AuthorTopic: Numismatic Art - Famous Coins Known For Historic Artistic Appeal  (Read 1369 times)

Offline Golden Oxen

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Diners,  Starting this thread with a coin that is loved and adored by collectors. The Famed Fugio Cent which was the work of one of my heroes Benjamin Franklin. Could there ever have been a more industrious man, our Peter is the only one I've met that comes close.

Talk about a coin for Libertarians, "MIND YOUR BUSINESS", the famous inscription on this Historic American Art Work.

                                             
                                           



                                           

                                                 


                                                                     THE STORY OF THE FUGIO CENTS

--Reprinted from "The Early Coins of America" by Sylvester S. Crosby, with modifications by Ron Guth

These were the earliest coins issued by the authority of the United States.  The records relating to them are very meager, and the papers therein referred to cannot be found.  The ensuing copies of the entries in the Journal of Congress contain all the information that can now be procured regarding the proceedings of the authorities in relation to this coinage:  these we copy according to their dates.

Saturday, April 21, 1787

"The coinage of federal CENTS, coppers, at New York, we are told, is carrying on, and we may expect soon to see them in circulation among us—these will free us from the impositions to which we are now exposed from the floods of light half-coined British half-pence, introduced among us—and as, from the excellent monitorial caution, 'MIND YOUR BUSINESS,' impressed on each of these, they may prove an antidote to insurgency, they will doubtless be held in high estimation."

Link to extensive article on our nation's first coin for interested readers

http://www.coinfacts.com/historical_notes/history_of_the_fugio_cents.htm :icon_study:
       

                                 

Offline Surly1

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Re: Numismatic Art - Famous Coins Known For Historic Artistic Appeal
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2015, 10:15:13 AM »
Just splendid.

Keep them up, GO. Wonderful bits of history reflected in coinage.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Golden Oxen

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Way back when money had value, we had the half penny coin. What pride and craftsmanship went into our early coinage.  Our young nation was so proud of it's LIBERTY and FREEDOM.

Miss Liberty is so beautiful and proud, with her flowing locks and wide open eyes beaming forward. What a beautiful antique of our young nations pride and vision.

Wonder what it would have been like to meet Ben Franklin or Paul Revere in person and chat with them for a moment


                                               




                                               

The first United States half cents were 35,334 pieces minted between July 20 and September 18, 1793. The dies are believed to have been prepared by Henry Voigt, but this remains uncertain. Half cents of this date are smaller in diameter than subsequent issues and bear a unique design adapted from the beautiful Libertas Americana medal coined in France. Liberty's bust faces left in this year alone, and the Phrygian Cap of the freedman is borne on her right shoulder. The wreath is extremely elaborate, with extensive detailing that required individual hand-punchings in the die preparation process. This type's beaded border is also unique to the 1793 coinage. In addition to the value expressed two ways on the reverse, the edge of each coin reads TWO HUNDRED FOR A DOLLAR in incused letters.

   

Offline Eddie

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Re: Numismatic Art - Famous Coins Known For Historic Artistic Appeal
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2015, 10:13:41 AM »
GO, I've never collected coins (other than modern bullion coins)....but I saw these the other day, and thought the premium over bullion was extremely low. I know these aren't truly rare, but it seemed to me that they might be worth paying the slight extra cost for the collectibility factor. I'd appreciate your opinion, either here or privately.



http://www.amergold.com/vault/pageview.php?coin=20_Liberty_gold_coins_ms61

And as an aside, I'd like to know if a "collectible" coin truly provides more "financial privacy" than a bullion coin.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: Numismatic Art - Famous Coins Known For Historic Artistic Appeal
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2015, 05:36:08 PM »
GO, I've never collected coins (other than modern bullion coins)....but I saw these the other day, and thought the premium over bullion was extremely low. I know these aren't truly rare, but it seemed to me that they might be worth paying the slight extra cost for the collectibility factor. I'd appreciate your opinion, either here or privately.



http://www.amergold.com/vault/pageview.php?coin=20_Liberty_gold_coins_ms61

And as an aside, I'd like to know if a "collectible" coin truly provides more "financial privacy" than a bullion coin.

Absolutely the better choice, the numismatic coin over the Generic. Was going to suggest this to you and AZ earlier in your recent purchase postings, but decided it would be nitpicking. Since you opened the door. Lets just do a shoet pros and cons list and see if that clears the fog.

Cons against purchasing numismatic gold at a slight premium to generic bullion coins.


The grading of a coin is an opinion, not a fact. In this case an MS61 coin to the grader might appear to be a AU 58 grade to another. A problem if he is to be the prospective buyer.

A generic bullion Gold coin is always one oz of gold, and it's value is never a question. It has NO numismatic value, and is worth whatever an oz of gold is worth in the fiat you are transacting in at the current point in time. Period. There can be slight argument if the coin is significantly scratched or damaged, but that is rarely the case.

A generic Bullion Gold coin is eligible to be placed in an IRA retirement account, such as an American Gold Double Eagle, a numismatic coin is not.

A numismatic Gold double eagle does not contain an oz of gold.

Originally the purity of all circulating gold coins in the United States was eleven twelfths pure gold (the same 22 karats level as English crown gold) and one twelfth alloy. Under U.S. law, the alloy was composed only of silver and copper, with silver limited to no more than half of the alloy by weight. Thus, U.S. gold coins had 22/24 (22 kt or 91.667%) pure gold, at most 1/24 (0–4.167%) silver, with the remaining one–two 24ths (4.167–8.333%) copper.[1]

If fleeing to another country, or just moving to say South America or Europe, as well as in your Own country the Generic Bullion Gold coin of a nation has instant recognition and marketability. Numismatic coins do not, and arouse suspicion amongst the wary, or those with limited numismatic knowledge, which is 99.9% of the population. Everyone dealing in these matters knows what an American Eagle, a Canadian Maple, a Mexican Libertad, or Austrian Philharmonic is, to name the most popular.

The Grim Reaper has a way of visiting folks unexpectedly, most folks die with their gold in a vault or safe keeping spot known by heirs. They are much less likely to get screwed by the unscrupulous with Generic Bullion coins for obvious reasons. Many of these people prey upon the dim in these matters, and have no conscience or scruples whatsoever. If they size heirs up as ultra dim, they will even claim the coins are counterfeit and your poor father got the shaft by someone. They will low ball bid for them and say they will sell the as forgeries to those who collect such items.
Don't laugh, this is a field where smiling, friendly, handshaking business suited con men are supreme masters at sizing up the strength or wisdom of their prey.


Pros for purchasing Numismatic low premium coins.

The strongest and most important reason to go this route is you are by legal precedent protected from the government declaring your Gold Coinage as unlawful.
FDR was forced to exempt all numismatic gold from his infamous executive order. While this not a guarantee of the future, as long as we are a nation of laws, such legal precedent is very important.

You become in purchasing numismatic gold, a coin collector, not a gold hoarder. You automatically acquire the legal team of the entire coin collecting and numismatic community, which has some very wealthy members, as legal protectors of your hobby and it's historical significance. you become a historian and collector of antiques, rather than a gold hoarding Piggie.

Again please don't laugh, Gold Bugs who blow farts in the governments face by turning their bankster fiat into gold at every opportunity, and urging others to do the same are considered swine. While another holding a sign at an Occupy Wall St movement, are considered  patriots and heroes. I have even been accused of murdering Incas centuries ago.

Numismatic coins are fixed as to supply, generics are manufactured endlessly, leading to higher and higher premiums as time and inflation move on for the scarcer fixed supply numismatic coin.

Numismatic coins as my postings on the diner have been trying to convey can also be classified as antiques, rare engravings, sculpture and art, family heirlooms, worthy of museum display such as the Smithsonian. One can see readily how they differ from generic gold bullion coins.

I prefer the numismatic Eddie, but of course we make up our own minds in these matters.

Two minor statements in closing. The dealer you mentioned in his ad referred to PCGS and NGC as the graders, but never actually specified it wa them, just sort od hinted at it. If they are certified by anyone else I would be wary.

You also mentioned the privacy, collectible, non reportable issues. Those no longer exist in my view. There is little doubt in my mind with revelations about NSA and Diner postings from Palloy, K-Dog, RE and others that privacy is this country no longer exists. If they wished to do so, they could produce a document of your actions for the last 48 hours in my view. A sad commentary of what has happened to our country and what the swill have done to us, so I wouldn't let it influence my decision much on these two choices.     

Illustrations below of two numismatic coins with the same grade to illustrate a point made in posting.

                                                   


                                                   

Illustrated merely to show the difference in gold coins as to looks, color, toning, scratches or marks.  While graded the same they are all very different to a numismatic coin collector


     














 

Offline Eddie

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Re: Numismatic Art - Famous Coins Known For Historic Artistic Appeal
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2015, 06:13:56 PM »
Thanks very much for the thoughtful reply.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: Numismatic Art - Copper Coinage Gallery
« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2017, 05:56:50 AM »
The unique base metal with a monetary history for coins of small purchasing power.

                                       

                                       
                                       


                                       


                                   


                                   


                                       


                                       


                                         


                                       


                                         

Offline Golden Oxen

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New Patagonian Toothfish coin for Falkland Islands aims to raise awareness of endangered fish


collectors-club-of-great-britain.co.uk
New Patagonian Toothfish coin for Falkland Islands aims to raise awareness - New Coin Releases - Collecting Rare Stamps & Coins

Patagonian Toothfish Falkland Islands coin

The plight of endangered fish is the subject of the first ever titanium coin released on behalf of the Falkland Islands, by Pobjoy Mint.

The 1 Crown coloured coin features the Patagonian Toothfish (Dissostichus eleginoides) a species of cod found in icy waters, primarily in the southern Hemisphere. This new coin recognises 30 years of work conducted by Falkland Islands Fisheries Department (FIS) to help maintain fish populations around the Falkland Islands. The Falkland Islands are playing a role in the conservation of the Patagonian Toothfish by creating regulated fisheries and collating data from Patagonian Toothfish catches.

The coloured titanium coin displays the unusual fish on the reverse, showing it swimming in a current of water. Because titanium reacts differently with every strike, each of the coins is technically different and varies slightly in colour. There is also a lined effect that is present on the coins which is unique to this metal. The obverse features the Pobjoy exclusive effigy design of HM Queen Elizabeth II.

For more information, or to order the coin, visit the Pobjoy Mint website.

Coin details - Titanium

Issue date: 16 August 2017

Diameter: 36.1mm

Weight: 10g

Cupro nickel

Issue date: 16 August 2017

Diameter: 38.6mm

Weight: 28.28g

                                                   


Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: Numismatic Art - Famous Coins Known For Historic Artistic Appeal
« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2018, 05:56:23 AM »
Just posting a sample selection of these marvelous antiques of our beloved country's early history and First President Diners.

In his own lifetime George Washington became the subject of numerous tokens and medals bearing his portrait or, at least, an engraver’s imagined portrait of Washington. These were not produced during his tenure as commander of the Revolutionary Army, but rather were coined after his unanimous election as President of the United States in 1789.

                       

While many of these pieces were produced subsequent to his death in 1799, even though bearing dates much earlier, quite a number were contemporary with his lifetime. These are the ones typically of greatest interest to numismatists, though the ones made during the opening decades of the 19th Century benefited from superior technology are more often to be found in higher grades. It is these later pieces that are most highly sought by less academic collectors.

Among the more interesting contemporary pieces is the GEORGIVS TRIUMPHO token, coined in copper in fairly large numbers. Bearing the date 1783, this is thought to be a reference to the peace treaty signed between Britain and its former colonies in that year. They were coined just a couple of years later and are known to have actually circulated during that decade. The portrait bust used is taken from coins of Britain’s King George III, but in this context the legends are believed to honor George Washington.

Also dated 1783 but coined decades later are a series of tokens bearing a left-facing bust of Washington wearing alternately a Roman toga or a military jacket. This was a very extensive coinage engraved and struck in England, and the many dies used resulted in numerous varieties of bust size and style, as well as pairings with different reverse types. Perhaps the most popular is a Draped Bust issue mated to a reverse in imitation of early USA cents. Curiously, the reverse legend reads UNITY STATES OF AMERICA. Both the Draped and Military Bust dies were mated to another reverse type portraying a seated figure modeled after Britannia on British coins. On these pieces the correct, though abbreviated legend UNITED STATES appears.

Extremely popular with collectors are the 1791-dated copper tokens actually denominated ONE CENT. These feature a handsome and fairly accurate bust of Washington facing left and dressed in a military jacket. Two major types are known, each displaying an eagle with a shield upon its breast. The first portrays the eagle with inverted wings, while the second and slightly scarcer type displays a smaller eagle with its wings upraised. Both have the eagle grasping an olive branch in its right claw and a bundle of arrows in its left, the whole ensemble being reminiscent of early United States Mint coins. These pieces, however, were coined in England as a proposal for a contract coinage that failed to materialize. Most of the high grade examples of each type known were preserved by British collectors, while the many worn examples actually circulated in America.

The 1790s witnessed the widespread manufacture of trade tokens in England, these being produced to make up for the absence of Royal copper coinage at the time. They quickly became popular with British collectors, and it was inevitable that the coiners would create numerous mulings of the various dies to sell at a generous profit to this market. Thus it was that the attractive portrait of George Washington from the 1791 cents was reused with a variety of reverse dies, and these other varieties differ in relative rarity but are avidly sought as relating indirectly to American coinage. The fact that most of them never saw that side of the Atlantic until decades later has become irrelevant.

Another popular entry in the Washington series are the brass tokens inscribed SUCCESS TO THE UNITED STATES on their reverse. Each features a right-facing bust of Washington, again in military dress, and they are known in two sizes. Since they’re typically found with little, if any wear, these tokens were evidently sold as souvenirs. The timing of their manufacture has been debated since the mid 1800s and has been placed anywhere from 1793 to the 1820s.
Many of the Washington tokens known to American collectors were neither produced nor circulated there, but rather they were issued solely for use in Britain. Known collectively as Conder tokens, after the man who first cataloged them, the values of pieces having purely British themes are typically lower than those that make even the vaguest reference to the USA. In the Conder series, several feature a right-facing bust of Washington in the usual military garb. These obverse dies were paired with several reverses to produce tokens which circulated as half pennies.

Among the more common and collectable entries are the Washington/Grate token, which indeed depicts a fireplace grate, and the LIBERTY AND SECURITY half penny, which bears a small eagle with upraised wings perched upon a shield. Both are dated 1795 and were likely struck in or shortly after that year. A much more skillfully engraved, left-facing bust of GW appears on the LIBERTY AND SECURITY penny, this token being almost medallic in its quality. Undated, it has been attributed to the same period. A 1795-dated version, this paired with a right facing bust of Washington, is also known and is quite rare. A 1793-dated half penny pairs a left-facing bust of Washington with a square-rigged vessel sailing to the right. This type was made in large numbers and bears a lettered edge. All of these pieces circulated exclusively in Britain but are readily collected by those interested in early American history.

Another curious issue in the long series of token pieces bearing a bust of George Washington is the North Wales half penny, so called for its inclusion of that legend on the reverse. Since the main device on that side of the token is a harp, symbolic of Ireland, this is an odd entry indeed. These tokens are believed to have been made solely to pass as a circulating medium, as none appear to have been preserved in high grades by contemporary collectors.

Among the more commonly seen of Washington pieces is the so-called Double Head cent, which features similar, left-facing military busts of GW on both sides. Undated, they are believed to have been coined in England during the 1820s or 1830s. Each bust resembles closely that on the 1783-dated Military Bust pieces described above and are thus attributed to the same source and time period. Both issues are inscribed ONE CENT, and they evidently circulated within the United States during the “Hard Times” period that followed the financial Panic of 1837.


                                       

                                       

                                       

                                       

                                         

                                         

                                           

                                           


                                           

                                           



                                           

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: Numismatic Art - Famous Coins Known For Historic Artistic Appeal
« Reply #9 on: July 30, 2018, 08:19:59 AM »
Lost it's Luster from usage but as Sound and Honest a Money as ever. A Proud coin for a Proud new country.

                                   

I Hear America Singing

Walt Whitman

I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear,
Those of mechanics, each one singing his as it should be blithe
     and strong,
The carpenter singing his as he measures his plank or beam,
The mason singing his as he makes ready for work, or leaves off
     work,
The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat, the
     deckhand singing on the steamboat deck,
The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench, the hatter singing
     as he stands,
The wood-cutter’s song, the ploughboy’s on his way in the
     morning, or at noon intermission or at sundown,
The delicious singing of the mother, or of the young wife at
     work, or of the girl sewing or washing,
Each singing what belongs to him or her and to none else,
The day what belongs to the day—at night the party of young
     fellows, robust, friendly,
Singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs.


       

 

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