. The sandwich sold out in a matter of just two weeks.

The fast-food joint announced the the crispy chicken was back on the menu on Sunday tweeting: 'This is not a drill... We’re fully stocked.'

After two months of waiting for Popeyes' highly-popular chicken sandwich to return, fans started to line up for the sandwich before stores opened at 10am.
Popeyes brought back their infamous chicken sandwich on Sunday for National Sandwich day
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Popeyes brought back their infamous chicken sandwich on Sunday for National Sandwich day
Videos have already started circulating of people throwing tantrum's over the sandwiches
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One man at a crowded Harlem location screamed at staff because he felt they were taking to long for his more than 10 sandwiches
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One man at a crowded Harlem location screamed at staff because he felt they were taking to long for his more than 10 sandwiches
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Popeyes customer in Harlem loses it waiting for chicken sandwiches
This twitter user shared a picture of the massive line at a Popeyes in Starke, Florida
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This twitter user shared a picture of the massive line at a Popeyes in Starke, Florida
This Twitter user in Washington DC shared a picture of the crowded Popeyes line at her local chain
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This Twitter user in Washington DC shared a picture of the crowded Popeyes line at her local chain

On Sunday the lines began before restaurant doors even opened and social media users were quick to share videos and photos of the craze.

A line even blocked up a lane on La Brea in Los Angeles.

'The cars to the left are all in line for a Popeyes chicken sandwich. Ain't no way in ..... it ain't that good lol,' he laughed about the traffic jam.

One man shared a video of a line outside a Popeyes in Savannah, Georgia going out the parking lot and wrapping around the street. Another man shared a similar scene where the line stretched along a highway in Orlando, Florida.

'There was 30+ cars backed up waiting to turn right into Popeyes and another 20 backed up in the turn lane waiting to turn left,' one Twitter user wrote.

'9.39...Popeyes don't open til 10 but we ready,'  another user shared showing a picture of a line of customers standing in a line outside the restaurant.

The Popeyes sandwich was a part of a 'Chicken Wars' between several fast food restaurants - including Chick-fil-A which is notably closed on Sundays - fighting for the best chicken sandwich. 

The summer craze saw customers become outraged as the sandwich quickly sold out in locations across the nation, sparking fights between costumers and Popeyes costumers.
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This Twitter user shared a picture of the Popeyes line outside a restaurant in Columbus, Ohio
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This Twitter user shared a picture of the Popeyes line outside a restaurant in Columbus, Ohio
This Twitter user shared a picture of the long line that stretched onto the street of their local Popeyes
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This Twitter user shared a picture of the long line that stretched onto the street of their local Popeyes
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Massive lines after Popeyes announces return of chicken sandwich

In one August viral video incident at an unknown location an irate Popeyes customer jumped through a drive-thru window to fight with three employees, angry that there were no more chicken sandwiches left at that location.

Another furious brawl broke out in Brooklyn in August when customers stood in line for an hour and were outraged to learn that the chain ran out. An argument escalated to the point where a Popeye's employee was injured.

But the fast food joint said they were prepared to meet the demand this time around. and had increased staff across franchisees.
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Popeyes said a day after the restock that the response has been 'extraordinary and unprecedented'.

'We don’t disclose specific information on sales, but the response to our new Chicken Sandwich has been truly extraordinary and unprecedented!,' a Popeyes rep told DailyMail.com Monday. 'We are very excited and humbled to see once again our fans coming out to our restaurants to enjoy the Popeyes Chicken Sandwich.

'Since the launch we’ve worked hard to make sure we have all of the amazing ingredients ready to bring the sandwich back to stores as a permanent addition to our menu.'
This Twitter user from Conway, Arkansas said he went to his Popeyes early for the sandwich
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