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Offline agelbert

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BREAKING: Tesla Passes Daimler In Market Cap .... 😀
« Reply #9465 on: December 05, 2018, 10:01:00 AM »
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BREAKING: Tesla Passes Daimler In Market Cap — Volkswagen Next?

December 4th, 2018 by Zachary Shahan

Another one bites the dust.  

Some people don’t understand it. How can a little upstart like Tesla be worth more than almost every other automaker in the world? Of course, being that I have an outsized investment in Tesla [TSLA] compared to other stocks, I have a fairly strong opinion on this topic. In summary, I would say that all is right in the world of auto stocks, so I’ll try to explain how this makes sense.

First of all, though, the important thing to remember is that people managing hundreds of billions of dollars have determined that auto company valuations should be where they are right now. The Tesla stock price does not rise and fall primarily on the mood of a few hundred fickle retail investors. The bulk of the stock is owned by gigantic institutional investors. In other words, the misleading narrative that the Tesla stock price is high because of näive, young, Kool Aid–drinking retail investors should be thrown in the trash.

Update: German automaker market caps above were off initially and have been corrected. Also, Toyota’s market cap is far higher than any of the other automaker’s, but it is not included here.

Another thing to consider is that it’s 2018, not 1918. Car companies aren’t just car companies. Conventional car companies have large engine factories on the books, and gasoline/diesel engines are on the way out.

Batteries are key to the electric ⚡ future, and it seems that Tesla is far in the lead with significant, fruitful investments in battery factories, useful IP, and overall battery expertise.

Software is also key to the future of cars, and Tesla again appears to have a leadership position (a big one) when it comes to sophisticated vehicle software.

Every carmaker has its hands in our ride-hailing, carsharing future — which eventually means robotaxis. Some people think GM has the most promise in this regard , some think it’s Volkswagen 🤔, but many certainly think it’s Tesla. That is a gigantic market and the leaders will be making a few fortunes, which means they’ll be worth a few fortunes. Uber was worth $72 billion in February and an IPO might put it at $120 billion. Supposedly, Tesla’s potential “Network” for self-driving carsharing isn’t valued by most Wall Street 😈 analysts. If it really isn’t included much in Tesla’s market cap, there’s plenty of room for further growth in the coming years. If it is included a bit in valuations, that further helps to explain why Tesla is already above Daimler, BMW, GM, Ford, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, Honda, Nissan, Renault, Hyunda, Kia, and others in market cap.

One more thing to consider briefly is that Tesla is hot, hot, hot among young people. Kids love Tesla, teenagers love Tesla, and young adults love Tesla. This brand strength among future car buyers will be powerful starting in 5–10 years. Stay tuned for that. 🧐

Back to today, the market valuations of Tesla, Daimler, and a few other top players at the close of market today were (in billions):

Tesla — $63.18

Daimler — $62.89

BMW — $55.03

Ford — $37.25

GM — $52.22

FCA — $26.76

Volkswagen — $82.44

Toyota — $171.1


Related: World’s 10 Biggest Automakers & Their EV Plans

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/10/29/worlds-10-biggest-automakers-their-ev-plans/
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Rock and Roll at Wall Street!
« Reply #9466 on: December 06, 2018, 08:11:49 AM »
THIS was two days ago (the markets were closed yesterday).


THIS is the  way it is going, so far, TODAY:




The (PROTECT THE CAPITALIST ELITE CROOKS) Plunge Protection Team springs in to save the "free" market from REALITY.


Ain't Dat CAPITALISM just wonerful?  ;)
« Last Edit: December 06, 2018, 04:48:28 PM by agelbert »
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Should We Cheer? ExxonMobil’s Renewable Energy Commitments Are In The News
« Reply #9467 on: December 06, 2018, 08:56:31 AM »
Should We Cheer? ExxonMobil’s Renewable Energy Commitments Are In The News

December 6th, 2018 by Carolyn Fortuna

EXCELLENT article! In addition to to exposing what these fossil fuelers are up to now, it covers ALL the crooked=CAPITALIST Profit Over People and Planet Bases of the ExxonMobil mens rea modus operandi for the past SEVERAL DECADES:
https://cleantechnica.com/2018/12/06/should-we-cheer-exxonmobils-renewable-energy-commitments-are-in-the-news/


Agelbert NOTE: Should we cheer?

The only upside to this use of Renewable Energy by the Hydrocarbon 🦕🦖 Hellspawn is that their argument, for the last century or so, that "Fossil Fuel sourced Energy is cheaper than Renewable Energy" is (and always was, by the way, but they did not admit it), KAPUT. 
« Last Edit: December 06, 2018, 09:11:50 AM by agelbert »
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Bernie Sanders: Concentrated Wealth is Concentrated Power
« Reply #9468 on: December 06, 2018, 09:50:10 AM »
Bernie Sanders: Concentrated Wealth is Concentrated Power

December 6, 2018

Sen. Sanders joins Paul Jay who asks if breaking up the big banks is enough to weaken the power of Wall St.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/VDsYvEskpWA&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/VDsYvEskpWA&fs=1</a>

Story Transcript

PAUL JAY: Welcome back to The Real News Network. I’m Paul Jay. We’re in Burlington, Vermont at the Sanders Institute Gathering. And once again, we’re joined by Senator Bernie Sanders. Thanks for joining us.

BERNIE SANDERS: My pleasure.

PAUL JAY: In one of the panels yesterday you said it’s not just about concentration of wealth and how the inequality, how unfair that is, the suffering it causes. But concentration of wealth means concentration of power. How do you challenge that power?

BERNIE SANDERS: This is not easy stuff. But we are certainly not going to deal with it if we don’t discuss it. And one of the crises that we face right now is that you’ve got a media that will not talk about this issue. And you’ve got, essentially, two parties that don’t talk about it very much. And I think one of the things that I wanted to do in my presidential campaign is kind of bust this whole thing open. Let’s talk about the real issues. You know, whether CBS likes it or not.

So what you have here is, first of all, massive income and wealth inequality. And as a nation we have got to think from a moral perspective and an economic perspective whether we think it is appropriate that three people, one, two, three, own more wealth than the bottom half of the American society. You know, that’s really quite outrageous, and it’s appropriate that we take a hard look at that. But it is not just that the one tenth of 1 percent owns more wealth than the bottom 90 percent. They don’t put their wealth underneath their mattresses, right. They use that wealth to perpetrate, perpetuate their power. And they do that politically. So you have the Koch brothers 🦕🦖 and a handful of billionaires 😈👹💵🎩 who pour hundreds of millions of dollars into elections, because their Supreme Court
 
gutted the campaign finance laws that were in existence, and now allow billionaires quite openly to buy elections.
 

So wealth equals power, politically. Wealth means that if I own a company in the United States, I own a GE plant, where there may be hundreds or thousands of workers, and that plant may be making money, but not as much money as it could make if I took it to China or to Mexico, I have the power to do that. Because politicians are not going to stop me. Because we have disastrous trade laws. If I am a billionaire, it is likely that I will have control over media, as well. So you have a handful of media conglomerates owned by some of the wealthiest people in this country and in the world determining what the news is; what is appropriate for the American people to discuss and not to discuss.

Now what–my wife Jane, she put this thing together, I’m a guest here. But what she understood is that when we deal with climate change, when we deal with the economy, when we deal with housing, when we deal with criminal justice or immigration issues, we have got to deal with those in a holistic way, and understand why all of that is happening. Not see them as separate issues. And a lot of that has to do that we live in a nation owned and controlled by a small number of multi-billionaires whose greed, incredible greed, insatiable greed, is having an unbelievably negative impact on the fabric of our entire country.

PAUL JAY: The process of financialization that’s taken place over the whole 20th century, especially since World War II, where finance, Wall Street is so dominant in the economy. And this concentration of ownership and concentration of power is, nowhere is that more important than in the financial sector, because it permeates everything.

BERNIE SANDERS: Yes.

PAUL JAY: But every attempt to regulate finance has been without much success at best, and currently whatever there was is being dismantled. Doesn’t there needs to also be a building up of the public sector, starting with banking? Some kind of public banking? Because you can’t really reform these guys, because they all-

BERNIE SANDERS: I don’t know that you can’t reform them. And I think your point is, though, very well taken. What we need–look, let’s be clear. You have … I will never forget, Lloyd Blankfein, the head of Goldman Sachs, came to Congress a few years ago. And this is after the taxpayers of this country bailed them out because of their greed and their illegal behavior. This is chutzpah. These guys, after being bailed out by the middle class and working families of this country, after causing incalculable harm, which–the Wall Street crash cost us millions of jobs, people lost their homes, they lost their life savings. These guys, after getting bailed out, they come to Congress. They say, you know, what we think Congress should do is you gotta cut Social Security, and Medicare, and Medicaid. And by the way, lower corporate tax rates and give more tax breaks to the wealthy. That’s power. That’s chutzpah. We have it all, we can do whatever we want to do. And I think the power of Wall Street.–you’ve got a half a dozen banks that own over 50 percent, equivalent to 50 percent of the assets in our GDP. And we have got to stand up to them.

Now, your point is, OK, while we try to do that, are there other alternative models? And right here in the state of Vermont I am a strong advocate of a state bank, for example, where we can use the tax revenue that comes in for the public good, to help us create jobs, deal with agriculture, deal with the environment and climate change, and so forth.

PAUL JAY: Because the blackmail that happened in ’07-’08, too big to fail, and too big to go to jail. And-

BERNIE SANDERS: That’s right. And we have–but I don’t want to give up that fight. We have legislation in that is so–commonsense legislation, that when you have a handful of banks that have such incredible control over our economy that when they agreed destroys the economy they have to be bailed out because they’re too big to fail. But it also gives them unbelievable political power. You gotta break them up. And we have legislation in there that would break up the largest banks and financial institutions in this country. And that’s what we should do.

PAUL JAY: But aren’t you concerned that, like when the telecoms were broken up, they reassemble. The capital behind the big banks are still there. And I’m not suggesting breaking up the big banks isn’t a good thing. But don’t you need a public bank at a scale that next time there’s, there’s this blackmail, you can say, you know, go speculate. If you go down, you go down.

BERNIE SANDERS: I’m not arguing with you, I agree with you. And I think right here in Vermont right now there are a number of people in our legislature, and I support this effort, that want to see a public bank. Ironically enough, you know what the oldest state public bank in the country is?

PAUL JAY: North Dakota.

BERNIE SANDERS: North Dakota. They’ve had it, I think, since the ’20s. And it’s worked pretty well for them. You know, we’re trying to strengthen credit unions, as well. And since the Wall Street crash, by the way, I think credit unions have seen a lot more capital coming in and a lot more growth.

PAUL JAY: Just finally–I know you have to run. The primary in 2016 got quite bitter. We know that whoever, whoever released these emails, and all the rest–we know the DNC was manipulating things in favor of Hillary Clinton and against you. This fight heading into 2020, whether you’re the candidate or there is a candidate that’s on the Sanders-esque kind of platform … This fight in the Democratic Party is not, in my opinion, just a difference of opinion how to get to the same place, which is sometimes framed that way. There’s a real struggle of interest here. The fight against the oligarchy–well, there’s an oligarchy in the Democratic Party. And there’s a fight there. How do you see this campaign unfolding?

BERNIE SANDERS: I’m proud that out of our campaign, I think, we have seen a significant increase–not just out of our campaign–but a great deal of grassroots activism all across this country. This new incoming freshman class in the Congress is not only going to be the most progressive freshman class in a very long time, but the most diverse. More women, more people of color, et cetera. Also, I think what is happening in this country is that to a significant degree we are winning the ideological struggle. Three years ago, as you recall, Medicare for All was seen to be a radical, fringe idea. Last polls that I saw, 70 percent of the American people support Medicare for All. And more and more Democrats are coming on board. Raising the minimum wage, 15 bucks an hour. Radical idea a few years ago; kind of mainstream today. Rebuilding our crumbling infrastructure, making public colleges and universities tuition-free, dealing with student debt, dealing in an aggressive way with the unbelievably dangerous challenge of climate change. I think more and more people understand that. Criminal justice reform. Immigration reform.

So many of the ideas that we campaigned on have now gotten broad support throughout the country and within the Democratic Party. But as, I think, your point makes, look. There is an establishment within the Democratic Party. There are Wall Street contributors in the Democratic Party, corporate contributors in the Democratic Party. And they have a very different and more conservative vision for the future of the Democratic Party than I do. My vision is pretty simple. My vision is that we have got to have the guts to take on Wall Street, take on the pharmaceutical industry, take on the insurance industry, take on the 1 percent, create an economy that works for all. And while we do that, we bring our people, and that is black, and white, and Latino, and Native American, and Asian American together. I think that’s the way you do it. And we’re beginning, beginning, beginning to see that. We’re seeing great young candidates who didn’t wait on line for 20 years to get permission to run, but kind of jumped in and beat some long-term incumbents. They’re saying, hey, I come from the community. I know what’s going on in this community, and I’m going to fight for working people, and I’m not afraid to take on big money. We’re seeing that. We got to see more of that.

So a two-part approach. Number one, we need to fight for our agenda. We need to elect candidates from the grassroots who are going to, are going to implement that agenda.

PAUL JAY: All right, thanks very much for joining us.

BERNIE SANDERS: Thank you very much.

PAUL JAY: And thank you for joining us on The Real News Network.

https://therealnews.com/stories/bernie-sanders-concentrated-wealth-is-concentrated-power
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Offline agelbert

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results are clear: the ice sheet is now melting at rates unseen within at least
« Reply #9469 on: December 07, 2018, 06:26:12 AM »
Quote
The first continuous, multi-century study of surface melt from the Greenland ice sheet was published in Nature Wednesday, and the results are clear: the ice sheet is now melting at rates unseen within at least the last 350 years.

EcoWatch

Greenland Melting Is ‘Off the Charts’

By Olivia Rosane

Dec. 06, 2018 09:30AM EST

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/HuDd3AakXrw&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/HuDd3AakXrw&fs=1</a>

Article with above video:

https://www.ecowatch.com/greenland-melting-overdrive-2622570930.html

Agelbert NOTE: Trump 🦀 Adminstration CAPITALIST Hydrocarbon Hellspawn 🦕🦖 reaction to the above irrefutable, scientifically determined empirical evidence of Catastrophic Climate Change resulting from the burning of hydrocarbons for energy:

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Coal Is On The Way Out —Natural Gas Is Next
« Reply #9470 on: December 07, 2018, 06:30:11 AM »
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Coal Is On The Way Out — Natural Gas Is Next

December 3rd, 2018 by George Harvey

Shortly after reading Tina Casey’s CleanTechnica article, “New Report Outlines Investor Risk of Supporting Coal Power,” I found myself looking at the November edition of the EIA’s Monthly Energy Review. Of course, I found myself connecting the two.

As natural gas has taken market share from coal-powered electric generation, it has pushed emissions from coal down. But the EIA document shows that natural gas is emitting carbon dioxide at a record level, and, sadly, its own levels of emissions seem to be increasing faster than those of coal are dropping. As I looked at information on carbon dioxide emissions, I found myself wondering how long it will take for the natural gas industry to go into its own steep decline.

The answer to this question may be becoming clear, and rather quickly. There has been a series of developments in California that anyone interested should notice.

The underlying context is a general switch to renewable energy that has been going on there for many years. As wind and solar systems have been added to the system, prices for electricity from renewable systems have declined. They have pushed down wholesale power prices in the state, especially those of peak demand times, when prices have been highest.

As the cost of renewable power has declined, however, the cost of electricity from fossil fuel plants has held rather steady. As can be seen in Lazard’s Levelized Cost of Energy Analysis, Version 12.0[, the costs of renewably-sourced electricity have generally fallen so that they are often below those of coal-burning and gas-burning plants. And the fossil fuel plants have seen their profits disappear with more powerful competition.

Metcalf Energy Center (MEC) in California

Now we come to a specific example of unfolding events that is particularly revealing. In 2005, Calpine Corporation brought a new gas-burning combined-cycle plant online at the Metcalf Energy Center (MEC) in California. A brief history of the plant can be found at Wikipedia. As a combined-cycle plant, it was of the type that generally produces the least expensive power available from fossil fuels.

By 2017, the MEC was finding market conditions difficult. In June of that year, Calpine notified the California Independent System Operator that the plant would have to run on a reliability-must-run basis, or it would be shut down because it was losing money. Calpine🦕 wanted to keep the plant open and was requesting extra income, to be charged in the end to ratepayers. 😈 To do this, it would require a special license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, to be renewed annually.

In November of 2017, the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) authorized Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) to look for a less expensive source of electricity that could replace the MEC’s gas plant. Thereupon, PG&E made a procurement request for that electric power. And in the first weeks of last summer, PG&E announced that it had requested approval from the CPUC for a specific solution to reducing customer costs.

That solution included four battery systems, two of which would be much larger than the 100-MW / 127-MWh Hornsdale Power Reserve (HPR) in South Australia, currently the largest battery in the world. A posting of July 3 at Utility Dive said the total energy storage capacity of the project would be 2,270 MWh, almost eighteen times that of the HRP.

In November, the CPUC approved the battery system. It is expected to be the largest battery system in the world. 👀  An article at Commercial Property Executive details this.

While all of the four batteries are huge, the largest is just about mind-boggling all by itself. Vistra Energy is set to produce and own a battery of 300 MW / 1,200 MWh, three times the power capacity and nearly ten times the energy storage capacity of HPR. To this will be added a battery of 182.5 MW / 730 MWh, to be produced by Tesla but to be owned by PG&E. The smaller batteries are systems of 75 MW and 10 MW, whose specifications called for four hours of storage each.

What I find most interesting about this is not the record-setting sizes of the battery systems. It is that a relatively new fossil fuel plant, of a design that produces the least expensive electricity we can get from combustion, is being replaced by batteries, which do not generate electricity but just store it as it comes from the wind and sun. A gas plant is being put out of business by lithium-ion batteries, because the energy storage costs, combined with the cost of the electricity from solar and wind plants, are more attractive than the cost of the least expensive fossil fuels.  

The Utility Dive article cited above had a quote in it from Alex Eller, a senior energy research analyst at Navigant. He said, “Storage at this scale is likely now cheaper than the total cost to run the gas plants.” More natural gas plants may be coming online, but they look destined to be the next round of stranded assets.

We are not talking about some day in the future here. Renewables are pushing gas🦕 out already. 

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/12/03/coal-is-on-the-way-out-natural-gas-is-next/
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Climate Crisis Critical Issue in 2020 Elections – Jane Sanders

December 7, 2018

Jane Sanders tells Paul Jay that voters shouldn’t support candidates who claim to be progressive, but don’t prioritize the fight against fossil fuel interests

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/fSQjRZPl0Ak&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/fSQjRZPl0Ak&fs=1</a>

Story Transcript

PAUL JAY: Welcome to The Real News Network. I’m Paul Jay.

The Gathering, a meeting of 200 or so progressive thought leaders invited to Burlington, Vermont, was a meeting to talk about what comes next in the coming 2020 elections to help create a vision, a policy framework, for what candidates might run on, what people might fight for. It comes at a rather momentous time in human history, as I said in one of the other interviews; 2020 is maybe the most important election anyplace, ever, given what’s at stake. The Gathering was called by Jane O’Meara Sanders, who’s co-founder of the Sanders Institute; now serves as a fellow. Jane served as a political consultant, has held appointed and elected office, and Jane was the driving force behind the Gathering. And she now joins us here in our studio at the Gathering. Thanks for joining us.


JANE SANDERS: Thanks, Paul.

PAUL JAY: Your hopes going in—and I heard this a little bit in the email back and forth—is we don’t want to spend all this time trashing Trump. We really want to talk policy and what a different world might look like. How do you feel that was achieved?

JANE SANDERS: I was astounded. I mean, we had 49 speakers in 48 hours. And actually, I think a few added on during the weekend. It was thought provoking, inspiring, much better than I had ever envisioned. I had pretty high thoughts for this weekend. We came—you mentioned thought leaders. And what I realized by the end is they’re not just progressive thought leaders. They are bringing the heart to the, their hearts to the causes, to the issues that we talked about. They’re leading from values and principles, and then their intellect informs the rest. But the first layer is the values and the principles that we espouse, for democracy and for human dignity.

PAUL JAY: The times we live in are, as I said, this may be—the coming election may be the most important ever, to a large extent because of climate change. If a climate denier is elected again, or if a corporate Democrat is elected who pays lip service to the climate crisis and doesn’t take effective action, we’re kind of screwed. We’re already close to 1.5 or 2 degrees above—in terms of warming, above pre-industrial averages. The tipping point is really within sight. In terms of the messaging of the extent of the crisis and what to do about it, do you think that was addressed here?

JANE SANDERS: I think it was. I think that people walked away with the concept that, and with the realization, that time is running out. And what we need to do is not just ask people what to do or inform people about the issue.

One of the things that we need to do, and the reason for the Gathering, was to amplify each other’s voices, resonate on the issues. We need leadership that actually says, I’m sorry, this is a crisis. We need to address it now. Not next year, not the year after. It’s leadership at the local, the statewide, the national, the international level. Not just people who are elected, but people who want to make a difference in the world.

At the end of the climate crisis panel, Bill McKibben said that we need to have healthcare, Medicare for All, a $15 minimum wage, and 100% renewable. Those are not the only things. But the 100% renewable and the focus on the climate crisis has to be at the outset of anybody running for office. Where do you stand? Where do you stand? Not [crosstalk]

PAUL JAY: Absolutely. But I’m not hearing it. Even with progressive candidates it’s like, I have to say even to some extent Bernie, although he’s certainly better than any of the others that actually have a mainstream role. But the extent of the threat is not like—it’s got to be front and center. We’re often, it’s like a shopping list, healthcare, Medicare for all, $15, climate. Well, climate is, it doesn’t matter if you get $15 an hour if we ain’t here. There seems to be a feeling both amongst people that work on this issue in the climate sector, people involved in political campaigns, that if you talk about the extent of the crisis you’re just going to scare people. Well, shouldn’t we be scaring people?

JANE SANDERS: I think so. I think you’re absolutely right. And we have to start—I believe a lot of people have conferences, and that’s the end game. Let’s have a conference. This was a jumping off point. We want to have the conference inform future action. What I heard from the questions from the attendees, the hallway conversations was that we have to hold people accountable. It’s not from a perception of you have to vote for this or vote for that. What do you understand about the climate crisis? Where do you stand on it, what are you willing to do, and what are you not willing to do? Don’t talk to me about in sound bites, don’t talk to me to say climate crisis is really bad, but no, I’m not going to fight the pipelines in the states. I’m not going to not take fossil fuel industry money. I think with the climate crisis, I think more than anything else we have to draw a very clear line and say these are the expectations. If you don’t do this, I don’t care how progressive you are, supposedly, it’s not—we’re not interested.

PAUL JAY: It’s got to be a criteria people use on who they vote for. But to do that we’ve got to get into those sections amongst working people who right now, climate is barely on the top 20 of their list. We did some work in southern Pennsylvania, we’ve done work around Baltimore where we’re based. And without doubt, the day-to-day suffering is such that people, they want that addressed. This thing has to be framed in a way that it is today. It’s not some great future prospect. And it’s your kids at stake, your grandkids at stake. The messaging is not getting through much to ordinary people.

JANE SANDERS: Well, when you look at the floods and the torrential rains and the fires, there is no analysis of that on the news. They cover it like voyeurs to say, oh, look at this terrible thing that’s happening. These people are helping, this is good news. The community is coming together, great. But they don’t ever ask why. Why is this occurring? Cover the science. And that is not happening. They need to cover the science.

PAUL JAY: Every day.

JANE SANDERS: Yeah, every day. But they’re not, and we need to insist they do.

PAUL JAY: We’re going to be, we are. and we’re going to be every day doing science. Because what’s missing from the whole discourse for ordinary people, people coming in on the issue, is the sense of urgency. People that understand what’s going on, we feel a sense of urgency, but there’s still this feeling that you can’t tell people that because it’s going to overwhelm them. It’s like treating people like kids.

JANE SANDERS: Partly. But I also think that people don’t want to have—want to just focus on a problem without a solution. Many of the people that are speaking about it or looking for votes don’t want to deal with the solutions. I do think that we have an opportunity at this point in time to say, to lay out what this administration has been doing in terms of rolling back air and water and all this, and all these regulations, and to recognize the support they’re giving to the fossil fuel industry with our tax dollars and not to renewables, which would help us. But to be able to say there is an answer.

The House just turned, and we should be making it very clear to the Democrats that are in control of the House, are you going to do something? If you’re not going to do something, thank you very much, we’re not going to be supporting you. If we say to the people, this is what you can do, and this is what we expect of you as leaders in your community or as elected leaders, we need your voice out there, then we can make a change. I think people need to not just focus only on the climate crisis, because as you say, that’s what everybody is saying. Everybody is going to be very nervous about it and very concerned. They should be, but we have to give them a path forward. We have to say how are you going to be able to make this-

PAUL JAY: Well, one of the things that came out of the conference was the discussion of a new green deal, a Green New Deal, I should say, which seems to make a lot of sense. It makes a lot of sense when you already understand why we need a new green deal—Green New Deal. Most people don’t even get the urgency of that.

JANE SANDERS: I think the bully pulpit really matters. The people in that room, and hopefully the people that watched on livestream, and the people that watch the things we’ll be putting out in the future at the Sanders Institute, will understand more. And Real News. You’ve been talking to people this entire time to have the Real News be covering the science, covering the facts, and having people who are in a position to lead their communities to solution. That helps. Now, the problem is that so many of the solutions, or so many of the approaches, seem to be protesting only. That’s not what we—I mean, protests are very important. That’s not enough. What we need to do is demand accountability, demand that they don’t take money from pipeline, they don’t support banks that fund pipelines. We need to say to our representatives and to the media, we expect you to ask and answer serious questions that are complex and not just give us sound bites.

PAUL JAY: I got a suggestion for the Sanders Institute.

JANE SANDERS: Okay.

PAUL JAY: One of the things I learned over the weekend was how Barcelona has created a publicly owned energy company. It seems to me more of that kind of program, like here’s what, if you actually took over a city, major city in this country, here’s what a city can do, here’s what a state could do. Also in terms of Congress, I think there’s going to be a real fight over whether real hearings are going to be held over what to do about climate change or trash Trump. I have no problem with trashing Trump. But if the focus is on that it’s just more of the same rhetorical battle.

JANE SANDERS: I agree. I think, unfortunately, the Democrats have a great opportunity, and unfortunately I’m concerned that they are going to blow it and focus on investigations, investigations, investigations. People want them to pay attention to the real issues facing their lives. And what’s happening now, I know, I really want Medicare for All, I really want $15 minimum wage, we want a lot of things. And a lot of new ideas and replicable policies came out of this conference. In terms of the climate crisis, what we need to do is focus on it, and if they don’t deliver to the voters that put them in, I think that it’s over. I think it’s over for that party. I don’t, I think-

PAUL JAY: It’s over for us humans.


JANE SANDERS: Well, but no. Because I think if they don’t focus on real change, on effecting real change, especially in this area, I think that we will be able to lead from below.

PAUL JAY: The logic—I mean, other than the fact that a whole section of the Democratic Party is very tied up with finance and fossil fuel, but set that aside for a second. They accept the dictatorship of corporate media. What I mean by that is the corporate news media is making a fortune out of this partisan battle. Not only does it drive ratings, because it’s like watching a football game, then the parties spend a billion, over a billion dollars, billions on advertising and campaigns. The partisan war, the news media loves. The logic goes if we have a hearing on climate change they won’t cover it.

JANE SANDERS: That’s what they said, actually. They have said that to us, that the ratings on climate change don’t matter. Then, at the same time, the ratings on fires and floods, they cover ad nauseum. Now, how hard would it be to cover them in a way that said these are the facts, this is climate change at work. This is why it’s happening. And this is what you can expect to happen later. These parts of the world are going to be underwater, and there’s going to be mass migration, and there’s going to be food shortages. They don’t have to cover it all at once. But when you look at things and you see the same footage for three days of terrible personal pain that people are experiencing, the loss of their homes and of their communities and even their cities, instead of saying, okay, we don’t have to put that on again, we can keep informing the people. That’s my, one of my concerns, is I think the fourth estate has been letting us down. A democracy requires an informed electorate. The media, the fourth estate, is supposed to inform the public. They’re not doing that. They’re selling ratings. But they’re not even thinking deeply about it. Because if they covered the fires and explained them, they’d get the same ratings.

PAUL JAY: I agree with you. But I have no expectation that corporate news media is going to change. This Democratic-controlled House, if they’re serious about climate change, they can create hearings with as much drama as the Kavanaugh hearings. You know, subpoena the head of Exxon, create a real dramatic presentation.

JANE SANDERS: Like they did with tobacco years ago, under Henry Waxman.

PAUL JAY: Exactly. But they have to want to do it. And that’s going to be a fight.

JANE SANDERS: It is going to be a fight, because people don’t want to take on the banks. They don’t want to take on the fossil fuel industry. They don’t want to take on the large donors and the big corporations. My hope is there will be—and I know there will be a group of people that will in the new Congress. And the Progressive Caucus in the Congress is pretty good.

PAUL JAY: There is a group now pushing for hearings on a Green New Deal.

JANE SANDERS: I think we’ll see some, for once, moving in the right direction. And I think the fact that under the Trump administration so many things have been so difficult for not just climate crisis, but everything, that I think people are beginning to realize we can’t take six more years of this. We can’t possibly survive that well. I guess that’s dramatic but-

PAUL JAY: A lot of people won’t survive.

JANE SANDERS: Yeah, a lot of people won’t. I think people are getting that. I have more faith in the American people. I think that they’re going to pay attention if they can be informed. That’s why places like The Real News and the Sanders Institute and all the people that were here from different organizations are so important, because—you started it with I don’t think they know. That education is extremely important.

PAUL JAY: Great, thanks very much.

JANE SANDERS: Thank you.

PAUL JAY: Thank you for joining us on The Real News Network.

https://therealnews.com/stories/climate-crisis-critical-issue-in-2020-elections-jane-sanders
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Mon, 12/17/2018 - 10:35

Quote
The Judge 👍

Keeping everyone's attention glued to the wall while the biggest types of insanity that could get us all killed or turned into degraded sapiens (even more so) just keep going on, like there is just nothing wrong with any of it, is indicative of what a sham our ( supposed ) democracy has devolved into. And apparently people just eat it up like it actually was the most pressing issue in these 4 years of the Don's presidency.  Don't you be a dunce.



Agelbert NOTE: The Wall is a deliberate distraction. Below, PLEASE SEE, a SIGNIFICANT part of the DESTRUCTIVE REALITY of the Trump Adminstration's   UNRELENTING ATTACK ON WE-THE-PEOPLE (just up to 2017 - it got WORSE in 2018): 🤬


Trump’s land and water grab laid bare in new maps

Press Release December 5, 2018

American landscapes being redrawn in rush to increase drilling and mining

A series of new maps by The Wilderness Society confirms the Trump administration’s rush to open public lands to drilling and mining is redrawing the American landscape. The maps are being released about a week before another round of public oil and gas lease sales and in concert with maps unveiled by The Guardian that are also drawn from TWS data.

The mapping and data project, called “Trump’s Land Grab” shows how in just two short years the administration has begun to radically alter the American landscape. Over 2017 and 2018, President Trump and Interior Secretary Zinke have rolled back protections on 153 million acres of land and water that were conserved for cultural, ecological, and recreational reasons. To put that into perspective, the area is about the size of California and Washington combined.

“This is how Trump’s call for so-called energy dominance plan looks when put into practice,” said Jenny Kordick, TWS’ climate and energy advocacy director. “In service of special interests, the administration has pushed to open millions of acres to drilling and mining, even as polls say the it’s out of step with mainstream American values.”

The new maps show the dramatic shift from protecting land to putting it up for sale. Included in the most controversial conservation rollbacks by the administration so far are Utah’s Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Escalante National Monuments, millions of acres in Western Sage-Grouse habitat, the California desert, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, the Arctic Ocean, and the U.S. Coastline.

“President Trump is not only making rollbacks to wildland protections, he’s attacking some of the most vulnerable and wildest places imaginable,” Kordick said. “Many of these places are among the wildest lands in the contiguous United States. These are places that should be conserved for future generations and are simply too wild to drill.”

The TWS maps were released ahead of another quarter of Interior department onshore oil and gas lease sales occuring on December 12-13. Over three million acres will be auctioned to energy companies in addition to what has already been made available.

END

https://www.wilderness.org/articles/press-release/trumps-land-and-water-grab-laid-bare-new-maps


Agelbert ADDED NOTE: Add to the above the Trump plan for Medicare and Social Security...



« Last Edit: December 17, 2018, 10:08:39 AM by agelbert »
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Quote
There are a few levers of power that can shut down fossil fuel companies, one of which is to cut off their supply of money. And investors are starting to do just that in increasingly greater numbers.


1,000 Organizations Have Pulled Their Money Out of Fossil Fuels in Major Milestone
Brian Kahn

December 13, 2018 8:50am Filed to: BAD INVESTMENTS  ;D

https://earther.gizmodo.com/1-000-organizations-have-pulled-their-money-out-of-foss-1831068493
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Offline agelbert

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amid growing evidence that rising temperatures have passed the comfort zone and
« Reply #9474 on: December 17, 2018, 10:30:44 AM »

Thu 13 Dec 2018 06.48 EST

By Jonathan Watts

SNIPPET:

Prof Richard Betts, who leads the climate research arm of Britain’s meteorological monitoring organisation, made the comments amid growing evidence that rising temperatures have passed the comfort zone and are now bringing increased threats to humanity.

“Global heating is technically more correct because we are talking about changes in the energy balance of the planet,” the scientist said at the UN climate summit in Katowice, Poland. “We should be talking about risk rather than uncertainty.”

Full article: 🧐

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New Study - ocean acidification, national security, violence and social instabil
« Reply #9475 on: December 17, 2018, 10:33:47 AM »


New Study Could Make It Harder for Trump’s 🦀 EPA 🦕 to Ignore the Dangers of Greenhouse Gases

By Yessenia Funes

December 13, 2018 2:12pm Filed to: TAKE THAT TRUMP

SNIPPET:

“It’s not always obvious that those health impacts are related to climate change,” Duffy said. “It’s not always obvious that an extreme weather event is made more likely by climate change. It’s not always obvious that an economic cost is exacerbated by climate change, but if you look at the scientific data, it’s clear that all those things are happening
.”

The team cited more than 250 studies, but the paper could’ve easily included more, Duffy told Earther. While the endangerment finding groups information into seven sections (air quality; food production and agriculture; forestry; water resources; sea level rise and coastal areas; ecosystems and wildlife; and energy, infrastructure, and settlements), this study went further and also looked at ocean acidification, national security, violence and social instability, and economic wellbeing.

Read more:

https://earther.gizmodo.com/new-study-could-make-it-harder-for-trump-s-epa-to-ignor-1831077278
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The (deliberate 🎩) Impoverishment of America
« Reply #9476 on: December 17, 2018, 10:37:20 AM »
Are We Witnessing The Impoverishment of America?

4,584 views

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/x5Y16S2k_hM&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/x5Y16S2k_hM&fs=1</a>


Thom Hartmann Program

Published on Dec 12, 2018

More and more Americans are shopping for groceries at Dollar Stores where only food with the least nutritional content is sold.

The middle class used to shop at K Marts and big name grocery stores but over a quarter century of Reaganomics has diminished the middle class and it's buying power.

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Friends of the Earth foe.org


VICTORY : Ryan Zinke 🦖 resigns as Interior Secretary

Dec 15, 2018, 9:59 AM

Dear Anthony,

Victory for the environment: Ryan Zinke resigns from the Department of the Interior after onslaught of scandals!
VICTORY! Ryan Zinke just stepped down as Secretary of the Interior, according to a tweet from Donald Trump. He will leave at the end of the year. This was largely thanks to people like you demanding he be held accountable for his corruption.

Every day Ryan Zinke was in office, he worked to destroy our public lands and waters -- with devastating impacts on our communities. He slashed protections for places like the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and Bears Ears National Monument. And he did it all to help his fossil fuel industry friends.

The scandals surrounding Zinke have been building for months. The DOI Inspector General released a report showing that every time Zinke had a choice between benefiting taxpayers and himself, he chose himself. He even changed policies so taxpayers would cover travel for his wife, and wasted $25,000 on a romantic trip to Turkey with her.

His corruption was so severe that the DOI Inspector General referred an investigation to the Department of Justice for possible criminal prosecution.

Friends of the Earth members like you spoke out on these scandals and made them impossible for Trump to ignore. Zinke resigned after you signed petitions, made phone calls, took to social media and took to the streets to demand that he be kicked out of the Department of Interior.

This shows that when people like you stand up to Trump and his Administration, you can make a difference. You can stop them from destroying our environment and endangering our communities.

Forcing Zinke out is a huge victory for people and the environment. Each day Zinke was Interior Secretary, he worked to advance his radical plan to slash national monuments, cut Indigenous communities out of the decision-making process, and ignore significant environmental, cultural, and scientific information. And he did it all in a mad dash to frack ☠️, mine ☠️ and drill ☠️ on America's public lands.

And until the scandals caught up to him, he was dangerously ☠️ effective at it.

By kicking Zinke out of the Department of the Interior, you helped send a strong message that it’s unacceptable for our leaders to put the fossil fuel industry and other corporate interests ahead of people and the planet.

Trump 🦀 is still trying to fill his government with corrupt extremists 💵 🎩 and climate deniers 🦕. Zinke’s likely replacement, David Bernhardt 🐉, is a walking conflict of interest. Before coming to Interior he was a high paid lobbyist representing the very industries that will profit from Trump’s plan to hand our public lands and waters over to polluters.

That’s why we’ll need you with us every step of the way as we work to stop these dangerous nominees and appointees. But Zinke’s ouster shows that when we all take action together, we win.

Thank you for helping build a better future for our country and our planet.

Standing with you,
Nicole Ghio,
Senior fossil fuels program manager,
Friends of the Earth

https://foe.org/news/
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Offline agelbert

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Tariffs this year = Growth of Imports relative to Exports + Unloaded Containers
« Reply #9478 on: December 17, 2018, 10:52:03 AM »
Agelbert NOTE:  "TEU" stands for "Twenty-foot Equivalent Unit" (TEU) is a shipping container whose internal dimensions measure about 20 feet long, 8 feet wide, and 8 feet tall. It can hold between 9 and 11 pallets, depending on whether they are standard pallets or EUR-pallets.



Port of Los Angeles On Track to Surpass 9 Million TEU This Year, But November Volumes Down

December 14, 2018 by Mike Schuler

Port of Los Angeles. Photo: trekandshoot / Shutterstock.com

America’s busiest container port, the Port of Los Angeles, processed 832,331 Twenty-Foot Equivalent Units (TEUs) in November 2018 putting it on track to once again surpass 9 million TEUs this year.

November marked the fifth consecutive month volumes exceeded 800,000 TEUs and tthe sixth busiest month in the 👀 Port’s history.

Compared to November 2017, however, November 2018 imports decreased 8.8 percent to 422,793 TEUs while exports also fell 14.3 percent to 152,527 TEUs. Exports of empty containers decreased 9.1 percent to 257,011 TEUs. Combined, November overall volumes were 832,331 TEUs, a 9.9 percent decrease compared to last year.

Last November’s 924,256 TEUs were an all-time record until it was surpassed in October 2018.

Year-to-date through November, overall volumes are 8,555,490 TEUs, nearly the same volumes compared to 2017 when the Port set an all-time annual cargo record.

“In November, we processed a number of high-volume vessels brought into service to facilitate the holiday season cargo surge and accommodate the push to import cargo before tariffs that were previously scheduled to increase on January 1st,” said Port of Los Angeles Executive Director Gene Seroka. “As we enjoy the holiday season, I’m grateful to all of our labor workforce, customers and stakeholders for the role they play in moving such a high volume of trade. As 2019 approaches, we are committed to tackling the challenges and seizing the opportunities that await.”

The Eleonora Maersk, calling at the Port’s APM Terminals, set a new North American container handling record for a single cargo vessel with the off-loading and then loading of 27,846 TEUs.

November cargo volumes at neighboring Port of Long Beach rose to 621,835 TEU, a 1.5 percent increase compared to November 2017, which puts it on track to break its 7.5 million TEU record set in 2017. According to Port of Long Beach Executive Director Mario Cordero, recent container trends, such as the growth of imports relative to exports and the large number of unloaded containers, illustrate how the higher tariffs imposed this year by the United States and China have impacted the flow of commerce.

https://gcaptain.com/port-of-los-angeles-on-track-to-surpass-9-million-teu-this-year-but-november-volumes-down/

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U.S. Coast Guard to Tackle 14-YEAR -OLD 🤬 Oil Leak in the Gulf of Mexico
« Reply #9479 on: December 17, 2018, 10:57:08 AM »


U.S. Coast Guard to Tackle 14-Year-Old Oil Leak in the Gulf of Mexico

December 14, 2018 by Mike Schuler

Oil slick at the Taylor MC20 site. Credit: U.S Coast Guard

The U.S. Coast Guard has partially assumed federal control over the operation to contain an oil dishcarge from the site of MC20 platform in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico that has likely been leaking since the platform toppled back in 2004.

The platform, owned by Taylor Energy 🦕, LLC, was located in Mississippi Canyon Block 20, approximately 11 miles south of the mouth of the Mississippi River. It toppled in September 2004 during Hurricane Ivan after storm surge triggered an underwater mudslide. The incident left the platform well conductor pipes buried in more than 100 feet of mud and sediment, impacting 25 of 28 connected wells. The spill went unnoticed for years until 2008 when it was identified as the source of daily sheen reports.

Now more than fourteen years after the hurricane, crude oil continues to discharge from the site and surface on the Gulf waters.

IN 2015, the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement estimated that oil continues to leak at a rate of approximately 1 to 55 barrels of oil per day. >:(  Satellite imagery and overflights have shown oil slicks on the surface varying in size, sometimes ranging up to 30 miles in length.

Even still, the specific source, or sources of the discharge at the MC20 site are not fully known. 🙉 🙊

Federal officials have directed Taylor Energy 🦕, as the Responsible Party, to remove the platform deck, remove sub-sea debris, decommission the oil pipeline, attempt to contain the leaking oil, and plug nine of the 25 impacted wells that were deemed highest risk.

Following several scientific studies conducted over several years by federal and industrial experts, the Federal On-Scene Coordinator (FOSC) issued Taylor Energy an administrative order back in October requiring it to propose a final viable plan to install a containment system. Last month, however, the FOSC ultimately issued Taylor Energy a Notice of Federal Assumption, and assumed authority for containing the oil. 

Under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the Coast Guard will now be able to access the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund and assume authority for containing and disposing the oil.

“While the safety of response personnel is paramount, we don’t want to delay response activities,” said U.S. Coast Guard Capt. Kristi Luttrell, the Federal On-Scene Coordinator (FOSC) for the MC20 response. “We plan to leverage every weather window available from now until the system is installed and collecting oil,” she said.

In November, Coast Guard contracted a specialized team to conduct a comprehensive site survey, fabricate a containment system, and install it at the source to start collecting the oil, however, as of now, the team is still in the planning phase. The Coast Guard says weather and sea state will largely dictate operations, which is expected to involve cumulative weeks at sea, extensive dive and remotely operated vehicle (ROV) operations, and underwater equipment installation.

“We are committed to public safety and preserving the Gulf marine environment,” said Luttrell. “As we move swiftly to develop and install the containment system, we will continue working with our federal, state, and local partners to ensure a permanent solution is in place,” she said.

As the Responsible Party, Taylor Energy 🦕, which is now defunct 😈, is required to pay for oil spill recovery and response costs under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA). It also has a continuing legal obligation to respond to the ongoing oil discharge and also must comply with the Coast Guard Administrative Orders.

https://gcaptain.com/u-s-coast-guard-to-tackle-mc20-oil-spill-containment-fourteen-years-after-it-began/

Agelbert NOTE: It's the CAPITALISM, stupid! WHY? Because the people that ran Taylor Energy (into the ground) are NOT "defunct". They have money. They have assets. THEY should be made ro PAY. BUT, since the LIABILITY is deliberately, AND ARTIFICIALLY "LIMITED" under CAPITALISM's "rules" for
😈 corporations, the COST of this cleanup will be SOCIALIZED to WE-THE-PEOPLE.

A "responsible LLC" is an oxymoron. It is a SICK JOKE for the Coast Guard to talk about "responsibility for cleanup"
under this or that Law  "ensures compliance" when applied to ANY Corporate polluter in the USA, ESPECIALLY the Fossil Fuelers, who are well practiced in the ethically bankrupt "art" of declaring bankruptcy and running off with the profits to start another Hydrocarbon Hellspawn operation with "limited liability". 

We are all dead if we do not stop pretending this IRRESPONSIBLE AND CRIMINAL behavior is "okay". What's it gonna take, people?



 The Fossil Fuelers 🦖 DID THE Clean Energy  Inventions suppressing, Climate Trashing, human health depleting CRIME,   but since they have ALWAYS BEEN liars and conscience free crooks 🦀, they are trying to AVOID   DOING THE TIME or   PAYING THE FINE!     Don't let them get away with it! Pass it on!   
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