AuthorTopic: Agelbert's Newz Channel  (Read 1494087 times)

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2019 Hyundai Ioniq preview
« Reply #9180 on: June 14, 2018, 09:43:34 AM »
2019 Hyundai Ioniq preview

Aaron Cole

Jun 14, 2018

The 2019 Hyundai Ioniq returns this year as an inexpensive alternative for green car shoppers on a budget. 😎

Its lineup has fully matured now; the Ioniq is available as an affordable hybrid, a slightly more expensive plug-in hybrid, or a fully electric model available in limited areas. We say: green, greener, or greenest—no bad pick.

The most notable change for the Ioniq this year is the addition of standard automatic emergency braking on the Hybrid SEL, the bread-and-butter trim level that likely starts at just more than $25,000 (Hyundai hasn't yet announced pricing for the 2019 models). The SEL trim level includes heated front seats, 16-inch wheels, power-adjustable driver's seat, and LED daytime lights.

Value-minded buyers can find nearly as many features for less money, however. Likely starting around $23,000, the base 2019 Hyundai Ioniq Blue is equipped with a 7.0-inch touchscreen with Android Auto/Apple CarPlay compatibility, cloth upholstery, a 6-speed automatic transmission, 1.56-kwh lithium-ion battery, and 15-inch wheels. The base Ioniq Blue has the distinction of being the most fuel-efficient car without a plug on sale in the U.S. with a 58 mpg combined rating. Other Ioniq Hybrids are rated at 55 mpg combined due to added weight and different tires.

At the top of the pile is the Ioniq Limited that swaps in leather upholstery, a sunroof, 17-inch wheels, and Hyundai's telematics system for more than $28,000 to start.

A spend-up package is available for SEL and Limited models that upgrades the touchscreen to an 8.0-inch unit with navigation, adds premium audio, wireless cellphone charging, and advanced voice recognition.

Plug-in hybrid and all-electric models are available in base and Limited trim levels. Plug-in hybrids likely will cost nearly $26,000 and electric models ring the bell at just over $30,000 before applicable federal and state incentives are factored in.

The Ioniq Plug-in Hybrid swaps out the hybrid's 1.56-kwh battery for a larger 8.9-kwh battery system that delivers an EPA-rated 29 miles of electric range before the 1.6-liter inline-4 internal combustion engine kicks in. It's rated at 52 mpg combined as a hybrid.

The Ioniq Electric is limited in availability—and in other ways. The electric Ioniq only offers 124 miles of range, significantly less than the Bolt EV and the upcoming 2019 Nissan Leaf with a bigger battery. The Ioniq Electric is only available in Southern California too 👎, and a confusing charging reimbursement program was dropped for 2018. That may not matter to seasoned EV owners who are accustomed to off-peak charging or who are familiar with existing charging infrastructure, but the Ioniq Electric is hardly appealing to first-time EV buyers with its limited range and availability.

In any powertrain configuration, the Ioniq's best trait may be its ability to blend in seamlessly to everyday operation. There are no "look at me" styling cues to give away the Ioniq's efficient powertrain, and it's dangerously close to being completely normal.

That also figures into the Ioniq Hybrid's usability. The cargo hold is still 23.5 cubic feet (marginally smaller than a Prius) but its wide opening makes most of that space usable. The Ioniq's touchscreen and infotainment is still one of our faves, made better with smartphone compatibility that new buyers might prefer.

We still think the most likeable part of the Ioniq Hybrid is its low price and three available powertrain configurations that is, so far, unmatched by any of its competitors.  


HI-RES GALLERY: 2019 Hyundai Ioniq

https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1117217_2019-hyundai-ioniq-preview
« Last Edit: June 14, 2018, 09:46:56 AM by agelbert »
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Scotland Moving Rapidly Towards a 100% Renewable Energy Economy
« Reply #9181 on: June 14, 2018, 11:16:32 AM »
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Scotland Hits Annual GHG Emissions Target Third Year Running

June 13th, 2018 by Joshua S Hill

Scotland’s Climate Change Secretary announced this week that the country met its statutory annual greenhouse gas emissions target for the third year in a row in 2016, which resulted in emissions being down 49% on a 1990 baseline.

Wind Farm in Scotland

scotland wind energyScotland announced on Tuesday the publication of its latest report detailing the country’s progress on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, based on its most recent and complete data, 2016. According to the new Official Statistics report from the Scottish Government, greenhouse gas source emissions were down 49% from 1990 to 38.6 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (MtCO2e) in 2016, representing a 10.3% decline since 2015. When these figures are adjusted to account for Scotland’s participation in European Union-wide emissions trading, they are down 45.2% to 41.481 MtCO2e in 2016, and down 2.5% from 2015.

In comparison to other western European countries, Scotland is second only to Sweden which has decreased its emissions by 51%, and they stand ahead of Finland with 42%, Germany with 25%, and Denmark with 23%.

“These statistics are hugely encouraging and show we have almost halved the greenhouse gases emitted in Scotland – underlining our role as an international leader in the fight against climate change,” said Scottish Climate Change Secretary Roseanna Cunningham. “But we must go further and faster if we are to meet our responsibilities to our children, grandchildren, and future generations.

“Our ambitious Climate Change Bill will ensure we do exactly that – by setting a new 90% reduction target for 2050 and paving the way towards achieving net-zero emissions as soon as possible.”

Of the basket of greenhouse gasses monitored by Scotland, it is unsurprising that carbon dioxide accounted for 70.8% of the total. The next closest was methane, which only accounted for 16.8%.

The largest source of net emissions in 2016 was the Transport sector with 14.4 MtCO2e, followed by the Agriculture and Related Land Use sector with 10 MtCO2e. The only sector which was able to display a net emissions sink was the Forestry sector, with -12.7 MtCO2e.


Expanding the timeline out to 1990, the emissions from the Energy Supply sector (such as power stations) from 1990 to 2016 was 15.6 MtCO2e, a 68.5% reduction. Waste Management Emissions such as those from landfills worked out to be 4.4 MtCO2e, a 72.8% reduction, while the decrease in the Business and Industrial Process sector was 5.8 MtCO2e, a reduction of 40.5%.

“It’s fantastic to hear that Scotland has hit its annual climate change target for the third year in a row,” said Claire Mack, Chief Executive of Scottish Renewables, the country’s renewable energy trade body, speaking in response to the report’s release. “The announcement today shows that setting ambitious targets is the best way to achieve results.

“The energy supply sector has seen the largest reduction in CO2 emissions, with a 68.5% reduction since 1990. This demonstrates that phasing out fossil fuels in favour of clean, green alternatives is having the desired effect.”

“It’s great news that Scotland has hit the annual target and reduced its climate emissions by 45% compared to the 1990 baseline and is well ahead of the 42% 2020 target,” added Tom Ballantine, Chair of Stop Climate Chaos Scotland (SCCS). “Everyone who has played their part in achieving this reduction should be proud.

Back in 2009, when Scotland’s first Climate Act was passed, there was no clear path to meeting the 42 per cent emissions reduction target and many were sceptical it could be achieved.

Today’s results show that setting stretching targets works by driving innovation and strong policy delivery. This success, along with support from the public, leading scientists and farming groups, should give the Scottish Government the confidence to aim high once again and set a net zero emissions target, by 2050 at the latest   , in the new Climate Change Bill.

“2016 reflects the first full year since the closure of Longannet power station, showing the big impact you can have by phasing out dirty coal and switching to clean renewables.

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/06/13/scotland-hits-annual-ghg-emissions-target-third-year-running/
« Last Edit: June 14, 2018, 11:19:21 AM by agelbert »
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Ørsted Officially Opens 573 Megawatt Race Bank Offshore Wind Farm
« Reply #9182 on: June 14, 2018, 02:03:34 PM »
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Ørsted Officially Opens 573 Megawatt Race Bank Offshore Wind Farm

June 14th, 2018 by Joshua S Hill

Danish offshore wind energy developer Ørsted officially opened the 573 megawatt (MW) Race Bank Offshore Wind Farm Wednesday, which will provide over half a million UK homes with clean electricity.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/hQbol643tZs" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/hQbol643tZs</a>

The Race Bank Offshore Wind Farm has had something of a long history, and was only pulled out of trouble in late 2013 when DONG Energy (now known as Ørsted) acquired 100% ownership in the project from British multinational energy and services company Centrica.

“Race Bank fits very well into our existing pipeline of offshore wind projects and will contribute to the achievement of our strategic target of constructing 6,500 MW by 2020,” said Samuel Leupold, Executive Vice President of DONG Energy Wind Power, at the time. “The addition of up to 580 MW to our UK project portfolio underlines our commitment to the UK market in general, and to the UK offshore wind sector in particular.”


A year and a half later, DONG Energy awarded a wind turbine order to Siemens (now Siemens Gamesa) to provide 91 of its 6 MW wind turbines for the project. Located 32 kilometers off the British eastern coast, Race Bank was one of the big projects announced through the early part of this decade, but has since been eclipsed by much larger projects with much bigger wind turbines.

At the end of 2016, DONG Energy divested 50% ownership in the project to the Macquarie European Infrastructure Fund 5 and Macquarie Capital, the principal investment arm of Macquarie Group in a deal that was worth £1.6 billion ($1.2 billion).

And finally, at the beginning of February this year, Ørsted announced that Race Bank had reached full power output across all of its 91 wind turbines and had already generated 1 terawatt-hour (TWh) of power 👀 since construction had begun.

video at article link of Race Bank Inauguration  8)
 
The project was therefore officially opened at a ceremony in Grimsby on Wednesday, home to Ørsted’s East Coast Hub, the UK’s largest offshore wind Operations and Maintenance (O&M) base. The project, beyond being a massive provider of clean electricity, also makes use of a new way of carrying out offshore maintenance, using a Service Operation Vessel that remains offshore with technicians working 14 days and 14 days off. 


“Race Bank is a fantastic infrastructure project and underlines Ørsted’s contribution to the UK’s energy transition. It’s also another clear signal of our firm commitment to Grimsby and the Humber, and the UK supply chain for offshore wind,” said Matthew Wright, Managing Director at Ørsted UK. “Race Bank is a hugely significant and innovative project, featuring the first-ever turbine blades to be made in Hull and becoming our first wind farm in the UK to be operated using a new Service Operation Vessel. It’s also one of the fastest projects we have ever built, with a fantastic safety record, and this is testament to the hard work of the project team and the great relationship we have with our partners.

“Powering over half a million homes every year, Race Bank is another positive step towards delivering the UK’s decarbonised energy system of the future.”

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/06/14/orsted-officially-opens-573-megawatt-race-bank-offshore-wind-farm/
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Learn why climate Change, an existential threat, is not treated as such
« Reply #9183 on: June 14, 2018, 02:32:19 PM »
Learn why climate Change, an existential threat, is not treated as an existential threat by most people plus the facts about several other important issues we all face.
Q & A: How & Why We Make Real News

Posted June 14, 2018

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/7aqdEQOw2rk" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/7aqdEQOw2rk</a>
« Last Edit: June 14, 2018, 02:34:22 PM by agelbert »
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Siemens said to mull sale of flagship gas turbine business
« Reply #9184 on: June 14, 2018, 02:49:22 PM »


June 14, 2018

#Business & Jobs #Fossil fuels

Bloomberg

Siemens said to mull sale of flagship gas turbine business 

Siemens is considering the sale of its struggling business that produces gas turbines for power plants, according to people familiar with the matter, report Oliver Sachgau and Eyk Henning for Bloomberg. But a final decision has not yet been made, and the company could end up weathering a downturn and keeping the business that has suffered from a collapse in orders as the global energy industry shifts to renewable sources like wind and solar and away from large-scale power plants that run on fossil fuels, according to the report.

Read the report in English here.

Find plenty of background in the factsheet Germany’s Siemens: A case study in Energiewende industry upheaval.

 
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VW fined one billion euros by German prosecutors in diesel emissions scandal
« Reply #9185 on: June 14, 2018, 02:55:13 PM »


June 14, 2018

VW fined one billion euros by German prosecutors in diesel emissions scandal

Car giant Volkswagen has been fined one billion euros by German prosecutors over diesel emissions cheating, reports the BBC. The carmaker said it did not plan to appeal the fine, which is one of the highest ever imposed by German authorities on a company, according to the report. But BBC business correspondent Theo Leggett writes in a short analysis that “the fine pales into insignificance compared with the fines and compensation the group has had to pay out in the US - which add up to well over 20 billion euros. If this puts an end to criminal proceedings in Europe, VW may well think it's a relatively small price to pay.”

Find the VW press release in English here.
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Regulators Approve Five Grid-Scale Lithium-Ion Battery Projects 💫 for Southern California

June 8, 2018

By Renewable Energy World Editors

         
Regulators in California gave San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) approval to move forward with development of five grid-scale lithium-ion battery projects in San Diego and Orange counties.

The five projects will deliver a total of 83.5 MW/334 MWh to SDG&E’s energy storage portfolio. SDG&E submitted the projects to the California Public Utilities Commission (PUC) in April 2017.

According to SDG&E, the projects include:

֍ A 30-MW/120-MWh lithium-ion battery storage facility in San Diego, Calif., that will be built by Renewable Energy Systems (RES) America and will be completed by December 2019

֍ A 4-MW/16-MWh lithium-ion battery storage facility in San Juan Capistrano, Calif, that will be built by Advanced Microgrid Solutions and will be completed by December 2019

֍ A 40-MW/160-MWh lithium-ion battery facility in Fallbrook, Calif., that will be built by Fluence and will be completed by March 2021

֍ A 6.5-MW/26-MWh lithium-ion battery storage facility in Escondido, Calif., that will be built by Powin Energy and will be completed by June 2021

֍ A 3-MW/12-MWh lithium-ion battery storage facility in Poway, Calif., that will be built by Enel Green Power and will be completed by December 2021

The PUC also approved a demand response program equaling 4.5 MW. OhmConnect will provide the demand response service.

Lead image credit: San Diego Gas & Electric

https://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2018/06/regulators-approved-five-gridscale-lithiumion-battery-projects-for-southern-california.html
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A “textbook changing” new form of photosynthesis has been discovered 🔬

LAST UPDATED ON JUNE 15TH, 2018 AT 10:14 AM BY ELENA MOTIVANS 

For those of you who think that we know it all already, there’s a new surprise. A recent discovery has shaken what know about photosynthesis, an already well-studied topic. The “textbook changer” is that a group of photosynthesizers exists that does not need visible red light. This was thought to be impossible because light below these wavelengths does not contain much energy.

It is very well established that photosynthetic organisms use visible red light for photosynthesis. The green pigment, chlorophyll-a, is used to collect red light and use its energy to make necessary biochemicals and oxygen. Chlorophyll-a is found in pretty much every single photosynthetic organism, so we thought that it sets an energy limit for photosynthesis. This has been termed the “red limit” and was thought to signify the minimum amount of energy required for the process of photosynthesis.

One cyanobacterium, Acaryochloris, that lives in the shade of a green sea squirt that blocks most visible light is known to use near-infrared light.

Green Sea Squirts

It was considered an exception as it is a single species and lives in an extremely specific habitat. Now, the researchers have discovered that it isn’t just a one-off, but actually a quite common lifestyle for cyanobacteria that live in shaded areas. A few examples are found in bacterial mats in Yellowstone Park and in Australian beach rock.

Go to article link for: Colony of cyanobacteria where magenta represents chlorophyll-a driven photosynthesis and yellow represents chlorophyll-f driven photosynthesis. Credit: Dennis Nuernberg.

So how are these cyanobacteria able to survive if they can’t power their chlorophyll-a? It turns out that chlorophyll-a shuts down under these circumstances and lets its sidekick chlorophyll-f take over. Previously, chlorophyll-f was thought to just harvest light, now we know that it takes a starring role under shaded conditions and can use infrared red light to perform photosynthesis below the red limit. Plants that use this photosynthesis type can also protect themselves from varying brightness of light.

“The new form of photosynthesis made us rethink what we thought was possible. It also changes how we understand the key events at the heart of standard photosynthesis. This is textbook changing stuff,” said lead researcher Professor Bill Rutherford, from the Department of Life Sciences at Imperial College London.

Now we know of a third widespread type of photosynthesis. It is only employed in special conditions, in infrared-rich shaded conditions. When there is normal light, standard photosynthesis is still the norm.

So what are the consequences of this discovery? The researchers think that it could help to engineer more efficient crops that can use a wider range of light. Another interesting implication is that is could lower our standard, so to speak, to search for life on other planets. Until now, the red limit is used in astrobiology to determine whether complex life could have evolved in other solar systems.

It’s pretty cool that there are major discoveries to be made on topics that we think that we know well! 


Journal reference: Dennis J. Nürnberg et al, Photochemistry beyond the red limit in chlorophyll f–containing photosystems, Science (2018). DOI: 10.1126/science.aar8313
https://www.zmescience.com/research/discoveries/a-textbook-changing-new-form-of-photosynthesis-has-been-discovered/

Agelbert NOTE: It's not just "pretty cool"; it is evidence that the energy required for life processes is NOT as cut and dried as the "carrying capacity" crowd would have us believe. PLease bear in mind that scientists thought this type of low energy photosynthesis was so difficult and so unlikely, that they actually tailored their search for life on other planets with a WRONG ASSUMPTION. IOW, regardless of the nice way it is presented in the above article, scientists thought it was IMPOSSIBLE BECAUSE of their rigid acceptance of the FLAWED laws of thermodynamics MATH. Remember that the next time somebody says you must have a minimum of X amount of energy to do this or that. The cyanobacterium, Acaryochloris proves that, at least for photosynthesis, you don't. If you think our scientists know all there is to know about thermodynamics, you are wrong.





« Last Edit: June 15, 2018, 11:45:49 AM by agelbert »
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Magnetic Gears Reduce Cost Of Wind Turbines & Wave Power

June 11th, 2018 by Steve Hanley

Transmissions are not sexy but they are essential to many mechanical devices. They allow components that turn at different speeds to work together. For instance, the blades of a wind turbine are not connected directly to the electrical generator inside. A transmission takes the relatively low rotational speed of the blades and steps it up to the higher RPMs needed to spin the generator fast enough to make electricity. Gears are the secret sauce inside any transmission. They are fairly reliable but if one breaks, it can be expensive to repair. And if it is located high on a wind turbine pylon or deep undersea in a wave power device, getting access to it to make a repair can be difficult.

magnetic gears Credit: Texas A&M

At Texas A&M, doctoral student Matthew Gardner is working on way to replace mechanical gears with magnetic ones. If he is successful, smaller, lighter, and less expensive transmissions that transmit power more efficiently will be the result. His research is being watched carefully by several companies, including ABB, the global technology company headquartered in Switzerland.

Magnetic gears require less maintenance, create less acoustical noise and vibrations and are more durable than mechanical gears. If too much power is applied to a conventional gear, it breaks but when excess power is applied to a magnetic gear, it simply slips with no mechanical damage. In essence, it acts like a clutch built into the transmission that can absorb spikes in the load applied without breaking.

“Magnetic gears drew my interest because they represent a potentially disruptive innovation in the field of electric machines,” Gardner says. “Much of the research in electric machines represents incremental improvements on the technology that has been developed over the last few hundred years.”

One of the projects Gardner is working on is building a transmission for a wave energy generator. Ocean waves can have enormous spikes in energy. The transmission has to be able to absorb high torque loads over and over again reliably. By definition, repairing a broken component that is mounted underwater is a daunting and expensive job. “Our analysis found that using a magnetically geared generator would be about 50 percent smaller, 50 percent lighter and 25 percent less expensive than using a generator without any gearing for this wave energy application,” Gardner says.

In collaboration with the US Department of Energy and ABB, he has constructed a prototype transmission with magnetic gears that can handle up to 4000 newton meters of torque. 👀 Most magnetic gearing solutions to date are limited to about 150 newton meters of torque. Converting to pounds feet — the measurement of torque most of us are familiar with — 4000 newton meters is equivalent to 3000 pounds feet — nearly four times more than a Tesla Model S P100D.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/AU8TfuRqBaA&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/AU8TfuRqBaA&fs=1</a>

“I am excited about the opportunity to make a disruptive change in the field of electric machines,” Gardner said. “Magnetic gears and magnetically geared machines offer the possibility to provide a significant, not just incremental, improvement in systems involving electric machines.” Anything that lowers the initial costs and ongoing maintenance expense of renewable energy systems is a welcome step forward on the road to eliminating carbon and other harmful emissions from fossil fueled generating plants. Lower renewable costs will also make nuclear power unprofitable. With magnetic gears, 100% renewable energy becomes a more realistic possibility.   

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/06/11/magnetic-gears-reduce-cost-of-wind-turbines-wave-power/

Agelbert COMMENT: I have always loved the magnetic gear concept. I imagine it has not gained more traction (pun intented 😎) due to the force needed for many applications. Nevertheless, I can see where a slow rotating giant transmission can make use of magnetic gears effectively, thereby saving millions of dollars in lubricant, while prolonging the life of the transmission itself simply because the "gears" never wear out.

I think transmissions on ships could benefit from magnetic gears as well. The less lubricants, particularly fossil fuel based lubricants, needed, the better!



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A reminder of why a history of false predictions by scientists is important.
« Reply #9189 on: June 16, 2018, 11:52:35 AM »
Quote
AG: It's not just "pretty cool"; it is evidence that the energy required for life processes is NOT as cut and dried as the "carrying capacity" crowd would have us believe. PLease bear in mind that scientists thought this type of low energy photosynthesis was so difficult and so unlikely, that they actually tailored their search for life on other planets with a WRONG ASSUMPTION. IOW, regardless of the nice way it is presented in the above article, scientists thought it was IMPOSSIBLE BECAUSE of their rigid acceptance of the FLAWED laws of thermodynamics MATH. Remember that the next time somebody says you must have a minimum of X amount of energy to do this or that. The cyanobacterium, Acaryochloris proves that, at least for photosynthesis, you don't. If you think our scientists know all there is to know about thermodynamics, you are wrong.
Palloy's rush to defend the scientific priesthood in Palloy's religion DELETED by Agelbert

Palloy never stops giving the ivory tower scientific community the benefit of the doubt, while at the same time he wastes no time in attacking absolutely anything I have posted that questions the validity of the world view many of these scientists have.

Palloy is banned here for lacking the most elementary semblance of logic and equanimity, which is often laced with snide remarks and mocking. Pallloy HATES to have anything that forms part of the "accepted", and often purely speculative, though pitched as "scientific reality", assumptions by the scientific community, questioned or discredited. Instead of just politely saying that he disagrees with me, he goes on the attack. Therefore, it is a waste of time to engage in debate with him.

It rarely happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' followed by actually changing their minds so that you never hear that old view from them again. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful.

Their humanity is not what I question; what I find fault with is their judgmental attitude towards anyone who questions their theories. They point fingers at religious people for "rigidity" and "irrationality" while failing to look in the mirror. They ignore the judgemental scientific community history that encompasses all the discredited visionary scientists (who questioned a theory and were posthumously proven right) who had careers destroyed by these ivory tower scientists claiming the exclusive mantel of "objectivity". BULLSHIT!

Here are some examples of arguments used to defend "science" that Evolution Theory defenders like Palloy often use, not just to defend the thoroughly unscientific latest iteration of Evolution Theory, MS (Modern Synthesis), but to defend the rationale for not being "harshly judgemental" about past errors in practically all areas of science (that were pitched, before being found to be wrong,  as scientific FACT, NOT speculation!).

As with Evolution Theory, anyone questioning some area of science is typically accused of being "irrational", "uncivilized"  or "stupid". How rude. How convenient. How sophistic. How skilled in fallacious debating techniques. How thoroughly UNscientific. 


Quote
This section examines various concerns evolutionists often have regarding their theory’s false predictions.

Responses to common objections

These falsified predictions are not necessary predictions of evolutionary theory. They merely reflect isolated instances of a practitioner’s surprise over specific sets of data.

The predictions were considered to be necessary when they were held. And they represented consensus evolutionary science at the time they were held. They are well documented in both peer-reviewed research papers, popular literature authored by leading evolutionists and interviews of leading evolutionists. They were not merely held by a few, individual evolutionists. Nor were they one of several possible competing predictions. That these predictions are not now considered to be necessary predictions of evolution is a reflection of the malleability of evolutionary theory and is a reminder of why a history of evolution’s false predictions is important.


False predictions often have led to productive research

Productive research can come from a great variety of scientific and nonscientific motivations, including false predictions. That productive research may have arisen from some of these predictions does not detract from the fact that they are false.



Evolutionists have fixed these false predictions

A proponent of a theory, given sufficient motivation, can explain all kinds of contradictory findings. (Quine) Typically, however, there is a price to be paid as the theory becomes more complex and has less explanatory power.


Ad hominem and denial

Criticism of evolution draws heated responses, and personal attacks are common. Such attacks, however, do not change the fact that evolution has generated many false predictions. Also, evolutionists sometimes ignore or deny the unexpected findings. They attempt to discredit the facts, referring to them as “tired old arguments,” or fallacies without following up such criticisms with supporting details.


Falsificationism is flawed

It has been argued that in order to qualify as science, ideas and theories need to be falsifiable. Also, falsified predictions are sometimes used to argue a theory is false. Such naïve falsificationism is flawed (Popper) and not used here. Evolution’s many false predictions do not demonstrate that evolution is not science or that evolution is false.

False predictions are valuable in judging the quality of a theory, its explanatory power, and for improving our scientific understanding in general. Nonetheless, evolutionists sometimes reject any mention of their theory’s false predictions as mere naïve falsificationism. The failures of naïve falsificationism do not give evolutionists a license to ignore substantial and fundamental failures of their theory.


If there are so many problems evolution would have been toppled

This objection falls under the category of naïve falsificationism. Science is a reactive process. New evidence is processed, and theories are adjusted accordingly. But science can also be a conservative process, sustaining substantial problems before reevaluating a theory. Therefore the reevaluation of a theory takes time. The fact that there are problems is no guarantee a theory will have been toppled. (Lakatos; Chalmers)


Those quoted believe in evolution

Many scientists doubt evolution, but they are not cited or quoted in this paper. Only material from evolutionists is used to illustrate that even adherents to the theory agree that the predictions are false.


These falsifications will be remedied in the future

As scientists, we need to evaluate scientific theories according to the currently available data. No one knows what future data may bring, and the claim that future data will rescue evolution is ultimately circular.



There is no better alternative

One way to evaluate a theory is to compare it to alternative explanations. This approach has the advantage of circumventing the difficulties in evaluating scientific theories. But of course any such comparison will crucially depend on what alternative explanations are used in the comparison. If care is not taken good alternatives can be misrepresented or even omitted altogether. And of course there may be alternatives not yet conceived. (van Fraassen; Stanford) In any case, the success or failure of evolution’s predictions depends on the science, not on any alternative explanations.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 12:05:59 PM by agelbert »
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Offline Eddie

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Re: 2019 Hyundai Ioniq preview
« Reply #9190 on: June 16, 2018, 12:08:20 PM »
2019 Hyundai Ioniq preview

Aaron Cole

Jun 14, 2018

The 2019 Hyundai Ioniq returns this year as an inexpensive alternative for green car shoppers on a budget. 😎

Its lineup has fully matured now; the Ioniq is available as an affordable hybrid, a slightly more expensive plug-in hybrid, or a fully electric model available in limited areas. We say: green, greener, or greenest—no bad pick.

The most notable change for the Ioniq this year is the addition of standard automatic emergency braking on the Hybrid SEL, the bread-and-butter trim level that likely starts at just more than $25,000 (Hyundai hasn't yet announced pricing for the 2019 models). The SEL trim level includes heated front seats, 16-inch wheels, power-adjustable driver's seat, and LED daytime lights.

Value-minded buyers can find nearly as many features for less money, however. Likely starting around $23,000, the base 2019 Hyundai Ioniq Blue is equipped with a 7.0-inch touchscreen with Android Auto/Apple CarPlay compatibility, cloth upholstery, a 6-speed automatic transmission, 1.56-kwh lithium-ion battery, and 15-inch wheels. The base Ioniq Blue has the distinction of being the most fuel-efficient car without a plug on sale in the U.S. with a 58 mpg combined rating. Other Ioniq Hybrids are rated at 55 mpg combined due to added weight and different tires.

At the top of the pile is the Ioniq Limited that swaps in leather upholstery, a sunroof, 17-inch wheels, and Hyundai's telematics system for more than $28,000 to start.

A spend-up package is available for SEL and Limited models that upgrades the touchscreen to an 8.0-inch unit with navigation, adds premium audio, wireless cellphone charging, and advanced voice recognition.

Plug-in hybrid and all-electric models are available in base and Limited trim levels. Plug-in hybrids likely will cost nearly $26,000 and electric models ring the bell at just over $30,000 before applicable federal and state incentives are factored in.

The Ioniq Plug-in Hybrid swaps out the hybrid's 1.56-kwh battery for a larger 8.9-kwh battery system that delivers an EPA-rated 29 miles of electric range before the 1.6-liter inline-4 internal combustion engine kicks in. It's rated at 52 mpg combined as a hybrid.

The Ioniq Electric is limited in availability—and in other ways. The electric Ioniq only offers 124 miles of range, significantly less than the Bolt EV and the upcoming 2019 Nissan Leaf with a bigger battery. The Ioniq Electric is only available in Southern California too 👎, and a confusing charging reimbursement program was dropped for 2018. That may not matter to seasoned EV owners who are accustomed to off-peak charging or who are familiar with existing charging infrastructure, but the Ioniq Electric is hardly appealing to first-time EV buyers with its limited range and availability.

In any powertrain configuration, the Ioniq's best trait may be its ability to blend in seamlessly to everyday operation. There are no "look at me" styling cues to give away the Ioniq's efficient powertrain, and it's dangerously close to being completely normal.

That also figures into the Ioniq Hybrid's usability. The cargo hold is still 23.5 cubic feet (marginally smaller than a Prius) but its wide opening makes most of that space usable. The Ioniq's touchscreen and infotainment is still one of our faves, made better with smartphone compatibility that new buyers might prefer.

We still think the most likeable part of the Ioniq Hybrid is its low price and three available powertrain configurations that is, so far, unmatched by any of its competitors.  


HI-RES GALLERY: 2019 Hyundai Ioniq

https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1117217_2019-hyundai-ioniq-preview

Thanks for this. I have learned to love my plug-in hybrid. The Hyundai sounds like a pretty good car.

I lean toward my next car being another Volt. When the eV battery range gets to about 50 miles, that means most of my driving is accomplished by grid power, and could be accomplished with PV power. But the small FF engine makes it possible to still make road trips when necessary. It's a good combination for someone who still needs to drive as much as I do. Volts still go for 35K+ though and when the Trumpites eliminate eV subsidies, it won't be a cheap car. My out of pocket for my volt was only 25K, and I got 4 yrs at no interest. Next time it's gonna cost more, maybe 10K more.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline agelbert

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Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly 🔥
« Reply #9191 on: June 16, 2018, 12:08:52 PM »
Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Offline agelbert

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Re: Agelbert's Newz Channel
« Reply #9192 on: June 16, 2018, 12:16:47 PM »
2019 Hyundai Ioniq preview

Aaron Cole

Jun 14, 2018

The 2019 Hyundai Ioniq returns this year as an inexpensive alternative for green car shoppers on a budget. 😎

Its lineup has fully matured now; the Ioniq is available as an affordable hybrid, a slightly more expensive plug-in hybrid, or a fully electric model available in limited areas. We say: green, greener, or greenest—no bad pick.

The most notable change for the Ioniq this year is the addition of standard automatic emergency braking on the Hybrid SEL, the bread-and-butter trim level that likely starts at just more than $25,000 (Hyundai hasn't yet announced pricing for the 2019 models). The SEL trim level includes heated front seats, 16-inch wheels, power-adjustable driver's seat, and LED daytime lights.

Value-minded buyers can find nearly as many features for less money, however. Likely starting around $23,000, the base 2019 Hyundai Ioniq Blue is equipped with a 7.0-inch touchscreen with Android Auto/Apple CarPlay compatibility, cloth upholstery, a 6-speed automatic transmission, 1.56-kwh lithium-ion battery, and 15-inch wheels. The base Ioniq Blue has the distinction of being the most fuel-efficient car without a plug on sale in the U.S. with a 58 mpg combined rating. Other Ioniq Hybrids are rated at 55 mpg combined due to added weight and different tires.

At the top of the pile is the Ioniq Limited that swaps in leather upholstery, a sunroof, 17-inch wheels, and Hyundai's telematics system for more than $28,000 to start.

A spend-up package is available for SEL and Limited models that upgrades the touchscreen to an 8.0-inch unit with navigation, adds premium audio, wireless cellphone charging, and advanced voice recognition.

Plug-in hybrid and all-electric models are available in base and Limited trim levels. Plug-in hybrids likely will cost nearly $26,000 and electric models ring the bell at just over $30,000 before applicable federal and state incentives are factored in.

The Ioniq Plug-in Hybrid swaps out the hybrid's 1.56-kwh battery for a larger 8.9-kwh battery system that delivers an EPA-rated 29 miles of electric range before the 1.6-liter inline-4 internal combustion engine kicks in. It's rated at 52 mpg combined as a hybrid.

The Ioniq Electric is limited in availability—and in other ways. The electric Ioniq only offers 124 miles of range, significantly less than the Bolt EV and the upcoming 2019 Nissan Leaf with a bigger battery. The Ioniq Electric is only available in Southern California too 👎, and a confusing charging reimbursement program was dropped for 2018. That may not matter to seasoned EV owners who are accustomed to off-peak charging or who are familiar with existing charging infrastructure, but the Ioniq Electric is hardly appealing to first-time EV buyers with its limited range and availability.

In any powertrain configuration, the Ioniq's best trait may be its ability to blend in seamlessly to everyday operation. There are no "look at me" styling cues to give away the Ioniq's efficient powertrain, and it's dangerously close to being completely normal.

That also figures into the Ioniq Hybrid's usability. The cargo hold is still 23.5 cubic feet (marginally smaller than a Prius) but its wide opening makes most of that space usable. The Ioniq's touchscreen and infotainment is still one of our faves, made better with smartphone compatibility that new buyers might prefer.

We still think the most likeable part of the Ioniq Hybrid is its low price and three available powertrain configurations that is, so far, unmatched by any of its competitors.  


HI-RES GALLERY: 2019 Hyundai Ioniq

https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1117217_2019-hyundai-ioniq-preview

Thanks for this. I have learned to love my plug-in hybrid. The Hyundai sounds like a pretty good car.

I lean toward my next car being another Volt. When the eV battery range gets to about 50 miles, that means most of my driving is accomplished by grid power, and could be accomplished with PV power. But the small FF engine makes it possible to still make road trips when necessary. It's a good combination for someone who still needs to drive as much as I do. Volts still go for 35K+ though and when the Trumpites eliminate eV subsidies, it won't be a cheap car. My out of pocket for my volt was only 25K, and I got 4 yrs at no interest. Next time it's gonna cost more, maybe 10K more.


Glad to be of service. I would love to buy a used Leaf. They are super cheap, but I can't get my wife to agree to buy one. Hopefully, she'll come around. For now, we use Vermont Green Cab taxi service.

What do you think of that magnetic gear development at Texas A&M? I'm REALLY excited about that. The reason is that, if, and when, magnetic replaces mechanical gearing in most applications, machine efficiency and durability (MTBF) increases so much that ALL the math about how much energy we NOW need to run the planet goes out the window. This is one more huge technological innovation that can make a 100% Renewable Energy powered world a reality.   
« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 12:28:07 PM by agelbert »
Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Agelbert's Newz Channel
« Reply #9193 on: June 16, 2018, 12:36:29 PM »
I saw the post but have not yet read it. I'll take a look.

I tend not to get excited with new tech until somebody makes it real and I can buy it and use it. I've been disappointed many times by "breakthroughs" that turn out not to be practically usable when push comes to shove. All real breakthroughs are welcome. We could use several about now.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Agelbert's Newz Channel
« Reply #9194 on: June 16, 2018, 12:52:51 PM »
I am thinking about trying to accumulate some more PV panels. I have a better opportunity than I've ever had before. Mission Solar is still a going concern in San Antonio (I think they are, anyway), and they are selling cosmetic blems for less than .40/watt, and they have them for sale locally here in Austin. Panels up to 360W apiece.

Whomever the seller is, they have varying quantities. Looks like not too much available in this last ad. I get the impression from their ads over the last several months that it was the factory selling unsold inventory, and not some reseller. Don't know though.

Usually, when I find a great deal on panels, they're in CA. Shipping is costly and the freight drivers are careless with the goods. I know from prior experience.

https://images.craigslist.org/00D0D_3kAa9w0Gfa2_600x450.jpg

Actually, it's the fork truck drivers on the freight docks, and not the real freight drivers who cause the damage, as far I as could see. I hereby correct my error. You truck drivers take note.

« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 12:56:48 PM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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