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Offline RE

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SoCal Inferno- The Rich Get Fried
« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2017, 08:05:13 AM »
The insurance industry is going to take a major beating on this one.

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Offline Eddie

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Re: SoCal Inferno- The Rich Get Fried
« Reply #16 on: December 07, 2017, 09:30:58 AM »
The insurance industry is going to take a major beating on this one.

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<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/EGEsLDG759M" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/EGEsLDG759M</a>

Time to go short on State Farm. Rich people in Cali are probably filing insurance claims and going short on insurance carriers at the same time.
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SoCal Inferno- HELL on Earth
« Reply #17 on: December 08, 2017, 05:19:45 AM »
FEEL THE BURN!   :evil4:

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Slave Labor on the Fire Line
« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2017, 04:52:26 AM »
http://grist.org/briefly/inmates-are-risking-their-lives-to-fight-californias-raging-fires/

Briefly
Stuff that matters
risky business


DAVID MCNEW / Stringer / Getty Images

Inmates are risking their lives to fight California’s raging fires.

As wildfires tear through the greater Los Angeles area, destroying hundreds of homes, officials have warned nearly 200,000 people to evacuate.

Thousands of firefighters have arrived on the scene — many of them inmates, who make up about a third of the state’s wildfire-fighting force. Since the 1940s, California has relied on inmates to combat the flames by digging containment lines and clearing away brush. In return for this difficult and dangerous work — which has been compared to slave-era labor conditions — inmates get credit toward early parole and $2 per day in camp plus $1 per hour for their time on the fire line.

Roughly 250 women inmates serve on California’s firefighting force, risking their lives to get out of prison faster.

“I’ve seen women come back with broken ankles and broken arms, burns, or just suffering from exhaustion, you know, the psychological stress that people go through trying to just pass the requirements,” Romarilyn Ralston, a former firefighter trainer, told PBS.

As climate change makes wildfires worse, state officials are scrambling to recruit more inmates to fight them.
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'This fire is a beast': Massive inferno keeps growing despite all-out battle
« Reply #19 on: December 14, 2017, 06:57:24 AM »
...and the Mansions just keep on burning!  :evil4:

RE

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-thomas-fire-ledeall-20171214-story.html

LOCAL L.A. Now
'This fire is a beast': Massive inferno keeps growing despite all-out battle

Firefighters try to stop the forward march of the Thomas Fire


Firefighter Chris Black with the Sacramento Fire Department douses flames Tuesday in Toro Canyon in Carpinteria. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Joseph Serna, Javier Panzar and Matt HamiltonContact Reporters

More than a week after the Thomas fire ignited in Ventura County, destroying hundreds of homes and displacing thousands as it grew into a massive inferno, firefighters are now in a race to protect the pristine coastal communities of neighboring Santa Barbara County before a shift in powerful winds forecast for this weekend.

Across the mountain ridges above Santa Barbara, Summerland and Montecito, firefighters Wednesday were building containment lines, clearing brush, digging breaks and setting small backfires to burn fuel, all in an effort to create barriers to stop the forward march of the fire.

Conditions so far this week have been favorable, allowing firefighters to attack the flames on the southwestern flank of the blaze as it moves west toward the Santa Ynez Mountains.

But the National Weather Service was forecasting sundowner winds blowing southeast at up to 35 mph Friday night, followed by Santa Ana winds Saturday that, at up to 45 mph, could steer the fire toward the southwest.

“When the wind starts pushing it, we can throw everything we have at it and it’s not going to do any good,” Mark Brown, an operations section chief for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, told Santa Barbara residents Wednesday night.

The stakes are high. If the fire moves into Santa Barbara and Montecito, nearly a quarter million residents and 62,000 structures worth $46 billion would be at risk.
Dozers build containment lines as fire approaches
A dozer from the Santa Barbara County Fire Department clears a fire break across a canyon from atop Camino Cielo down to Gibraltar to make a stand should the fire move in that direction. (Mike Eliason / Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP)
“When the wind starts pushing it, we can throw everything we have at it and it’s not going to do any good." — Mark Brown, Cal Fire operations section chief

As firefighters well know, sundowner winds are notoriously unpredictable. The winds occur when hot air from the Santa Ynez Valley rises and swiftly pours over the mountain passes toward the Pacific Ocean, as if a person pressed a thumb over the end of a hose.

“It creates very erratic wind conditions, which are very difficult to predict and very difficult to fight fire in,” said Capt. Brendan Ripley, a fire behavior analyst with the Ventura County Fire Department. “It moves fire in different directions. It changes throughout the day.”

If crews can’t finish the containment line across a roughly six-mile stretch in the mountains fast enough to stop the fire’s march west, firefighters may have to burn the fuel themselves — a risky proposition and a scary sight for residents.

“It’s a proactive approach to fight the fire on our terms instead of on Mother Nature’s terms,” Brown said. “It’s well-coordinated if we do it. We’ve had numerous subject-matter experts put the plan together. It’s been vetted at all levels. All the local authorities have looked at it and approved it.”

Fire officials stressed that this plan would be used only if the weekend wind events occur as predicted and if crews can’t make a stand and fight the fire directly. The controlled blaze would burn up to 4,000 acres and be started when winds are favorable for firefighters.
Massive Thomas Fire Threatens Santa Barbara County
The Thomas Fire, feeding on thick chaparral brush which hasn't burned in generations, approaches homes in Montecito. (David McNew / Getty Images)

Meanwhile, firefighters hoped to slow the blaze by building breaks into areas with less vegetation because those areas burned in the last decade, said Chris Childers, a battalion chief with the Santa Barbara County Fire Department.

About 600 fire engines are jammed into the narrow, winding roads in the Santa Barbara County foothills. Trucks are spraying retardant on grassy hillsides and firefighters are wrapping small, indefensible buildings in protective metallic sheeting that looks like tinfoil to reduce the chances they ignite.

As smoke cleared and visibility improved, a conga line of low-flying helicopters started arriving at a county park in Santa Barbara off Highway 154 to pick up fire retardant. Officials said 33 helicopters and eight airplanes were dropping water and retardant on the blaze.

As of Wednesday night, the Thomas fire had burned more than 238,000 acres and was 30% contained. It has destroyed more than 900 homes in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties since it began Dec. 4 near Thomas Aquinas College in Santa Paula. In its first day, the fire spread southwest, toward Ventura, and northwest, eventually hugging Ojai before pushing to the Central Coast.

With containment lines now protecting Ventura and Santa Paula, firefighters there have been on a “seek and destroy” mission for any lingering hot spots that could threaten avocado groves, fire officials said Wednesday.

“This fire is a beast and you’re gonna kill it,” Martin Johnson, Santa Barbara County fire division chief, told fire crews at a morning briefing. “I have no doubt."

Authorities said it will probably take months for fire officials to determine the cause of the Thomas fire.
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Thomas fire: Thousands of acres burn in Ventura County

Serna from reported from Ventura, Panzar from Santa Barbara and Hamilton from Los Angeles.

joseph.serna@latimes.com

javier.panzar@latimes.com

matt.hamilton@latimes.com

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Inferno Newz: One Dead Fireman, California being 'Devoured'
« Reply #20 on: December 15, 2017, 12:29:09 AM »
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Inferno Newz: Today's Target- San Ysidro Creek
« Reply #21 on: December 16, 2017, 03:46:11 AM »
http://beta.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-thomas-fire-ledeall-20171216-story.html
http://beta.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-thomas-fire-ledeall-20171216-story.html

Winds, danger return as Thomas fire takes aim at Santa Barbara County
By Joseph Serna and Brittny Mejia
Dec 16, 2017 | 2:00 AM
| Montecito, Calif.
Winds, danger return as Thomas fire takes aim at Santa Barbara County


Firefighter Chris Black with the Sacramento Fire Department douses flames in Toro Canyon in Carpinteria. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Spotters are in place. Hillsides have been scrubbed of as much flammable vegetation as possible. And now it's time to see whether it was all enough to stop the deadly Thomas fire from wreaking additional havoc.

All eyes Saturday morning are expected to be on the hills above Montecito in Santa Barbara County.

The westernmost edge of the giant Thomas fire, now the fourth largest since California began keeping formal records in 1932, was by Friday night in the north-south canyon through which San Ysidro Creek runs.

A few hours after sunset Friday, the fire was relatively calm. But firefighters feared that gusts of up to 40 mph could start blowing from the north directly to the south in this canyon from 2 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

And if the fire gets into the canyon and the winds breathe new life into the flames, there is nothing to stop the blaze from racing into the foothill homes of Montecito, said Mark Brown, a fire operations commander.

Firefighters have smothered the hills in hundreds of thousands of gallons of fire retardant in an attempt to keep embers from igniting spot fires and to keep flames at bay, Brown said. Some hillsides have been denuded above Montecito, Summerland and Carpinteria, including in Romero and Toro canyons, to limit the potential damage. The fire is out in much of those areas and protected by established containment lines, he said.

But that's not the case around San Ysidro Creek, which is where authorities are most concerned about flames overnight, he said. There was a limit to how much flammable vegetation could be burned in a controlled manner before the Thomas fire arrived at the canyon.

It would have been too risky to attempt a controlled burn there during days of stubborn winds because it would have created another large fire that would sprinkle embers throughout the communities to the south and west, Brown said.
&nbsp;
  (Sources: Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, Cal Fire, Mapzen, OpenStreetMap )

So at some point Saturday morning, when the spotters on mountain tops alert crews below that the winds are coming, firefighters are going to clear out and watch and wait to see whether their preparations were enough.

If the winds catch the flames well enough to send the blaze running south down the canyon toward Montecito, "we won't stop the spread," Brown said.

There are hundreds of homes that would be in the fire's potential path and with winds that strong, it's a deadly proposition to place firefighters in front to stop it. Instead, crews would have to watch the fire pass by from designated "safety zones" then attack it from behind.

Brown said he expected that structures would burn Friday night or Saturday if the winds return.

More than 300 engine crews are posted along road shoulders, in open fields and on private estates with plenty of room to operate. An additional 300 are ready to flood the area.

"We are doing anything and everything we can to keep the community safe," Brown said.

Martin Johnson, a division chief with the Santa Barbara County Fire Department, sent a message directly to residents in the potential evacuation zone.

"If you are in an evacuation order area, I am asking you to please heed that order. If you're in one of the warning areas … be ready to go at a moment's notice," Johnson said. "This is a significant event and we want everybody to be ready."

Commanders have identified specific locations in the mountains that would trigger additional evacuations if the fire reaches those points.


Firefighters are worried that gusts Saturday will fuel the fire's spread into a canyon containing San Ysidro Creek directly south into the community of Montecito in Santa Barbara County. The red area indicates the area that has burned. (Cal-FIRE / Google Maps )

Friday was the 12th consecutive day of red flag fire warnings — the longest sustained period of fire weather warnings on record.

“We put out plenty of red flag warnings, but we haven’t seen them out 12 days in a row. That’s unusual,” said National Weather Service meteorologist Curt Kaplan. “This has been the longest duration event that we have had a red flag warning out without any breaks.”

Red flag warnings were instituted by the weather service in 2004 and are intended to alert fire agencies to hot, dry and windy conditions that foster wildfires.

The National Weather Service warned that red flag conditions would be in effect in the Santa Barbara County mountains from late Friday night through Saturday evening.

Red flag conditions are also forecast in the mountains and valleys of Ventura and Los Angeles counties late Saturday night through Sunday evening; they were also forecast for parts of Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties Sunday.

Red flag warnings were also in place for this weekend across large swaths of California, including parts of the Bay Area, the Central Valley and Sierra Nevada.

The Thomas fire has killed two people, including a firefighter on Thursday, destroyed more than 1,000 structures, and damaged hundreds more. It was 35% contained Friday night.

The fire began Dec. 4 in Santa Paula near Thomas Aquinas College. In its first day, the fire spread southwest, toward Ventura, and northwest, eventually hugging — and sparing — Ojai before pushing to the Santa Barbara County coast.

The wildfire has scorched 256,000 acres. Now the fourth-largest fire in modern state history, it is only a few thousand acres from climbing the ranks again.

The fire is so large that its eastern and western fronts are influenced by entirely different wind patterns and terrain. In many ways, it's as if firefighters are battling two separate fires some 40 miles apart.

Much of the fire's recent growth was north of Ojai in the Rose Valley east of Highway 33, where flames are feeding on chaparral and dead vegetation, said Jude Olivas, a spokesman for the agencies battling the fire.

The rest of the fire's spread was either north, deeper into Los Padres National Forest, or to the west — where it crawled along canyons near the wealthy enclaves in Summerland, Montecito and Santa Barbara.

Crews from the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection have been painstakingly working alongside firefighters from 10 other western states to scrape containment lines that would serve as firebreaks before winds were expected to shift Friday night. Streaks of red fire retardant dropped by aircraft or sprayed by tanker trucks line the hillsides as well.

Firefighters conducted small, controlled burns that destroy fuel for the wildfire. Crews ignite backfires using either a flaming, fuel-filled drip torch or a "stubby" — a pistol that launches flares 20 to 40 feet into the brush. Water tankers and firefighters continually monitor these fires and douse them if they grow too large, Olivas said.

Firefighters estimate the blaze has so far cost $96.9 million to fight. There were an estimated 8,300 firefighters battling the fire Friday.

Serna reported from Montecito and Ventura, Mejia from Los Angeles. Times staff writer Rong-Gong Lin II contributed to this report from Los Angeles.

joseph.serna@latimes.com

brittny.mejia@latimes.com
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Inferno Newz: Livestream 12/16/2017
« Reply #22 on: December 16, 2017, 06:00:27 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/It97piBrE30" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/It97piBrE30</a>
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Ring of Fire
« Reply #23 on: December 19, 2017, 04:14:51 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/mIBTg7q9oNc" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/mIBTg7q9oNc</a>

RE

https://www.counterpunch.org/2017/12/19/ring-of-fire/

December 19, 2017
Ring of Fire

by John Davis


Photo by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center | CC BY 2.0

Southern California’s Thomas Fire, the state’s fourth largest, continues to grow. To date, it has consumed over 250,000 acres but in the middle of its burn area, which stretches from Santa Paula in the south east to Santa Barbara in the north west, the Ojai Valley (barring an extraordinary turn-of events), has survived. A week ago, the local weekly, The Ojai Valley News, emblazoned its front page with the banner headline, “Ring of Fire”, a phrase that had been in local circulation for several days previously as residents watched the flames encircle their communities on their seemingly inevitable way to the coast.

Many of us who have reached a certain age cannot hear that phrase without hearing, in our mind’s ear, the thudding voice of Johnny Cash running through his sister-in-law’s honky-tonk ditty of 1963. His earnest rendition has become a cultural touchstone: now, in central coast California and its inland valleys, it has become entwined with the epic events of December 2017 when much of the landscape that lies to the south of the Santa Ynez transverse mountain range was charred in the ring of fire that girdled the Ojai Valley; as it continues to burn to the north and west, it has already destroyed over a thousand structures – the surrounding chaparral blackened, somber, and pungent with congealed super-heated resins.

Cash had a great deal of history in the area. He recorded the song Ring of Fire in a small Ojai recording studio while living in Casitas Springs, the western-most community in the Valley. The town now proclaims itself as “The Home of Johnny Cash” and the trailer park he purchased for relatives to manage still stands forlorn in an area whose center is anchored by a convenience store, nameless but for the red neon sign over its door that reads ‘Bait and Liquor’.

Casitas Springs was founded in 1834 when local Chumash Indians, formerly wards of the Mission San Buenaventura were relocated to pastures along the Ventura River flood plain half a dozen miles inland from the coast. There they settled, built rough shelters (euphemistically called casitas and memorialized in the town’s name) and led lives tragically foreclosed by both the loss of their connection to a tribal life and the enforced institutionalization to which they had succumbed during the Mission era. Their sad histories were washed away in the frequent floods that plague these rank bottom-lands; their archeological footprint, primarily evidenced by their basketry, destroyed by the brush fires that periodically sweep along the escarpment to the south. The fire this time skirted Casitas Springs and the three other towns that run east between the Santa Ynez mountains to the north and Sulphur Mountain to the south – the Valley saved by its topographical character, its heavily irrigated buffers of citrus and avocado groves, accommodating winds and the battalions of fire fighters who worked at its margins.

For all its local resonance, this literal ring of fire also reflects the wild fires that customarily girdle the planet and are shown in a stunning animation on NASA’s Eco Earth website generated from information transmitted by its Terra satellite. Perhaps most of these fires represent versions of slash and burn agriculture, but whatever their origin they are now all non-human creatures of the Anthropocene, their fiery conflagrations, exacerbated by global warming to some unknown degree, reflections of the burning of the planet’s stored solar energy scavenged from its crust.

The Thomas fire has now swept through territory once lightly populated with Chumash Indians who regularly burned their food-gathering lands. As Kat Anderson has shown in Tending the Wild, Native American Knowledge and the Management of California’s Natural Resources, 2006, local Indians managed their wild food resources by burning the land to encourage their growth and to create clearings in which they could better hunt game. While the coastal Chumash relied heavily on sea food, inland groups harvested acorns as their staple supplemented with chia seeds, the fruits of the holly leafed cherry and small game. The untouched wilderness eulogized by John Muir was in fact a carefully managed environment, with swathes of chaparral charred in controlled burns where the plants had long co-evolved with regenerative lightning-sparked conflagrations.

Following the European invasion of California in 1769 and the subsequent sacking of the territory by Anglo Americans in the mid nineteenth century in pursuit of gold, rampant infrastructural development in these fire-lands has raised the stakes for the rapid containment of its cyclical irruptions. Californian and Federal agencies, as well as municipal fire-brigades from all over the western states and the National Guard have massed their land and air forces to battle the Thomas fire. They are backed-up by a large police presence and loosely aggregated community support groups. There is a sense that in controlling the flames, in taming their wildness, the chaparral is being returned to the asylum, its place of subjugation. As Thomas H. Birch notes in The Incarceration of Wildness: Wilderness areas as Prisons, “when this place is made, and wildness is incarcerated in it, the imperium is completed”.

If we accept fire as a natural event (although, in the case of the Thomas fire its two starting points were of an anthropogenic origin), then the determination to contain it is very much in the tradition of Mao’s Great Leap Forward of the 1950’s which proposed conquering nature through human intervention. In an arguably more enlightened twenty-first century America might we begin to move towards policies of accommodation and of co-existence with non-human entities and their often cataclysmic manifestations? Reasonable containment strategies could then be incorporated into urban planning practices, or in the case of existing developments, accorded the same level of priority as other infrastructure upgrades in the areas of transportation, public health, communications and the supply of goods and services.

To continue the manic patchwork of whack-a-mole fire suppression is a profoundly reactionary approach that both validates and preserves the existing incongruities of urban and suburban developments within areas whose ecologies requires them to burn.  In many respects, this reaction echoes the mindset that drives the U.S. military towards the lethal suppression of armed resistance in areas of conflict rather than pursuing soft strategies of social, political, and economic accommodation that might remove the underlying grievances of the putative enemy. In both cases, these aggressive policies are the testosterone fueled products of the Neolithic mind.

In addition, the perception of the firefighter as Hero (who saved our town/house/life/pet) gets in the way of a sensible appraisal of the issues at stake. Firefighters do their job and for the most part are handsomely paid for their efforts (prisoners from state penitentiaries on the fire-line excepted) and while they often display extraordinary bravery in the protection of stranger’s lives, their property and pets, our adulation likely confirms in them and their command structure a sense of the ineffable righteousness of their work. We, as a community, are thus locked into the whack-a-mole ethos, which stands in the way of a measured coexistence with forest fires. Co-existence and accommodation do not represent humanity’s defeat in its battle with the elements but indicate a level of solidarity with the non-human and of an appropriate humility in acknowledgement of the other powers with whom we share the Earth.

In the aftermath of the fire running through areas of Upper Ojai there were several instances of looting of evacuated and damaged houses. I witnessed the arrest of a suspected looter on my street. Three Ventura County Sheriff’s black and white SUV’s were pulled up behind a beige Chevy Suburban bulging with boxes of household goods and clothing. Two bicycles were thrown haphazardly on the roof rack. A deputy knelt at the curb carefully probing one box of civilizational detritus at a time. The cuffed suspect was standing by his vehicle, his female companion still in the front passenger seat. I pulled up and my enquiring gaze was met with an explanation from one of the sheriff’s deputies that they were patrolling the streets around the burn area apprehending looters and other ‘undesirables’. I drove off, that last word etched in my consciousness.

Some years after Cash recorded Ring of Fire he went to Folsom prison, actively consorted with the state’s undesirables, then entertained and demonstrated solidarity with them. He revived his fading career by adopting an outlaw image as ‘The Man in Black’. He understood the plight of all those who refused to be totally coopted by the rules-making capitalist imperium. Perhaps, as a profoundly Christian man, he foresaw a day, in an epoch we now call the Anthropocene, when the ‘undesirables’ (in the neo-liberal lexicon, but one step away from the non-human), would inherit the Earth.
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John Davis is an architect living in southern California. He blogs at Urban Wildland.
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Thomas Fire Second-Largest California Wildfire on Record; 425 Miles Burned
« Reply #24 on: December 20, 2017, 12:42:57 AM »
http://ktla.com/2017/12/19/favorable-conditions-slow-271750-acre-thomas-fires-pace-but-dangerous-winds-are-expected-to-return/

Thomas Fire Now Considered Second-Largest California Wildfire on Record; 425 Miles Burned
Posted 9:57 AM, December 19, 2017, by Erika Martin, Updated at 07:13PM, December 19, 2017


The massive Thomas Fire is now the second-largest California wildfire on record, as it reaches 55 percent containment while continuing to burn into a third week across Ventura and Santa Barbara counties on Tuesday.

Thousands remain evacuated from their homes ahead of the Christmas holiday. The stubborn blaze has been half contained since Monday and burned 750 acres overnight — slowing its usual pace — to cover 272,000 acres by Tuesday evening, Cal Fire said. It is second in size only to 2003's Cedar Fire in San Diego, which charred 273,246 acres.
A firefighter puts out hotspots on a smoldering hillside in Montecito as strong winds blow smoke and embers inland, Dec. 16, 2017. (Credit: Robyn Beck / AFP / Getty Images)

A firefighter puts out hotspots on a smoldering hillside in Montecito as strong winds blow smoke and embers inland, Dec. 16, 2017. (Credit: Robyn Beck / AFP / Getty Images)

Rising humidity hindered the flame's spread overnight, allowing firefighters to reinforce containment lines and put out hotspots. Fire crews also made "good progress" during the day Monday with winds dissipating, said Mark Brown,operations section chief for Cal Fire.

"It's nice to have a couple of days in a row where we've had good progress," Brown said. "The weather conditions were just right for us; the winds were blowing into the fire."

However, the powerful gusts that are blamed for fanning the flames thus far are expected to return by Wednesday, with some wind picking up Tuesday afternoon, and humidity is expected to rise, according to Cal Fire and the National Weather Service (NWS). Officials are warning that those could shift northeast and turn into Santa Ana winds over Ventura County by Thursday or Friday, the Los Angeles Times reported.

And, despite positive developments with wind and humidity, hillside chaparral across the region remains "critically dry," Cal Fire said. NWS expects there will be no rain in the area for the rest of the year.

More than 8,200 firefighters are still battling the blaze, which they do next expect to be fully contained until next year, around Jan. 7. The firefight so far has cost $140 million, according to Cal Fire.

Two people, a firefighter from San Diego and a Santa Paula resident, have been killed in the fire.
A strong wind blows embers from smoldering trees as the Thomas Fire burns in Montecito on Dec. 16, 2017. (Credit: David McNew / Getty Images)

A strong wind blows embers from smoldering trees as the Thomas Fire burns in Montecito on Dec. 16, 2017. (Credit: David McNew / Getty Images)

For a second week, 18,000 structures are under threat, firefighters said. Evacuations orders mainly affect those in Santa Barbara County — where animals have even been evacuated from the Santa Barbara Zoo — though some in Ventura County persist.

The Thomas Fire also is the states' third-most destructive in structure losses and has razed more than 1,000 buildings, at least 765 of them homes, and damaged hundreds more.

Fire crews on Tuesday would be focusing their resources on extinguishing hotspots and strengthening containment lines in Montecito and the Gibralter Road area of Santa Barbara. Firefighters would also be working in the hills north of Camino Cielo to establish a fire line and push forward progress into the burn area from the Zaca Fire that scorched 240,207 acres in 2007.

Officials warned that hotspots also remain active in the Ojai Valley area, where a small tree line fire broke out Monday night, but said the threat to Fillmore has decreased.

On the wildfire's north and east flanks, flames are moving further into the Matilija and Sespe wilderness reserves and toward the Sespe Condor Sanctuary.

To date, it has burned an area larger than New York City, Washington D.C. and San Francisco combined -- and is larger than any city in California except Los Angeles.

For more information on evacuations and road closures, visit CountyofSB.org or ReadyVenturaCounty.org.
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🚰 Wasted Water in Capetown
« Reply #25 on: January 27, 2018, 12:58:46 AM »
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