AuthorTopic: End of More: Interview with Norman Pagett  (Read 1688 times)

Offline RE

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End of More: Interview with Norman Pagett
« on: July 22, 2015, 03:50:42 AM »


logopodcastOff the microphone of RE



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Aired on the Doomstead Diner on July 22, 2015



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Recently, we had the opportunity to talk with Norman Pagett, one of the Authors of the End of More, and excellent Primer for people new to the world of Industrial Civilization Collapse and Population Overshoot.  Norman resides in Shropshire, England, right at the heart of where the Industrial Revolution began in the early 1700s with the invention of the Steam Engine, and its early application in pumping the water out of Coal Mines.



In this first part of our discussions with Norman, we go over the early history of the Industrial Revolution and its expansion in the early years.



Much more to come in future episodes.  We have a few hours of collapse chat still to wade through and edit here.  Meanwhile, enjoy our Collapse analysis of the day here on the Doomstead Diner.



RE






Snippet:



http://axisoflogic.com/artman/uploads/2/children_in_coal_mines_-_dickens495.JPG



RE: …I don't know how much do you followed any of the old Dickens stories about the dirty state of London back in the early nineteenth century as a result of coal burning?



Norman: Yes I do. In fact two things which expanded London and other cities as well because all of them was the go to transport that's rail transport and the output of sewage, because if you've got a city with a million people in it you've got an awful lot of sewage and you've got to get rid of it, and the only way you can get rid of it was building a sewage system which could only be built with bricks, and the heat needed in vast quantities could only came from coal. So coal firms were about sixty or seventy miles from London where the bricks were fired and they had to be transported into the city by train, and then from that they use the six million bricks to build the London sewage system, which was then pumped out from the London Centre right to the estuary on the North Sea, and then the big engines out there which pumped the sewage into the sea and was just discharged and got rid of . Now again you're talking not just about pumping the water out of the coal mines you're talking about pumping water into the city fresh water in some way and then taking sewage and pumping it out of the city. So those two processes then enable cities to start growing to much larger sizes than they had ever before and so that was a prrocess there that allowed the sytem to take off…



 



For the rest, LISTEN TO THE INTERVIEW!!!


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Offline RE

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End of More: Interview with Norman Pagett 2
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2015, 02:14:15 AM »


logopodcastOff the Microphones of Norman Pagett, RE & Monsta



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Aired on the Doomstead Diner on August 5, 2015



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End_of_More



Discuss this Interview at the Podcast Table inside the Diner



In this second part of our podcast With Norman Pagett, we talk about the timeline questions and many of the more complicated questions of resource depletion and collapse.



Part 1 can be found HERE






Snippet:




From Monsta:



….Hello and welcome to another edition of the Collapse Cafe here at the Doomsday Diner.   Today we are joined by RE and Norman Pagett, the main topic in this discussion will be about population overshoot and which regions we would expect to see that are most affected. We also try and cover well are the most likely breaking points in societies and what outcomes we can expect to see once those tipping points are reached. But before we discuss those issues, one of the areas that is most prominent and obvious for most of that is that of the financial system.  One of the recurring problems we see on the gross level here is the various monetary problems we see around the world, for example in China this is seen was declining values in the Chinese Stock exchange while increase we see there simply enormous debt loads are not only a threat to themselves but the entire Euro Zone in the end of war. Do you have any discussion on how money and debt is affecting all nations?….



From Norman:



…I think Nations just borrow money endlessly to keep themselves afloat. The only people who are not borrowing money are the ones producing oil like a country like Saudi.  As a sovereign wealth fund of hundred or close to a trillion dollars or something like that whatever it is, and they just use it to create jobs by building the towers and roads of the hotels and offices and stuff like that, but that's only as long as the goal of flows when the oil stops flowing the economy will crash less like anybody else's. This how do you call of the will crash like Greece crash well and in fact the oil doesn't even have to stop flowing. The price that the oil wealth brings and the market drops like that that crashes the miners. Exactly that's what I meant that when the price becomes unaffordable…



From RE:



..Consider the Greeks.They are now having trouble importing all the stuff that they need to keep going. All the systems functioning, and that's in a country that has like I say good arable land. The Saudis have just no chance of self-sufficiency.  That environment just simply can't support that many people. You know historically it never did, I mean the Saudis themselves are descendants of Bedouin tribesmen and so forth that wandered around the desert and there just weren't a whole heck of a lot of them. They proved I guess to be the best allies that Western nations could find in the aftermath of the breakup of the Ottoman Empire after  World War I, 1914 or so you know, they got the nod and of course the United States/Fascist States of  America built air force bases and what not down there, and you know the Saudis probably have the largest military with the best military hardware of anybody down in the Middle East.  I guess that's basically what keeps them in power right now. Once the oil is gone then the Saudis are toast. You know that's actually my tagline for the Chinese usually, when talking about their population issues and pollution issues and so forth…




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