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Offline RE

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SoCal Inferno- The Rich Get Fried
« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2017, 08:05:13 AM »
The insurance industry is going to take a major beating on this one.

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Re: SoCal Inferno- The Rich Get Fried
« Reply #16 on: December 07, 2017, 09:30:58 AM »
The insurance industry is going to take a major beating on this one.

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Time to go short on State Farm. Rich people in Cali are probably filing insurance claims and going short on insurance carriers at the same time.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

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SoCal Inferno- HELL on Earth
« Reply #17 on: December 08, 2017, 05:19:45 AM »
FEEL THE BURN!   :evil4:

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Slave Labor on the Fire Line
« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2017, 04:52:26 AM »
http://grist.org/briefly/inmates-are-risking-their-lives-to-fight-californias-raging-fires/

Briefly
Stuff that matters
risky business


DAVID MCNEW / Stringer / Getty Images

Inmates are risking their lives to fight California’s raging fires.

As wildfires tear through the greater Los Angeles area, destroying hundreds of homes, officials have warned nearly 200,000 people to evacuate.

Thousands of firefighters have arrived on the scene — many of them inmates, who make up about a third of the state’s wildfire-fighting force. Since the 1940s, California has relied on inmates to combat the flames by digging containment lines and clearing away brush. In return for this difficult and dangerous work — which has been compared to slave-era labor conditions — inmates get credit toward early parole and $2 per day in camp plus $1 per hour for their time on the fire line.

Roughly 250 women inmates serve on California’s firefighting force, risking their lives to get out of prison faster.

“I’ve seen women come back with broken ankles and broken arms, burns, or just suffering from exhaustion, you know, the psychological stress that people go through trying to just pass the requirements,” Romarilyn Ralston, a former firefighter trainer, told PBS.

As climate change makes wildfires worse, state officials are scrambling to recruit more inmates to fight them.
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'This fire is a beast': Massive inferno keeps growing despite all-out battle
« Reply #19 on: December 14, 2017, 06:57:24 AM »
...and the Mansions just keep on burning!  :evil4:

RE

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-thomas-fire-ledeall-20171214-story.html

LOCAL L.A. Now
'This fire is a beast': Massive inferno keeps growing despite all-out battle

Firefighters try to stop the forward march of the Thomas Fire


Firefighter Chris Black with the Sacramento Fire Department douses flames Tuesday in Toro Canyon in Carpinteria. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Joseph Serna, Javier Panzar and Matt HamiltonContact Reporters

More than a week after the Thomas fire ignited in Ventura County, destroying hundreds of homes and displacing thousands as it grew into a massive inferno, firefighters are now in a race to protect the pristine coastal communities of neighboring Santa Barbara County before a shift in powerful winds forecast for this weekend.

Across the mountain ridges above Santa Barbara, Summerland and Montecito, firefighters Wednesday were building containment lines, clearing brush, digging breaks and setting small backfires to burn fuel, all in an effort to create barriers to stop the forward march of the fire.

Conditions so far this week have been favorable, allowing firefighters to attack the flames on the southwestern flank of the blaze as it moves west toward the Santa Ynez Mountains.

But the National Weather Service was forecasting sundowner winds blowing southeast at up to 35 mph Friday night, followed by Santa Ana winds Saturday that, at up to 45 mph, could steer the fire toward the southwest.

“When the wind starts pushing it, we can throw everything we have at it and it’s not going to do any good,” Mark Brown, an operations section chief for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, told Santa Barbara residents Wednesday night.

The stakes are high. If the fire moves into Santa Barbara and Montecito, nearly a quarter million residents and 62,000 structures worth $46 billion would be at risk.
Dozers build containment lines as fire approaches
A dozer from the Santa Barbara County Fire Department clears a fire break across a canyon from atop Camino Cielo down to Gibraltar to make a stand should the fire move in that direction. (Mike Eliason / Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP)
“When the wind starts pushing it, we can throw everything we have at it and it’s not going to do any good." — Mark Brown, Cal Fire operations section chief

As firefighters well know, sundowner winds are notoriously unpredictable. The winds occur when hot air from the Santa Ynez Valley rises and swiftly pours over the mountain passes toward the Pacific Ocean, as if a person pressed a thumb over the end of a hose.

“It creates very erratic wind conditions, which are very difficult to predict and very difficult to fight fire in,” said Capt. Brendan Ripley, a fire behavior analyst with the Ventura County Fire Department. “It moves fire in different directions. It changes throughout the day.”

If crews can’t finish the containment line across a roughly six-mile stretch in the mountains fast enough to stop the fire’s march west, firefighters may have to burn the fuel themselves — a risky proposition and a scary sight for residents.

“It’s a proactive approach to fight the fire on our terms instead of on Mother Nature’s terms,” Brown said. “It’s well-coordinated if we do it. We’ve had numerous subject-matter experts put the plan together. It’s been vetted at all levels. All the local authorities have looked at it and approved it.”

Fire officials stressed that this plan would be used only if the weekend wind events occur as predicted and if crews can’t make a stand and fight the fire directly. The controlled blaze would burn up to 4,000 acres and be started when winds are favorable for firefighters.
Massive Thomas Fire Threatens Santa Barbara County
The Thomas Fire, feeding on thick chaparral brush which hasn't burned in generations, approaches homes in Montecito. (David McNew / Getty Images)

Meanwhile, firefighters hoped to slow the blaze by building breaks into areas with less vegetation because those areas burned in the last decade, said Chris Childers, a battalion chief with the Santa Barbara County Fire Department.

About 600 fire engines are jammed into the narrow, winding roads in the Santa Barbara County foothills. Trucks are spraying retardant on grassy hillsides and firefighters are wrapping small, indefensible buildings in protective metallic sheeting that looks like tinfoil to reduce the chances they ignite.

As smoke cleared and visibility improved, a conga line of low-flying helicopters started arriving at a county park in Santa Barbara off Highway 154 to pick up fire retardant. Officials said 33 helicopters and eight airplanes were dropping water and retardant on the blaze.

As of Wednesday night, the Thomas fire had burned more than 238,000 acres and was 30% contained. It has destroyed more than 900 homes in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties since it began Dec. 4 near Thomas Aquinas College in Santa Paula. In its first day, the fire spread southwest, toward Ventura, and northwest, eventually hugging Ojai before pushing to the Central Coast.

With containment lines now protecting Ventura and Santa Paula, firefighters there have been on a “seek and destroy” mission for any lingering hot spots that could threaten avocado groves, fire officials said Wednesday.

“This fire is a beast and you’re gonna kill it,” Martin Johnson, Santa Barbara County fire division chief, told fire crews at a morning briefing. “I have no doubt."

Authorities said it will probably take months for fire officials to determine the cause of the Thomas fire.
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Thomas fire: Thousands of acres burn in Ventura County

Serna from reported from Ventura, Panzar from Santa Barbara and Hamilton from Los Angeles.

joseph.serna@latimes.com

javier.panzar@latimes.com

matt.hamilton@latimes.com

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Inferno Newz: One Dead Fireman, California being 'Devoured'
« Reply #20 on: December 15, 2017, 12:29:09 AM »
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Inferno Newz: Today's Target- San Ysidro Creek
« Reply #21 on: December 16, 2017, 03:46:11 AM »
http://beta.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-thomas-fire-ledeall-20171216-story.html
http://beta.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-thomas-fire-ledeall-20171216-story.html

Winds, danger return as Thomas fire takes aim at Santa Barbara County
By Joseph Serna and Brittny Mejia
Dec 16, 2017 | 2:00 AM
| Montecito, Calif.
Winds, danger return as Thomas fire takes aim at Santa Barbara County


Firefighter Chris Black with the Sacramento Fire Department douses flames in Toro Canyon in Carpinteria. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Spotters are in place. Hillsides have been scrubbed of as much flammable vegetation as possible. And now it's time to see whether it was all enough to stop the deadly Thomas fire from wreaking additional havoc.

All eyes Saturday morning are expected to be on the hills above Montecito in Santa Barbara County.

The westernmost edge of the giant Thomas fire, now the fourth largest since California began keeping formal records in 1932, was by Friday night in the north-south canyon through which San Ysidro Creek runs.

A few hours after sunset Friday, the fire was relatively calm. But firefighters feared that gusts of up to 40 mph could start blowing from the north directly to the south in this canyon from 2 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

And if the fire gets into the canyon and the winds breathe new life into the flames, there is nothing to stop the blaze from racing into the foothill homes of Montecito, said Mark Brown, a fire operations commander.

Firefighters have smothered the hills in hundreds of thousands of gallons of fire retardant in an attempt to keep embers from igniting spot fires and to keep flames at bay, Brown said. Some hillsides have been denuded above Montecito, Summerland and Carpinteria, including in Romero and Toro canyons, to limit the potential damage. The fire is out in much of those areas and protected by established containment lines, he said.

But that's not the case around San Ysidro Creek, which is where authorities are most concerned about flames overnight, he said. There was a limit to how much flammable vegetation could be burned in a controlled manner before the Thomas fire arrived at the canyon.

It would have been too risky to attempt a controlled burn there during days of stubborn winds because it would have created another large fire that would sprinkle embers throughout the communities to the south and west, Brown said.
&nbsp;
  (Sources: Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, Cal Fire, Mapzen, OpenStreetMap )

So at some point Saturday morning, when the spotters on mountain tops alert crews below that the winds are coming, firefighters are going to clear out and watch and wait to see whether their preparations were enough.

If the winds catch the flames well enough to send the blaze running south down the canyon toward Montecito, "we won't stop the spread," Brown said.

There are hundreds of homes that would be in the fire's potential path and with winds that strong, it's a deadly proposition to place firefighters in front to stop it. Instead, crews would have to watch the fire pass by from designated "safety zones" then attack it from behind.

Brown said he expected that structures would burn Friday night or Saturday if the winds return.

More than 300 engine crews are posted along road shoulders, in open fields and on private estates with plenty of room to operate. An additional 300 are ready to flood the area.

"We are doing anything and everything we can to keep the community safe," Brown said.

Martin Johnson, a division chief with the Santa Barbara County Fire Department, sent a message directly to residents in the potential evacuation zone.

"If you are in an evacuation order area, I am asking you to please heed that order. If you're in one of the warning areas … be ready to go at a moment's notice," Johnson said. "This is a significant event and we want everybody to be ready."

Commanders have identified specific locations in the mountains that would trigger additional evacuations if the fire reaches those points.


Firefighters are worried that gusts Saturday will fuel the fire's spread into a canyon containing San Ysidro Creek directly south into the community of Montecito in Santa Barbara County. The red area indicates the area that has burned. (Cal-FIRE / Google Maps )

Friday was the 12th consecutive day of red flag fire warnings — the longest sustained period of fire weather warnings on record.

“We put out plenty of red flag warnings, but we haven’t seen them out 12 days in a row. That’s unusual,” said National Weather Service meteorologist Curt Kaplan. “This has been the longest duration event that we have had a red flag warning out without any breaks.”

Red flag warnings were instituted by the weather service in 2004 and are intended to alert fire agencies to hot, dry and windy conditions that foster wildfires.

The National Weather Service warned that red flag conditions would be in effect in the Santa Barbara County mountains from late Friday night through Saturday evening.

Red flag conditions are also forecast in the mountains and valleys of Ventura and Los Angeles counties late Saturday night through Sunday evening; they were also forecast for parts of Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties Sunday.

Red flag warnings were also in place for this weekend across large swaths of California, including parts of the Bay Area, the Central Valley and Sierra Nevada.

The Thomas fire has killed two people, including a firefighter on Thursday, destroyed more than 1,000 structures, and damaged hundreds more. It was 35% contained Friday night.

The fire began Dec. 4 in Santa Paula near Thomas Aquinas College. In its first day, the fire spread southwest, toward Ventura, and northwest, eventually hugging — and sparing — Ojai before pushing to the Santa Barbara County coast.

The wildfire has scorched 256,000 acres. Now the fourth-largest fire in modern state history, it is only a few thousand acres from climbing the ranks again.

The fire is so large that its eastern and western fronts are influenced by entirely different wind patterns and terrain. In many ways, it's as if firefighters are battling two separate fires some 40 miles apart.

Much of the fire's recent growth was north of Ojai in the Rose Valley east of Highway 33, where flames are feeding on chaparral and dead vegetation, said Jude Olivas, a spokesman for the agencies battling the fire.

The rest of the fire's spread was either north, deeper into Los Padres National Forest, or to the west — where it crawled along canyons near the wealthy enclaves in Summerland, Montecito and Santa Barbara.

Crews from the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection have been painstakingly working alongside firefighters from 10 other western states to scrape containment lines that would serve as firebreaks before winds were expected to shift Friday night. Streaks of red fire retardant dropped by aircraft or sprayed by tanker trucks line the hillsides as well.

Firefighters conducted small, controlled burns that destroy fuel for the wildfire. Crews ignite backfires using either a flaming, fuel-filled drip torch or a "stubby" — a pistol that launches flares 20 to 40 feet into the brush. Water tankers and firefighters continually monitor these fires and douse them if they grow too large, Olivas said.

Firefighters estimate the blaze has so far cost $96.9 million to fight. There were an estimated 8,300 firefighters battling the fire Friday.

Serna reported from Montecito and Ventura, Mejia from Los Angeles. Times staff writer Rong-Gong Lin II contributed to this report from Los Angeles.

joseph.serna@latimes.com

brittny.mejia@latimes.com
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Inferno Newz: Livestream 12/16/2017
« Reply #22 on: December 16, 2017, 06:00:27 AM »
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Ring of Fire
« Reply #23 on: December 19, 2017, 04:14:51 PM »
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https://www.counterpunch.org/2017/12/19/ring-of-fire/

December 19, 2017
Ring of Fire

by John Davis


Photo by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center | CC BY 2.0

Southern California’s Thomas Fire, the state’s fourth largest, continues to grow. To date, it has consumed over 250,000 acres but in the middle of its burn area, which stretches from Santa Paula in the south east to Santa Barbara in the north west, the Ojai Valley (barring an extraordinary turn-of events), has survived. A week ago, the local weekly, The Ojai Valley News, emblazoned its front page with the banner headline, “Ring of Fire”, a phrase that had been in local circulation for several days previously as residents watched the flames encircle their communities on their seemingly inevitable way to the coast.

Many of us who have reached a certain age cannot hear that phrase without hearing, in our mind’s ear, the thudding voice of Johnny Cash running through his sister-in-law’s honky-tonk ditty of 1963. His earnest rendition has become a cultural touchstone: now, in central coast California and its inland valleys, it has become entwined with the epic events of December 2017 when much of the landscape that lies to the south of the Santa Ynez transverse mountain range was charred in the ring of fire that girdled the Ojai Valley; as it continues to burn to the north and west, it has already destroyed over a thousand structures – the surrounding chaparral blackened, somber, and pungent with congealed super-heated resins.

Cash had a great deal of history in the area. He recorded the song Ring of Fire in a small Ojai recording studio while living in Casitas Springs, the western-most community in the Valley. The town now proclaims itself as “The Home of Johnny Cash” and the trailer park he purchased for relatives to manage still stands forlorn in an area whose center is anchored by a convenience store, nameless but for the red neon sign over its door that reads ‘Bait and Liquor’.

Casitas Springs was founded in 1834 when local Chumash Indians, formerly wards of the Mission San Buenaventura were relocated to pastures along the Ventura River flood plain half a dozen miles inland from the coast. There they settled, built rough shelters (euphemistically called casitas and memorialized in the town’s name) and led lives tragically foreclosed by both the loss of their connection to a tribal life and the enforced institutionalization to which they had succumbed during the Mission era. Their sad histories were washed away in the frequent floods that plague these rank bottom-lands; their archeological footprint, primarily evidenced by their basketry, destroyed by the brush fires that periodically sweep along the escarpment to the south. The fire this time skirted Casitas Springs and the three other towns that run east between the Santa Ynez mountains to the north and Sulphur Mountain to the south – the Valley saved by its topographical character, its heavily irrigated buffers of citrus and avocado groves, accommodating winds and the battalions of fire fighters who worked at its margins.

For all its local resonance, this literal ring of fire also reflects the wild fires that customarily girdle the planet and are shown in a stunning animation on NASA’s Eco Earth website generated from information transmitted by its Terra satellite. Perhaps most of these fires represent versions of slash and burn agriculture, but whatever their origin they are now all non-human creatures of the Anthropocene, their fiery conflagrations, exacerbated by global warming to some unknown degree, reflections of the burning of the planet’s stored solar energy scavenged from its crust.

The Thomas fire has now swept through territory once lightly populated with Chumash Indians who regularly burned their food-gathering lands. As Kat Anderson has shown in Tending the Wild, Native American Knowledge and the Management of California’s Natural Resources, 2006, local Indians managed their wild food resources by burning the land to encourage their growth and to create clearings in which they could better hunt game. While the coastal Chumash relied heavily on sea food, inland groups harvested acorns as their staple supplemented with chia seeds, the fruits of the holly leafed cherry and small game. The untouched wilderness eulogized by John Muir was in fact a carefully managed environment, with swathes of chaparral charred in controlled burns where the plants had long co-evolved with regenerative lightning-sparked conflagrations.

Following the European invasion of California in 1769 and the subsequent sacking of the territory by Anglo Americans in the mid nineteenth century in pursuit of gold, rampant infrastructural development in these fire-lands has raised the stakes for the rapid containment of its cyclical irruptions. Californian and Federal agencies, as well as municipal fire-brigades from all over the western states and the National Guard have massed their land and air forces to battle the Thomas fire. They are backed-up by a large police presence and loosely aggregated community support groups. There is a sense that in controlling the flames, in taming their wildness, the chaparral is being returned to the asylum, its place of subjugation. As Thomas H. Birch notes in The Incarceration of Wildness: Wilderness areas as Prisons, “when this place is made, and wildness is incarcerated in it, the imperium is completed”.

If we accept fire as a natural event (although, in the case of the Thomas fire its two starting points were of an anthropogenic origin), then the determination to contain it is very much in the tradition of Mao’s Great Leap Forward of the 1950’s which proposed conquering nature through human intervention. In an arguably more enlightened twenty-first century America might we begin to move towards policies of accommodation and of co-existence with non-human entities and their often cataclysmic manifestations? Reasonable containment strategies could then be incorporated into urban planning practices, or in the case of existing developments, accorded the same level of priority as other infrastructure upgrades in the areas of transportation, public health, communications and the supply of goods and services.

To continue the manic patchwork of whack-a-mole fire suppression is a profoundly reactionary approach that both validates and preserves the existing incongruities of urban and suburban developments within areas whose ecologies requires them to burn.  In many respects, this reaction echoes the mindset that drives the U.S. military towards the lethal suppression of armed resistance in areas of conflict rather than pursuing soft strategies of social, political, and economic accommodation that might remove the underlying grievances of the putative enemy. In both cases, these aggressive policies are the testosterone fueled products of the Neolithic mind.

In addition, the perception of the firefighter as Hero (who saved our town/house/life/pet) gets in the way of a sensible appraisal of the issues at stake. Firefighters do their job and for the most part are handsomely paid for their efforts (prisoners from state penitentiaries on the fire-line excepted) and while they often display extraordinary bravery in the protection of stranger’s lives, their property and pets, our adulation likely confirms in them and their command structure a sense of the ineffable righteousness of their work. We, as a community, are thus locked into the whack-a-mole ethos, which stands in the way of a measured coexistence with forest fires. Co-existence and accommodation do not represent humanity’s defeat in its battle with the elements but indicate a level of solidarity with the non-human and of an appropriate humility in acknowledgement of the other powers with whom we share the Earth.

In the aftermath of the fire running through areas of Upper Ojai there were several instances of looting of evacuated and damaged houses. I witnessed the arrest of a suspected looter on my street. Three Ventura County Sheriff’s black and white SUV’s were pulled up behind a beige Chevy Suburban bulging with boxes of household goods and clothing. Two bicycles were thrown haphazardly on the roof rack. A deputy knelt at the curb carefully probing one box of civilizational detritus at a time. The cuffed suspect was standing by his vehicle, his female companion still in the front passenger seat. I pulled up and my enquiring gaze was met with an explanation from one of the sheriff’s deputies that they were patrolling the streets around the burn area apprehending looters and other ‘undesirables’. I drove off, that last word etched in my consciousness.

Some years after Cash recorded Ring of Fire he went to Folsom prison, actively consorted with the state’s undesirables, then entertained and demonstrated solidarity with them. He revived his fading career by adopting an outlaw image as ‘The Man in Black’. He understood the plight of all those who refused to be totally coopted by the rules-making capitalist imperium. Perhaps, as a profoundly Christian man, he foresaw a day, in an epoch we now call the Anthropocene, when the ‘undesirables’ (in the neo-liberal lexicon, but one step away from the non-human), would inherit the Earth.
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John Davis is an architect living in southern California. He blogs at Urban Wildland.
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Thomas Fire Second-Largest California Wildfire on Record; 425 Miles Burned
« Reply #24 on: December 20, 2017, 12:42:57 AM »
http://ktla.com/2017/12/19/favorable-conditions-slow-271750-acre-thomas-fires-pace-but-dangerous-winds-are-expected-to-return/

Thomas Fire Now Considered Second-Largest California Wildfire on Record; 425 Miles Burned
Posted 9:57 AM, December 19, 2017, by Erika Martin, Updated at 07:13PM, December 19, 2017


The massive Thomas Fire is now the second-largest California wildfire on record, as it reaches 55 percent containment while continuing to burn into a third week across Ventura and Santa Barbara counties on Tuesday.

Thousands remain evacuated from their homes ahead of the Christmas holiday. The stubborn blaze has been half contained since Monday and burned 750 acres overnight — slowing its usual pace — to cover 272,000 acres by Tuesday evening, Cal Fire said. It is second in size only to 2003's Cedar Fire in San Diego, which charred 273,246 acres.
A firefighter puts out hotspots on a smoldering hillside in Montecito as strong winds blow smoke and embers inland, Dec. 16, 2017. (Credit: Robyn Beck / AFP / Getty Images)

A firefighter puts out hotspots on a smoldering hillside in Montecito as strong winds blow smoke and embers inland, Dec. 16, 2017. (Credit: Robyn Beck / AFP / Getty Images)

Rising humidity hindered the flame's spread overnight, allowing firefighters to reinforce containment lines and put out hotspots. Fire crews also made "good progress" during the day Monday with winds dissipating, said Mark Brown,operations section chief for Cal Fire.

"It's nice to have a couple of days in a row where we've had good progress," Brown said. "The weather conditions were just right for us; the winds were blowing into the fire."

However, the powerful gusts that are blamed for fanning the flames thus far are expected to return by Wednesday, with some wind picking up Tuesday afternoon, and humidity is expected to rise, according to Cal Fire and the National Weather Service (NWS). Officials are warning that those could shift northeast and turn into Santa Ana winds over Ventura County by Thursday or Friday, the Los Angeles Times reported.

And, despite positive developments with wind and humidity, hillside chaparral across the region remains "critically dry," Cal Fire said. NWS expects there will be no rain in the area for the rest of the year.

More than 8,200 firefighters are still battling the blaze, which they do next expect to be fully contained until next year, around Jan. 7. The firefight so far has cost $140 million, according to Cal Fire.

Two people, a firefighter from San Diego and a Santa Paula resident, have been killed in the fire.
A strong wind blows embers from smoldering trees as the Thomas Fire burns in Montecito on Dec. 16, 2017. (Credit: David McNew / Getty Images)

A strong wind blows embers from smoldering trees as the Thomas Fire burns in Montecito on Dec. 16, 2017. (Credit: David McNew / Getty Images)

For a second week, 18,000 structures are under threat, firefighters said. Evacuations orders mainly affect those in Santa Barbara County — where animals have even been evacuated from the Santa Barbara Zoo — though some in Ventura County persist.

The Thomas Fire also is the states' third-most destructive in structure losses and has razed more than 1,000 buildings, at least 765 of them homes, and damaged hundreds more.

Fire crews on Tuesday would be focusing their resources on extinguishing hotspots and strengthening containment lines in Montecito and the Gibralter Road area of Santa Barbara. Firefighters would also be working in the hills north of Camino Cielo to establish a fire line and push forward progress into the burn area from the Zaca Fire that scorched 240,207 acres in 2007.

Officials warned that hotspots also remain active in the Ojai Valley area, where a small tree line fire broke out Monday night, but said the threat to Fillmore has decreased.

On the wildfire's north and east flanks, flames are moving further into the Matilija and Sespe wilderness reserves and toward the Sespe Condor Sanctuary.

To date, it has burned an area larger than New York City, Washington D.C. and San Francisco combined -- and is larger than any city in California except Los Angeles.

For more information on evacuations and road closures, visit CountyofSB.org or ReadyVenturaCounty.org.
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🚰 Wasted Water in Capetown
« Reply #25 on: January 27, 2018, 12:58:46 AM »
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🎾 Heat policy in effect at the Net with N.Y. temperatures on rise
« Reply #26 on: August 29, 2018, 12:22:31 AM »
Where's McEnroe when we really need him?

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RE

http://www.espn.com/tennis/story/_/id/24504349/as-temps-soar-us-open-players-retire-due-heat

Heat policy in effect with N.Y. temperatures on rise
play
4:22 PM AKDT


    Aishwarya KumarESPN.com


NEW YORK -- Three players were forced to retire Tuesday at the US Open due to issues related to the extreme heat, conditions that were so intense that Novak Djokovic and his opponent used ice baths to cool down during their opening match.

Lithuanian Ricardas Berankis retired due to a heat illness and Stefano Travaglia retired because of cramps, according to tournament referee Brian Earley.

Leonardo Mayer of Argentina said he also retired from his match against Laslo Djere due to the heat, and he added that his blood pressure dropped and he was feeling dizzy.
Editor's Picks

    Hot topic: USTA needs common-sense heat policy at the US Open

    Three players were forced to retire Tuesday because of issues related to the extreme heat, forcing the USTA to ad-lib rules. And Day 3 is supposed to be just as hot.
    Federer cruises, then clarifies retirement joke

    Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic moved one step closer to a potential quarterfinal showdown after each came away with a first-round win on Tuesday at the US Open.
    Keys, Sharapova reach 2nd round of US Open

    Madison Keys and Eugenie Bouchard were among Tuesday's first-round winners at the US Open. Keys beat Pauline Parmentier and Bouchard won at the Open for the first time since a fall in the trainers' room left her with a concussion in 2015.

"I think we should no longer play five sets," Mayer said in Spanish. "That's my opinion, I think that's the past. They won't stop until someone dies. It's incredible, matches become ugly. The only way [to solve this] is to shorten them."

During a break in the second set of the Djokovic-Marton Fucsovics match, Djokovic asked for a trash can -- in case he became ill -- and was provided with several towels with ice for him to cool down. He revealed after the match that during the break the two competitors stripped down and took ice baths side by side in the locker room before resuming the match.

"It was funny," Djokovic said. "Marton and I had the ice baths, one next to the other. So we were in the two ice baths, we were naked in the ice baths and it was quite a wonderful feeling, you know. Battling with a guy for two and a half hours and then you get into the locker room and you haven't finished the match and you're naked in the ice baths. It was quite a magnificent feeling, I must say."

Temperatures hit 98 degrees with a heat index of 107 Tuesday. The United States Tennis Association had released an extreme heat policy for the tournament after one player retired due to heat Monday.

Under the extreme heat policy, men receive a 10-minute break between the third and the fourth sets. No coaching is permitted, but players are allowed to take bathroom breaks and showers to cool down. The tournament referee and the US Open medical team monitor the on-site conditions to determine when the policy will no longer be in effect.

Not all players were happy. Australian John Millman wasn't pleased about the 10-minute break after the third set.

"They should have maybe asked a few people because it seems like they've made up their own rules there," he said after a straight-set victory over Jenson Brooksby. "Probably not the biggest fan of the 10-minute break. I don't know if it does you much good."

This rule change comes after the WTA sent out a statement on Monday reinforcing its policy for the women's side of the tournament, which allows players to take a 10-minute break after the completion of the second set, if one player requests it. A heat break was taken in the Taylor Townsend-Amanda Anisimova match earlier Tuesday. Townsend won the match in three sets after dropping the first set.

"I just imagine I'm laying on a beach with a margarita in hand," Caroline Wozniacki said when asked how she handles the heat during her matches.

It's not just the players who are affected. Fans are feeling the heat, as well. About 20 people were taken to the first aid stations, according to officials, after complaining of dehydration. Some even felt faint. They were given ice packs and electrolytes, and their vitals were checked.

There's no relief coming. Wednesday's temperatures in New York are expected to be just as scorching.
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https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/03/31/climate-change-could-soon-melt-years-worth-human-poop-alaska-park/3299522002/

Climate change could melt decades worth of human poop at Denali National Park in Alaska
Elizabeth Weise, USA TODAY Published 10:50 a.m. ET March 31, 2019 | Updated 8:18 p.m. ET March 31, 2019


At Denali National Park a gross reality is taking shape. Climate change could melt decades worth of human poop in the near future! Nathan Rousseau Smith has the story. Buzz60, Buzz60

There’s good news and bad news at Denali, North America’s tallest mountain.

The bad news is that the 66 tons of frozen feces left by climbers on the Alaska summit is expected to start melting out of the glacier sometime in the coming decades and potentially as soon as this summer, a process that’s speeding up in part due to global warming.

The good news is that this year, for the first time, the guide companies that lead many of the 1,200 climbers who attempt the summit each year have voluntarily decided to start packing out their human waste. This comes just a year after the National Park Service instituted a policy that all such waste below 14,000 feet must be carried off the mountain.

“Climbers and particularly guide services are really embracing the new policy and are even exceeding it. It has become kind of an informal badge of merit to carry off all your waste,” said Michael Loso, a National Park Service glaciologist who’s been studying the problem of climber excrement on the mountain for close to a decade.

Denali is a majestic mountain about five hours north of Anchorage, Alaska. At 20,300 feet, it's visible from the city on clear days. It's one of the Seven Summits, the highest mountains on each of the seven continents. Conquering them all is considered a major mountaineering challenge in the climbing world. 
Former National Park Service ranger Dan Corn prepares to depart Kahiltna Basecamp is at 7,200 feet on Alaska's Denali with his Clean Mountain Can strapped to his sled. The CMC (green, with straps) is used to store solid human waste during the trek up and down the mountain.

Former National Park Service ranger Dan Corn prepares to depart Kahiltna Basecamp is at 7,200 feet on Alaska's Denali with his Clean Mountain Can strapped to his sled. The CMC (green, with straps) is used to store solid human waste during the trek up and down the mountain. (Photo: National Park Service)

The poop problem is very real. Climbers scaling  Denali, previously known as Mount McKinley, generate close to 2 metric tons of human waste each year, according to the National Park Service. (The average human “deposit” weighs half a pound and the average length of a climber's stay on the mountain is 18 days, which is how researchers got the figure of 66 tons over the course of the past century.)

Initially, human waste was left in snow pits on the Kahiltna glacier, the most common route up, or thrown into deep crevasses at higher elevations. It was believed that the waste would be ground up in the ice over time.

It turns out that what goes around comes around, even in a glacier, Loso said. He performed several experiments that show the buried feces eventually resurface farther downstream on the surface of the glacier, where they begin to melt.

This is true of all glaciers, which are really extremely slow-moving rivers of ice, though the process seems to be speeding up.

Research by the National Park Service found that in the past 50 years, the area covered by ice within the Alaskan parks has diminished by 8 percent.

“We have lost more glacier cover in the Alaskan national parks than there is area in the whole state of Rhode Island,” said Loso.

“One of the consequences of warming temperatures is that the surface of the glacier is melting more quickly,” he said.

This means that waste deposited at the lowest climbing camp on the mountain could start reappearing soon, maybe even this climbing season, which begins in April. Waste deposited higher up the mountain will take longer to appear.

“That could be as much as two to three centuries,” Loso said.

Park Service staff are keeping their eyes open, but they’re not making special trips to look for excrement.

“We don’t choose to spend our limited funding to just hunt for it all summer long,” Loso said.
Still pretty yucky

Denali has to deal with excrement. On Mount Everest, melting glaciers are exposing the bodies of climbers who had long been buried in the snow and ice. Because elevations are lower on Denali, most climbers who die on the mountain are carried off to be buried.
Tents of climbers on Denali, the tallest peak in North America, in Alaska.

Tents of climbers on Denali, the tallest peak in North America, in Alaska. (Photo: RMI Expeditions)

A 40-some-year trip through a glacier doesn’t make human waste any less gross. Loso’s research suggests that, in general, the bacteria and other bugs that live in feces survive after being buried in the snow or dropped in a crevasse. Tests of the rivers into which the glacier melts found fecal coliform bacteria, albeit in amounts well below the standard for recreational lakes and rivers.

It won't be pleasant for whoever finds that emerging poop.

“The waste will emerge at the surface not very different from when it was buried. It will be smushed and have been frozen and be really wet. It will be biologically active, so the E. coli that was in the waste when it was buried will be alive and well. We expect it to still smell bad and look bad,” Loso said.
Packing it out

The National Parks Service realized there was a poop problem on Denali years ago. In 2001, it launched a pilot program with the American Alpine Club climbing group to test small, lightweight portable toilets called Clean Mountain Cans.
A Clean Mountain Can on the back of a sled on Alaska's Denali. CMCs are used to securely hold human solid waste so it can be packed off the mountain.

A Clean Mountain Can on the back of a sled on Alaska's Denali. CMCs are used to securely hold human solid waste so it can be packed off the mountain. (Photo: National Pak Service)

These reusable bucket-size containers hold 1.8 gallons of solid waste and are lined with a biodegradable bag.

But no urine, notes Joe Horiskey, director of RMI Expeditions. “If you urinate in the CMC, it’s going to freeze and increase the weight.”

After years of testing, last year’s climbing season was the first in which all climbers were required to pack out their excrement below 14,000 feet. Above that, they are allowed to throw the frozen bags into one designated area in a deep ice crevasse.

But for this year’s climbing season, six of the seven guide companies – which take about 50 percent of climbers up the mountain – have voluntarily committed to packing out all their waste, said Tucker Chenoweth, a mountaineering ranger at Denali with the National Park Service.

That means carrying cans of excrement all the way to the summit and back. It’s something the guide companies have been doing informally for a while, but now they're making the leap into total removal.

It’s not the easiest thing to do, said Todd Burleson, president of Alpine Ascents International.

“You’re already carrying 100 pounds and then you’re adding another 20 pounds of feces. But it’s the right thing to do,” he said.

Chenoweth says a lot of individual climbers, especially Americans, are also packing out all their waste.

“There’s a pretty strong ‘Leave no trace’ ethic among U.S. climbing and outdoors folks. It’s kind of part of the deal,” he said.
A climber ascending Alaska's Denali on fixed lines, with a Clean Mountain Can on his backpack. CMCs are used to safely transport human solid waste off the mountain.

A climber ascending Alaska's Denali on fixed lines, with a Clean Mountain Can on his backpack. CMCs are used to safely transport human solid waste off the mountain. (Photo: AAI/Coley Gentzel)
'The best thing for the mountain'

So how do you deal with 21 days' worth of poop? Very carefully.

Each climber is assigned their own Clean Mountain Can by the Park Service before they fly up to base camp at 7,200 feet.

From the moment they touch down on the mountain, all solid waste goes into that can. No trash or wet wipes are allowed, though toilet paper is OK.
Climbers ascending Alaska's Denali, using sleds to carry their equipment.

Climbers ascending Alaska's Denali, using sleds to carry their equipment. (Photo: RMI Expeditions)

“We say about 12 uses is a full can. It weighs somewhere between 10 and 15 pounds when full,” Chenoweth said.

Guides delicately note that up on the mountain, where climbers are eating mostly freeze-dried food, bathroom needs are a little different than down below.

“It might not be an ‘everyday’ thing,” Horiskey said.

The cans are equipped with a gas release valve, so the lid doesn’t pop off when they’re flown off the mountain from base camp.

On the lower part of the climb, climbers use sleds to hold their gear, which includes the cans. Due to the altitude, the cans' contents freeze, so they're not smelly.

On the last leg of the climb, the sleds aren’t used and the cans are strapped to climbers’ backpacks.

“This is something we will all be getting used to,” Horiskey said. “But it’s the best thing for the mountain. It’s just what we’re going to have to do.”


Climbers on the West Buttress route coming down from the Denali high camp at 17,000 carrying their waste off the mountain. (Photo: George Kashouh)
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☀️ Deadly European heatwave highlights global climate crisis
« Reply #28 on: July 01, 2019, 02:26:04 AM »
The SUN ☀️ gives life, and it taketh away.

RE

Deadly European heatwave highlights global climate crisis

At least eight people die in France, Italy and Spain, while parts of the continent get relief from record temperatures.
18 hours ago

Deadly European heatwave highlights global climate crisis


A woman cools off in a water fountain in Marseille as record heatwave hits much of France [Reuters]

Wildfires have burned tracts of land in France and Spain, while a welcome dip in temperatures in parts of Europe has brought relief to areas facing a deadly heatwave for nearly a week.

Hot-weather warnings were lifted across northern and western France, days after the country posted all-time high temperatures as it sizzled along with Italy, Spain and some central European nations.
READ MORE
Europe's heatwave in pictures

Six days of intense heat fuelled huge blazes and pollution peaks, and officially claimed four lives in France and two each in Italy and Spain, including a 17-year-old harvest worker, a 33-year-old roofer and a 72-year-old homeless man.
Record heat in France

The temperature in France's southern Gard region hit an all-time high of 45.9 degrees Celsius on Friday - hotter than in California's Death Valley - sparking scores of fires that burned 600 hectares of land and destroyed several homes and vehicles.

France is the seventh European country to ever register a plus 45-degree temperature, along with Bulgaria, Portugal, Italy, Spain, Greece and North Macedonia, Meteo France said, prompting the weather service to issue its highest alert level of red for the first time.

Winegrowers in the south of France said their precious crops had been badly burned.

"Some vines seem to have been hit with a blowtorch," Jerome Despey said. "I've been a winegrower for 30 years. I have never seen a vine burned by a sudden onset of heat like yesterday."

France remains haunted by the memory of the devastating heatwave of August 2003, in which nearly 15,000 people were estimated to have died.

"I want to appeal to the sense of responsibility of citizens - there are avoidable deaths in every heatwave," French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe said.
Weather alerts

In Spain, 40 out of 50 regions have been put under weather alert with seven of them considered to be an extreme risk, the national weather agency said.

Temperatures in Girona in northeastern Spain reached 43.9 degrees Celsius on Friday - the highest recorded in the Catalan city.

A fire that started on Friday in the central Spanish town of Almorox burned at least 1,600 hectares of land, spilling over into the Madrid region and forcing the evacuation of a village, emergency services said.

Temperatures eased slightly on Sunday although the Spanish national meteorological agency predicted the mercury could stay over 40 degrees Celsius in some parts of the country, in particular in the northeast.

Germany's weather service warned of "extreme" heat on Sunday, forecasting peak temperatures of up to 39 degrees Celsius from Saxony in the east to the Upper Rhine in the west - just below an all-time high of 40.3 Celsius.

Germany's national weather service said temperatures were more than four degrees higher in June than an international reference period of 1981-2010.

The stifling heat caused air quality to nosedive in some European cities, prompting local authorities to take anti-pollution measures.
2019 set to be one of the hottest

Meteorologists say a weakening of the high-level jet stream is increasingly causing weather systems to stall and leading summer temperatures to soar.

Five of Europe's hottest summers in the last 500 years have happened in this century.

Earlier this week, the World Meteorological Organization said 2019 was on track to be among the world’s hottest years, and 2015-2019 would then be the hottest five-year period on record.

It said the European heatwave was "absolutely consistent" with extremes linked to the impact of greenhouse gas emissions.

On Friday, a "Rebellion on the Bridge" protest was held in Paris, during which hundreds of people, many of them students, blocked traffic as they called for more attention to climate change.

"The goal was to create activities to alert people and to call for media attention to climate change and its consequences. And today, we see that the government's response was not to start a dialogue with us or hear out our demands, but simply to chase us away by force.", said Loic Daniellou, a 20-year-old French student.
 
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Offline RE

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July has kicked of this week with a SCORCHER here in the Matanuska-Susitna River Valley on the Last Great Frontier.  Hasn't topped 90F (32C) yet, but predicted for this weekend.  I'm roasting.


RE

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/june-hottest-month-ever-earth-2019-weather-heatwave-hot-a8984691.html



Last month was the hottest June ever recorded, the EU‘s satellite agency has announced.

Data provided by the Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S), implemented by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts on behalf of the EU, showed that the global average temperature for June 2019 was the highest on record for the month.

The data showed European average ​temperatures were more than 2C above normal and temperatures were 6-10C above normal over most of France, Germany and northern Spain during the final days of the month, according to C3S.

The global average temperature was about 0.1C higher than during the previous warmest June in 2016.

Experts have said climate change made last week’s record-breaking European heatwave at least five times as likely to happen, according to recent analysis.
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Rapid assessment of average temperatures in France between 26-28 June showed a “substantial” increase in the likelihood of the heatwave happening as a result of human-caused global warming, experts at the World Weather Attribution group said.

The recent heatwave saw France record the hottest temperature in the country’s history (45.9C) and major wildfires across Spain, where temperatures exceeded 40C.

Germany, Poland and Czech Republic also recorded their highest temperatures for June last week.
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