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Offline agelbert

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National lab: Wind power has become historically low-cost
« Reply #7950 on: August 10, 2017, 04:24:00 PM »


National lab: Wind power has become historically low-cost

August 8, 2017

by Hannah Hunt: Senior Research Analyst with AWEA focused on wind industry data and analysis, with applied GIS experience.

Talk about good timing: Building on our first-ever American Wind Week, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) released its annual Wind Technologies Market Report today.

LBNL’s findings confirm that U.S. wind energy costs continue to fall, technology continues to advance and performance continues to improve. This has helped the wind industry sell energy at historically low prices to electricity customers, increasing demand from utilities and corporate purchasers alike. As a result, the outlook for the industry is strong.

All of this activity drives job creation– new wind jobs are up 32 percent since 2015 and now top 100,000.

Let’s look at the report’s highlights:

Wind energy has become historically cheap

LBNL examined wind power purchase agreement (PPA) prices across the country, finding that the average levelized PPA price fell to about $20/megawatt hour (MWh) last year. That is a 66 percent price reduction since 2009. PPA prices have fallen across the country, varying by region, with the lowest prices found in the interior.


The low prices reported by LBNL confirm similar recent reports. For example, late last year Wall Street management firm Lazard reported a two-thirds reduction in the unsubsidized levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for wind since 2009.

As those other analysts have noted, wind energy is now the lowest-cost option among all energy sources. PPAs not only provide cost-competitive pricing today, they also allow utilities and corporate purchasers to secure price stability over periods of 10, 20, or even 30 years, providing a hedge against future fuel price increases.

It has gotten much cheaper to build new wind turbines

LBNL reported that it now costs 33 percent less, on average, to install a new wind turbine than the peak reported in 2009 and 2010. Similar to PPA price data, installed costs were lowest in the interior states. Installed costs include all expenses before a wind project comes online, including turbine purchases, balance of plant, and interconnection costs. As turbine purchases are considered the most expensive component of a wind project’s installed costs, decreases in turbine prices were cited by LBNL as the primary factor in cost decreases.


Technology advancements increased wind project performance


Cost reductions continued in 2016 even as wind turbines grew larger, which is a remarkable accomplishment. For turbines installed in 2016, LBNL reported a 13 percent increase in average rotor diameter length over the previous 5-year average, as well as an 11 percent increase in average rated turbine capacity. These technology improvements enable wind turbines to optimize their performance and produce more electricity by reaching stronger, steadier winds. Increased rotor diameters in particular helped to boost new wind turbine performance, with wind projects built in 2014 and 2015 reporting a 42.5 percent average capacity factor in 2016, compared to a 32.1 percent capacity factor for projects built between 2004-2011.

A new finding from the report also reveals how increased performance is being pursued through site customization. That means different turbine models throughout the same wind farm are used to ensure projects reach peak performance. Nearly 25 percent of all wind projects installed in 2016 used multiple turbine configurations from the same turbine manufacturer.

The report supports AWEA data that wind power is now the leading source of renewable energy capacity in the country

The wind industry deployed 8,203 megawatts (MW) in 2016, for a total of 82,143 MW of installed capacity at the end of the year—enough to power 25 million average American homes. That strong installation activity pushed wind power past conventional hydropower to become the largest renewable energy capacity source in America. AWEA’s 2017 second quarter market report confirms strong continued activity, with new wind farm development up 40 percent over this time last year.

The outlook for the wind industry is strong

While the LBNL report notes strong growth is expected to continue through 2020, the report does conclude with a balanced discussion of factors affecting the outlook for the U.S. wind industry in the 2020s.

It lists many positive factors, including “the potential for continued technological advancements and cost reductions enhance the prospects for longer-term growth, as does burgeoning corporate demand for wind energy and continued state (renewable portfolio standard) requirements. Moreover, new transmission in some regions is expected to open up high-quality wind resources to development.”

Some have focused on the report’s discussion of potential economic challenges for the industry, including competition from natural gas and solar. However, it should be noted that those challenges are nothing new and have in fact been listed in every version of the report this decade. Thanks to the innovation and productivity of American workers, the wind industry has been able overcome those challenges by greatly exceeding cost reduction expectations, and we expect that successful track record to continue.

LBNL’s full report provides valuable insights on wind industry market and technology trends. We’re excited to see that wind energy is more cost-competitive than ever, with momentum in place to supply 10 percent of the country’s electricity by 2020, while adding another 50,000 jobs to our 100,000-strong wind energy workforce over the same time frame.

http://www.aweablog.org/national-lab-wind-power-become-historically-low-cost/
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Offline agelbert

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Political Assassination of Governor Don Siegelman orchestrated by Karle Rove
« Reply #7951 on: August 10, 2017, 04:57:33 PM »
The Political Assassination of Governor Don Siegelman

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/pH6Bj7rpaVg" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/pH6Bj7rpaVg</a>

Aug. 9, 2017 5:00 pm

Thom is joined by guest Steve Wimberly (Director/Producer - Atticus v. the Architect: The Political Assassination of Governor Don Siegelman) to talk about the complete prosecutorial attack on Don Siegelman by his political enemies.
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Offline agelbert

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Arctic sea ice may well be gone by September
« Reply #7952 on: August 10, 2017, 05:38:34 PM »
The multi-year ice is gone.  :(

The ice extent is about the same as the year it was the lowest at this time (2012). HOWEVER, the thickness was much greater in 2012 (see below).


Learn more:


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2, 2017

Arctic sea ice may well be gone by September 2017

http://arctic-news.blogspot.com/2017/

Agelbert NOTE:
When the ice is gone, the methane bomb will not be far behind.



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Offline agelbert

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Explore every American wind farm and wind factory on our new interactive map
« Reply #7953 on: August 11, 2017, 10:12:05 AM »
Explore every American wind farm and wind factory on our new interactive map
 

MANUFACTURING AUGUST 10, 2017

by Hannah Hunt

Our first-ever American Wind Week is in full swing, delivering exciting updates on the falling costs of wind, progress in the offshore wind market, and overwhelming public support for wind across the country.

But we’re not stopping there.

Today we’ve released a new interactive map that allows anyone to easily view the location of every utility-scale wind project and wind-related manufacturing facility in the United States, visualizing the growth of America’s largest source of renewable energy capacity over time.

Why did we build this map? We know that wind power is providing economic benefits to all 50 states, creating jobs and deploying wind projects in rural communities each year. This map helps to visualize, for the first time, the footprint of the U.S. wind industry, and in more detail than ever before.

The default map view shows all online utility-scale wind projects. However, there’s also a time-lapse feature built in to show the progress of wind power capacity built over time. The time-lapse feature begins in 1981, when the first modern projects were built in California. It then continues through 2017, where wind project development is now strongest in heartland states like Texas, Iowa, Oklahoma, and Kansas.

Beyond the time lapse, users can zoom in and click on individual symbols to find more details about each online wind project, including the name of the project, when it came online, the size of the project, the number of wind turbines, and its congressional district.

The map also includes the locations of the more than 500 active U.S. wind-related manufacturing facilities. When users click on each factory, they’ll discover the name of the company and the type of wind component they produce.

AWEA’s new map uses only a small percentage of the full wind project and manufacturing data available to AWEA members through Market Database Pro, a comprehensive, interactive database of all online, under construction, and advanced development wind projects, and all active wind-related manufacturing facilities. Over 50 data points are provided at both the project and turbine level, with advanced interactive mapping services including filtered search capabilities, summary maps, and political boundaries.



Click on the map to access our new interactive tool (at link below).

The wind industry currently supports over 100,000 U.S. jobs across all 50 states, with nearly 85,000 MW of installed capacity at the end of the second quarter of 2017. That’s enough to power 25 million American homes. Take time to explore our new map to discover where these economic benefits are being delivered.

http://www.aweablog.org/explore-every-american-wind-farm-factory-new-interactive-map/

Agelbert NOTE: Fossil fuelers, EAT YOUR HEART OUT!
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Offline agelbert

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Tesla Electric Semi Truck to test Self-Driving, capable of 'Platooning': report
« Reply #7954 on: August 11, 2017, 12:03:13 PM »
Tesla Electric Semi Truck to test Self-Driving, capable of 'Platooning': report
Aug 10, 2017  John Voelcker 104 Comments

With Tesla, there's always something new coming up to keep owners, buyers, and fans excited.

The company's main task over the next year is to get its lower-priced Model 3 electric car into volume assembly at high quality, a process CEO Elon Musk has called "production hell."

But there's more to come, one of the new products being Tesla's promised all-electric semi tractor, apparently for long-haul freight.

Musk released a teaser image of the Tesla semi at a TED Talk in May

Now some details may have leaked out, in the form of an e-mail conversation between Tesla and the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles seen by the Reuters news service.

In those documents, Tesla sought state approval to test a prototype of its electric semi in Nevada that will contain self-driving software.

California DMV officials told Reuters they were to meet Tesla yesterday to discuss the company's "efforts with autonomous trucks" as well.

According to Reuters, the Tesla semi is likely to offer the capability of "platooning."

That's the term for automated vehicles traveling very close together at speed, which significantly cuts aerodynamic drag.

Vehicles that platoon must continually communicate with each other and the infrastructure around them, but the distances between them are far too short to allow a human driver to react in time to emergencies.

READ THIS: Tesla trucks: semi to be shown in Sept, pickup in 18-24 months

Several companies are working on autonomous driving technology specifically for long-haul trucks, in Silicon Valley and elsewhere.

Long-haul trucks do not face cross traffic when they travel on limited-access highways, and they largely operate at steady speeds.

Those are seen as more favorable conditions for self-driving vehicles than the far more diverse circumstances faced by passenger vehicles in a wide range of uses.

Continental gets Nevada approval to test autonomous cars

Daimler Trucks testing the first series-production autonomous truck on public roads

CHECK THIS OUT: Daimler to build large electric semi truck

Platooning, meanwhile, is seen as a way to reduce fuel consumption significantly among trucks with internal combustion engines (or energy use in the all-electric Tesla semi).

Robot Semi Trucks platooning
Daimler, Volvo, and other European heavy-truck makers have put years of effort into the technology, including numerous demonstrations on limited stretches of highway.

Platooning is viewed as a precursor to fully autonomous long-haul trucks, which are still widely assumed to be 10 years or more in the future.

He has driven the semi, he said, calling the big rig capable of sporty and spirited driving characteristics.

"This will be a very spry truck," Musk said. "You can drive this around like a sports car."

http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1112028_tesla-semi-truck-to-test-self-driving-capable-of-platooning-report

Agelbert NOTE: The widely assumed 10 year transition period for autonomus EV Semi Trucks is incorrect. They will be dominating in less than five years, simply because the sensor package is NOW cheap AND MORE reliable than a human driver.

The 1% want this profit over people automation. When they want something, it happens. 

In this case ,securing the truck contents will become better paid than driving the truck.

Unfortunately for hopeful drivers planning on being semi truck riding security guards, I do not doubt that the 1% will try to make we-the-people pay for truck contents security with added taxation for added police highway monitoring, rather than doing the responsible thing and hiring a security guard to ride with the truck and ensure safe delivery of the goods, along with the required paperwork.  >:(

At any rate, when you see lots of Semi Trucks Platooning, EV Semi Platooning will be right there to replace every diesel semi truck on the roads.

The upside of this for the biosophere and people of good will is that the lung clogging, respiratory disease causing particulate matter and green house gas pollution on our roads will be much reduced and the big oil refineries will have to put their diesel fuel CRAP where the sun doesn't shine.  ;D
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Offline agelbert

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#AmericanWindWeek highlights: An outpouring of support
« Reply #7955 on: August 11, 2017, 02:39:05 PM »

#AmericanWindWeek highlights: An outpouring of support   

AUGUST 10, 2017

By Greg Alavarez, the Writer and Content Manager for AWEA. He is the head editor and writer for Into the Wind, and oversees AWEA's online content and opinion writing. Greg holds a Master's degree in Global Environmental Policy from American University's School of International Service. He also holds a Bachelor's degree in International Relations and Journalism from Lehigh University.

SNIPPET:

We still have three days to go in the first-ever #AmericanWindWeek, but it’s time to check in and see what people are saying. Simply put, the response so far has been amazing.

Thousands of everyday Americans, advocacy groups, lawmakers and businesses from across the country have shared the reasons that U.S. wind power is important in their lives. Let’s get right to the highlights!

Great pictures and heartwarming comments about people who obtained stable, Renewable Energy based, employment:

http://www.aweablog.org/americanwindweek-highlights-outpouring-support/

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/xUt4f0JV1Qk" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/xUt4f0JV1Qk</a>

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Offline agelbert

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Hat Tip to Az for educating me on the Schuman Resonance
« Reply #7956 on: August 11, 2017, 03:39:20 PM »
 This link is to a continuosly updated global graphic data set for temperatures, GHG levels, jet stream, ocean currents, wave heights, etc.

Good to have that link handy. Thanks.

The Schumann resonance link is on that corresponding thread as well.


I didn't know what that was so I looked it up. Thanks for the  information. I suspect Global Warming will jack up the Schuman Resonance, which will cause more frequent fires.  :( I'll be watching that too.


For other readers not in the know:

Schumann Resonance

SNIPPET:

At any given moment about 2,000 thunderstorms roll over Earth, producing some 50 flashes of lightning every second. Each lightning burst creates electromagnetic waves that begin to circle around Earth captured between Earth's surface and a boundary about 60 miles up. Some of the waves - if they have just the right wavelength - combine, increasing in strength, to create a repeating atmospheric heartbeat known as Schumann resonance. This resonance provides a useful tool to analyze Earth's weather, its electric environment, and to even help determine what types of atoms and molecules exist in Earth's atmosphere.

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sunearth/news/gallery/schumann-resonance.html
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Offline agelbert

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Former Governor Don Siegelman tells it like it IS!
« Reply #7957 on: August 11, 2017, 05:07:44 PM »
Republicans Have Weaponized the Criminal Justice System (w/guest Gov. Don Siegelman)

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/RgzqO7g6lKk" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/RgzqO7g6lKk</a>

Aug. 10, 2017 5:00 pm

Thom speaks with guest Don Siegelman  (Former Governor - Alabama, 1999-2003, profiled in the new documentary, Atticus v. the Architect: The Political Assassination of Don Siegelman).

Please go to http://free-don.org/ and sign the Petition  to allow the film in Montgomery:Stop Censorship: Urge Capri Theatre in Alabama to Show Siegelman Documentary Film

« Last Edit: August 11, 2017, 05:37:24 PM by agelbert »
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Offline agelbert

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For readers who can think logically
« Reply #7958 on: August 11, 2017, 06:14:26 PM »
For readers who can think logically, please view the following graphics. The fossil fuelers are allergic to them. them.

Population is NOT the problem

THIS is how the fossil fuel industry, and almost half of the world’s 100 largest companies want that 'Fragmentation of Agency' (to PAY to mitigate Catastrophic climate Change) pie chart  to look like (that is, when the fossil fuel worshipping greed balls can no longer pretend that isn't a "Chinese myth"):


The biosphere math facts clearly state that less than 17% of the human population, MOSTLY concentrated in wealthy countries, is DOING over 80% of the damage by consuming over 80% of the resources. Only about half (or less) of the MILITARY budgets alone of the wealthy countries could pay for bio-remediating the most impacted areas, stop the exploitation and care for and educate the high population growth poor there so they become good stewards instead of biosphere destroyers.

Since, according to the U.N., the richest 20% of the world's population uses 80% of the resources, the 'Fragmentation of Agency' pie chart for the damage done to the biosphere should look like this:

The REAL bottom line is that less than 17% of the human population is an existential threat to the ALL of the human population AND a large part of macroscopic species in the biosphere.





The world view of greedy people does not allow them to think logically (see below):

Quote
"Capitalist ideology claims that the world is perfectly ordered and everybody is in their place (i..e. everybody gets what they deserve). This self legitmating aspect of Capitalism is Socially Catastrophic. This is the Victorian view of the world." Rob Urie - Author " Zen Economics"
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Offline agelbert

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Words are important
« Reply #7959 on: August 12, 2017, 09:35:32 AM »
Agelbert NOTE: The parables taught by Jesus Christ have been frequently misinterpreted or even used to rationalize doing the opposite of what Christ actually taught. I am posting the following over several days in order to help clear up any misunderstandings among people of good will, along with eliminating self-serving rationalizitions often used by people of bad will.

Matthew 13:1-58

Eight parables are found here. In the first instance the parable is of the sower. The sowing of the seed refers to the Word of God.


The seed, having grown in the good soil, becomes not only one but many believing witnesses cast into the world. Jesus explained that "the good seed are the children of the kingdom".

These parables are given so that we as the children of the kingdom in the world may know that we must expect opposition from the devil and his children.

In these parable, we are given the negative reaction to Christian action.

We must not try to uproot the weeds, representative of the evil ones in the world, because of our inability to judge rightly without the possibility of making a mistake. The ultimate disposition of the evil ones in the world will be accomplished by angels who are going to be sent by the Lord (v. 41) at the consummation of the age. Actually, the angels are designated as the final reapers of the harvest of our labor (v. 39).


Quote
35 A good man brings good things out of the good stored up in him, and an evil man brings evil things out of the evil stored up in him. 36 But I tell you that everyone will have to give account on the day of judgment for every empty word they have spoken. 37 For by your words you will be acquitted, and by your words you will be condemned.” - Matthew  12:35-37

Enjoy this Country Western style singing of a Psalm David wrote:     
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/XjEpB2ikkuE" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/XjEpB2ikkuE</a>


Continued tomorrow
« Last Edit: August 12, 2017, 09:39:40 AM by agelbert »
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Offline agelbert

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August 11, 2017

Federal Court Nixes Environmental Law Trump Actually Supports

William Snape III, of The Center for Biological Diversity, discusses US Court of Appeals overturning of EPA ban on hydrofluorocarbons, which are thousands of times more powerful greenhouse gases than carbon dioxide

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/hv3_ezVVtHw" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/hv3_ezVVtHw</a>

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=19751
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Offline agelbert

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U.S. Pipelines Spill 9,000 Gallons of Dangerous Chemicals a Day
« Reply #7961 on: August 12, 2017, 12:20:46 PM »


August 10, 2017

U.S. Pipelines Spill 9,000 Gallons of Dangerous Chemicals a Day
Leading anti-pipeline campaigner Diana Best discusses hearings in Nebraska that may mark Keystone XL's last stand and a new Greenpeace warning that four proposed Tar Sands oil pipelines threaten water resources

Diana Best  is a senior climate and energy campaigner at Greenpeace USA, based in Denver, CO. She began working with Greenpeace in 2008 on federal climate legislation and has since worked on reforming federal fossil fuel leasing programs and fighting new infrastructure projects around the US. She is currently leading Greenpeace's pipeline resistance work aimed at halting proposed tar sands pipelines as well as undermining the political and social influence of the oil industry during Trump's administration.

transcript

U.S. Pipelines Spill 9,000 Gallons of Dangerous Chemicals a Day

DHARNA NOOR:   Welcome to The Real News Network. I'm Dharna Noor joining you from Baltimore. For the past 10 years, pipelines have spilled an average of 9,000 gallons of hazardous liquids every single day in the U.S. alone. This is according to Greenpeace USA. In a recent study, Greenpeace found that over the past decade these spills in the U.S. have led to 20 fatalities, 35 injuries, $2.6 billion in cost and over 800,000 total barrels spilled, that's 34 million gallons. They also concluded that the Tar Sands oil pipelines are virtually guaranteed to spill.

The release of this report comes at the moment that hearings are taking place in Nebraska, where regulators have yet to approve the expansion of the Keystone XL Pipeline. On Thursday, environmental groups, including Greenpeace, and also Bold Nebraska, The Indigenous Environmental Network, and others are set to deliver over 300,000 public comments against the Keystone XL to the Nebraska Public Service Commission. The deadline for public comment is this Friday.

Our next guest is here to discuss the Nebraska Keystone XL hearings and Greenpeace's important report titled Four Proposed Tar Sands Oil Pipelines Pose A Threat To Water Resources. We're very pleased to be joined from Denver, Colorado, by Diana Best. She is the Senior Climate and Energy Campaigner with Greenpeace USA. Thanks so much for joining us today.

DIANA BEST:   Thank you so much for having me.

DHARNA NOOR:   First of all, what are the four proposed Tar Sands oil pipelines that your new report says will pose a threat to water resources?

DIANA BEST:   Great. Yeah, there's four proposed Tar Sands pipelines, all starting at the Alberta Tar Sands fields. One of those is Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain Pipeline that will go out west to the B.C. coast. Another one, of course, is the Keystone XL Pipeline, which is the subject of these hearings this week. The third is the Line 3, Enbridge's Line 3, which goes through Canada and then cuts through a portion of Northern U.S. territories. Then, the final one is Energy East.

DHARNA NOOR:   Why is Greenpeace saying that Tar Sands oil pipelines are guaranteed to spill? What makes them virtually guaranteed to spill?

DIANA BEST:   Great. As you mentioned, Greenpeace U.S. released a report very recently, which details the spill record of some of these companies behind the four proposed pipelines that I just mentioned. Those companies have had a terrible track record of spills since 2010, which is detailed in our report. The U.S. crude oil pipeline system, as a whole, has had an average of one significant incident, about a total of 570 barrels release per a year per a 1,000 miles of pipelines over the past 10 years. As I mentioned, they don't have a great track record.


What is really scary about this right now is that instead of actually seeing a downward trend in the number of spills, this investigation also found that the long-term trend data shows a significant pipeline incidents have actually increased since 2007. Assuming that some of this data holds true, that means that these pipelines, if they are built, are virtually guaranteed to spill.

DHARNA NOOR:   Let's talk a little bit about the hearings currently going on in Nebraska. These hearings may shape up to be the final battle against the expansion of the Keystone XL Tar Sands Pipeline. Nebraska regulators have, again, get to approve the pipeline. Talk a little bit about the significance of these hearings and why people are concerned about the expansion of the Keystone.

DIANA BEST:   Definitely. I think, one of the best opportunities we have right now to slow pipeline construction down in the U.S. is through these state permitting processes. Pipelines in general need a handful of both federal and state permits. The state permits are really where, I think, we're seeing a lot of opposition at the pipelines, and a lot of the activism around the pipelines really taking shape.

What's happening right now in Nebraska is that The Nebraska Public Service Commission has been tasked with essentially having open hearings and taking public comments to review the risks and rewards of this pipeline and whether or not to approve this critical state permit, the last permit that the Keystone XL Pipeline needs to complete its route from Alberta, through Montana, South Dakota and then Nebraska. This is a really critical window for people to share their stories, to talk about the impacts of what this pipeline will mean for their communities, for their property, for their climate. It's a huge moment right in Nebraska.

We saw on Sunday thousands of people, hundreds of people coming together in Lincoln from Indigenous community leaders, to First Nations and tribes, landowners, climate activists, people from all over the state and all over the region coming together to give Key XL the boot. It was a big, powerful march on Sunday to kick off these hearings. Now, we're in day three of what will be a five-day all day hearings at the Public Service Commission.

DHARNA NOOR:   One of the Keystone XL pipeline actually already runs through Nebraska, right? This last is really contentious because of its proximity to a major underground water aquifer. Why is that important? Does it matter that it's so close to this water aquifer?

DIANA BEST:   Yeah. I think Tar Sands pipelines really pose a threat to a lot of water resources, from where they start in the oil fields of Alberta, all the way throughout. There are countless streams and rivers and aquifers that those pipelines intersect and go over. I think what's particularly scary about the Keystone XL Pipeline is that it actually crosses the Ogallala Aquifer, which is one of the biggest freshwater resources that we have. Millions of people rely on it for drinking water and then you start to incorporate some of the indirect ways that people depend on having a clean, fresh water source. For agriculture, for growing crops and food. This is the heartland of our country, where a lot of our food does come from. To think that that water could be contaminated at all by, hopefully not, a disastrous pipeline spill, it certainly starts to increase the stakes of what this pipeline could potentially have for people in that region.

DHARNA NOOR:   Some, of course, in the pipeline or oil and natural gas industry, say, spills are just part of the cost of doing business and that they factor in spills and are prepared for those emergencies. What's your response to this sort of pushback?

DIANA BEST:   Yeah, certainly. I think there's a lot of responses. One, let's start with the economic. Spills cost money, that's the bottom line. We've discussed in the report, the billions have been associated already with previous spills that have happened. When you start to add up the various high-price tag costs of these pipelines, which include not only the cost of cleaning up spills, the cost of delays, the uncertainty of the permitting process, the reputational risk of these pipelines, the protest risks, all of these risks, we start to really add up the cost quite quickly.

All of this is coming, of course, in a fairly uncertain and unpredictable oil market, when we're also seeing the cost of renewable energy go down, we're seeing a boom in post-fossil fuel technology, like electric cars. I think one has to ask, and I'm certain key investors are asking themselves, or should be asking is it worth it? At what point do the risks outweigh the very limited rewards of pushing forward these pipelines?

Each of these companies right now that are proposing these pipelines are looking to finance these pipelines and going to major Wall Street investors and banks. One of our objectives at Greenpeace, and I know a lot of our allies and partner groups are also making similar demands. One of the things that we're trying to do is go to some of these big investors and some of the groups bankrolling and banks bankrolling these projects and say, "You have to look at what the increased price tag of this is and you should consider just not funding these at all."

DHARNA NOOR:   I have to ask you, what about the talking point, of course, that these pipelines will create jobs?


DIANA BEST:   Yeah, I think this is something ... We've seen president Trump use this as a justification. We've seen the industry uses as a justification for pushing these pipelines forward for almost a decade. The reality is there's been numerous reports, which dispel the myth that this is a long-term job creator. In fact, the permanent job growth from pipelines is under 100 for a pipeline, I think Keystone XL Pipeline. I think you also have to look at where the job market is going and where the long-term trend is right now.

There is a huge boom in the solar and renewable energy industry right now. We know that there are jobs that are going to take us into a fossil-free future, and those jobs are going to be there to last. While there may be a short-term boom in job growth in the region for the construction, in the long-term, is this going to be this sort of economic boom that the industry and Trump and the oil and gas cronies claim it will be? No.

DHARNA NOOR:   The recent Greenpeace report says that the decades of spills averaging 9,000 barrels a day have amounted to $2.6 billion in cost. Is that the pipeline or oil companies who are paying those costs? Or are taxpayers also having to foot the bill?

DIANA BEST:   That's a really good question. According to the EPA, by law, companies responsible for the use or transport, storage, disposal of hazardous substances and oil, they're actually technically liable for the cost. That can include spills, cleanup, damages, you name it. I don't think it's a surprise to anyone and we've seen this in the past that some companies refuse to comply. In the past, the EPA, among other places, have had public funds put aside to help deal with some of the cleanup, or damages, just basically getting some of these contaminations in order.

I think what is nerve-wracking about the situation that we're in, is that the Trump administration is both, pushing forward new pipelines, they are undercutting the regulatory process that we're in, and they're de-funding or underfunding some of the EPA regulatory programs that we rely on. A lot of the safety nets that we've seen in the past come to play in moments of disaster might not be there and that's an uncertainty that I think we're going to have to face. Who ultimately foots the bill for that? Will it be the companies? Will it be local taxpayers? Will it be the federal government? I think that's an unknown and something that we should be considering very closely.

DHARNA NOOR:   When might we know the outcome of the Nebraska hearings and the ultimate fate of the Keystone XL Pipeline?

DIANA BEST:   Right. At this point, the Public Service Commission of Nebraska is hearing this testimony, there is cross-examination. The company also has a chance to testify and share their testimony. They're going to go back, they're going to review all of that, including the thousands and thousands of public comments that are being delivered on Thursday, the final comment period, of course, closes on Friday. They're going to review all of that. What we're hearing right now is that we should expect an up or down final vote on whether or not to approve the Nebraska permit sometime in the late fall, that could be sometime in November.

DHARNA NOOR:   How much of the American public is at risk, in terms of their drinking water from oil and gas pipeline spillage? Are there specific at-risk populations?

DIANA BEST:   Yeah. I think, the pipeline network across the U.S. has certainly expanded in recent years. I think the risks from a pipeline spill are numerous. From contaminating our water that we depend on to drink, to a fossil fuel leakage and spills of hazardous materials, and of course, the risk to our climate. I think who is at risk? It's technically all of us. I think when we look at Key pipelines, like the Keystone XL Pipeline that's currently on the table and being debated of whether or not to approve this, it crosses the Ogallala Aquifer, as I mentioned, a water source that millions of people rely on directly for drinking water, and indirectly countless people rely on for food. A contamination and a key drinking water source like that would be absolutely disastrous.

DHARNA NOOR:   Can you talk a little bit more about the long-term effects of these kinds of pipeline spills?

DIANA BEST:   Yeah. I think we can look at other places that we've seen oil spills. I think Deepwater Horizon is still in everyone's recent memory. We can also look at Michigan's Kalamazoo River spill that happened in 2010, when 20,000 plus barrels of oil spilled into that river, what the cleanup costs were. I think it brings a lot more than just direct impacts. Of course, there is water contamination, not being able to drink water, not being sure if your water is safe, to some of the other environmental hazards that happen. Can you appreciate and enjoy the outdoors without fear of contamination? I think there is also just a perception risk. It affects people's property values. It affects people's desire to want to spend time in that region. I think there's a tourism angle here that is also not widely discussed.

DHARNA NOOR:   Let's turn to the owner and the builder of the would be Keystone XL Trans Canada. What's their track record for spill rates?

DIANA BEST:   Yeah. Their track record, like all of these companies, is not great. In our report, we use pipeline incident data maintained by the U.S. Pipeline and Hazardous Material Safety Administration. That is a mouthful. We looked through that report, and what we found is that Trans Canada was responsible for 13 spills totalling about 829 barrels of crude oil since 2010. They had two significant spills. One in 2011 and one in 2016.

DHARNA NOOR:   Greenpeace's recent study also concluded that we could expect 59 significant spills over the next 50 years. The study said there's even more to concern when it comes to the Alberta Tar Sands, because of the mining and processing of bitumen. What exactly is bitumen and why does that pose a particular concern for Greenpeace?

DIANA BEST:   Sure. Bitumen is a fancy term for Tar Sands oil. Unlike conventional crude oil, bitumen has a consistency of almost like a thick tar. It's too thick to just pump straight out of the ground and pushed through pipelines. In order to actually get it to flow through the pipelines, which are being considered right now, bitumen must be mixed with light crude oil, or natural gas to give it the consistency that it can actually flow through those pipelines. That's called diluted bitumen, or dilbit for short.

DHARNA NOOR:   Did a Trans Canada's Pipeline competitors Kinder Morgan or Enbridge and their subsidiaries fare any better in your report in terms of their track records for spills?

DIANA BEST:   They actually fared a lot worse, in fact. Kinder Morgan was involved in approximately 213 spills. 35 of those were crude oil and six were highly volatile liquids. 22 of those were actually deemed significant spills by the regulators. Enbridge, as well, had about 147 spills. 17 of those were classified as significant.

DHARNA NOOR:   All right. Diana Best, thank you so much for joining us today.

DIANA BEST:   Thank you so much for having me, take care.

DHARNA NOOR:   Thanks so much for joining us on The Real News. We'll keep tracking these unfolding developments for the Keystone XL and other pipelines and the environmental health battle against them.

Video at link:

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=19736


 
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Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Offline agelbert

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Re: Agelbert's Newz Channel
« Reply #7962 on: August 12, 2017, 12:31:28 PM »

Gigantic Pipes Beach in England After Breaking Free from Tow

August 11, 2017 by Mike Schuler

More pictures and story:

http://gcaptain.com/gigantic-pipes-wash-ashore-in-england-after-breaking-free-during-tow/
« Last Edit: August 12, 2017, 12:33:06 PM by agelbert »
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if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Offline agelbert

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Parked Electric Cars Earn Cash While Feeding the Power Grid
« Reply #7963 on: August 12, 2017, 12:47:06 PM »
Parked Electric Cars Earn Cash While Feeding the Power Grid

August 11, 2017

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/98dfIwhXKqc" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/98dfIwhXKqc</a>

Full article by Lorraine Chow:


https://www.ecowatch.com/evs-power-grid-2471744121.html
« Last Edit: August 12, 2017, 12:49:25 PM by agelbert »
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Offline azozeo

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Re: Agelbert's Newz Channel
« Reply #7964 on: August 12, 2017, 01:07:39 PM »
2017-08-10 - How fossil fuel money made climate change denial the word of God:
http://splinternews.com/how-fossil-fuel-money-made-climate-denial-the-word-of-g-1797466298

 

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