AuthorTopic: Agelbert's Newz Channel  (Read 1544510 times)

Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: Agelbert's Newz Channel
« Reply #9210 on: June 16, 2018, 08:21:34 PM »
because of this statement from the guys building it:If too much power is applied to a conventional gear, it breaks but when excess power is applied to a magnetic gear, it simply slips with no mechanical damage. In essence, it acts like a clutch built into the transmission that can absorb spikes in the load applied without breaking.

Of course, but that would be for a force beyond the 4000 newton meter max. In a mechanical gear, you over torque it and it breaks, destroying the gears. Don't you think that is a mechanical gear disadvantive, compared to this magnetic gear?
hard to say until they publish something tangible. its biggest advantage would probably be not breaking when excess loads are applied just slipping. To compensate for the inability to slip a more robust mechanical gear would be deployed that could take the excess which means more weight. That is why I think vehicles or something that fluctuates wildly would be a good fit.  We will see
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Offline agelbert

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Cheers for David B. and Canadian Hydro!
« Reply #9211 on: June 16, 2018, 08:21:57 PM »
we are quite proud of this one. months to engineer and design, 4 years to get regulatory approval. The dam has been there since the 1940's but everything new has to  be gone over with a fine tooth comb... Small, local, green all my favourites Thought you might like it.

https://www.facebook.com/HaliburtonSolarandWind/videos/1725076830905653/



I don't have a facebook account. They cut me off with the log in screen. I have avoided face book like the plague, just like I have avoided getting a cell phone. I'm an old fuddy duddy with a land line.

I'll take your word that it is a nice facility. I must confess to you, however, that anything Halliburton does smells like greenwashing to me. Former Bush VP Cheney🦖 used to be their CEO and he was the one that got the Frackers to be exempt from the Clean Water act provisions, to the detriment of the biosphere in the USA. Maybe Halliburton is trying to improve their image. I don't trust those profit over planet fossil fuelers.
Well we are in Haliburton Ontario hence the name and the one"l" and no relation to the evil one's company. Here is a youtube link:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/1tgvfmO78gg&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/1tgvfmO78gg&fs=1</a>

OH! :-[  I STAND CORRECTED! WELL DONE!  🌟 🌟 🌟 

Green Mountain Power gets a lot of their juice from Canadian Hydro. Vermont is grateful to you Canadians for selling us clean hydro power.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 08:27:45 PM by agelbert »
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Offline agelbert

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Re: Agelbert's Newz Channel
« Reply #9212 on: June 16, 2018, 08:25:42 PM »
because of this statement from the guys building it:If too much power is applied to a conventional gear, it breaks but when excess power is applied to a magnetic gear, it simply slips with no mechanical damage. In essence, it acts like a clutch built into the transmission that can absorb spikes in the load applied without breaking.

Of course, but that would be for a force beyond the 4000 newton meter max. In a mechanical gear, you over torque it and it breaks, destroying the gears. Don't you think that is a mechanical gear disadvantive, compared to this magnetic gear?
hard to say until they publish something tangible. its biggest advantage would probably be not breaking when excess loads are applied just slipping. To compensate for the inability to slip a more robust mechanical gear would be deployed that could take the excess which means more weight. That is why I think vehicles or something that fluctuates wildly would be a good fit.  We will see

Agreed. I'll be watching ABB Corporation to see what they publish on this.  🕵️
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Offline jdwheeler42

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Nevertheless, I can see where a slow rotating giant transmission can make use of magnetic gears effectively, thereby saving millions of dollars in lubricant, while prolonging the life of the transmission itself simply because the "gears" never wear out.
"Never" is a verry long time... magnets actually do wear out eventually, unless they are kept at absolute zero.  The hotter they get, the quicker they demagnetize.  Raise a magnet to its melting point and it will demagnetize instantly, unless it is already in a strong enough magnetic field.

But, for a wind turbine whose lifespan is measured in decades, this should be negligible... as long as there are no volcanoes erupting nearby ;-)
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Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: Agelbert's Newz Channel
« Reply #9214 on: June 16, 2018, 08:46:46 PM »
well texas a and m better hurry up this one is already patented and undergoing testing.
https://www.engineering.com/ElectronicsDesign/ElectronicsDesignArticles/ArticleID/6466/Shifting-Gears-on-Wind-Turbines.aspx
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Offline agelbert

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Re: Agelbert's Newz Channel
« Reply #9215 on: June 17, 2018, 10:31:35 AM »
well texas a and m better hurry up this one is already patented and undergoing testing.
https://www.engineering.com/ElectronicsDesign/ElectronicsDesignArticles/ArticleID/6466/Shifting-Gears-on-Wind-Turbines.aspx


Interesting!  8) he race is ON!  ;D
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Offline agelbert

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Nevertheless, I can see where a slow rotating giant transmission can make use of magnetic gears effectively, thereby saving millions of dollars in lubricant, while prolonging the life of the transmission itself simply because the "gears" never wear out.
"Never" is a verry long time... magnets actually do wear out eventually, unless they are kept at absolute zero.  The hotter they get, the quicker they demagnetize.  Raise a magnet to its melting point and it will demagnetize instantly, unless it is already in a strong enough magnetic field.

But, for a wind turbine whose lifespan is measured in decades, this should be negligible... as long as there are no volcanoes erupting nearby ;-)


Agreed about the wind turbines. The big plus there is that their efficiency goes up several percentage points because they no longer suffer from transmission gear friction losses. The fossil fuelers will not like that. 

As to magnetic gears wearing out, Yes and no. An increase in heat, as you stated, debilitates a magnetic field, but as long as the heat is not above a certain threshold (far above ablosute zero), the field strength recovers completely, for most practical purposes, when the temperature goes back to normal operating temperature. Yes, there is SOME degradation if the temerature is not above absolute zero, but the rate of degradation is insignificitant compared to mechanical gear degradation from friction.

True, very high heat disrupts the molecular alignment that gives a a magnet its gauss strengh, hence your view view that they "wear out". In the factory process making a magnet, as you know, a strong magnetic field is placed over a molten piece of potentially magnetic material and allowed to cool, producing a "permanent" magnet.

In truth. magnets do not "wear out", ever, if you are using electromagnetism. I understand your assumption about "wear" with these magnetic gears may be based on them being permanent magnets that overheat and lose effectiveness over time, but that is not relevant to the comparison with mechanical gear wear. A mechanical gear wears, as you know, because of friction. There is zero friction with magnetic gears. That is the BIG DEAL that can change he entrie paradigm of the efficiency calculations, and therefore minimum energy requirements, to run our civilization. With magnetic gears, you eliminate a HUGE loss of efficiency now present in every single machine that hitherto used mechanical gears.   

The rate of wear of mechanical gears is orders of magnitude above the "wear" from normal magnetic heat caused degradation.

Here's a screenshot from one of the videos by Amory Lovins on the inefficiencies of our civilization. As you can see mechanical transmission (i.e. friction losses from mechanical gears) are a big drag on efficiency. We get rid of that and it's a whole new LOWER energy required ball game. 💫    



« Last Edit: June 17, 2018, 11:56:34 AM by agelbert »
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Offline agelbert

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Hat Tip to David B. for pointing me to this EXCELLENT article. 👀
« Reply #9217 on: June 17, 2018, 11:21:13 AM »
Agelbert NOTE: This article is 5 years old, but worth your attention. Perhaps it has not gained much attention, simply because the units are not for huge wind turbines that get all the news. Nevertheless, they are doing a great service for smaller installations like homes and farms (see video at the end of this article and 2017 press releasee).

Shifting Gears on Wind Turbines

Tom Lombardo posted on October 13, 2013 | 2 Comments | 16387 views

To gear or not to gear?

Most wind turbines have gearbox transmissions that connect the slowly spinning turbine with the speed-hungry generator. But gearboxes have disadvantages: they’re noisy, complex, and prone to failure. Gearboxes need regular maintenance and lubrication, increasing their total cost of ownership. Some manufacturers have opted for gearless direct-drive turbines, but there’s a trade-off: because the shaft spins slowly, they require much larger permanent-magnet generators, increasing the weight and initial cost of the turbines. A new technology may capture the best of both designs.

Windtech has partnered with Future Force LLC to build a turbine based on the Zero Contact TransmissionTM (ZCT) patented by Future Force. The technology uses a transmission of sorts, but instead of mechanical gears, belts, or chains, the ZCT uses neodymium permanent magnets to make the generator in the turbine spin five times faster than the rotor. Lab tests conducted at the University of St. Thomas (Minnesota) have shown the ZCT to be 98% efficient at transferring energy from its input to its output.


As shown above, the rotor drives the main shaft, which is magnetically coupled (via the ZCT) to five independent generators, each spinning five times faster than the rotor. (The picture only shows four generators, but their documentation says five. There must be one in the middle.) This provides  redundancy; the turbine could withstand the failure of one or two generators and still produce some power. The turbine is capable of generating substantial energy at low wind speeds; its peak power occurs when the wind speed is 8.1 m/s (18 mph), where comparable turbines require speeds in excess of 12 m/s (27 mph) to achieve peak output. Its startup speed is a meager 2.2 m/s (5.0 mph). It’s designed for locations with average wind speeds of 4 m/s (8.8 mph), which makes wind power viable in 50% more places.


Windtech is currently testing a prototype of its 100E 10 kW turbine (pictured below) in Glencoe MN. They plan to sell the 100E at a price that’s competitive with other units of similar size, making it more likely that customers will take this turbine out for a spin.



https://www.engineering.com/ElectronicsDesign/ElectronicsDesignArticles/ArticleID/6466/Shifting-Gears-on-Wind-Turbines.aspx

Agelbert NOTE:  The following video shows WINDTECH 8 KW VAWT AND 14 KW HAWT WIND TURBINE for small sites and homes ( 📢 Eddie, check this out!) and the BREAK THROUGH TECHNOLOGY of their patented Zero Contact Transmission (ZCT), a unique system that eliminates contact friction
 
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/xy_Mgblb7Cw" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/xy_Mgblb7Cw</a>



Zero-Contact Transmission logs 15,000 hours of operation 👀   

June 19, 2017

Future Force Zero Contact Transmission (ZCT) hits 15,000 hour milestone. The ZCT designed and built for WindTech, Inc. just surpassed 15,000 hours of operation with NO lubrication.   

The ZCT utilizes magnetic propulsion so there is no friction or need for lubricants. Mike Tkadlec, founder of Future Force and inventor of the Zero Contact Transmission said, “to deploy a ZCT in a wind turbine is perfect for proving the viability of a high torque magnetic propulsion transmission which operates at 35% greater efficiency than a standard oil-encased gearbox. This is a major breakthrough in advancing to the next size ZCT for mW generators without lubrication.”

Future Force, LLC is a privately-owned company offering licensing to it’s patented magnetic propulsion technologies. More information can be found at www.futureforcellc.com

http://futureforcellc.com/futureforce/2017/06/19/zero-contact-transmission-logs-15000-hours-operation/
« Last Edit: June 17, 2018, 11:32:56 AM by agelbert »
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Offline Eddie

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Re: Agelbert's Newz Channel
« Reply #9218 on: June 17, 2018, 12:00:11 PM »
I have the two turbines I bought from Mike after I took my turbine building course. I built one like my little one, and I helped build one like my bigger one, but I had Mike build the ones I bought. Experience is worth something. His simple designs have been proven. Nothing fancy, but plenty of them in service.

For wind, its a relatively easy job to build a turbine from commonly available stuff, if you can get magnets. I went for simple rather than high efficiency.

Sourcing and erecting a tower is a much bigger job, imho, than building a turbine. And with 9mph wind, it's more of a novelty here. But on some days in winter it would no doubt be nice to have a turbine spinning, even here. I have not ever gotten a tower up. Expensive, complicated job, usually requiring a crane. I've been shopping for a good tower deal forever.

I have a low wind Mallard LW built from a repurposed Delco car alternator, and a bigger Mallard SP80.



http://www.mikeswindmillshop.com/product/low-wind-mallard-lw
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Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: Agelbert's Newz Channel
« Reply #9219 on: June 17, 2018, 12:09:15 PM »
I have the two turbines I bought from Mike after I took my turbine building course. I built one like my little one, and I helped build one like my bigger one, but I had Mike build the ones I bought. Experience is worth something. His simple designs have been proven. Nothing fancy, but plenty of them in service.

For wind, its a relatively easy job to build a turbine from commonly available stuff, if you can get magnets. I went for simple rather than high efficiency.

Sourcing and erecting a tower is a much bigger job, imho, than building a turbine. And with 9mph wind, it's more of a novelty here. But on some days in winter it would no doubt be nice to have a turbine spinning, even here. I have not ever gotten a tower up. Expensive, complicated job, usually requiring a crane. I've been shopping for a good tower deal forever.

I have a low wind Mallard LW built from a repurposed Delco car alternator, and a bigger Mallard SP80.



http://www.mikeswindmillshop.com/product/low-wind-mallard-lw
Nice! micro wind has been mostly destroyed by low cost solar. as mentioned the tower costs and maintenance make them non competitive except on the best wind sites. I have hugh piggott's book and wanted to build one. With the access I have now id just buy one.
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Offline agelbert

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New Nissan LEAF Is Sold Every 10 Minutes In Europe

June 16th, 2018 by Zachary Shahan

2018 Nissan Leaf 🍃 🌟


The new Nissan LEAF doesn’t get a ton of attention or love. It was born in the shadow of the Tesla Model 3, and that’s a big shadow. But it’s a few leaps above the original LEAF, and that model is still the most common plug-in car on the planet as far as I’ve seen.

But the relative lack of hype and PR doesn’t mean the new LEAF isn’t selling. In fact, in Europe, there were more than 37,000 orders in 8 months. Nissan recently highlighted that there’s “one new Nissan LEAF car sold every 10 minutes across Europe.” Furthermore, the 100,000th European Nissan LEAF found its home a couple of weeks ago.

“Globally, over 320,000 Nissan LEAFs have been sold, making it the most sold EV in the world.” That’s impressive, but could the LEAF see that many more in a few years with the 2018 LEAF, 2019 LEAF, and 2020 LEAF? Could the company average 4,000 a month in Europe and another 4,000 a month in the rest of the world? That seems do-able. Could the LEAF average 10,000 sales a month globally, leading to 360,000 sales in 3 years?

I did ask Nissan about its expectations for European, US, and global sales. I’ll update this article when I get a response.

Susana de Mena, of Madrid, the 100,000th buyer of a Nissan LEAF in Europe, said, “I’ve spent two years trying to find an electric car. I knew it would be a Nissan!


“When I saw there was a brand-new model of the LEAF, there were no doubts in my mind it would be the perfect fit. My husband and I agreed that the quality, price and specification made it second-to-none.

“We are very conscious that we must respect and protect the environment, so we knew we’d want to go 100% electric. On top of this, an electric car lets us get to the very centre of Madrid when ordinary vehicles can sometimes be restricted due to pollution issues.”

Of course, the LEAF benefits from the many, many advantages of electric cars. It also comes in at a more competitive price than most and the new LEAF has a respectable 150 miles (240 km) of range that shouldn’t have trouble getting the job done. It’s also on the top of the line with regards to Nissan tech.

The LEAF is the first European model to offer ProPILOT and ProPILOT Park technologies, which are akin to Tesla’s Autopilot suite of semi-autonomous driving support.

It also had e-Pedal, which appears to be the most advanced regenerative braking setup in a consumer car. With one-pedal driving being one of drivers’ favorite benefits of electric driving, it’s clear that Nissan got the note from early adopters, stepped it up a notch, and is eager to tell the world.

Much more than just a 100% electric vehicle, the LEAF is a whole new driving experience, designed to move people with greater exhilaration, confidence and connection to the world around them. The LEAF is the embodiment of Nissan Intelligent Mobility, helping to pioneer a future which brings together intelligent power, intelligent drive and intelligent integration.”

Gareth Dunsmore, Electric Vehicle Director, Nissan Europe, explained, “For us it’s no surprise that the Nissan LEAF is the world’s best-selling electric vehicle. We have been developing our electric vehicle mass-market offering for longer than any other brand and are proud to bring an affordable, visionary car to customers across Europe. In less than 10 years, we managed to make electric vehicle a mass market reality. This milestone proves once again that our Nissan Intelligent Mobility vision is embraced by our customers who believe in a more confident, more exciting, and more connected future.” Well, what do you expect to hear from Nissan’s top EV guy — self-criticism?

“European Nissan LEAF customers have now driven over 2 billion kilometres and saved over 300,000 tonnes of CO2,” Nissan adds. “They also boast a 92% customer satisfaction rate – more than any other Nissan model.”


Well, she looks happy already. 

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/06/16/new-nissan-leaf-is-sold-every-10-minutes-in-europe/
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Offline agelbert

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Re: Agelbert's Newz Channel
« Reply #9221 on: June 17, 2018, 12:24:37 PM »
I have the two turbines I bought from Mike after I took my turbine building course. I built one like my little one, and I helped build one like my bigger one, but I had Mike build the ones I bought. Experience is worth something. His simple designs have been proven. Nothing fancy, but plenty of them in service.

For wind, its a relatively easy job to build a turbine from commonly available stuff, if you can get magnets. I went for simple rather than high efficiency.

Sourcing and erecting a tower is a much bigger job, imho, than building a turbine. And with 9mph wind, it's more of a novelty here. But on some days in winter it would no doubt be nice to have a turbine spinning, even here. I have not ever gotten a tower up. Expensive, complicated job, usually requiring a crane. I've been shopping for a good tower deal forever.

I have a low wind Mallard LW built from a repurposed Delco car alternator, and a bigger Mallard SP80.



http://www.mikeswindmillshop.com/product/low-wind-mallard-lw


Nice! micro wind has been mostly destroyed by low cost solar. as mentioned the tower costs and maintenance make them non competitive except on the best wind sites. ...

True. As you said, the advantage a wind turbine could have over photovoltaic is strictly in places where there is a lot of pretty constant wind, particularly at night, I might add. 


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New Nissan LEAF Is Sold Every 10 Minutes In Europe

June 16th, 2018 by Zachary Shahan

2018 Nissan Leaf 🍃 🌟


The new Nissan LEAF doesn’t get a ton of attention or love. It was born in the shadow of the Tesla Model 3, and that’s a big shadow. But it’s a few leaps above the original LEAF, and that model is still the most common plug-in car on the planet as far as I’ve seen.

But the relative lack of hype and PR doesn’t mean the new LEAF isn’t selling. In fact, in Europe, there were more than 37,000 orders in 8 months. Nissan recently highlighted that there’s “one new Nissan LEAF car sold every 10 minutes across Europe.” Furthermore, the 100,000th European Nissan LEAF found its home a couple of weeks ago.

“Globally, over 320,000 Nissan LEAFs have been sold, making it the most sold EV in the world.” That’s impressive, but could the LEAF see that many more in a few years with the 2018 LEAF, 2019 LEAF, and 2020 LEAF? Could the company average 4,000 a month in Europe and another 4,000 a month in the rest of the world? That seems do-able. Could the LEAF average 10,000 sales a month globally, leading to 360,000 sales in 3 years?

I did ask Nissan about its expectations for European, US, and global sales. I’ll update this article when I get a response.

Susana de Mena, of Madrid, the 100,000th buyer of a Nissan LEAF in Europe, said, “I’ve spent two years trying to find an electric car. I knew it would be a Nissan!


“When I saw there was a brand-new model of the LEAF, there were no doubts in my mind it would be the perfect fit. My husband and I agreed that the quality, price and specification made it second-to-none.

“We are very conscious that we must respect and protect the environment, so we knew we’d want to go 100% electric. On top of this, an electric car lets us get to the very centre of Madrid when ordinary vehicles can sometimes be restricted due to pollution issues.”

Of course, the LEAF benefits from the many, many advantages of electric cars. It also comes in at a more competitive price than most and the new LEAF has a respectable 150 miles (240 km) of range that shouldn’t have trouble getting the job done. It’s also on the top of the line with regards to Nissan tech.

The LEAF is the first European model to offer ProPILOT and ProPILOT Park technologies, which are akin to Tesla’s Autopilot suite of semi-autonomous driving support.

It also had e-Pedal, which appears to be the most advanced regenerative braking setup in a consumer car. With one-pedal driving being one of drivers’ favorite benefits of electric driving, it’s clear that Nissan got the note from early adopters, stepped it up a notch, and is eager to tell the world.

Much more than just a 100% electric vehicle, the LEAF is a whole new driving experience, designed to move people with greater exhilaration, confidence and connection to the world around them. The LEAF is the embodiment of Nissan Intelligent Mobility, helping to pioneer a future which brings together intelligent power, intelligent drive and intelligent integration.”

Gareth Dunsmore, Electric Vehicle Director, Nissan Europe, explained, “For us it’s no surprise that the Nissan LEAF is the world’s best-selling electric vehicle. We have been developing our electric vehicle mass-market offering for longer than any other brand and are proud to bring an affordable, visionary car to customers across Europe. In less than 10 years, we managed to make electric vehicle a mass market reality. This milestone proves once again that our Nissan Intelligent Mobility vision is embraced by our customers who believe in a more confident, more exciting, and more connected future.” Well, what do you expect to hear from Nissan’s top EV guy — self-criticism?

“European Nissan LEAF customers have now driven over 2 billion kilometres and saved over 300,000 tonnes of CO2,” Nissan adds. “They also boast a 92% customer satisfaction rate – more than any other Nissan model.”


Well, she looks happy already. 

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/06/16/new-nissan-leaf-is-sold-every-10-minutes-in-europe/
yup the leaf and the bolt are both eating tesla's lunch. Add on the Volt and BMW's entry the market is growing fast. We have a client who has a bolt and absolutely loves it. We installed a 20 amp plug that runs off their solar and a 40 amp plug off the grid (they are grid zero so they can't sell back. When its sunny they use the auxiliary charger off solar when they plan a road trip they use the grid the night before. So far they have used the grid twice in 3 months. I'm quite proud of that one it was my work around for solar car charging off grid.
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline agelbert

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Re: Yup the Leaf and the Bolt are both eating Tesla's lunch.
« Reply #9223 on: June 17, 2018, 12:49:25 PM »
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New Nissan LEAF Is Sold Every 10 Minutes In Europe

June 16th, 2018 by Zachary Shahan

2018 Nissan Leaf 🍃 🌟


The new Nissan LEAF doesn’t get a ton of attention or love. It was born in the shadow of the Tesla Model 3, and that’s a big shadow. But it’s a few leaps above the original LEAF, and that model is still the most common plug-in car on the planet as far as I’ve seen.

But the relative lack of hype and PR doesn’t mean the new LEAF isn’t selling. In fact, in Europe, there were more than 37,000 orders in 8 months. Nissan recently highlighted that there’s “one new Nissan LEAF car sold every 10 minutes across Europe.” Furthermore, the 100,000th European Nissan LEAF found its home a couple of weeks ago.

“Globally, over 320,000 Nissan LEAFs have been sold, making it the most sold EV in the world.” That’s impressive, but could the LEAF see that many more in a few years with the 2018 LEAF, 2019 LEAF, and 2020 LEAF? Could the company average 4,000 a month in Europe and another 4,000 a month in the rest of the world? That seems do-able. Could the LEAF average 10,000 sales a month globally, leading to 360,000 sales in 3 years?

I did ask Nissan about its expectations for European, US, and global sales. I’ll update this article when I get a response.

Susana de Mena, of Madrid, the 100,000th buyer of a Nissan LEAF in Europe, said, “I’ve spent two years trying to find an electric car. I knew it would be a Nissan!


“When I saw there was a brand-new model of the LEAF, there were no doubts in my mind it would be the perfect fit. My husband and I agreed that the quality, price and specification made it second-to-none.

“We are very conscious that we must respect and protect the environment, so we knew we’d want to go 100% electric. On top of this, an electric car lets us get to the very centre of Madrid when ordinary vehicles can sometimes be restricted due to pollution issues.”

Of course, the LEAF benefits from the many, many advantages of electric cars. It also comes in at a more competitive price than most and the new LEAF has a respectable 150 miles (240 km) of range that shouldn’t have trouble getting the job done. It’s also on the top of the line with regards to Nissan tech.

The LEAF is the first European model to offer ProPILOT and ProPILOT Park technologies, which are akin to Tesla’s Autopilot suite of semi-autonomous driving support.

It also had e-Pedal, which appears to be the most advanced regenerative braking setup in a consumer car. With one-pedal driving being one of drivers’ favorite benefits of electric driving, it’s clear that Nissan got the note from early adopters, stepped it up a notch, and is eager to tell the world.

Much more than just a 100% electric vehicle, the LEAF is a whole new driving experience, designed to move people with greater exhilaration, confidence and connection to the world around them. The LEAF is the embodiment of Nissan Intelligent Mobility, helping to pioneer a future which brings together intelligent power, intelligent drive and intelligent integration.”

Gareth Dunsmore, Electric Vehicle Director, Nissan Europe, explained, “For us it’s no surprise that the Nissan LEAF is the world’s best-selling electric vehicle. We have been developing our electric vehicle mass-market offering for longer than any other brand and are proud to bring an affordable, visionary car to customers across Europe. In less than 10 years, we managed to make electric vehicle a mass market reality. This milestone proves once again that our Nissan Intelligent Mobility vision is embraced by our customers who believe in a more confident, more exciting, and more connected future.” Well, what do you expect to hear from Nissan’s top EV guy — self-criticism?

“European Nissan LEAF customers have now driven over 2 billion kilometres and saved over 300,000 tonnes of CO2,” Nissan adds. “They also boast a 92% customer satisfaction rate – more than any other Nissan model.”


Well, she looks happy already. 

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/06/16/new-nissan-leaf-is-sold-every-10-minutes-in-europe/
yup the leaf and the bolt are both eating tesla's lunch. Add on the Volt and BMW's entry the market is growing fast. We have a client who has a bolt and absolutely loves it. We installed a 20 amp plug that runs off their solar and a 40 amp plug off the grid (they are grid zero so they can't sell back. When its sunny they use the auxiliary charger off solar when they plan a road trip they use the grid the night before. So far they have used the grid twice in 3 months. I'm quite proud of that one it was my work around for solar car charging off grid.


Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Agelbert's Newz Channel
« Reply #9224 on: June 17, 2018, 01:00:13 PM »
I have the two turbines I bought from Mike after I took my turbine building course. I built one like my little one, and I helped build one like my bigger one, but I had Mike build the ones I bought. Experience is worth something. His simple designs have been proven. Nothing fancy, but plenty of them in service.

For wind, its a relatively easy job to build a turbine from commonly available stuff, if you can get magnets. I went for simple rather than high efficiency.

Sourcing and erecting a tower is a much bigger job, imho, than building a turbine. And with 9mph wind, it's more of a novelty here. But on some days in winter it would no doubt be nice to have a turbine spinning, even here. I have not ever gotten a tower up. Expensive, complicated job, usually requiring a crane. I've been shopping for a good tower deal forever.

I have a low wind Mallard LW built from a repurposed Delco car alternator, and a bigger Mallard SP80.



http://www.mikeswindmillshop.com/product/low-wind-mallard-lw


Nice! micro wind has been mostly destroyed by low cost solar. as mentioned the tower costs and maintenance make them non competitive except on the best wind sites. ...

True. As you said, the advantage a wind turbine could have over photovoltaic is strictly in places where there is a lot of pretty constant wind, particularly at night, I might add.

Great for boats.  Boat mounted turbines max out their performance when you're actually under sail, so its a little different than a land based turbine.

Wind generators really produce power when sailing on a reach. The wind coming off the main sail gets directed back to the wind generator at a higher wind speed causing the wind generator to produce power.

The coast here is windy enough to make them work at anchorage, but that isn't a given everywhere.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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