AuthorTopic: Agelbert's Newz Channel  (Read 1575146 times)

Offline Surly1

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Re: Agelbert's Newz Channel
« Reply #9045 on: May 28, 2018, 05:28:11 PM »

I know you don't agree with me about this, Surly, but there are posters here that are as irredeemably evil as  Monsieur and Madame Thénardier.

RE has a far sunnier outlook on our fellow beings than I. He thinks people can be saved. I do not; their behavior, however, can be changed. Their hearts, not so much.

As regards posting here, I am interested in stories and issues and less about individuals. As noted.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline agelbert

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Re: Agelbert's Newz Channel
« Reply #9046 on: May 28, 2018, 06:31:58 PM »

I know you don't agree with me about this, Surly, but there are posters here that are as irredeemably evil as  Monsieur and Madame Thénardier.

RE has a far sunnier outlook on our fellow beings than I. He thinks people can be saved. I do not; their behavior, however, can be changed. Their hearts, not so much.

As regards posting here, I am interested in stories and issues and less about individuals. As noted.


I think you and I have a great deal in common.  :emthup: :icon_sunny: I try to avoid focusing on individuals unless they make it their goal on this forum to trash/snipe/mock a significant portion of my posts in regard to Renewable Energy. As to politics and corruption, I post about that too, as you know. I just have less hope that this country can be turned back from open dictatorship than you do. In that regard, I still cheer Progressive Democrats, although I feel it is mostly a quixotic effort. I hope I am wrong.

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Offline agelbert

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Massive Chinese adoption of solar panels is THE reason for the price drop!
« Reply #9047 on: May 28, 2018, 06:35:16 PM »
MAY 27, 2018 JUAN COLE

China’s Green Shift Positions It to Overtake U.S. in Energy, Security

SNIPPET:

The Guardian reports that air pollution in 62 Chinese cities fell by 30 percent between 2013 and 2016, according to the World Health Organization. Beijing, the capital, fell from a global fourth-place ranking on polluted air to 187th.

I was in Beijing in March 2015 for a conference, and did a jaunt out to the Great Wall, bringing my camera. I needn’t have bothered. That day, at least, you couldn’t see more than 50 feet away from your face, and my dreams of photographs of the wall stretching out into the distance were dashed. I was there for a week and my throat got sore from just breathing the air. Things are quickly improving, though. The smog in those 62 cities was largely being caused by burning coal, for household heating and industrial purposes. Coal is the worst emitter of carbon dioxide among the hydrocarbon fuels, but it also puts out, when you burn it, lots of particulate matter that causes lung problems, heart attacks, mercury poisoning and cancer.

Last year, the concentration of PM2.5, or tiny motes of particulate matter smaller than 2.5 microns, which can lodge in the lungs, was down about 40 percent in greater Beijing, compared with 2012.

China’s coal use has fallen enormously as a proportion of its electricity generation. It used to provide 80 percent of China’s electricity, but that is down to 65 percent and falling rapidly as a proportion. Even in absolute terms, despite a minor uptick in 2017, coal use has been declining since 2013.

A recent Brookings study by Wenjuan Dong and Ye Qi says,

“In 2017, renewable energy encompassed 36.6% of China’s total installed electric power capacity, and 26.4% of total power generation. According to Energy Production and Consumption Revolution Strategy 2016-2030, by 2030, 50% of total electric power generation will be from non-fossil energy sources, including nuclear and renewable energy.”
These are astonishing statistics for one of the world’s two largest economies.

Although nuclear energy remains important, most new electricity generation in China in the past six years has come from renewables, according to a just-published paper by John A. Matthews with Xin Huang in the Asia-Pacific Journal that a friend sent me this morning.

This is its key chart:


Matthews argues that massive Chinese adoption of solar panels is the major cause for the rapid decline in their price since 2012, and that this price drop will continue. Likewise, he argues that for all the hype about China building new nuclear plants, it has in fact put most of its eggs with regard to new energy generation in the wind power basket.

New solar power bids are now being occasionally let for less than 3 cents a kilowatt hour. Coal is at least 5 cents a kilowatt hour, if you don’t count its environmental damage. If you take that into account, it is likely closer to 80 cents a kilowatt hour. With regard to China, the Brookings study notes, “In the most recently concluded Third Photovoltaic venture base bidding in China, the bid price for electricity continuously came in new lows. For example, the last two bids for cities Golmud and Delingha, both in Qinghai, came in at 0.31 RMB per kWh, which is even lower than the 0.3247 RMB per kWh price for on-grid desulfurized coal-fired electricity.” Even today, Chinese solar is cheaper than coal, and the competitive advantage of solar will only increase over the next decade.

Matthews further makes an important set of arguments about China’s green shift and global power. By generating its own electricity through renewables and by switching in a big way to electric cars, China is preparing for a vast reduction in its imports of hydrocarbons. In turn, that move makes China less vulnerable to hydrocarbon blackmail or blockade and increases its energy security.

The United States uses about 20 million barrels of petroleum a day. Despite the new production enabled by hydraulic fracturing, its own oil production is about half that. Some oil produced in the U.S., especially in Alaska and the West, can be more cheaply exported abroad than sent to the East Coast where the demand is. You see pundits and Big Oil propagandists hype U.S. production and U.S. exports, but the fact is that the U.S. still imports nearly half of the oil it needs to run its economy, and some of those imports come from unstable places like Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. On transportation (the major use of petroleum), the U.S. is highly vulnerable.

China put 680,000 electric vehicles 👀 on the road last year, and plans to be doing 2 million a year by 2020. These EVs will increasingly be fueled by renewable energy, reducing Chinese dependence on Saudi Arabia and Iran.

Full article:

https://www.truthdig.com/articles/chinas-green-shift-is-positioning-it-to-overtake-u-s-in-energy-technology-and-security/
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Offline agelbert

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Truthdig

Glenn Greenwald: Trump 🦀 Is a ‘Continuation of American Political Culture’ 😈 👹 💵 🎩 🍌 🏴‍☠️ 🐉🦕🦖  (Video)

MAY 27, 2018

— Posted by Natasha Hakimi Zapata

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/DKRGsPCUTqs" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/DKRGsPCUTqs</a>

https://www.truthdig.com/videos/glenn-greenwald-trump-is-a-continuation-of-american-political-culture-video/
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Offline agelbert

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State of Thirst: CALIFORNIA drought = food decline
« Reply #9049 on: May 29, 2018, 09:18:30 AM »
Agelbert NOTE: This 2014 video is every bit as applicable, if not more so, today. This is Catastrophic Climate Change in action. California MUST HAVE about 43 million acre-feet of water, of which farms use about 40%. That amount of water is no longer available because of Climate Change. Idiots and other assorted deniers of the CAUSE of this crazy weather (i.e. BURNING FOSSIL FUELS), will always come up with some irrational  (it's just variable weather - nothing to see -move along ) straw to grasp in defense of the unsustainable status quo. So it goes.

State of Thirst: CALIFORNIA drought = food decline

March 1, 2014

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/s_bqPVU0LWM" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/s_bqPVU0LWM</a>
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Offline agelbert

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80% chance of MEGA-Drought due to GHG CAUSED Climate Change
« Reply #9050 on: May 29, 2018, 09:46:23 AM »
Quote
80% chance of MEGA-Drought due to GHG CAUSED Climate Change

The Great North American Megadrought

618,785 views

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/GyKFv-bEamU" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/GyKFv-bEamU</a>


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Offline agelbert

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"The root cause of all this mayhem is climate change."
« Reply #9051 on: May 29, 2018, 10:31:01 AM »
The Snow Drought In California Is Fueling Wildfires 🔥, Floods 💧, & Mudslides

May 28th, 2018 by Nexus Media

Originally published on Nexus Media. 

By Jeremy Deaton

California is likely facing another year of water woes. The Sierra Nevada snowpack, which supplies up to a third of California’s water, is exceptionally meager this year. Experts found around half as much snow on the mountains as they typically would in early April, when the snowpack is historically most voluminous.

Not only does the dwindling snowpack put California’s water supply at risk, it also portends more floods, wildfires and mudslides over the coming year. This is precisely what makes climate change so dangerous. Even small changes in weather can have cascading effects, multiplying the risk of natural disaster.


Declining snowfall means less fresh water.

Climate change is depriving California of needed precipitation, and it is also causing more precipitation to come down as rain instead of snow. The result is that, over time, the Sierra Nevada see less and less snow, with consequences for the Golden State. Every spring and summer, that snow melts, feeding the streams and rivers that supply California’s reservoirs. Less snow means less water for farms and cities. Making matters worse, warmer temperatures mean that snow melts in late spring and early summer, leading to shortages later in the year.


When more precipitation falls as rain instead of snow, it can lead to flash floods.

More abundant rainfall can lead to flash flooding, as large volumes of water runoff feeds into streams and rivers, causing them to overflow. In February, 2017, for example, heavy rainfall caused the San Joaquin River to spill over, leading hundreds of people to evacuate. The San Joaquin River originates in the high Sierra, which is seeing more precipitation come down as rain instead of snow in the winter months.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/qAgw-dL2o2k" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/qAgw-dL2o2k</a>

Diminished snowpack drives up the risk of wildfires.

The Sierra Nevada is harboring less snow, and that snow is melting faster, which is leaving the mountains without water during the warmer months. Hot weather and dry conditions up the risk of wildfire. The Sierra Nevadas have seen more and more wildfires in recent years. An October 2017 wildfire in the Sierra Nevada foothills, for example, killed four people and displaced thousands more.


Wildfires lead to mudslides.

The roots of trees and shrubs hold soil in place. When wildfires burn up alpine vegetation, the roots needed to retain that soil shrivel up. Then, when rain returns in the winter, it will carry loose soil down the mountain in mudslides. A series of February 2017 rainstorms produced mudslides along the Sierra Nevada, closing highways and, in a few cases, carrying cars off the road.

Blame it on climate change.

The root cause of all this mayhem is climate change. Carbon pollution is trapping heat, which is cooking the planet. Warmer water temperatures in the Pacific Ocean are giving rise to atmospheric rivers that deliver rain — instead of snow — to the Sierra Nevada. Heavy rainfall threatens to melt what little snow gathers on the slopes. This has consequences for the entire state, as reduced snowpack fuels drought more broadly, yielding wildfires and mudslides in coastal areas as well as in the mountains.

In a recent op-ed for the Los Angeles Times, UCLA climate scientist Alex Hall and science communicator Katharine Davis Reich warned, “In simple terms: We’re going to lose a lot of snow to climate change. Equally worrisome, California’s water infrastructure is not resilient enough to make up for the loss.

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/05/28/the-snow-drought-in-california-is-fueling-wildfires-floods-mudslides/W
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Offline agelbert

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REAPING what burning fossil fuels CONTINUES to sow
« Reply #9052 on: May 29, 2018, 10:52:13 AM »
Climate & Extreme Weather News #122 (26th-28th May 2018)

Understanding Climate Change

Published on May 28, 2018

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ONsi4Esl204" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ONsi4Esl204</a>



Agelbert NOTE: The expected reaction to the above irrefutable evidence of Crazy Weather from idiots and other assorted straw grasping, fossil fuel loving, Climate change Deniers:

« Last Edit: May 29, 2018, 10:57:15 AM by agelbert »
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Offline agelbert

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the ice loss is accelerating each and every year.
« Reply #9053 on: May 29, 2018, 11:29:42 AM »
Antarctica is not just losing a steady amount of ice each year; the ice loss is accelerating each and every year.

Quote
Note: the grey area is the average sea ice extent for the day of year +/- two standard deviations (+/- 2σ). Average and standard deviation are computed from the 1981-2010 (WMO standard) data.

It might take centuries to melt ALL of it, but it WILL only take few decades to melt enough of it to cause trillions of dollars in damage to ports and sea side cities. The cretins who do not want to admit this threat needs to be addressed NOW by a ban on the burning of fossil fuels will always claim the melting of the ice is "not worth mentioning".

We need fossil fuels like a dog needs ticks.



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Offline agelbert

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BYD Stands Strong In Response To LA Times 🦖 Criticism — #Pravduh #RealityCheck


May 29th, 2018 by Kyle Field

SNIPPET:

Quote
BYD President Stella Li reiterated this sentiment in an email to employees in response to the LA Times article, where she called for them to strengthen their resolve in a fight against the dying fossil fuel industry:

“It is also no surprise to me that critics question our ability to deliver on our mission to change the world by creating a complete clean-energy ecosystem that reduces the world’s reliance on petroleum. We are unequivocally the leader of a movement that will reverse centuries of exploitation of our planet.

The entrenched fossil fuel industry 🐉🦕🦖 leading that exploitation will stop at nothing in their efforts to slow down our progress.”

A Bright Future 💫


Ultimately, the near-term critics cannot stop the inevitable tide of renewables and zero-emission transportation solutions. Bloomberg New Energy Finance estimates that 84% of all new buses sold in 2030 will be electric. Silencing this generation of critics will inevitably give way to another and another, but the transition is occurring. …

Over at BYD, they will stay the course, as they have for years, from their early beginnings as a battery company to their position today as a global EV leader. BYD is accustomed to change and marketplace disruption, having moved from its beginnings in  batteries into the general automotive sector and later also solar to fulfill its objective of becoming a new energy company.

“And across the nation, our work moves forward. Yesterday, we signed a contract with the University of Georgia for 21 of our buses. Today, the Chattanooga Area Regional Transportation Authority (CARTA) will receive their first of three buses.

“It is undeniable that electrification is the cornerstone of our future. We’re glad you are here with us working to save our planet for future generations.”    


Full article:

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/05/29/byd-stands-strong-in-response-to-la-times-criticism-pravduh-realitycheck/

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Offline agelbert

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Agelbert NOTE: More of the above brinkmanship stupidity from the Trump 🦀 wrecking crew.

A poster named Jtrillian tells it like it is.


Quote
Jtrillian Wed, 05/30/2018 - 11:13 Permalink
So much for the POTSDAM DECLARATION.

Those Islands are China's.  They belonged to China prior to Japan taking them in WWII.  They were returned to China in the terms dictated in the above mentioned agreement as part of Japans unconditional surrender.

But hey, when has any agreement that we signed ever stopped us from making war?

China has a valid claim to the islands.  The US government is trying to provoke the sleeping dragon into a war.  Be careful what you wish for... you just might get it.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potsdam_Declaration

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spratly_Islands




Quote
“We are going out of our way to cooperate with Pacific nations, that’s the way we do business in the world,” Mattis 🦀 told reporters. “But we are also going to confront what we believe is out of step with international law, out of step with international tribunals that have spoken on the issue.”


The above is from the article linked below:

Wed, 05/30/2018 Mattis: US Will Confront China With "Steady Drumbeat" Of American Ships Over Weaponized Islands

Agelbert analysis: Friends, to the too clever by a half Trump wrecking crew, this is not about war.    That's right. sports fans.

THIS is about the silly posturing blustering bravado Trump's ghost writer talked about in the "Art of the Deal". It is no accident that Mattis 🦍 is making all these noises just as the US trade team is scheduled to arrive in China.

The Chinese, who are experts in this sort of thing, are probably laughing all over themselves by this crude and thoroughly pedestrian attempt to get China to swallow some US tariffs without retaliating big time. Trump does absolutely everything he can to insult both the North Koreans and the Chinese so he can get them into the "negotiating position" Trump wants.

Trump totally missed the memo on Face Saving in these cultures. The only thing Trump has accomplished is to strengthen their resolve to RETALIATE economically BECAUSE they have LOST FACE! Trump thinks he has "softened them up" with threats before he turns on the charm (📢 THAT DOES NOT WORK WITH THE CHINESE or the North Koreans!).

Trump is cornered by China on trade. THAT is what this is REALLY all about. The US, due to its trading account imbalance, NEEDS Chinese products more than they need ours. China can EASILY destroy what is left of our asset stripped and impoverished economy while maintaining a market for its products in other countries.

Sure, Turmp knows that. But the only thing Trump understands is winning by intimidation. That DOES NOT WORK with China (or anyone with half a brain when dealing with a country with a reputation for ignoring/breaking treaties like the USA).

China inderstands the USA better than the USA does. The USA is ALL ABOUT MONEY. So, expect China to REALLY put the tariff heat on our exports now (this will negatively impact our economy FAR AND WIDE, not just the grain exports).

This will hit the banksters that run the USA in the wallet, where their god is.

This will severly impact tthe stock market.

This will bring down the Trump wrecking crew.


The problem is that the Trump 🦀 wrecking crew😈🦕👹🦖🦍  is so STUCK on their "(F)Art of the Deal" ideology, that they might just start a shooting war 💣 if they see that their too clever by a half FArt of the Deal intimidation maneuvers resulted in the following:

1) they FAILED to make China back down

2) The USA becoming the economic and military laughing stock of the world

3) Political GOP disaster in the midterms due to a cratering market and economy.


Read the following story between the lines. Please consider what I have written in regard to the Chinese modus operandi. If you work for the Trump wrecking crew, please get your "Art of the Deal" mafia head out of your ass and stop this insane brinkmanship before you end up wishing you had never been born.

War Erupts Between Trump's🦀
Two Top Trade Advisors 😈 👹  Over China

by Tyler Durden

Wed, 05/30/2018 - 10:14

Commenting on the latest, surprise escalation in the US-China trade ceasefire war, in which Trump unexpectedly announced 25% tariffs on up to $50BN in Chinese imports, prompting a fresh round of outrage and confusion in Beijing which was confident it was done with Trump's "flip-flopping", we observed that "the latest move by Trump signals the more hawkish wing of Trump’s trade team is trying to amplify its hard line, after Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said this month that any talk of a trade war was suspended for now."

“Mnuchin’s ‘trade war on hold’ comments look to have been repudiated,” said Derek Scissors, a China analyst at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington. “It may be the administration has shifted somewhat to appease the Congress on the lifting of the ZTE sanctions.”

Which, we concluded, begs the question:

is China trade hawk dragon Peter Navarro back in Trump's good graces, and if so, is the countdown to Mnuchin's resignation officially on?

Then just moments later, none other than Peter Navarro himself confirmed that there may be another major battle behind the scenes, when in a rare public rebuke of Steven Mnuchin, Navarro - who the media recently relegated to D-grade advisor status when he was excluded from China talks after reportedly exploding at Mnuchin and Wilbur Ross two weeks ago - called Mnuchin's claim that the trade war with China was "on hold" an "unfortunate sound bite" and admitting that there’s a dispute that needs to be resolved.

“What we’re having with China is a trade dispute, plain and simple,” Navarro said in an interview broadcast Wednesday with National Public Radio. “We lost the trade war long ago" with deals such as Nafta and China’s entry into the World Trade Organization, he said.

"That was an unfortunate sound bite," says WH adviser Peter Navarro of Steven Mnuchin saying a trade war with China is "on hold." It's on hold no longer, though Navarro calls it a "trade dispute." More in this thread.https://t.co/m7oPSJWcTA @MorningEdition @npr

— Steve Inskeep (@NPRinskeep) May 30, 2018
Navarro also said that "we can stop them from putting our high tech companies out of business" and "buying up our crown jewels of technology.... Every time we innovate something new, China comes in and buys it or steals it."

Earlier this month, Mnuchin shocked markets and sent stocks surging after he said in a weekend televised interview that the prospect of a trade war with China was "on hold." It turns out, Mnuchin was merely saying whatever someone had told him to say.

The latest controversial remark from Navarro, who refuses to go gentle into that good night, came just days before U.S.  Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross is scheduled to meet with his counterparts in Beijing to discuss ways to reduce the U.S.’s trade deficit with China, and - as noted earlier - follows Trump's surprise announcement that the U.S. is moving ahead with plans to impose tariffs on $50 billion of Chinese imports and curb investment in sensitive technology.

The renewed tariff threats could stop the planned talks and jeopardize a deal, the WSJ reported on Wednesday, citing sources in both countries. A team of U.S. officials was scheduled to arrive in Beijing on Wednesday. Asked about potential Chinese retaliation, especially on American farm goods, Navarro said “we’re ready for anything.”

As for the implications of this growing trade advisor war in Trump's inner circle, two weeks ago Bill Blain wrote that "Mnuchin’s Name Is Now High On The Trump Deadpool List" and come to think of it, it has been a while since Trump fired anyone...

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-05-30/war-erupts-between-trumps-two-top-trade-advisors



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Offline agelbert

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Tesla Over-The-Air Update Fixes Model 3 Braking Issues, Consumer Reports Fires Back With Improved Rating ✨

May 30th, 2018 by Kyle Field

Tesla Model 3

Tesla CEO Elon Musk confirmed on Twitter approximately an hour ago that the braking issues identified by Consumer Reports have been addressed by an over-the-air software update. His post shows that he has toned down his responses to the trusted firm, which Tesla butted heads with back in October.

The about-face by Consumer Reports happened in what must be a record, taking just 7 days from a Consumer Reports article detailing such a significant issue to having it resolved by the manufacturer. As we reported earlier, Consumer Reports had issues with the Model 3’s braking capability — it took significantly longer to brake than expected for such a car.

The rapid turnaround speaks to the impressive responsiveness by Tesla when faced with what it deems are real issues, and also to the power of its over-the-air software update capability, which can roll out fixes faster, easier, and more cheaply than automakers have ever done.

Somewhat surprisingly, legacy automobiles have never enjoyed the luxury of over-the-air updates, with even a small firmware flash or navigation update requiring a visit to a local service center and the inevitable service bills that follow. Tesla, on the other hand, just has to kick out a software update and push it out to all affected vehicles, much like a cellphone manufacturer would do.

Elon added more color to the update in a second tweet, noting that the braking and user interface (UI) updates were for all Model 3’s, not just the new ones it was building moving forward. He also noted two hardware updates that Tesla had identified to address other concerns raised by Consumer Reports — a quieter windshield and better suspension that would improve the ride quality. It appears that he implied any Model 3 owner could come in for the upgrades and have them done on the house, but he didn’t explicitly say that and he actually discouraged owners from bothering with these issues if they aren’t “really bothered by them.”

The exchange on Twitter shows just how responsive Tesla can be, but really starts to make one wonder about Elon’s capacity and if Twitter is the most effective use of his time. Maybe a Tesla Twitter team with a more structured approach to handling issues, taking feedback, and responding to criticism would result in a better end product and let Elon get back to what is surely a lengthy list of more pressing issues? Oh well — he’s the one changing the world, who am I to offer solutions?

For sure, Elon will just keep doing what he does.  To close out the tweets on such updates (for now, at least), he announced yet another innovative feature that would allow drivers to accelerate the speed at which Tesla’s vehicles improve. He tweeted that drivers could create “bug reports” for Tesla’s vehicles much like they would do for a computer or smartphone app and just using voice commands.

Quote
Elon Musk ✔ @elonmusk
 All items below will go to all Model 3s within next few months with V8.2 software. To report a bug or ask for a feature, press voice button, say “bug report” followed by issue description. https://twitter.com/mactechgenius/status/1001867688413544448

12:58 PM - May 30, 2018
4,708
775 people are talking about this

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/05/30/tesla-over-the-air-update-fixes-model-3-braking-issues-consumer-reports-fires-back-with-improved-rating/
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Offline agelbert

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The Limits of Police Reform: The Origins and Ends of the Police
« Reply #9057 on: May 30, 2018, 06:37:01 PM »
Agelbert NOTE: Great discussion of the history of policing.

The Limits of Police Reform: The Origins and Ends of the Police

May 30, 2018

Alex Vitale talks about his new book “The End of Policing,” which casts a skeptical eye on the liberal calls for police reform, and calls for us to stop asking police to solve a wide variety of social problems

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/sMg5ZUisIrY" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/sMg5ZUisIrY</a>

https://therealnews.com/stories/the-limits-of-police-reform-the-origins-and-ends-of-the-police
« Last Edit: May 30, 2018, 06:39:10 PM by agelbert »
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Offline agelbert

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`Dawn’ of Asia’s Offshore Wind Boom 🌟 Lures Japanese Trading Houses
« Reply #9058 on: May 30, 2018, 07:50:56 PM »
`Dawn’ of Asia’s Offshore Wind Boom 🌟 Lures Japanese Trading Houses

May 29, 2018 by Bloomberg

Photo: Tilman Ehrcke / Shutterstock

SNIPPET:

“Asia is at the dawn of development of its offshore wind market,” Yoshio Kometani, chief operating officer of Mitsui’s infrastructure projects business unit, said in an email. “Taiwan is especially promising as it has favorable natural conditions and the government is taking initiative to improve investment and development opportunities.”

Buffeted by strong breezes in the Taiwan Strait, the island has emerged as a hot spot for clean power projects as President Tsai Ing-Wen works to phase out nuclear energy while adding 25 gigawatts of renewable energy by 2025. The island is seeking to boost offshore wind capacity to 5.5 gigawatts over the same timeframe, from just 8 megawatts.

In Japan, the government is working on legislation that standardizes offshore wind development guidelines and streamline the approval process for new projects. In March, the country’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry updated its offshore wind map with more data on conditions and the agency is accelerating the environmental impact assessment process.

Globally, there are about 18 gigawatts of offshore wind capacity and Europe accounts for more than 80 percent of that, with the rest mostly in Asia, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. Asia will add 3.5 gigawatts of offshore wind capacity in 2030, more than double the 1.5 gigawatts to be added in Europe the same year, according to estimates in a December report from BNEF.

To be sure, most of Asia’s offshore wind development is occurring in China, a place where historically Japanese companies have a small footprint. The world’s largest energy user is ranked third globally for offshore wind capacity with about 2.8 gigawatts as of last year, after the U.K. and Germany, according to BNEF.

Japanese trading houses have been making moves into offshore wind in overseas markets for years, gaining experience to participate the coming Asia boom. Marubeni owns a stake in a project in the U.K. and Sumitomo Corp. owns parts of two Belgium and two other U.K. offshore wind farms.

Mitsubishi, which will start construction of a 950-megawatt wind project off the U.K. coast with partners this year, aims to double its renewable output so that it accounts for about 20 percent of its total power production by 2030. Offshore wind will play an important role in that expansion, according to Yusuke Takeuchi, who heads a power business development team at Mitsubishi.

Full article:

http://gcaptain.com/dawn-of-asias-offshore-wind-boom-lures-japanese-trading-houses/
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Offline agelbert

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Trump "Deal" will backfire, with ominous consequences for US consumers.
« Reply #9059 on: May 31, 2018, 08:55:51 AM »

US barking up the wrong trade tree

By Stephen S. Roach | China Daily | Updated: 2018-05-31 07:36

The author, a faculty member at Yale University and former chairman of Morgan Stanley Asia, is the author of Unbalanced: The Codependency of America and China.

The good news is that the United States and China appear to have backed away from the precipice of a trade war. While vague in detail, a May 19 agreement has defused tension and created room for further negotiation. The bad news is that the framework of negotiations is flawed: A deal with any one country will do little to resolve the US' fundamental economic imbalances that have arisen in an interconnected world.

There is a longstanding disconnect between bilateral and multilateral approaches to international economic problems. In May 1930, some 1,028 of the US' leading economists wrote an open letter to Herbert Hoover, then US president, urging him to veto the pending Smoot-Hawley tariff bill. Hoover ignored the advice, and the global trade war that followed made a garden-variety depression "great". Incumbent US President Donald Trump has put a comparable spin on what it takes to "make America great again".

Politicians have long favored the bilateral perspective, because it simplifies blame: you "solve" problems by targeting a specific country. By contrast, the multilateral approach appeals to most economists, because it stresses the balance-of-payments distortions that arise from mismatches between savings and investment. This contrast between the simple and the complex is an obvious and important reason why economists often lose public debates. The dismal science has never been known for clarity.

Such is the case with the US-China debate. China is an easy political target. After all, it accounted for 46 percent of the US' colossal $800 billion merchandise trade gap last year. Moreover, China has been accused of egregious violations of international rules, ranging from allegations of currency manipulation and State-subsidized dumping of excess capacity to cyber-hacking and forced technology transfer.

Equally significant, China seems to have lost the battle in the Western arena of public opinion - criticized by Western policymakers, a few high-profile academics, and others for having failed to live up to the grand bargain struck in 2001, when it joined the World Trade Organization. A recent article in Foreign Affairs by two senior officials in the Barack Obama administration says it all: "(T) he liberal international order has failed to lure or bind China as powerfully as expected." As is the case with the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Syria and Iran, strategic patience has given way to impatience, with the nationalistic Trump administration leading the charge against China.

The counter-argument from multilateral-focused economists like me rings hollow in this climate. Tracing outsize current-account and trade deficits to an extraordinary shortfall of US domestic savings - just 1.3 percent of national income in the fourth quarter of 2017 - counts for little in the arena of popular opinion. Likewise, it doesn't help when we emphasize that China is merely a large piece of a much bigger multilateral problem: the US had bilateral merchandise trade deficits with 102 countries in 2017. Nor does it matter when we point out that correcting the supply-chain distortions - caused by inputs from other countries that enter into Chinese assembly platforms - would reduce the bilateral US-China trade imbalance by 35-40 percent.

Flawed as it may be, the bilateral political case argument resonates in a US where there is enormous pressure to ease the angst of the country's beleaguered middle class. Trade deficits, goes the argument, lead to job losses and wage compression. And, with the merchandise trade gap hitting 4.2 percent of GDP last year, these pressures have only intensified during the current economic recovery. As a result, targeting China has enormous political appeal.

So, what can be made of the May 19 deal?

Beyond a ceasefire in tit-for-tat tariffs, there are few real benefits. US negotiators are fixated on targeted reductions of about $200 billion in the bilateral trade imbalance over a two-year time frame. Given the extent of the US' multilateral problem, this is largely a meaningless objective, especially in light of the massive and ill-timed tax cuts and federal expenditure increases that the Trump administration has enacted in the last six months.

Indeed, with budget deficits likely to widen, the US' savings shortfall will only deepen in the years ahead. That points to rising balance-of-payments and multilateral trade deficits, which are impossible to resolve through targeted actions against a single country.

Chinese negotiators are more circumspect, resisting numerical deficit targets but committing to the joint objective of "effective measures to substantially reduce" the bilateral imbalance with the US. China's promise to import more US agricultural and energy products borrows a page from the "shopping list" approach of its earlier trade missions to the US. Unfortunately, the big-wallet mindset of China reinforces the US narrative that China is guilty as charged.

Even if the stars were in perfect alignment and the US was not facing a savings constraint, it stretches credibility to seek a formulaic bilateral solution to the US' multilateral problem. Since 2000, the largest annual reduction in the US-China merchandise trade imbalance amounted to $41 billion, and that occurred in 2009, during the depths of the global financial crisis. The goal of achieving back-to-back annual reductions totaling more than double that magnitude is sheer fantasy.

In the end, any effort to impose a bilateral solution on a multilateral problem will backfire, with ominous consequences for US consumers. Without addressing the shortfall in domestic savings, the bilateral fix simply moves the deficit from one economy to others.

And therein lies the cruelest twist of all. China is the US' low-cost provider of imported consumer goods. The Trump 🦀 deal would shift the Chinese piece of the US' multilateral imbalance to higher-cost imports from elsewhere - the functional equivalent of a tax hike on US families. As Hoover's ghost might ask, what's so great about that?

Project Syndicate

http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201805/31/WS5b0f3585a31001b82571d494.html
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Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

 

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